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 Allergy Advisor Digest - September 2014
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Evaluation of antibiotic allergy: the role of skin tests and drug challenges.
Read Disagreement between skin prick test and specific IgE in young children.
Read Changes in allergen sensitization over the last 30 years in Korea respiratory allergic patients
Read Diagnostic accuracy of specific IgE to components in diagnosing peanut allergy: a systematic review.
Read Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5.
Read Clinical and immunochemical profiles of food challenge proven or anaphylactic shrimp allergy in the tropical Singapore.
Read Epitope analysis of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6: characteristic patterns of IgE-binding fingerprints among individuals with similar clinical histories.
Read Is Helicobacter Pylori infection inversely associated with atopy? A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Read Does usage of a room air fresheners affect the nasal mucosa?
Read Elevated total serum IgE in nonatopic patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.
Read Effect of heat treatment on milk and egg proteins allergenicity.
Read Hypersensitivity reactions to non-betalactam antibiotics in children: an extensive review.
Read Reintroduction failure after negative peanut challenges in children.
Read Cypress pollen allergy.
Read Methylisothiazolinone: emerging allergen
Read Eating bugs and allergic risk
Read Severe form of allergy to cow's milk protein in the infant and mother
Read Enterocolitis syndrome induced fish protein. Three new cases

Abstracts shared in September 2014 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read An unusual case of occupational asthma in a part time magician.
Read Shrimp allergy beyond Tropomyosin in Italy: clinical relevance of Arginine Kinase, Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein and Hemocyanin.
Read Component-resolved diagnosis in vespid venom-allergic individuals.
Read Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis due to maize in a snack processor: a cross-reactivity study between lipid transfer proteins from different cereals and peach.
Read Specific IgE to fish extracts does not predict allergy to specific species within an adult fish allergic population.
Read Component resolved diagnosis: when should it be used?
Read Alternaria alternata and Its Allergens: a Comprehensive Review.
Read Goat's cheese anaphylaxis after cutaneous sensitization by moisturizer that contained goat's milk.
Read iPad--increasing nickel exposure in children.
Read Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.
Read Macrogol anaphylaxis.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of antibiotic allergy: the role of skin tests and drug challenges.
Antibiotic allergies are frequently reported in both adult and pediatric populations. While a detailed drug history is essential in the evaluation of antibiotic allergy, the history is typically insufficient to determine the presence of a drug allergy. The most readily available diagnostic testing for evaluating antibiotic allergies are drug skin testing and drug challenges. This review will focus on updates in the evaluation of antibiotic allergy utilizing immediate skin tests, delayed intradermal testing, drug patch tests, and drug challenges for both adults and children with histories of antibiotic allergies

Evaluation of antibiotic allergy: the role of skin tests and drug challenges.  
Solensky R, Khan DA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Sep;14(9):459

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Disagreement between skin prick test and specific IgE in young children.
There is substantial disagreement between SPT and sIgE for diagnosing allergic sensitization in young children, which increase with age for food sensitization. Choice of assessment method therefore has major impact on results with wide implications for both clinical practice and research.

Disagreement between skin prick test and specific IgE in young children.  
Schoos AM, Chawes BL, Folsgaard N, Samandari N, Bonnelykke K, Bisgaard H.
Allergy 2014 Sep 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Changes in allergen sensitization over the last 30 years in Korea respiratory allergic patients
This Korean study found that current skin reactivity to grass pollens (13.9%) and weed pollens (27.0%) has significantly decreased since the 1990s (20.3%, 40.9%, respectively). Skin reactivity to house dust mites showed no difference between the 1990s (55.2%) and the 2010s (55.6%). Skin reactivity to dog (27.3%->20.7%) and cockroach (25.3%->12.3%) have significantly decreased in the 2010s in comparison with the 1990s.

Changes in allergen sensitization over the last 30 years in Korea respiratory allergic patients: a single-center.  
Park HJ, Lim HS, Park KH, Lee JH, Park JW, Hong CS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Sep;6(5):434-443

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnostic accuracy of specific IgE to components in diagnosing peanut allergy: a systematic review.
The diagnostic accuracy of skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE (sIgE) to peanut extract in diagnosing peanut allergy is suboptimal. Recent studies have evaluated sIgE to peanut components as a possible new diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to systematically search the literature to assess the diagnostic value of sIgE to peanut components in diagnosing peanut allergy. Twenty-two studies were eligible, of which 21 studies in pediatric populations. Most studies reported on sIgE to peanut extract (15) and sIgE to Ara h 2 (12), followed by SPT (9) and sIgE to Ara h 1 (7). All studies were at risk of bias or caused applicability concerns on at least one item of the quality assessment tool. The best combination of diagnostic accuracy measures of all diagnostic tests was found for sIgE to Ara h 2. This finding was independent of geographic location. Compared to SPT and sIgE to peanut extract, sIgE to Ara h 2 was mainly superior in diagnosing peanut allergy in case of a positive test result. Worst diagnostic accuracy measures were found in general for sIgE to Ara h 8 and sIgE to Ara h 9.

Diagnostic accuracy of specific IgE to components in diagnosing peanut allergy: a systematic review.  
Klemans RJ, van Os-Medendorp H, Blankestijn M, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Knol EF, Knulst AC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5.
These results reveal the presence of a large number of independent IgE epitopes on the Phl p 5 allergen explaining the high allergenic activity of this protein and its ability to induce severe allergic symptoms.

Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5.  
Levin M, Rotthus S, Wendel S, Najafi N, Kallstrom E, Focke-Tejkl M, Valenta R, Flicker S, Ohlin M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 27;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical and immunochemical profiles of food challenge proven or anaphylactic shrimp allergy in the tropical Singapore.
Shellfish allergy in Singapore is highly prevalent, and shrimp allergy is the most common. This study aims to evaluate the clinical characteristics and immunological phenotype of shellfish allergy in this population. Patients with self-reported shellfish allergy were recruited. Open oral food challenges (OFC) to glass prawn (Litopenaeus vannamei) and tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) were carried out. The 104 patients recruited were categorized into shellfish allergic (SA) when OFC was positive or had a history of severe anaphylaxis (n=39), shellfish tolerant (ST) when OFC was negative (n=27), and house dust mite positive controls (HDM+) who were shellfish tolerant (n=38). Oral symptoms (87.1%) were the predominant clinical manifestation. Positive challenge doses ranged from 2 to 80 gm of cooked shrimp, with 25/52 patients reacting to either one or both shrimps challenged. The presence of specific IgE to shrimp either by SPT and/or ImmunoCAP® assay provided diagnostic test sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 22.2%. The inclusion of specific IgE to shrimp tropomyosin and IgE immunoblots with shrimp extracts did not improve the diagnostic proficiency substantially. This study highlights the predominance of oral symptoms in shrimp allergy in tropical Asia and that a high provocation dose may be necessary to reveal shrimp allergy. Furthermore, specific IgE diagnostic tests and immunoblots were of limited use in this population.

Clinical and immunochemical profiles of food challenge proven or anaphylactic shrimp allergy in the tropical Singapore.  
Thalayasingam M, Gerez IF, Yap GC, Llanora GV, Chia IP, Chua L, Lee CJ, Ta Le HD, Cheng YK, Thong BY, Tang CY, Van Bever HP, Shek LP, Curotto de Lafaille MA, Lee BW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Epitope analysis of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6: characteristic patterns of IgE-binding fingerprints among individuals with similar clinical histories.
Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are moderately homologous and highly potent peanut allergens. This study identified IgE-binding linear epitopes of Ara h 6 and compared them to those of Ara h 2. Thirty highly peanut-allergic subjects were evaluated. Each subject had a unique IgE-binding fingerprint to peptides; these data were coalesced into epitope binding. IgE from subjects with a history of more severe reactions (n = 19) had a smaller frequency of binding events (BE) for both Ara h 2 (52 BE out of 152 possible binding events and Ara h 6 (13 BE out of 133 possible Bes) compared to IgE from those with milder histories (n = 11) (Ara h 2: 47 BE out of 88 possible Bes, p < 0.01; Ara h 6: 25 BE out of 77 possible Bes, p < 0.001). Subjects with similar histories tended to cluster. Therefore IgE from patients with more severe clinical histories recognize fewer linear epitopes of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 than do subjects with milder reactions and bind these epitopes in characteristic patterns.

Epitope analysis of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6: characteristic patterns of IgE-binding fingerprints among individuals with similar clinical histories.  
Otsu K, Guo R, Dreskin SC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 11;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Is Helicobacter Pylori infection inversely associated with atopy? A systematic review and meta-analysis.
The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to quantify the association between H. pylori infection and atopy. It concludes that evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that H. pylori infection is associated with an estimated 18% reduction in odds of atopy. If the observed association is causal, more insights into the underlying mechanisms could provide clues to possible therapeutic opportunities in allergic disease.

Is Helicobacter Pylori infection inversely associated with atopy? A systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Taye B, Enquselassie F, Tsegaye A, Medhin G, Davey G, Venn A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 10;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Does usage of a room air fresheners affect the nasal mucosa?
Effects of chemicals emitted from the room air freshener sprays (RAFSs) on nasal mucosa are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of RAFSs on the nasal mucosa of rats for different time intervals. The authors conclude that the results showed that continuous use of RAFS can cause inflammation and eosinophilic infiltration in rats, which begins after 2 months of exposure and may lead to metaplasia after 3 months. Because of differences in body size, geometry, and physiological responses of rats, the extrapolation of these results to humans is not straightforward.

Does usage of a room air fresheners affect the nasal mucosa?  

Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Sep 11;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Elevated total serum IgE in nonatopic patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.
Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), also known as Samter's triad, is characterized by asthma, recurrent nasal polyps, and by allergic-like reactions to aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, although it is not a true immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy. The authors write that they have observed a subgroup of patients with AERD who have no history of atopy but have abnormally elevated total serum IgE, and they sought to explore this phenomenon of elevated total serum IgE in the absence of atopy in a subset of patients with AERD. The study concludes that in a subset of patients with AERD, elevated total serum IgE was observed even when atopy was not present. To better understand the disease, the cause and clinical relevance of this phenomenon deserves further exploration

Elevated total serum IgE in nonatopic patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Johns CB, Laidlaw TM.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Jul;28(4):287-289

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of heat treatment on milk and egg proteins allergenicity.
Heating destroys many conformational epitopes and reduces allergenicity of some foods. IgE-epitope binding has been shown to be different amongst patients who outgrew their cow milk or hen's egg allergy and those who did not. A significant proportion of milk or egg allergic children are tolerant to these foods in their baked forms. This study sought to explore the effects of heating on milk and egg proteins and to evaluate for differences in immunolabeling amongst children with regards to reactivity to heated milk or egg. Sera from 20 milk- and 24 egg-allergic children were utilized. Gel electrophoresis showed strongly staining casein bands that persisted for up to 60 minutes of heating. In contrast, beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactalbumin bands became progressively weaker with increasing heating times, with no detectable beta-lactoglobulin after 15-20 minutes of heating. The ovalbumin band became progressively weaker, whereas ovomucoid remained stable after 25 minutes of heating. Immunolabeling revealed that all heated milk-reactive children possessed IgE antibodies that bound the casein fraction regardless of heating time. Presence of wheat during heating resulted in decreased IgE antibody binding to milk and egg white proteins. Therefore heating has a different effect on whey and caseins in cow's milk and ovalbumin and ovomucoid in hen's egg white. The effect of heat on protein allergenicity is affected by the temperature and duration, along with the presence of wheat.

Effect of heat treatment on milk and egg proteins allergenicity.  
Bloom KA, Huang FR, Bencharitiwong R, Bardina L, Ross A, Sampson HA, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity reactions to non-betalactam antibiotics in children: an extensive review.
In contrast to hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to beta-lactam antibiotics in children, studies about HSR to non-beta-lactam antibiotics (NBLA) such as sulfonamides, macrolides, quinolones and anti-tuberculosis agents are scarce and information is generally limited to case reports. The aim of this extensive review was to summarize our present knowledge on clinical characteristics, evaluation and management of HSR to NBLAs in children based on the literature published between 1980 and 2013. NBLAs have been reported to induce a wide spectrum of HSRs from mild eruptions to severe, and sometimes fatal, systemic drug reactions, especially in some high-risk groups. The diagnosis relies upon history and remained unconfirmed by allergological tests in most of the cases. Obtaining a detailed history is valuable in the diagnosis of suspected reactions to NBLAs. Diagnostic in vivo and in vitro tests for NBLAs lack validation, which makes the diagnosis challenging. The definitive diagnosis of NBLA hypersensitivity frequently is confirmed by drug provocation test. Studies including children showed that only 7.8% to 36% of suspected immediate and delayed HSRs to NBLAs could be confirmed by skin tests and provocation tests. Therefore, a standardized diagnostic approach and management strategy should be developed and employed for pediatric patients in the evaluation of suspected HSRs to NBLAs, some of which may be critical and unreplacable in certain clinical situations.

Hypersensitivity reactions to non-betalactam antibiotics in children: an extensive review.  
Kuyucu S, Mori F, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Caubet JC, Terreehorst I, Gomes E, Brockow K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Reintroduction failure after negative peanut challenges in children.
A negative double blind placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) should normally be followed by reintroduction of the food. However, reintroduction fails in a subset of children. The observed reintroduction problems could be due to refusal of the food that long has been avoided, to other behavioural / psychological factors or to false negative DBPCFC outcome. This study analysed the frequency, causes and risk factors for reintroduction failure in children after negative peanut DBPCFC. Follow-up data were obtained in 103 children with a negative peanut challenge. In 70 (68%) children reintroduction was successful (54 children tolerated peanut, 16 children tolerated peanut as ingredient). Reintroduction failed in 33 (32%) children. Food refusal (45%) and peanut related symptoms (33%) were the most reported reasons. Risk factors for reintroduction failure were an elimination diet for more than three other foods (p=0.019), a long elimination diet for peanut (p=0.048) and peanut related symptoms at home (p=0.002).

Reintroduction failure after negative peanut challenges in children.  
van Erp FC, Boot J, Knulst AC, SG MP, van der Ent CK, Meijer Y.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cypress pollen allergy.
Cypress belongs to the Cupressaceae family, which includes 140 species with non-deciduous foliage. The most important genera in allergic diseases are Cupressus sempervirens or Green cypress, Cupressus arizonica or Blue cypress, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus communis and Thuya. Because J. oxycedrus pollinates in October, C. sempervirens in January and February, C. arizonica in February and March, J. communis in April, the symptomatic period is long-lasting. Because of global warming, the pollination period is tending to last longer and Cupressaceae species are becoming established further the north. In Mediterranean countries, cypress is by far the most important pollinating species, accounting for half of the total pollination. The major allergens belong to group 1. The other allergens from cypress and Juniper share 75 to 97 % structural homology with group 1 major allergens. The prevalence of cypress allergy in the general population ranges from 5 % to 13 %, according to exposure to the pollen. Among outpatients consulting an allergist, between 9 and 35 %, according to different studies, are sensitized to cypress pollen. Repeated cross-sectional studies performed at different time intervals have demonstrated a threefold increase in the percentage of cypress allergy. Risk factors include a genetic predisposition and/or a strong exposure to pollen, but air pollutants could play a synergistic role. The study of the natural history of cypress allergy allows the identification of a subgroup of patients who have no personal or family history of atopy, whose disease began later in life, with low total IgE and often monosensitization to cypress pollen. In these patients, the disease is allergic than rather atopic. In the clinical picture, rhinitis is the most prevalent symptom but conjunctivitis the most disabling. A cross-reactivity between cypress and peach allergy has been demonstrated. The pharmacological treatment of cypress allergy is not different from that for other allergies. Hyposensitization has been used, at first by injection, but nowadays mostly through the sublingual route, but clinical trials have included few patients. Avoidance can be implemented at the individual level but also at the community levels using alternative plants, low-pollinating cypresses or by trimming hedges prior to pollination

Cypress pollen allergy. [French]  
Charpin D, Calleja M, Pichot C, Penel V, Hugues B, Poncet P.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Dec;30(10):868-878

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylisothiazolinone: emerging allergen
Methylisothiazolinone (MI) is an emerging allergen present in cosmetics and in occupational and household products. In recent years, a real outbreak of contact allergy, with a prevalence of 5.6–6 % in the most recent studies, has been observed in Europe. For these reasons, MI at a concentration of 2000 ppm in water has recently been included in the European baseline series. Regulatory measures concerning cosmetics are now being discussed at the European level.

Méthylisothiazolinone : un allergène émergent / Methylisothiazolinone: emerging allergen  
F. Giordano-Labadie
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):311-314

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Eating bugs and allergic risk
Consumption of edible insects, known as entomophagy, is gradually spreading to the USA and European countries. Although it remains rather limited, in some European countries entomophagy is developing with the emergence of companies dedicated to the mass production of edible insects, together with the opening of restaurants specialized in menus featuring such insects. It is advisable that an awareness of the allergic risk should occur, which may represent for people allergic to shellfish, mollusks or house dust mites due to various panallergens such as tropomyosin and arginine kinase, which are common to insects, crustaceans, mollusks, dust mites and nematodes. In addition to these panallergens, other allergens more specifically associated with insects could likewise trigger allergic reactions. However, these allergens are still not well known and remain to be identified and characterized.

Entomophagie et risque allergique / Eating bugs and allergic risk  
A. Barre, S. Caze-Subra, C. Gironde, F. Bienvenu, J. Bienvenu, P. Rougé
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):315-321

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe form of allergy to cow's milk protein in the infant and mother
A report on two families with a history of cow's milk protein allergy in both an infant and its mother leads the authors to discuss the role of sensitization of infants in utero and, concerning the mother, the role of airborne food allergens as the cause of anaphylactic reactions.

Forme sévère d’allergie aux protéines du lait de vache chez le nourrisson et la mère / Severe form of allergy to cow's milk protein in the infant and mother  
P. Molkhou
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):322-324

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Enterocolitis syndrome induced fish protein. Three new cases
Three new cases of enterocolitis induced by fish proteins in children is presented. Their presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (2/3), vomiting (2/3), and pallor (3/3). The diagnosis was confirmed by negative skin prick-tests, specific IgE assay and by a positive oral provocation test with increased polynuclear cells in two of the three cases.

Syndrome d’entérocolite induite par les protéines de poisson. Trois nouvelles observations / Enterocolitis syndrome induced fish protein. Three new cases  
M. Pétrus, C. Dormoy, C. Cadix, V. Mangin, P. Delbast, G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(5):394-396

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Evaluation of antibiotic allergy: the role of skin tests and drug challenges.  
Solensky R, Khan DA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Sep;14(9):459
Click to view abstract

Epigenetics and development of food allergy (FA) in early childhood.  
Hong X, Wang X.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Sep;14(9):460
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Skin discoloration caused by iron salts.  
Drakensjo IT, Lengstam I, Hedblad MA.
Acta Derm Venereol 2014 Jan;94(1):92-93

A plausible allergy to peanut revealed only by Immunoblot.  
Richard C, Jacquenet S, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Sep;46(5):181-183

An unusual case of occupational asthma in a part time magician. He has got an allergy surprise from his top hat!.  
Liccardi G, Billeri L, Foglia M, Sapio C, De Giglio MA, D'Amato G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Sep;46(5):178-180
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Shrimp allergy beyond Tropomyosin in Italy: clinical relevance of Arginine Kinase, Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein and Hemocyanin.  
Giuffrida MG, Villalta D, Mistrello G, Amato S, Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Sep;46(5):172-177
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Component-resolved diagnosis in vespid venom-allergic individuals.  
Galindo-Bonilla PA, Galán-Nieto A, Alfaya-Arias T, García-Rodríguez C, de la Roca-Pinzón F, Feo-Brito F.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2014 Sep 2;
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Double-blind food challenges in children in general pediatric practice: Useful and safe, but not without pitfalls.  
Plaza AM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2014 Sep;42(5):385-386

Helicobacter Pylori Associated Urticarias.  
Khan S.
Allergol Int 2014 Sep 25;

Japanese guideline for food allergy 2014.  
Urisu A, Ebisawa M, Ito K, Aihara Y, Ito S, Mayumi M, Kohno Y, Kondo N.
Allergol Int 2014 Sep;63(3):399-419
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Disagreement between skin prick test and specific IgE in young children.  
Schoos AM, Chawes BL, Folsgaard N, Samandari N, Bonnelykke K, Bisgaard H.
Allergy 2014 Sep 16;
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Abstracts from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Congress, 7-11 june 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark.  

Allergy 2014 Sep;69 Suppl 991-619

EAACI position paper: irritant-induced asthma.  
Vandenplas O, Wiszniewska M, Raulf M, de BF, Gerth van WR, Moscato G, Nemery B, Pala G, Quirce S, Sastre J, Schlunssen V, Sigsgaard T, Siracusa A, Tarlo SM, van K, Zock JP, Walusiak-Skorupa J.
Allergy 2014 Sep;69(9):1141-1153
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Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis due to maize in a snack processor: a cross-reactivity study between lipid transfer proteins from different cereals and peach.  
Guillen D, Barranco P, Palacin A, Quirce S.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Sep;6(5):470-473
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Flare up reaction during provocation test to glatiramer acetate in a patient with allergy to interferon beta1a.  
Minciullo PL, Calapai G, Gangemi S.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Sep;6(5):467-469
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Changes in allergen sensitization over the last 30 years in Korea respiratory allergic patients: a single-center.  
Park HJ, Lim HS, Park KH, Lee JH, Park JW, Hong CS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Sep;6(5):434-443
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Allergic diseases and multiple chemical sensitivity in Korean adults.  
Jeong I, Kim I, Park HJ, Roh J, Park JW, Lee JH.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Sep;6(5):409-414
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Skin prick/puncture testing in North America: a call for standards and consistency.  
Fatteh S, Rekkerth DJ, Hadley JA.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2014;10(1):44
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Diagnostic accuracy of specific IgE to components in diagnosing peanut allergy: a systematic review.  
Klemans RJ, van Os-Medendorp H, Blankestijn M, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Knol EF, Knulst AC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 16;
Click to view abstract

Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5.  
Levin M, Rotthus S, Wendel S, Najafi N, Kallstrom E, Focke-Tejkl M, Valenta R, Flicker S, Ohlin M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 27;
Click to view abstract

Clinical and immunochemical profiles of food challenge proven or anaphylactic shrimp allergy in the tropical Singapore.  
Thalayasingam M, Gerez IF, Yap GC, Llanora GV, Chia IP, Chua L, Lee CJ, Ta Le HD, Cheng YK, Thong BY, Tang CY, Van Bever HP, Shek LP, Curotto de Lafaille MA, Lee BW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 25;
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Epitope analysis of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6: characteristic patterns of IgE-binding fingerprints among individuals with similar clinical histories.  
Otsu K, Guo R, Dreskin SC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 11;
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Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort.  
Martin PE, Eckert JK, Koplin JJ, Lowe AJ, Gurrin LC, Dharmage SC, Vuillermin P, Tang ML, Ponsonby AL, Matheson M, Hill DJ, Allen KJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 11;
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Is Helicobacter Pylori infection inversely associated with atopy? A systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Taye B, Enquselassie F, Tsegaye A, Medhin G, Davey G, Venn A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 10;
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Peanut avoidance and peanut allergy diagnosis in siblings of peanut allergic children.  
Lavine E, Clarke A, Joseph L, Shand G, Alizadehfar R, Asai Y, Chan ES, Harada L, Allen M, Ben-Shoshan M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Sep 10;
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Specific IgE to fish extracts does not predict allergy to specific species within an adult fish allergic population.  
Schulkes KJ, Klemans RJ, Knigge L, de Bruin-Weller M, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Marknell dA, Lidholm J, Knulst AC.
Clin Transl Allergy 2014;427
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Component resolved diagnosis: when should it be used?  
Luengo O, Cardona V.
Clin Transl Allergy 2014;428
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Alternaria alternata and Its Allergens: a Comprehensive Review.  
Kustrzeba-Wojcicka I, Siwak E, Terlecki G, Wolanczyk-Medrala A, Medrala W.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 10;
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Analysis of a database to predict the result of allergy testing in vivo in patients with chronic nasal symptoms.  
Lacagnina V, Leto-Barone MS, La PS, Seidita A, Pingitore G, Di LG.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Sep;28(5):414-418
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Correlation between skin-prick testing, individual specific IgE tests, and a multiallergen IgE assay for allergy detection in patients with chronic rhinitis.  
Cho JH, Suh JD, Kim JK, Hong SC, Park IH, Lee HM.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Sep;28(5):388-391
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House dust mite allergen levels in households and correlation with allergic rhinitis symptoms.  
Wang Y, Xiong L, Yin X, Wang J, Zhang Q, Yu Z, Gong G, Zheng Y, Chen J, Kong W.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Sep;28(5):193-196
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Nasal allergen deposition leads to conjunctival mast cell degranulation in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.  
Callebaut I, De VA, Steelant B, Hox V, Bobic S, Van GL, Ceuppens JL, Hellings PW.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Jul;28(4):290-296
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Elevated total serum IgE in nonatopic patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Johns CB, Laidlaw TM.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Jul;28(4):287-289
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Work-related airway symptoms, nasal reactivity and health-related quality of life in female hairdressers: a follow-up study during exposure.  
Kronholm DK, Jonsson BA, Axmon A, Nielsen J.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2014 Jan;87(1):61-71
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Asthma related to workplace dampness and impaired work ability.  
Karvala K, Nordman H, Luukkonen R, Uitti J.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2014 Jan;87(1):1-11
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Investigation of allergenicity of some cosmetic mixtures by using ex vivo local lymph node assay-brdu endpoints.  
Ulker OC, Kaymak Y, Karakaya A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 20;164(4):301-307
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Risk factors in fatal cases of anaphylaxis due to contrast media: a forensic evaluation.  
Palmiere C, Reggiani BL.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;164(4):280-288
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Rethinking the role of immunoglobulin E and its high-affinity receptor: new insights into allergy and beyond.  
Dema B, Suzuki R, Rivera J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;164(4):271-279
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Porcine or bovine valve replacement in 3 patients with IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.  
Mozzicato SM, Tripathi A, Posthumus JB, Platts-Mills TA, Commins SP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Sep;2(5):637-638

A Lesson from Component-resolved Testing: We Need Better Extracts.  
Aalberse JA, Aalberse RC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Sep;2(5):635-636

Clinical reactivity to hazelnut may be better identified by component testing than traditional testing methods.  
Kattan JD, Sicherer SH, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Sep;2(5):633-634

Goat's cheese anaphylaxis after cutaneous sensitization by moisturizer that contained goat's milk.  
Voskamp AL, Zubrinich CM, Abramovitch JB, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Sep;2(5):629-630

Occupational asthma due to colophony in a violin player.  
Hanon S, Ronge R, Potvin M, Schuermans D, Vincken W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Sep;2(5):624-625

Photosensitive lichenoid drug eruption to capecitabine.  
Walker G, Lane N, Parekh P.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2014 Aug;71(2):e52-e53

Traffic-related air pollution and asthma hospital readmission in children: a longitudinal cohort study.  
Newman NC, Ryan PH, Huang B, Beck AF, Sauers HS, Kahn RS.
J Pediatr 2014 Jun;164(6):1396-1402
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Effect of heat treatment on milk and egg proteins allergenicity.  
Bloom KA, Huang FR, Bencharitiwong R, Bardina L, Ross A, Sampson HA, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 24;
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Hypersensitivity reactions to non-betalactam antibiotics in children: an extensive review.  
Kuyucu S, Mori F, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Caubet JC, Terreehorst I, Gomes E, Brockow K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;
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Food allergy in south african children with atopic dermatitis.  
Gray CL, Levin ME, Zar HJ, Potter PC, Khumalo NP, Volkwyn L, Fenemore B, du TG.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;
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Reintroduction failure after negative peanut challenges in children.  
van Erp FC, Boot J, Knulst AC, SG MP, van der Ent CK, Meijer Y.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;
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Can total IgE/specific IgE ratio predict tolerance in cow's milk allergic children?  
hinena-Spera A, Giner-Munoz MT, varo-Lozano M, Iniesta-Benedicto R, Lozano-Blasco J, Piquer-Gibert M, Ferrer-Codina I, Dominguez-Sanchez O, Jimenez FR, Plaza-Martin AM.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Sep 9;
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iPad--increasing nickel exposure in children.  
Jacob SE, Admani S.
Pediatrics 2014 Aug;134(2):e580-e582
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Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.  
Fiocchi A, onisi-Vici C, Cotugno G, Koch P, Dahdah L.
Pediatrics 2014 Aug;134(2):e602-e605
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Cypress pollen allergy. [French]  
Charpin D, Calleja M, Pichot C, Penel V, Hugues B, Poncet P.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Dec;30(10):868-878
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Des allergènes émergents : le fénugrec, Tenebrio molitor, la méthylisothiazolinone, le macrogol, etc. Et les grillons ? / Emerging allergens: fenugreek, Tenebrio molitor, Methylisothiazolinone, macrogol, etc. And crickets?  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):287-290
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Tests de réintroduction médicamenteuse chez l’enfant : hospitalisation ou consultation ? Proposition d’un arbre décisionnel / Reintroduction drug testing in children: hospitalization or consultation? Proposal for a decision tree  
H. Colas, V. David, I. Molle, C. Bernier, A. Magnan, A. Pipet
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):300-306
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Anaphylaxie au macrogol. À propos de 5 cas déclarés au Réseau Allergo-Vigilance / Macrogol anaphylaxis. About 5 cases reported Allergo-Vigilance Network  
V.-M. Nguyen, N. Petitpain, B. Lovato, P. Terrier, I. Begon Bagdassarian, I. Sullerot, E. Beaudouin, D.-A. Moneret-Vautrin
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):307-310
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Méthylisothiazolinone : un allergène émergent / Methylisothiazolinone: emerging allergen  
F. Giordano-Labadie
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):311-314
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Entomophagie et risque allergique / Eating bugs and allergic risk  
A. Barre, S. Caze-Subra, C. Gironde, F. Bienvenu, J. Bienvenu, P. Rougé
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):315-321
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Forme sévère d’allergie aux protéines du lait de vache chez le nourrisson et la mère / Severe form of allergy to cow's milk protein in the infant and mother  
P. Molkhou
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):322-324
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Allergie au cyprès / Allergy to cypress  
N. Souki, R.G. Bopaka, W. El Khattabi, H. Afif, A. Aichane
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(4):325-327
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Plan d’action en cas de réaction accidentelle dans l’allergie alimentaire chez l’enfant : position du groupe de travail / Action Accidental reaction plane in food allergy in children: position of the working group "food allergy"  
A. Deschildre, F. Villard-Truc, S.-A. Gomez, C. Santos, J. Just, Groupe de travail « allergie alimentaire » de la Société française d’allergologie
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(5):389-393
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Syndrome d’entérocolite induite par les protéines de poisson. Trois nouvelles observations / Enterocolitis syndrome induced fish protein. Three new cases  
M. Pétrus, C. Dormoy, C. Cadix, V. Mangin, P. Delbast, G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(5):394-396
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