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 Allergy Advisor Digest - January 2016
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Challenge-proven immediate type multiple local anesthetic hypersensitivity in a child.
Read Oral challenge tests for soybean allergies in Japan: A summary of 142 cases.
Read New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.
Read Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.
Read Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype is a risk factor for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein.
Read The risk of respiratory symptoms on allergen exposure increases with increasing specific IgE levels.
Read Two galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose carrying peptidases from pork kidney mediate anaphylactogenic responses in delayed meat allergy.
Read Cow's Milk Allergy: the Relevance of IgE.
Read Anaphylaxis following a transvaginal ultrasound.
Read Anaphylaxis exclusivity in a single Citrus species.
Read Tolerance of a high-protein baked-egg product in egg-allergic children.
Read Association between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy.
Read Venom allergy testing: is a graded approach necessary?
Read Ranitidine-induced anaphylaxis: clinical features, cross-reactivity, and skin testing.
Read Nut allergy prevalence and differences between Asian born children and Australian born children of Asian descent: a state-wide survey of children at primary school entry in Victoria, Australia.
Read Rapid aspirin challenge in patients with aspirin allergy and acute coronary syndromes.
Read Practical management of patients with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to common non-beta-lactam drugs.
Read Clinical presentation, allergens, and management of wheat allergy.
Read Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents: The European Anaphylaxis Registry.
Read Occupational allergy to peach (Prunus persica) tree pollen and potential cross-reactivity between rosaceae family pollens.
Read alpha-Gal-a new clue for anaphylaxis in mastocytosis.
Read Parent report of food allergy management by pediatricians and allergists.
Read Clinical utility of recombinant allergen components in diagnosing buckwheat allergy.
Read Innate and adaptive immune response to fungal products and allergens.
Read Hedgehog allergy: new pet, old allergens.
Read A case of anaphylaxis after garlic ingestion: is alliinase the only culprit allergen?
Read Multiple drug allergy due to hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols of various molecular weights.
Read Bronchial challenge with Tri a 14 as an alternative diagnostic test for baker's asthma.
Read Oral allergy syndrome due to nut oleosins.
Read Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs in children and adolescents: cross-intolerance reactions.
Read Comparative risk of anaphylactic reactions associated with intravenous iron products.
Read Molecular approach to allergy diagnosis and therapy.
Read Belt buckles-increasing awareness of nickel exposure in children: a case report.
Read Web based listing of agents associated with new onset work-related asthma.
Read Enterocolitis syndrome induced chicken protein: an original observation

Abstracts shared in January 2016 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Children with atopic dermatitis should always be patch-tested if they have hand or foot dermatitis.
Read Remission rate of patients with wheat allergy sensitized to hydrolyzed wheat protein in facial soap.
Read Fish collagen is an important panallergen in the Japanese population.
Read Identification of cross-reactivity between buckwheat and coconut.
Read Description of Sunflower Seed-Fungus Syndrome.
Read Recurrent anaphylaxis: a case of IgE-mediated allergy to carmine red (E120).
Read Allergic reactions to pine nut: a review.
Read Rhinitis due to larvae used in pet food.
Read Fish allergens at a glance: variable allergenicity of parvalbumins, the major fish allergens.
Read COR a 14- Specific IgE Predicts symptomatic hazelnut allergy in children.
Read The mite, allergen carrier
Read LTP cannabis: a path of sensitization to food LTP

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Challenge-proven immediate type multiple local anesthetic hypersensitivity in a child.
Adverse reactions to local anesthetics (LA) are commonly reported in patients undergoing dental procedures and other minor surgical procedures. Most of these reactions, however, originate from psychosomatic, vasovagal or toxic conditions and are not immune-mediated. True immune-mediated reactions are considered extremely rare and are estimated to account for less than 1% of all adverse reactions to LA. On the other hand, almost all of the immune-mediated LA reactions that have been reported are related to adult patients. Here, however, we will present a pediatric case proven to be hypersensitive to two different amide-derivative LA's

Challenge-proven immediate type multiple local anesthetic hypersensitivity in a child.  
Ertoy K, Yilmaz O, Bakirtas A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Jan;48(1):27-30

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oral challenge tests for soybean allergies in Japan: A summary of 142 cases.
This study aimed to analyze the results of soybean challenge tests that were conducted over approximately 7 years at a Japanese institution. Between July 2004 and May 2010, 142 cases (125 patients) underwent food challenge tests (100 g of silken tofu) for the diagnosis of soybean allergy or confirmation of their tolerance. The mean age at the test was 2.8 +/- 1.7 years. The positive rate for the challenge test was 38.7%. Induced symptoms were observed in the skin (81.8%), respiratory system (50.9%), and gastrointestinal system/mucosal membrane/anaphylaxis (12.7%). Intramuscular epinephrine was administered to all 7 patients who experienced an anaphylactic reaction. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic efficiency of soybean-specific IgE titers were low for predicting the responses to the challenge test. As soybean allergies were diagnosed in only 18% of the subjects with positive sensitization to soybeans, therefore, soybean-specific IgE titers are not an effective predictor of a positive response to the challenge test.

Oral challenge tests for soybean allergies in Japan: A summary of 142 cases.  
Sato M, Shukuya A, Sato S, Komata T, Utsunomiya T, Imai T, Tomikawa M, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):68-73

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.
A number of studies have suggested that a large subset of children (approximately 70%) who react to unheated milk or egg can tolerate extensively heated forms of these foods. A diet that includes baked milk or egg is well tolerated and appears to accelerate the development of regular milk or egg tolerance when compared with strict avoidance. However, the indications for an oral food challenge (OFC) using baked products are limited for patients with high specific IgE values or large skin prick test diameters. Oral immunotherapies (OITs) are becoming increasingly popular for the management of food allergies. However, the reported efficacy of OIT is not satisfactory, given the high frequency of symptoms and requirement for long-term therapy. With food allergies, removing the need to eliminate a food that could be consumed in low doses could significantly improve quality of life. This review discusses the importance of an OFC and OIT that use low doses of causative foods as the target volumes. Utilizing an OFC or OIT with a low dose as the target volume could be a novel approach for accelerating the tolerance to causative foods.

New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.  
Yanagida N, Okada Y, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan 7;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.
This study concludes that a very low-dose oral food challenge can shift the management of some low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children from complete avoidance to partial wheat intake.

Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.  
Okada Y, Yanagida N, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):82-87

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype is a risk factor for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein.
This study concludes that Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype is a risk factor for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype is a risk factor for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein.  
Sugiyama A, Kishikawa R, Honjo S, Shimoda T, Nishie H, Motomura C, Taba N, Murakami Y, Iwata M, Odajima H, Iwanaga T, Furue M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):115-116

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The risk of respiratory symptoms on allergen exposure increases with increasing specific IgE levels.
Specific IgE levels are the most important predictor of allergen-related symptoms. The risk of both oculonasal/asthmalike symptoms increases with specific IgE levels, suggesting that specific IgE contribute to the 'united airways disease'.

The risk of respiratory symptoms on allergen exposure increases with increasing specific IgE levels.  
Olivieri M, Heinrich J, Schlunssen V, Anto JM, Forsberg B, Janson C, Leynaert B, Norback D, Sigsgaard T, Svanes C, Tischer C, Villani S, Jarvis D, Verlato G.
Allergy 2016 Jan 14;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Two galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose carrying peptidases from pork kidney mediate anaphylactogenic responses in delayed meat allergy.
Serum IgE-antibodies directed at galactose-a-1,3-galactose (a-Gal) are associated with a novel form of delayed anaphylaxis occuring upon consumption of red meat or innards. Pork kidney is known as the most potent trigger of this syndrome, but the culprit allergens have not yet been identified. The aim of this study was the identification and characterization of pork kidney proteins mediating delayed anaphylactic reactions through specific IgE to a-Gal. A cohort of 59 patients with specific IgE to a-Gal was screened by immunoblot for IgE-reactive proteins in pork kidney. Several IgE-binding proteins of high molecular weight (100 - >200 kDa) were detected in pork kidney extracts by immunoblot using patient sera and an anti-a-Gal antibody. Two major IgE-binding proteins were identified as porcine angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE I) and aminopeptidase N (AP-N). Reactivity of patient sera and anti-a-Gal antibody to both proteins was abolished by carbohydrate oxidation. The a-Gal IgE epitopes were resistent to heat denaturation. Two cell-membrane proteins carrying a-Gal epitopes were identified in pork kidney. For the first time, isolated meat proteins were shown to induce basophil activation in patients with delayed anaphylaxis to red meat providing further confirmation for the clinical relevance of these a-Gal-carrying proteins.

Two galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose carrying peptidases from pork kidney mediate anaphylactogenic responses in delayed meat allergy.  
Hilger C, Fischer J, Swiontek K, Hentges F, Lehners C, Eberlein B, Morisset M, Biedermann T, Ollert M.
Allergy 2016 Jan 5;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cow's Milk Allergy: the Relevance of IgE.
This observational and retrospective experience evaluated the usefulness of ImmunoCAP and ISAC to detect anaphylaxis after CM ingestion. CMA diagnosis was performed on suggestive history consistent with CM sensitization (i.e. symptom occurrence after milk ingestion), documented milk sensitization, and a positive food challenge test. Anaphylaxis was defined according to validated criteria. 53 patients (20 with anaphylaxis and 33 with CMA) were evaluated. The assessment of molecular components by ImmunoCAP was unsatisfactory in regards to area under the ROC curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity, despite the fair positive and negative values. The micro-assay ISAC method was also unreliable in this setting. The authors believe that the diagnostic work-up for CMA should consider a molecular-based allergy diagnostic as well as a raw allergen assessment to obtain more useful information for the management and possible identification of risk factors.

Cow's Milk Allergy: the Relevance of IgE.  
Tosca MA, Pistorio A, Rossi GA, Ciprandi G.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Jan;8(1):86-87

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis following a transvaginal ultrasound.
Polyethylene glycol is a ubiquitous, water-soluble, organic compound found in a wide variety of commercially available products. While generally a benign substance, in rare instances, it can induce hypersensitivity reactions. Herein, we describe a case of anaphylaxis to polyethylene glycol-containing lubricating gel used for a transvaginal ultrasound.

Anaphylaxis following a transvaginal ultrasound.  
Jakubovic BD, Saperia C, Sussman GL.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;123

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis exclusivity in a single Citrus species.
Anaphylaxis exclusivity in a single Citrus species. A 47-year-old female has a history of anaphylaxis to Citrus clementina and oral allergy syndrome to ragweed- and birch-related foods, although she has no issues with peach or apple. She was investigated to resolve the question of whether she had an allergy to clementine (C. clementina) while tolerating sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and C sinensis extract, which she tested negative for on skin prick and ImmunoCAP tests. The also tolerated mandarin (Citrus reticulata). C sinensis speci?c IgE was less than 0.35 kU/L. Symptoms of anaphylaxis included itchy throat, urticaria, palpitations, presyncope, and weakness. She has since eaten grapefruit (C. paradisi), navel orange (a mutant variant of C sinensis), and C sinensis without dif?culty and also drinks orange juice daily (including the day of the clinic visit). Skin prick tests were12 mm positive to all C clementina spots and negative to all C sinensis spots (including the commercial extract). The anaphylaxis could be explained by a sensitization to a C clementina LTP, categorically known as Cit cl 3, which is not cross-reactive with LTPs expressed in the phenotype of either C reticulata or C sinensis, or that that C clementina expresses allergens not found in C sinensis or C reticulata (C clementina’s ancestral species) but that are perhaps found in other plants.

Anaphylaxis exclusivity in a single Citrus species.  
Cai G, Lee JK.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct 6;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tolerance of a high-protein baked-egg product in egg-allergic children.
The objective of this study was to establish whether children with egg allergy would pass a baked-egg challenge to a larger amount of egg protein and the potential criteria for predicting the likelihood of baked-egg tolerance. A chart review was conducted of all patients 6 months to 18 years of age with egg allergy who underwent oral baked-egg challenges at Children's Medical Center Dallas over a 2-year period. Challenges were conducted in the clinic with a 3.8-g baked-egg product. Fifty-nine of 94 patients (63%) tolerated the 3.8-g baked-egg product. This study is the first to use 3.8 g of EW protein for the challenges. The EW SPT wheal diameter and EW-specific IgE levels were the best predictors of baked-egg tolerance

Tolerance of a high-protein baked-egg product in egg-allergic children.  
Saifi M, Swamy N, Crain M, Brown LS, Bird JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 20;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Association between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy.
The prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria was found to be approximately 3 times greater than in the general population. The prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy was also found to be approximately 3 times greater than in the population. This link between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy highlights the need for clinicians to inquire about self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria and to consider penicillin skin testing. Furthermore, patients who report penicillin allergy might actually have chronic urticaria, indicating the importance of inquiring about chronic urticaria symptoms in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy

Association between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy.  
Silverman S, Localio R, Apter AJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Venom allergy testing: is a graded approach necessary?
Many institutions recommend a stepwise approach to intradermal testing for venom allergy. This is costly and uncomfortable for the patient. The rationale for this approach is the risk of potential adverse reactions to testing with the maximal dose alone. This study concludes that a single-step venom allergy intradermal testing protocol with a 1.0-mug/mL concentration of commercially available extracts is a safe option, which, if adopted into practice, could lead to more streamlined care for patients and cost savings for the medical system

Venom allergy testing: is a graded approach necessary?  
Quirt JA, Wen X, Kim J, Herrero AJ, Kim HL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan;116(1):49-51

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ranitidine-induced anaphylaxis: clinical features, cross-reactivity, and skin testing.
Although ranitidine is known as a safe drug, it can also cause diverse adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis. This study demonstrates the need to pay attention to adverse reactions to ranitidine and consider ranitidine as a cause of anaphylaxis.

Ranitidine-induced anaphylaxis: clinical features, cross-reactivity, and skin testing.  
Park KH, Pai J, Song DG, Sim DW, Park HJ, Lee JH, Jeong KY, Pan CH, Shin I, Park JW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Jan 14;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Nut allergy prevalence and differences between Asian born children and Australian born children of Asian descent: a state-wide survey of children at primary school entry in Victoria, Australia.
Asian infants born in Australia are 3 times more likely to develop nut allergy than non-Asian infants and rates of challenge-proven food allergy in infants have been found to be unexpectedly high in metropolitan Melbourne. To further investigate risk factors for nut allergy we assessed the whole of State prevalence distribution of parent-reported nut allergy in 5 year old children entering school.

All 5 year old children in Victoria, Australia, we assessed the prevalence of parent-reported nut allergy. Parent-reported nut allergy prevalence was 3.1% amongst a cohort of nearly 60,000 children. Migration from Asia after the early infant period appears protective for the development of nut allergy. Additionally, rural regions have lower rates of nut allergy than urban areas.

Nut allergy prevalence and differences between Asian born children and Australian born children of Asian descent: a state-wide survey of children at primary school entry in Victoria, Australia.  
Panjari M, Koplin JJ, Dharmage SC, Peters RL, Gurrin LC, Sawyer SM, McWilliam V, Eckert JK, Vicendese D, Erbas B, Matheson MC, Tang ML, Douglass J, Ponsonby AL, Dwyer T, Goldfeld S, Allen KJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Jan 5;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Rapid aspirin challenge in patients with aspirin allergy and acute coronary syndromes.
Aspirin allergy in a patient with acute coronary syndrome represents one of the more urgent challenges an allergist may face. Adverse reactions to aspirin are reported in 1.5 % of patients with coronary artery disease. A history of adverse reaction to aspirin often leads to unnecessary withholding of this medication or use of alternative antiplatelet therapy which may be inferior or more costly. Aspirin therapy has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Rapid aspirin challenge/desensitization in the aspirin allergic patient has been consistently shown to be both safe and successful in patients with acute coronary syndromes

Rapid aspirin challenge in patients with aspirin allergy and acute coronary syndromes.  
Cook KA, White AA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Jan;16(2):11

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Practical management of patients with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to common non-beta-lactam drugs.
Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to medications are among the most feared adverse drug reactions, because of their close association with anaphylaxis. This review discusses a practical management approach for patients with a history of an immediate hypersensitivity to a non-beta-lactam medication, where reexposure to the implicated, or similar, medication is clinically necessary. Mechanisms associated with severe immediate hypersensitivity reactions include IgE-mediated mast cell activation, complement-mediated mast cell activation, and direct mast cell activation. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions may also be mediated by vasodilators, other pharmacologic mechanisms, or be secondary to underlying patient-specific biochemical abnormalities such as endocrine tumors or chronic spontaneous urticaria. The key features in the reaction history and the biochemistry of the implicated medication are discussed. Most individuals with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to a medication, who require reuse of that drug, can be safely retreated with a therapeutic course of the implicated drug after a full-dose challenge, graded challenge, or desensitization, with or without premedication and/or any preliminary diagnostic testing, depending on the specific situation

Practical management of patients with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to common non-beta-lactam drugs.  
Macy E.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Jan;16(1):4

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical presentation, allergens, and management of wheat allergy.
IgE-mediated allergy to wheat proteins can be caused by exposure through ingestion, inhalation, or skin/mucosal contact, and can affect various populations and age groups. Respiratory allergy to wheat proteins is commonly observed in adult patients occupationally exposed to flour, whereas wheat food allergy is more common in children. Wheat allergy is of growing importance for patients with recurrent anaphylaxis, especially when exercise related. The diagnosis of wheat allergy relies on a consistent clinical history, skin prick testing with well-characterized extracts and specific IgE tests. The accuracy of wheat allergy diagnosis may be improved by measuring IgE responses to several wheat components. However, a high degree of heterogeneity has been found in the recognition pattern of allergens among patient groups with different clinical profiles, as well as within each group. Thus, oral provocation with wheat or the implicated cereal is the reference test for the definitive diagnosis of ingested wheat/cereal allergy

Clinical presentation, allergens, and management of wheat allergy.  
Quirce S, Boyano-Martínez T, Díaz-Perales A.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2016 Jan 22;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents: The European Anaphylaxis Registry.
The European Anaphylaxis Registry confirmed food as the major elicitor of anaphylaxis in children, specifically hen's egg, cow's milk, and nuts. Reactions to insect venom were seen more in young adulthood. Intensive care unit admissions and grade IV/fatal reactions were rare. The registry will serve as a systematic foundation for a continuous description of this multiform condition.

Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents: The European Anaphylaxis Registry.  
Grabenhenrich LB, Dolle S, Moneret-Vautrin A, Kohli A, Lange L, Spindler T, Rueff F, Nemat K, Maris I, Roumpedaki E, Scherer K, Ott H, Reese T, Mustakov T, Lang R, Fernandez-Rivas M, Kowal.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Jan 21;

Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergy to peach (Prunus persica) tree pollen and potential cross-reactivity between rosaceae family pollens.
Orchard workers in north China are highly exposed to orchard pollens, especially peach and other Rosaceae family pollens during pollination season. The aim of this study was to investigate whether occupational allergy to peach tree pollen as a member of Rosaceae family is IgE-mediated and to evaluate the cross-reactivity among Rosaceae family pollens. Sensitizations to peach pollen were found in both skin test and conjunctival challenge in the patients. Serum specific IgE to three pollens (peach, apricot and cherry) were detected through ELISA. When peach pollen used as solid phase, ELISA inhibition revealed other four kinds of pollens capable of inducing partial to strong inhibitions (45% to 87%), with the strongest inhibition belonging to apricot pollen (87%). Western blotting showed predominant IgE binding to a 20 KD protein among these pollens, which appeared to be a cross-reactive allergen component through western blotting inhibition. It was recognized as a protein homologous to glutathione s-transferase 16 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Peach and other Rosaceae family tree pollen may serve as a potential cause of IgE mediated occupational respiratory disease in orchard workers in north China.

Occupational allergy to peach (Prunus persica) tree pollen and potential cross-reactivity between rosaceae family pollens.  
Jiang N, Yin J, Mak P, Wen L.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct;14(5):483-492

Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
alpha-Gal-a new clue for anaphylaxis in mastocytosis.
This study presents the first case of galactose-a-1,3-galactose-associated anaphylaxis in a patient with co-occurring indolent systemic mastocytosis.

alpha-Gal-a new clue for anaphylaxis in mastocytosis.  
Roenneberg S, Bohner A, Brockow K, Arnold A, Darsow U, Eberlein B, Biedermann T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 12;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Parent report of food allergy management by pediatricians and allergists.
This study is the first to assess the parental perception of care for food allergy in a large sample of parents. Parents reported the quality of their health care to be very positive. However, parents reported that many allergists and pediatricians had not explained the essential steps of when and how to use EAs. Not all physicians prescribe epinephrine for all food allergy diagnoses.

Parent report of food allergy management by pediatricians and allergists.  
Blumenstock JA, Dyer AA, Smith BM, Wang X, Pongracic JA, Gupta RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 5;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical utility of recombinant allergen components in diagnosing buckwheat allergy.
In this Japanese study, 65 children with suspected buckwheat allergy were recruited. They were divided into 2 groups according to their clinical reactivity to buckwheat based on challenge outcome and/or clinical history. The symptomatic group comprised subjects with a positive challenge result (n = 21) and subjects with a convincing history of buckwheat allergy (n = 7), among which 4 subjects previously experienced anaphylactic symptoms. There were significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of total IgE level and other food allergy. The cumulative dose of boiled buckwheat noodle resulting in objective allergic symptoms during an OFC ranged from 1 to 64 g (median dose, 37 g). Rescue medication was necessary during the OFC in 17 of the symptomatic patients (81%). Skin reactions were the most commonly observed symptoms during the OFC (71%) followed by respiratory (62%), gastrointestinal (52%), cardiovascular (5%), and other symptoms (10%). The overall frequency of sensitization was higher to Fag e 1 (71%) and Fag e 3 (61%) than for Fag e 2 (25%), Fag e 10 kD (18%), and Fag e TI-2c (14%).

The reactivity of sIgE antibodies to Fag e 3 was evaluated using ImmunoCAP. The streptavidin ImmunoCAP test immobilized with biotinylated recombinant Fag e 3 was used in comparison with the commercially available buckwheat ImmunoCAP. Although there was no significant difference between the commercially available buckwheat ImmunoCAP and Fag e 3 experimental ImmunoCAP in the symptomatic group, the sIgE levels to Fag e 3 were significantly lower than those by buckwheat ImmunoCAP in the asymptomatic group. Control subjects with food allergies other than to buckwheat did not have sIgE antibodies to Fag e 3.

Clinical utility of recombinant allergen components in diagnosing buckwheat allergy.  
Maruyama N, Sato S, Yanagida N, Cabanos C, Ito K, Borres MP, Moverare R, Tanaka A, Ebisawa M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 5;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Innate and adaptive immune response to fungal products and allergens.
Exposure to fungi and their products is practically ubiquitous, yet most of this is of little consequence to most healthy individuals. This is because there are a number of elaborate mechanisms to deal with these exposures. Most of these mechanisms are designed to recognize and neutralize such exposures. However, in understanding these mechanisms it has become clear that many of them overlap with our ability to respond to disruptions in tissue function caused by trauma or deterioration. These responses involve the innate and adaptive immune systems usually through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and the production of cytokines that are considered inflammatory accompanied by other factors that can moderate these reactivities. Depending on different genetic backgrounds and the extent of activation of these mechanisms, various pathologies with resulting symptoms can ensue. Complicating this is the fact that these mechanisms can bias toward type 2 innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, to understand what we refer to as allergens from fungal sources, we must first understand how they influence these innate mechanisms. In doing so it has become clear that many of the proteins that are described as fungal allergens are essentially homologues of our own proteins that signal or cause tissue disruptions.

Innate and adaptive immune response to fungal products and allergens.  
Williams PB, Barnes CS, Portnoy JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 2;

Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hedgehog allergy: new pet, old allergens.
A 26-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of respiratory problems manifesting as moderate persistent rhinoconjunctivitis, dyspnea, cough, and persistent audible wheezing. The patient reported no seasonal variations in the symptoms, but claimed that they improved during a 2-week vacation away from home. For the last 3 years, she had kept 2 African pygmy hedgehogs and explained that her respiratory symptoms worsened on cleaning their cage and the room in which they were located, as well as on picking up the animals. An extract was prepared with material supplied by the patient, including hedgehog dander and spines, which tested positive. Several bands were observed for the extracts of spines and dander. The bands corresponded to different molecular weights (15-17 kDa, 20-25 kDa, and 50-75 kDa). The proteins of the lowest molecular weight, more intensely expressed in dander, could correspond to lipocalins, whereas those of the highest molecular weight, more intensely expressed in spines, could correspond to serum albumins.

Hedgehog allergy: new pet, old allergens.  
Nunez-Acevedo B, Dominguez-Ortega J, Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Kindelan-Recarte C, Jimeno-Nogales L.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):376-377

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of anaphylaxis after garlic ingestion: is alliinase the only culprit allergen?
A 48-year-old man with seasonal allergic rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux presented with a history of generalized urticaria, angioedema, and vomiting 20 minutes after ingestion of a kebab with garlic sauce. On a second occasion, he experienced urticaria, angioedema, and hypotension a few minutes after eating tzatziki. In an oral challenge, 20 minutes after intake of 0.9 g of raw garlic (cumulative dose of 1.675 g), the patient reported headaches and presented flush, urticaria, shortness of breath, and hypotension. Proteins identified in garlic were as follows: alliinase; 7 proteins that were likely irrelevant; and 8 proteins possibly representing novel garlic clove allergens (ie, enolase [twice], high-molecular-weight and low-molecular- weight glutenin, alpha-amylase inhibitor, triosephosphate isomerase, starch synthase, and lectin fragment).

A case of anaphylaxis after garlic ingestion: is alliinase the only culprit allergen?  
Treudler R, Reuter A, Engin AM, Simon JC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):374-375

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Multiple drug allergy due to hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols of various molecular weights.
A 26-year-old woman, with no previous history of allergy, reported many episodes of generalized urticaria within 1 hour of the intake for a range of antibiotics and anti- inflammatory drugs. The patient also manifested urticarial reactions after using cosmetic products. Specific IgE antibody determinations for a number of antibiotics were negative. Oral challenges with alternative anti- inflammatory drugs caused diffuse urticaria shortly after the patient took small doses of these drugs. Prick tests were positive for all polyethylene glycols (PEG) derivates: polysorbate 80 (wheal diameter, 20 mm), PEG 400 and 4000 (10 mm), and PEG 6000 (20 mm). Polyethylene glycols (otherwise known as macrogols or PEGs) are condensation products of glycols with ethylene oxide; the resulting molecules have various lengths and molecular weights (eg, polysorbate 80, macrogol 400, 4000, 6000, etc). Because of their stabilizing properties, macrogols are widely used as excipients, solvents, and dispersing agents in the production of foods, cosmetics, and topical and systemic drugs.

Multiple drug allergy due to hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols of various molecular weights.  
Badiu I, Guida G, Heffler E, Rolla G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):368-369

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Bronchial challenge with Tri a 14 as an alternative diagnostic test for baker's asthma.
Baker's asthma (BA) is the most prevalent occupational respiratory disease in developed countries. It is caused by inhalation of wheat dust in the working environment and affects 1%-10% of workers in the baking industry. Diagnosis of BA is based on bronchial challenge with wheat, a technique that carries a high risk for patients. The wheat lipid transfer protein Tri a 14 is a major allergen in BA. The aim of our study was to characterize Tri a 14 as a marker of BA in order to prevent patients from having to undergo bronchial challenge with wheat. 55 patients were evaluated. The study concludes that Tri a 14 is a good marker of BA and can be used in SPT and BCT as an alternative diagnostic method, thus avoiding bronchial challenge with wheat and reducing the risk associated with this technique.

Bronchial challenge with Tri a 14 as an alternative diagnostic test for baker's asthma.  
Armentia A, Garrido-Arandia M, Cubells-Baeza N, Gomez-Casado C, az-Perales A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):352-357

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oral allergy syndrome due to nut oleosins.
A 55-year old woman who reported several episodes of oral pruritus after eating fried peanuts and raw walnuts and 1 episode of lingual angioedema after eating oil-fried peanuts. The prick- by-prick tests for peanuts, walnuts, olive oil, and sunflower oil were negative in all cases. Total IgE was 27.5 IU/mL and specific IgE was negative for walnuts, peanuts, and almonds. Immunoblotting showed bands with a molecular weight of 18 to 20 kDa corresponding to the oleosins, and of 35 to 37 kDa, probably corresponding to the caleosins.

Oral allergy syndrome due to nut oleosins.  
Lacomba MJ, Domenech WJ, Pineda de la LF, Jover C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):301-302

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs in children and adolescents: cross-intolerance reactions.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used worldwide and are responsible for several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. The 2 major groups of DHRs to NSAIDs are those induced by immunological mechanisms (selective reactions) and those where inflammatory mediators are released through activation of the prostaglandin-leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance). In the present review, we focus on cross-intolerance reactions, which are the most frequent DHRs and are becoming a topic of major interest in children and adolescents. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the drugs that most frequently cause DHRs in children; other NSAIDs are responsible for reactions in adolescents. In vivo and in vitro tests are of limited diagnostic value, with some exceptions for the less common selective reactions.

Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs in children and adolescents: cross-intolerance reactions.  
Blanca-Lopez N, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Plaza-Seron MC, Dona I, Torres-Jaen MJ, Canto G, Padilla-Espana L, Kidon M, Perkins JR, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):259-269

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Comparative risk of anaphylactic reactions associated with intravenous iron products.
All intravenous (IV) iron products are associated with anaphylaxis, but the comparative safety of each product has not been well established. This study compared the risk of anaphylaxis among marketed IV iron products. A retrospective cohort study of IV iron recipients (n = 688,183) enrolled in the US fee-for-service Medicare program from January 2003 to December 2013 were assessed. A total of 274 anaphylaxis cases were identified at first exposure, with an additional 170 incident anaphylaxis cases identified during subsequent IV iron administrations. The risk for anaphylaxis at first exposure was 68 per 100,000 persons for iron dextran and 24 per 100,000 persons for all nondextran IV iron products combined (iron sucrose, gluconate, and ferumoxytol). At first exposure, when compared with iron sucrose, the adjusted OR of anaphylaxis for iron dextran was 3.6 (95% CI, 2.4-5.4); for iron gluconate, 2.0 (95% CI 1.2, 3.5); and for ferumoxytol, 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-4.3).

Comparative risk of anaphylactic reactions associated with intravenous iron products.  
Wang C, Graham DJ, Kane RC, Xie D, Wernecke M, Levenson M, MaCurdy TE, Houstoun M, Ryan Q, Wong S, Mott K, Sheu TC, Limb S, Worrall C, Kelman JA, Reichman ME.
JAMA 2015 Nov 17;314(19):2062-2068

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular approach to allergy diagnosis and therapy.
Presently, allergy diagnosis and therapy procedures are undergoing a transition phase in which allergen extracts are being step-by-step replaced by molecule-based products. The new developments will allow clinicians to obtain detailed information on sensitization patterns, more accurate interpretation of allergic symptoms, and thus improved patients' management. In this respect, recombinant technology has been applied to develop this new generation of molecule-based allergy products. The use of recombinant allergens allows full validation of identity, quantity, homogeneity, structure, aggregation, solubility, stability, IgE-binding and the biologic potency of the products. In contrast, such parameters are extremely difficult to assay and standardize for extract-based products. In addition to the possibility of bulk production of wild type molecules for diagnostic purposes, recombinant technology opened the possibility of developing safer and more efficacious products for allergy therapy. A number of molecule-based hypoallergenic preparations have already been successfully evaluated in clinical trials, bringing forward the next generation of allergy vaccines. In this contribution, we review the latest developments in allergen characterization, molecule-based allergy diagnosis, and the application of recombinant allergens in therapeutic setups. A comprehensive overview of clinical trials using recombinant allergens as well as synthetic peptides is presented.

Molecular approach to allergy diagnosis and therapy.  
Ferreira F, Wolf M, Wallner M.
Miscellaneous Yonsei Med J 2014 Jul;55(4):839-52.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Belt buckles-increasing awareness of nickel exposure in children: a case report.
Children, especially those with atopic dermatitis, are at risk for nickel sensitization and subsequent dermatitis from metal-containing objects, namely belt buckles. We describe allergic contact dermatitis in 12 children with peri-umbilical nickel dermatitis (with and without generalized involvement) caused by dimethylglyoxime-positive belt buckles. The patients' symptoms resolved with avoidance of the nickel-containing products.

Belt buckles-increasing awareness of nickel exposure in children: a case report.  
Goldenberg A, Admani S, Pelletier JL, Jacob SE.
Pediatrics 2015 Sep;136(3):e691-e693

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Web based listing of agents associated with new onset work-related asthma.
The AOEC has developed a readily available web based listing of agents associated with new onset work-related asthma in adults. The listing is based on peer-reviewed criteria. The listing is updated twice a year. Regular review of the peer-reviewed medical literature is conducted to determine whether new substances should be added to the list. Clinicians should find the list useful when considering the diagnosis of work-related asthma. After 13 years of review, there are 327 substances designated as asthma agents on the AOEC list; 173 (52.9%) coded as sensitizers, 35 (10.7%) as generally recognized as an asthma causing agent, four (1.2%) as irritants, two (0.6%) as both a sensitizer and an irritant and 113(34.6%) agents that still need to be reviewed. The list of agents can be found at: www.aoecdata.org/ExpCodeLookup.aspx.

Web based listing of agents associated with new onset work-related asthma.  
Rosenman KD, Beckett WS.
Respir Med 2015 May;109(5):625-631

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Enterocolitis syndrome induced chicken protein: an original observation
A seven-month-old infant with a food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome due to eating chicken. Surprisingly, the symptoms occurred after his first ingestion of chicken. Of interest, his mother also had also a history of a food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome due to chicken and chicken eggs which began before the age of five years. This case illustrates how difficult this diagnosis can be in the initial acute phase due to its various clinical signs and laboratory findings. In addition, attention should be paid to the metabolic disorders, including hyperglycemia and hyperlactatemia, which can be identified in the acute phase of enterocolitis; they may be the result of tissue damage.

Syndrome d'entérocolite induite par les protéines de poulet : une observation originale / Enterocolitis syndrome induced chicken protein: an original observation  
G. Pouessel, S. Combes, Y. Bernaczyk, K. Mention, S. Ganga, A. Deschildre Pouessel G., S. Combes, Bernaczyk Y., K. Mention, S. Ganga, A. Deschildre
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(8):534-537

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Contact urticaria due to a face mask coated with disinfectant liquid spray.  
Iwata M, Tanizaki H, Fujii H, Endo Y, Fujisawa A, Tanioka M, Miyachi Y, Kabashima K.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 May;95(5):628-629

Challenge-proven immediate type multiple local anesthetic hypersensitivity in a child.  
Ertoy K, Yilmaz O, Bakirtas A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Jan;48(1):27-30

Aeroallergens, atopy and allergic rhinitis in the Middle East.  
Goronfolah L.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Jan;48(1):5-21

Simuliosis - A dermatosis caused by black flies.  
Chiriac A, Brzezinski P, Miron L, Moldovan C, Podoleanu C, Stolnicu S.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan 4;

Oral challenge tests for soybean allergies in Japan: A summary of 142 cases.  
Sato M, Shukuya A, Sato S, Komata T, Utsunomiya T, Imai T, Tomikawa M, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):68-73

Serological diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis: Progress and challenges.  
Fukutomi Y, Tanimoto H, Yasueda H, Taniguchi M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):30-36

Anaphylaxis-two stories not covered by the current guidelines.  
Matsumoto K, Izuhara K.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):1-2

Multiple fixed drug eruption caused by ropinirole in a patient with Parkinson's disease.  
Sasaki-Saito N, Sawada Y, Ohmori S, Omoto D, Haruyama S, Yoshioka M, Nishio D, Nakamura M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan 17;

New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.  
Yanagida N, Okada Y, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan 7;

Remission rate of patients with wheat allergy sensitized to hydrolyzed wheat protein in facial soap.  
Hiragun M, Ishii K, Yanase Y, Hiragun T, Hide M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):109-111

Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.  
Okada Y, Yanagida N, Sato S, Ebisawa M.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):82-87
Click to view abstract

Antibiotic-induced immediate type hypersensitivity is a risk factor for positive allergy skin tests for neuromuscular blocking agents.  
Hagau N, Gherman N, Cocis M, Petrisor C.
Allergol Int 2016 Jan;65(1):52-55
Click to view abstract

The risk of respiratory symptoms on allergen exposure increases with increasing specific IgE levels.  
Olivieri M, Heinrich J, Schlunssen V, Anto JM, Forsberg B, Janson C, Leynaert B, Norback D, Sigsgaard T, Svanes C, Tischer C, Villani S, Jarvis D, Verlato G.
Allergy 2016 Jan 14;

Hospitalisations due to allergic reactions in Finnish and Swedish children during 1999-2011.  
Kivisto JE, Protudjer JL, Karjalainen J, Wickman M, Bergstrom A, Mattila VM.
Allergy 2016 Jan 8;

Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by a non-IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity.  
Simon D, Cianferoni A, Spergel JM, Aceves S, Holbreich M, Venter C, Rothenberg ME, Terreehorst I, Muraro A, Lucendo AJ, Schoepfer A, Straumann A, Simon HU.
Allergy 2016 Jan 22;

Fish collagen is an important panallergen in the Japanese population.  
Kobayashi Y, Akiyama H, Huge J, Kubota H, Chikazawa S, Satoh T, Miyake T, Uhara H, Okuyama R, Nakagawara R, Aihara M, Hamada-Sato N.
Allergy 2016 Jan 19;

Non-IgE mediated cow's milk allergy in EuroPrevall.  
Koletzko S, Heine RG, Grimshaw KE, Beyer K, Grabenhenrich L, Keil T, Sprikkelman AB, Roberts G.
Allergy 2015 Dec;70(12):1679-1680

Two galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose carrying peptidases from pork kidney mediate anaphylactogenic responses in delayed meat allergy.  
Hilger C, Fischer J, Swiontek K, Hentges F, Lehners C, Eberlein B, Morisset M, Biedermann T, Ollert M.
Allergy 2016 Jan 5;

IgE responses to exogenous and endogenous allergens in atopic dermatitis patients under long-term systemic cyclosporine A treatment.  
Lucae S, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Wuthrich B, Kraft D, Valenta R, Linhart B.
Allergy 2016 Jan;71(1):115-118
Click to view abstract

Cow's Milk Allergy: the Relevance of IgE.  
Tosca MA, Pistorio A, Rossi GA, Ciprandi G.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Jan;8(1):86-87

Update on advances in research on idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.  
Kim SH, Naisbitt DJ.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2016 Jan;8(1):3-11
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to common aeroallergens in a population of young adults in a sub-Saharan Africa setting: a cross-sectional study.  
Mbatchou Ngahane BH, Noah D, Nganda MM, Mapoure NY, Njock LR.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;121

Anaphylaxis following a transvaginal ultrasound.  
Jakubovic BD, Saperia C, Sussman GL.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016;123

Anaphylaxis exclusivity in a single Citrus species.  
Cai G, Lee JK.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct 6;

Identification of cross-reactivity between buckwheat and coconut.  
Cifuentes L, Mistrello G, Amato S, Kolbinger A, Ziai M, Ollert M, Pennino D, Ring J, Darsow U, Heffler E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct 3;

Tolerance of a high-protein baked-egg product in egg-allergic children.  
Saifi M, Swamy N, Crain M, Brown LS, Bird JA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 20;

Anaphylaxis to the amoxicillin skin prick test: utility of the basophil activation test in diagnosis.  
Barni S, Mori F, Valleriani C, Testi S, Sarti L, Azzari C, Novembre E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 21;

Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced DRESS syndrome in a 4-year-old child.  
Rueda-Valencia ME, Infantes S, Campos M, Belendez C, Saavedra LJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 9;

Association between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy.  
Silverman S, Localio R, Apter AJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 9;

Allergy to hedgehog with carboxypeptidase and chitinase-like and chymotrypsin-like elastase family members as the relevant allergens.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Munoz-Garcia E, Haroun-Diaz E, Bartolome B, Pastor-Vargas C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan 7;

Additional provocation testing in patients with negative provocation test results with beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Capanoglu M, Vezir E, Misirlioglu ED, Guvenir H, Buyuktiryaki B, Toyran M, Kocabas CN.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan;116(1):82-83

Venom allergy testing: is a graded approach necessary?  
Quirt JA, Wen X, Kim J, Herrero AJ, Kim HL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan;116(1):49-51
Click to view abstract

High rate of failure to thrive in a pediatric cohort with eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Paquet B, Begin P, Paradis L, Drouin E, Des RA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan;116(1):73-74

Are fish tropomyosins allergens?  
Gonzalez-Fernandez J, Veleiro B, Daschner A, Cuellar C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Jan;116(1):74-76

Three cases of drug-induced pneumonia caused by mesalazine. [Japanese]  
Akiyama N, Yokomura K, Nozue T, Abe T, Matsui T, Suda T.
Arerugi 2015 Dec;64(10):1334-1340

Transition of airborne fungi during 20-years from 1993 to 2013 in Sagamihara. [Japanese]  
Saito A, Takatori M, Takatori K, Taniguchi M.
Arerugi 2015 Dec;64(10):1313-1322
Click to view abstract

The harm of tobacco starts before birth.  
Farber HJ.
Chest 2015 Sep;148(3):573-574

Tobacco smoke exposure, airway resistance, and asthma in school-age children: the generation r study.  
den Dekker HT, Sonnenschein-van der Voort AM, de Jongste JC, Reiss IK, Hofman A, Jaddoe VW, Duijts L.
Chest 2015 Sep;148(3):607-617
Click to view abstract

Thunderstorm related asthma: what happens and why.  
D'Amato G, Vitale C, D'Amato M, Cecchi L, Liccardi G, Molino A, Vatrella A, Sanduzzi A, Maesano C, nnesi-Maesano I.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Jan 14;

Ranitidine-induced anaphylaxis: clinical features, cross-reactivity, and skin testing.  
Park KH, Pai J, Song DG, Sim DW, Park HJ, Lee JH, Jeong KY, Pan CH, Shin I, Park JW.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Jan 14;

Immediate hypersensitivity to iodinated contrast media: diagnostic accuracy of skin tests and intravenous provocation test with low dose.  
Sese L, Gaouar H, Autegarden JE, Alari A, Amsler E, Vial-Dupuy A, Pecquet C, Frances C, Soria A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Jan 10;

Nut allergy prevalence and differences between Asian born children and Australian born children of Asian descent: a state-wide survey of children at primary school entry in Victoria, Australia.  
Panjari M, Koplin JJ, Dharmage SC, Peters RL, Gurrin LC, Sawyer SM, McWilliam V, Eckert JK, Vicendese D, Erbas B, Matheson MC, Tang ML, Douglass J, Ponsonby AL, Dwyer T, Goldfeld S, Allen KJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016 Jan 5;

Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.  
Bonadonna P, Bonifacio M, Lombardo C, Zanotti R.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Jan;16(1):5
Click to view abstract

Clinical presentation, allergens, and management of wheat allergy.  
Quirce S, Boyano-Martínez T, Díaz-Perales A.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2016 Jan 22;

The House Dust Mite Major Allergen Der p 23 Displays O-Glycan-Independent IgE Reactivities but No Chitin-Binding Activity.  
Soh WT, Le MM, Suratannon N, Satitsuksanoa P, Chatchatee P, Wongpiyaboron J, Vangveravong M, Rerkpattanapipat T, Sangasapaviliya A, Nony E, Piboonpocanun S, Ruxrungtham K, Jacquet A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2016 Jan 21;168(3):150-160
Click to view abstract

Iron requirements for infants with cow milk protein allergy.  
Vanderhoof JA, Kleinman RE.
J Pediatr 2015 Oct;167(4 Suppl):S36-S39

An update on pediatric atopic dermatitis and food allergies.  
Nguyen TA, Leonard SA, Eichenfield LF.
J Pediatr 2015 Sep;167(3):752-756

Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents: The European Anaphylaxis Registry.  
Grabenhenrich LB, Dolle S, Moneret-Vautrin A, Kohli A, Lange L, Spindler T, Rueff F, Nemat K, Maris I, Roumpedaki E, Scherer K, Ott H, Reese T, Mustakov T, Lang R, Fernandez-Rivas M, Kowal.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Jan 21;
Click to view abstract

Sensitivity and specificity of Hymenoptera allergen components depend on the diagnostic assay employed.  
Schrautzer C, Bokanovic D, Hemmer W, Lang R, Hawranek T, Schwarz I, Aberer W, Sturm E, Sturm GJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Jan 5;

In utero exposure to pets is associated with asthma and wheezing in Mexican American children.  
Eldeirawi K, Kunzweiler C, Combs AM, Persky VW.
J Asthma 2016 Jan 21;1-8
Click to view abstract

Occupational agriculture organic dust exposure and its relationship to asthma and airway inflammation in adults.  
Wunschel J, Poole JA.
J Asthma 2016 Jan 19;1-7
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of specific IgE to wheat flour allergens in Romanian pediatric population.  
Samasca G, Sur G, Iancu M, Lupan I, Deleanu D.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct;14(5):543-544

Occupational allergy to peach (Prunus persica) tree pollen and potential cross-reactivity between rosaceae family pollens.  
Jiang N, Yin J, Mak P, Wen L.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct;14(5):483-492
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis induced by proton pump inhibitors.  
Mota I, Gaspar A, Chambel M, Morais-Almeida M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 21;

alpha-Gal-a new clue for anaphylaxis in mastocytosis.  
Roenneberg S, Bohner A, Brockow K, Arnold A, Darsow U, Eberlein B, Biedermann T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 12;

Parent report of food allergy management by pediatricians and allergists.  
Blumenstock JA, Dyer AA, Smith BM, Wang X, Pongracic JA, Gupta RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 5;

Clinical utility of recombinant allergen components in diagnosing buckwheat allergy.  
Maruyama N, Sato S, Yanagida N, Cabanos C, Ito K, Borres MP, Moverare R, Tanaka A, Ebisawa M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 5;

Post cystoscopy anaphylaxis.  
Sokol WN.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan;4(1):189

Omalizumab and allergic reactions.  
Ledford DK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan;4(1):187-188

Venom allergy.  
Stitt J, Katial R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan;4(1):184-185

Hypersensitivity reactions, dietary supplements, and the importance of the case report.  
Blumenthal KG, Ziegler JB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan;4(1):177-178

Multiple food protein intolerance of infancy or severe spectrum of non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy?-A case series.  
McWilliam V, Heine R, Tang ML, Allen KJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 2;

Prospects for prevention of food allergy.  
Allen KJ, Koplin JJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 2;
Click to view abstract

Innate and adaptive immune response to fungal products and allergens.  
Williams PB, Barnes CS, Portnoy JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan 2;
Click to view abstract

Severe delayed skin reaction during intradermal testing with beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Syrigou E, Zande M, Grapsa D, Syrigos K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Jan;4(1):158-159

An unusual case of contact dermatitis to vulcanization additives.  
Carbonell MA, Escudero Pastor AI, Martinez NA, Fernandez CE, Cardona Materna PR, Miralles Lopez JC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):452-453

Description of Sunflower Seed-Fungus Syndrome.  
Lara S, Sobrevia M, Bartolome B, Marques L, Alcoceba E, Almacellas J, Marin JP.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):449-451

Fixed drug eruption due to mesna.  
Soria A, Lebrun-Vignes B, Le FN, Frances C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):444-445

Allergic reactions in anesthesia: do diagnostic studies ensure the safety of reoperation?  
Audicana MT, Lobera T, Gonzalez I, Tomas L, Reyes S, Munoz D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):441-443

Recurrent anaphylaxis: a case of IgE-mediated allergy to carmine red (E120).  
De PT, Buonomo A, Illuminati I, D'Alo S, Pucci S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):440-441

Proteins responsible for fruit allergies in the northwest of Spain.  
Azofra GJ, Martinez BJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):438-439

Longitudinal validation of the Spanish version of the Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaire for Hymenoptera Venom Allergy (HRQLHA).  
Alfaya T, Vega A, Dominguez-Noche C, Ruiz B, Marques L, Sanchez-Morillas L.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):426-430
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in children and adolescents: selective reactions.  
Blanca-Lopez N, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Perez-Alzate D, Perez-Sanchez N, Plaza-Seron MC, Dona I, Torres MJ, Canto G, Kidon M, Perkins JR, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(6):385-395
Click to view abstract

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis associated with eosinophilic gastroenteritis.  
Bumbacea RS, Balea MI, Ghiordanescu IM, Popp C, Bumbacea D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):380-381

Hedgehog allergy: new pet, old allergens.  
Nunez-Acevedo B, Dominguez-Ortega J, Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Kindelan-Recarte C, Jimeno-Nogales L.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):376-377

A case of anaphylaxis after garlic ingestion: is alliinase the only culprit allergen?  
Treudler R, Reuter A, Engin AM, Simon JC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):374-375

Immediate-type hypersensitivity to atracurium: use of the stimulation index as the optimal positivity threshold for the flow-assisted basophil activation test.  
Petrisor C, Gherman N, Sfichi M, Cocis M, Hagau N.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):372-373

Multiple drug allergy due to hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols of various molecular weights.  
Badiu I, Guida G, Heffler E, Rolla G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):368-369

Fatal anaphylaxis associated with the Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent Gadoteridol (ProHance).  
Takahashi S, Takada A, Saito K, Hara M, Yoneyama K, Nakanishi H.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):366-367

Bronchial challenge with Tri a 14 as an alternative diagnostic test for baker's asthma.  
Armentia A, Garrido-Arandia M, Cubells-Baeza N, Gomez-Casado C, az-Perales A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):352-357
Click to view abstract

Component-resolved diagnostic study of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus major allergen molecules in a Southern Chinese cohort.  
Zeng G, Luo W, Zheng P, Wei N, Huang H, Sun B, Zhao X.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):343-351
Click to view abstract

Allergic reactions to pine nut: a review.  
Cabanillas B, Novak N.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(5):329-333
Click to view abstract

Rhinitis due to larvae used in pet food.  
Uriarte SA, Fernandez-Nieto M, Carnes P, Lopez-Matas MA, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):311-312

Anaphylaxis to intravenous methylprednisolone hemisuccinate in a patient with immune thrombocytopenia.  
Alvarez CF, Garcia G, Gonzalez GJ, Garcia MR, Garcia NB, Gomez FA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):309-310

Oral allergy syndrome due to nut oleosins.  
Lacomba MJ, Domenech WJ, Pineda de la LF, Jover C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):301-302

Recurrent anaphylaxis due to enoxaparin.  
Leguisamo S, Prados CM, Pinero SM, Cimbollek S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):297-299

Do skin prick test and in vitro techniques diagnose sensitization to peach lipid transfer protein and profilin equally well in allergy to plant food and pollen?  
Goikoetxea MJ, Berroa F, Cabrera-Freitag P, Ferrer M, Nunez-Cordoba JM, Sanz ML, Gastaminza G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):283-287
Click to view abstract

Validation of the Spanish version of the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Adult Form (S-FAQLQ-AF).  
ntolin-Amerigo D, Cerecedo C, Muriel A, Fernandez-Rivas M, Dieguez PM, Flokstra-de BB, Dubois A, De la Hoz CB.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):270-275
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs in children and adolescents: cross-intolerance reactions.  
Blanca-Lopez N, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Plaza-Seron MC, Dona I, Torres-Jaen MJ, Canto G, Padilla-Espana L, Kidon M, Perkins JR, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(4):259-269
Click to view abstract

Comparative risk of anaphylactic reactions associated with intravenous iron products.  
Wang C, Graham DJ, Kane RC, Xie D, Wernecke M, Levenson M, MaCurdy TE, Houstoun M, Ryan Q, Wong S, Mott K, Sheu TC, Limb S, Worrall C, Kelman JA, Reichman ME.
JAMA 2015 Nov 17;314(19):2062-2068
Click to view abstract

Molecular approach to allergy diagnosis and therapy.  
Ferreira F, Wolf M, Wallner M.
Miscellaneous Yonsei Med J 2014 Jul;55(4):839-52.

Fish allergens at a glance: variable allergenicity of parvalbumins, the major fish allergens.  
Kuehn A, Swoboda I, Arumugam K, Hilger C, Hentges F.
Miscellaneous Front Immunol 2014 Apr 22;5:179.
Abstract

Functions of dendritic-cell-bound IgE in allergy.  
Platzer B, Stout M, Fiebiger E.
Mol Immunol 2015 Dec;68(2 Pt A):116-119
Click to view abstract

Occupational asthma in cleaners: a challenging black box.  
De MS, Cullinan P.
Occup Environ Med 2015 Nov;72(11):755-756

Trends in incidence of occupational asthma.  
Tarlo SM.
Occup Environ Med 2015 Oct;72(10):688-689

COR a 14- Specific IgE Predicts symptomatic hazelnut allergy in children.  
Carraro S, Berardi M, Bozzetto S, Baraldi E, Zanconato S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Dec 17;

Belt buckles-increasing awareness of nickel exposure in children: a case report.  
Goldenberg A, Admani S, Pelletier JL, Jacob SE.
Pediatrics 2015 Sep;136(3):e691-e693
Click to view abstract

Web based listing of agents associated with new onset work-related asthma.  
Rosenman KD, Beckett WS.
Respir Med 2015 May;109(5):625-631
Click to view abstract

Chronic Farmer's lung disease with emphysema. [French]  
Soumagne T, Degano B, Dalphin JC.
Rev Mal Respir 2015 Mar;32(3):275-278
Click to view abstract

Aspirin hypersensitivity: characteristics and diagnostic approach. [French]  
Baudrand H, Zaouche S, Dubost R, Carsin A, Chatte G, Freymond N, Piperno D, Dubreuil C, Froehlich P, Pacheco Y, Devouassoux G.
Rev Mal Respir 2015 Mar;32(3):221-228
Click to view abstract

Influence of tobacco smoking on the risk of developing asthma. [French]  
Underner M, Perriot J, Peiffer G, Meurice JC.
Rev Mal Respir 2015 Feb;32(2):110-137
Click to view abstract

Cup s 1 Inflammatory extracts Cupressus sempervirens planted in eastern Algeria: the mouse model to stimulation of BEAS-2B cells by the major allergen s Cup 1. [French]  
I. Bouguenoun, M.-C. De Pauw-Gillet, Z. Bensakhri, D. Baiwir, G. Mazzucchelli, E. De Pauw, D. Bendjeddou
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;56(1):10-19
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Diagnostic de l'allergie alimentaire à l'arachide / Diagnosis of food allergy to peanuts  
S. Lefèvre, S. Jacquenet, G. Kanny
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;56(1):20-28
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L'acarien transporteur d'allergènes / The mite allergen carrier  
A. Naegele, S. Roussel, G. Reboux
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;56(1):29-33
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Vascularite induite par la pristinamycine / Pristinamycin induced vasculitis  
B. Dahmani, N. Amarani, O. Boudghene Stambouli, N. Yelles, A. Benchouk, M. Dib
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;56(1):43-45
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Pustulose exanthématique aiguë généralisée liée à la nifédipine ? / Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to nifedipine?  
S. Bellakhal, B. Ben Kaab, A. Souissi, F. Derbel, A. Mestiri, M.H. Douggui
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;56(1):50-51
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Faut-il s’intéresser aux protéines édulcorantes ? / Should we be interested in sweetening protein?  
F. Lavaud, G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(8):499-500
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

La LTP du cannabis : une voie de sensibilisation aux LTP alimentaires / LTP cannabis: a path of sensitization to food LTP  
A. Omidi, C. Sauvage, L.M. Vandezande, B. Wallaert
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(8):501-505
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Corrélations entre contrôle de l'asthme et sensibilisation cutanée aux moisissures / Correlations between asthma control and skin sensitization to mold  
RG Bopaka, W. El Khattabi, B. El Bied, M. Choubi, A. Aichane, H. Afif
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(8):517-520
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les produits de comblement / The fillers .  
A. Pons-Guiraud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(8):521-525
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Syndrome d'entérocolite induite par les protéines de poulet : une observation originale / Enterocolitis syndrome induced chicken protein: an original observation  
G. Pouessel, S. Combes, Y. Bernaczyk, K. Mention, S. Ganga, A. Deschildre Pouessel G., S. Combes, Bernaczyk Y., K. Mention, S. Ganga, A. Deschildre
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(8):534-537
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Du lierre à l'arachide : de nombreux allergènes / From ivy to peanuts: A lot of allergens  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud G.
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;56(1):1-2
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis with intravenous immunoglobulin: a time for introspection.  
Jain RS, Agrawal R, Kumar S, Gupta PK.
Am J Emerg Med 2015 Sep;33(9):1332-1332

Hyaluronan and its heavy chain modification in asthma severity and experimental asthma exacerbation.  
Lauer ME, Majors AK, Comhair S, Ruple LM, Matuska B, Subramanian A, Farver C, Dworski R, Grandon D, Laskowski D, Dweik RA, Erzurum SC, Hascall VC, Aronica MA.
J Biol Chem 2015 Sep 18;290(38):23124-23134
Click to view abstract


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