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 Allergy Advisor Digest - July 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read A recombinant Sal k 1 isoform as an alternative to the polymorphic allergen from Salsola kali pollen for allergy diagnosis.
Read Identification of allergens in the Box jellyfish Chironex yamaguchii that cause sting dermatitis.
Read Frequent episodes of adult soybean allergy during and following the pollen season.
Read Drug-induced anaphylaxis in Latin American countries.
Read High similarity between lentil and other lentil-like-proteins (dal) complicates recommendations on avoidance in lentil allergic patients.
Read Repeated anaphylaxis caused by amaranth grains
Read Temporary tattoos with lasting consequences
Read Time trends in Australian hospital anaphylaxis admissions in 1998-1999 to 2011-2012.
Read Peanut defensins: Novel allergens isolated from lipophilic peanut extract.
Read Evaluation of allergen-microarray-guided dietary intervention as treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.
Read IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins: Cross-reactivity and tolerability of alternative cephalosporins.
Read Analysis of glutathione S-transferase allergen cross-reactivity in a North American population: Relevance for molecular diagnosis.
Read Allergen characterization of chia seeds (Salvia hispanica), a new allergenic food.
Read Pollen-food syndrome involving allergy to tiger nut.
Read Tomato nsLTP as an 'In Vivo' Diagnostic Tool: Sensitization in a Mediterranean Population.
Read Hypersensitivity to tomato in peach-allergic patients: rPrup 3 and rPrup 1 are predictive of symptom severity.
Read The new latex allergen Hev b 15: IgE-binding properties of a recombinant serine protease inhibitor.
Read Anaphylaxis in a child after ingestion of persimmon.
Read Allergic reaction to undeclared lupin in a chocolate.
Read Occupational asthma to fish (Yellow?n sole).
Read Wheat allergy in a pediatric population from the Mediterranean area.
Read Prevalence of allergy to cow's milk proteins in children younger than 3 years of the city of Constantine (Algeria)
Read Molecular, proteomic and immunological parameters of allergens provide inclusion criteria for new candidates within established grass and tree homologous group
Read Anomalous cutaneous absorption of allergens as cause of skin prick testing adverse reactions in adult patients.
Read Allergological characterisation of the storage mite Acarus gracilis
Read Determinants of nocebo effect during oral drug provocation tests.
Read Epitope specificity determines cross-protection of a SIT-induced IgG antibody.
Read Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the alpha-Gal glycan.
Read Sensitization pattern of crustacean allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs.
Read Tree pollen allergens - an update from a molecular perspective.
Read Clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar.
Read Diagnostic use of recombinant Tha p 2 in the allergy to Thaumetopoea pityocampa.
Read Lipid transfer protein sensitization: reactivity profiles and clinical risk assessment in an Italian cohort.
Read Risk factors in pediatric shrimp allergy.
Read Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization.
Read First case of airborne-induced anaphylaxis triggered by fruit (fig).
Read Anaphylaxis induced by Goji berries.
Read Stability and potency of raw and boiled shrimp extracts for skin prick test.
Read Pro j 2 is mesquite profilin: molecular characteristics and specific IgE binding activity.
Read Molecular-based allergy diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized Japanese patients.
Read Accidental exposures to peanut in a large cohort of Canadian children with peanut allergy.
Read The development of a standardised diet history tool to support the diagnosis of food allergy.
Read Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis caused by argan oil
Read Anaphylaxis to insect venom allergens: role of molecular diagnostics.
Read Delayed anaphylaxis involving IgE galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.
Read New causes of immunologic occupational asthma, 2012-2014.
Read Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.

Abstracts shared in July 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Human saliva acting as an allergen
Read Buckwheat allergy: an emerging clinical problem in Europe
Read Recognition pattern of kiwi seed storage proteins in kiwifruit allergic children.
Read Outcome of mixed nut biscuit challenges in low risk patients who are on tree nut exclusion diet.
Read Allergy to salmon eggs without cross fish allergies, three pediatric cases
Read Cross-reactivity of a new food ingredient, dun pea, with legumes, and risk of anaphylaxis in legume allergic children.
Read Improved sensitivity to venom specific-immunoglobulin E by spiking with the allergen component in Japanese patients suspected of Hymenoptera venom allergy.
Read Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.
Read Allergy to cooked, but not raw, peas: a case series and review.
Read Further studies on the biological activity of hazelnut allergens.
Read Allergic reaction caused by the artificial sweetener, acesulfame potassium (Acesulfame K).

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A recombinant Sal k 1 isoform as an alternative to the polymorphic allergen from Salsola kali pollen for allergy diagnosis.
The incidence of Amaranthaceae pollen allergy has increased due to the desertification occurring in many countries. In some regions of Spain, Salsola kali is the main cause of pollinosis, at almost the same level as olive and grass pollen. Sal k 1 - the sensitization marker of S. kali pollinosis - is used in clinical diagnosis, but is purified at a low yield from pollen. This study aimed to produce a recombinant (r)Sal k 1 able to span the structural and immunological properties of the natural isoforms from pollen, and validate its potential use for diagnosis. rSal k 1 exhibited a higher IgE cross-reactivity with plant-derived food extracts such as peanut, almond or tomato than with pollen sources such as Platanus acerifolia and Oleaceae members. It spans the immunological properties of most of the isoforms found in pollen, and it might substitute natural Sal k 1 in clinical diagnosis.

A recombinant Sal k 1 isoform as an alternative to the polymorphic allergen from Salsola kali pollen for allergy diagnosis.  
Mas S, Boissy P, Monsalve RI, Cuesta-Herranz J, az-Perales A, Fernandez J, Colas C, Rodriguez R, Barderas R, Villalba M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 22;167(2):83-93

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of allergens in the Box jellyfish Chironex yamaguchii that cause sting dermatitis.
The purpose of this study was to define the specific allergen of the box jellyfish Chironex yamaguchii and to study the precise mechanism of the resulting dermatitis using sera from 1 patient and from several controls. From the nematocyst wall and spine, IgG-binding acidic glycoprotein (of 66 and 30 kDa) was detected. The 66-kDa protein was found to be an asparagine residue-coupled N-linked glycoprotein and the epitope resided in the protein fraction. CqTX-A, the major toxic protein of the nematocyst, was a heat-stable IgE-binding allergen. This was confirmed as a 45-kDa protein by Western blot from both nematocyst extracts and purified CqTX-A. The detection of these proteins may, in part, explain the combined immediate allergic-toxic and persistent allergic responses.

Identification of allergens in the Box jellyfish Chironex yamaguchii that cause sting dermatitis.  
Horiike T, Nagai H, Kitani S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 22;167(2):73-82

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Frequent episodes of adult soybean allergy during and following the pollen season.
This Japanese study showed seasonal variation in systemic allergic symptoms after ingestion of soy products in patients with pollen- related soybean allergy. Soy allergic symptoms were most frequent during or after the relevant pollen season.

Frequent episodes of adult soybean allergy during and following the pollen season.  
Minami T, Fukutomi Y, Saito A, Sekiya K, Tsuburai T, Taniguchi M, Akiyama K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):441-442

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Drug-induced anaphylaxis in Latin American countries.
The objective of this study was to assess implicated medications, demographics, and treatments received for DIA in Latin American patients referred to national specialty centers for evaluation. There were 1005 patients evaluated for possible drug hypersensitivity reactions during the study interval, and 264 (26.3%) met criteria for DIA. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (N = 178 [57.8%]), beta-lactam antibiotics (N = 44 [14.3%]), and other antibiotics (N = 16 [5.2%]) were the most frequently implicated drug classes. Anaphylaxis was rated as severe in N = 133 (50.4%) and anaphylactic shock (AS) was present in N = 90 (34.1%).

Drug-induced anaphylaxis in Latin American countries.  
Jares EJ, Baena-Cagnani CE, Sanchez-Borges M, Ensina LF, rias-Cruz A, Gomez M, Cuello MN, Morfin-Maciel BM, De FA, Barayazarra S, Bernstein JA, Serrano C, Monsell S, Schuhl J, Cardona-Villa R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 1;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
High similarity between lentil and other lentil-like-proteins (dal) complicates recommendations on avoidance in lentil allergic patients.
Green lentil (Lens culinaris green), toor dal/pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), mung dal/mung bean (Vigna radiata), urad dal/ black gram (Vigna mungo), chana dal/chickpea (Cicer arietinum), mooth dal/moth bean (Vigna aconitifolia), and masoor dal/red lentil (L. culinaris red) extracts were prepared from cooked lentils. Sera from 3 lentil allergic children from Turkey, 3 lentil allergic children from Spain, and 3 lentil allergic children from the United States (all IgE > 0.35 kUA/L) and a negative control were used for immunoblotting. IgE binding patterns of lentil allergic patients’ sera showed similarity among taxonomically and phenotypically similar dal proteins (mung dal and mooth dal; urad dal and toor dal; chana dal/chickpea). IgE binding patterns to various lentil proteins did not allow for distinction between sensitization to various types of lentils. These results indicate a high degree of identity at the protein level between selected lentil-like (dal) proteins and other legumes.

High similarity between lentil and other lentil-like-proteins (dal) complicates recommendations on avoidance in lentil allergic patients.  
Andreae DA, Grishina G, Sackesen C, Ibanez MD, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Repeated anaphylaxis caused by amaranth grains
A 43-year old female patient developed two anaphylactic episodes after consumption of a self-mixed cereal including oatmeal, fresh milk, strawberries, apples and amaranth grains. Toasted amaranth grains could be identified as elicitor of anaphylaxis by prick-to-prick testing. Amaranth grains are a very uncommon elicitor of anaphylaxis, however amaranth should be kept in mind as a cause for food allergy as the consumption of this product is rising.

Fading due the unfading: repeated anaphylaxis caused by amaranth grains  
Claudia Pföhler, Andreas Merkoureas, Cornelia SL Müller and Thomas Vogt
J Aller Ther 2015;6(2):205

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Temporary tattoos with lasting consequences
Body art and tattoos have become a ubiquitous part of modern culture and the popularity and availability of unregulated temporary henna-based tattoos has increased. The addition of para-phenylenediamine to natural henna makes the tattoo set quicker and gives a darker coloration; however, it is a potent allergen. We describe the case of an 11 year old girl who developed a Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to a black henna tattoo. This case highlights the importance of public education about potent allergens that may be encountered in products such as henna tattoos.

Temporary tattoos with lasting consequences  
Jonathan Cubitt, Marc C Swan and Michael P Tyler
J Aller Ther 2015;6(2):206

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Time trends in Australian hospital anaphylaxis admissions in 1998-1999 to 2011-2012.
This study sought to examine whether childhood food allergy/anaphylaxis prevalence has increased further since 2004-2005. The study concludes that food-related anaphylaxis has increased further in all age groups since 2004-2005. Although the major burden falls on those aged 0 to 4 years, there is preliminary evidence for a recent acceleration in incidence rates in those aged 5 to 14 years. This contrasts with the previous decade in which the greatest proportionate increase was in those aged 0 to 4 years. These findings suggest a possible increasing burden of disease among adolescents and adults who carry the highest risk for fatal anaphylaxis

Time trends in Australian hospital anaphylaxis admissions in 1998-1999 to 2011-2012.  
Mullins RJ, Dear KB, Tang ML.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut defensins: Novel allergens isolated from lipophilic peanut extract.
Peanut is one of the most hazardous sources of food allergens. Unknown allergens are still hidden in the complex lipophilic matrix. These allergens need to be discovered to allow estimation of the allergenic risk for patients with peanut allergy and to further improve diagnostic measures. This study performed detection, isolation, and characterization of novel peanut allergens from lipophilic peanut extract. IgE-reactive proteins of 12, 11, and 10 kDa were first detected after chloroform/methanol extraction. The proteins were able to activate basophils of patients with peanut allergy. These were identified as peanut defensins. On microbial cell cultures, the peanut defensins showed inhibitory effects on the mold strains of the genera Cladosporium and Alternaria but none on bacteria. Defensins as novel peanut allergens (Ara h 12 and Ara h 13) that react in particular with IgE of patients with severe peanut allergy were identified.

Peanut defensins: Novel allergens isolated from lipophilic peanut extract.  
Petersen A, Kull S, Rennert S, Becker WM, Krause S, Ernst M, Gutsmann T, Bauer J, Lindner B, Jappe U.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 30;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of allergen-microarray-guided dietary intervention as treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.
This study concludes that in this prospective study, CRD-based (allergen-microarray) dietary treatment was not effective in adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The lack of response could be a result of missed sensitizations; however, it may also reflect the limited relevance of IgE in the pathophysiology of EoE.

Evaluation of allergen-microarray-guided dietary intervention as treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.  
van Rhijn BD, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Versteeg SA, Akkerdaas JH, van Ree R, Terreehorst I, Sprikkelman AB, Verheij J, Smout AJ, Bredenoord AJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 29;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins: Cross-reactivity and tolerability of alternative cephalosporins.
Cephalosporin hypersensitivity does not seem to be a class hypersensitivity. Subjects with cephalosporin allergy who especially require alternative cephalosporins might be treated with compounds that have side-chain determinants different from those of the responsible cephalosporins and have negative pretreatment skin test responses

IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins: Cross-reactivity and tolerability of alternative cephalosporins.  
Romano A, Gaeta F, Valluzzi RL, Maggioletti M, Zaffiro A, Caruso C, Quaratino D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 27;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Analysis of glutathione S-transferase allergen cross-reactivity in a North American population: Relevance for molecular diagnosis.
It is not clear whether cross-reactivity or cosensitization to glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) occurs in tropical and subtropical environments. In the United States, Bla g 5 (German cockroach) is the most important GST allergen and lack of coexposure to GSTs from certain species allows a better assessment of cross-reactivity. This study examined the molecular structure of GST allergens from cockroach (Bla g 5), dust mites (Der p 8 and Blo t 8), and helminth (Asc s 13) for potential cross-reactive sites, and to assess the IgE cross-reactivity of sensitized patients from a temperate climate for these allergens for molecular diagnostic purposes. Comparisons of the allergen structures revealed cross-reactivity unlikely. Accordingly, anti-Bla g 5 or anti-Der p 8 IgE from North American patients did not recognize Der p 8 or Bla g 5, respectively, and neither showed binding to Blo t 8 or Asc s 13. A weaker binding of anti-Bla g 5 IgE to Der p 8 versus Bla g 5 ( approximately 100-fold) was observed by inhibition assays, similar to a weak recognition of Der p 8 by anti-Bla g 5 mAb. Each GST is needed for accurate molecular diagnosis in different geographic areas

Analysis of glutathione S-transferase allergen cross-reactivity in a North American population: Relevance for molecular diagnosis.  
Mueller GA, Pedersen LC, Glesner J, Edwards LL, Zakzuk J, London RE, Arruda LK, Chapman MD, Caraballo L, Pomes A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 27;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen characterization of chia seeds (Salvia hispanica), a new allergenic food.
A 54-year-old man with a previous diagnosis of rhinitis and asthma with sensitization to grass pollen and cat dander, who a few days after starting to consume chia seeds as a recommended means of lowering cholesterol levels, noticed pruritus in his mouth and on the third day he developed generalized urticaria, and experienced facial angioedema, shortness of breath, and dizziness. Total IgE was 1592 kU/L. Prick-prick testing with chia seeds was positive. Chia extracts revealed multiple protein bands with an apparent molecular weight ranging from 15 to 60 kDa and a common band around 31 kDa. The liposoluble chia extract showed 3 IgE-binding bands with molecular sizes of around 15, 17, and 29 kDa. The water-soluble chia extract showed 2 IgE-binding bands with molecular sizes around 25 and 46 kDa. A common band around 31 kDa was detected in both extracts. The 29-kDa protein (LE) yielded a high match with lectins from related species such as Phaseolus coccineus and Phaseolus vulgaris, with a match identity of around 86%. The 46-kDa IgE-binding band (WSE) exhibited a high degree of homology with elongation factor from species such as Medicago trucantula, with a match identity of around 80%. The 31-kDa IgE-binding band exhibited a high degree of homology with a legumin precursor (11S globulin) from species such as Ricinus communis, Quercus robur, Ficus pumila, and Juglans regia, with an identity match of around 75%.

Allergen characterization of chia seeds (Salvia hispanica), a new allergenic food.  
Garcia JS, Pastor VC, de las HM, Sanz MA, Vivanco F, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):55-56

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen-food syndrome involving allergy to tiger nut.
Pollen-food syndrome involving allergy to tiger nut. A report on 3 patients aged 47, 23, and 15 years (P1, P2, and P3, respectively) with a history of oral pruritus and dysphagia (P1, P2, and P3) and chest tightness (P1) within minutes of eating tiger nut. All the patients also presented adverse reactions to other fruits, namely peach peel (P1), banana, melon, and coconut (P2), and fruits belonging to the rosacea family (P3). Prick-by-prick tests with tiger nut showed a positive result in all. Serum IgE were >0.35 kUA/L for all 3 patients. Protein bands ranging between 12 and 97 kDa were shown. Immunoblotting revealed IgE reactivity with proteins ranging from 66 to 28 kDa and a 16-kDa protein with the 3 sera; a 14-kDa protein was also detected with serum from P2 and P3. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting inhibition assays showed pollen as the primary sensitizer. We suggest that, apart from profilin, as partial inhibition with O europea pollen was obtained, other unknown panallergens might be involved in the present study.

Pollen-food syndrome involving allergy to tiger nut.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Mohedano-Vicente E, Gandolfo-Cano M, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):197-198

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tomato nsLTP as an 'In Vivo' Diagnostic Tool: Sensitization in a Mediterranean Population.
This study evaluated the prevalence of sensitization to Sola l 3 (tomato) in a Mediterranean population, and compared the resulting sensitization profile with that of individuals sensitized to tomato, peach, and/or purified lipid transfer protein (LTP). Sola l 3 was purified, characterized, and used to prepare skin prick tests (SPTs). Two groups of patients were selected. Group 1 consisted of patients with at least 1 positive SPT to tomato, peach, or LTP mixture (marker extracts) who were subsequently tested with Sola l 3 (n = 280). Group 2 (prevalence study) consisted of patients who underwent simultaneous SPT with the 3 marker extracts and Sola l 3 (n = 658). Patients from either group who were positive to any of the 4 extracts were studied in detail (study group, n = 1 23). ELISA and immunoblot assays were performed in individuals with a positive SPT to Sola l 3 to detect the presence of specific IgE antibodies to this allergen. Prevalence of sensitization to Sola l 3 was 3.2% overall and 54.7% in tomato-positive patients. Most tomato-sensitized patients were asymptomatic. Symptoms were more common in Sola l 3-positive individuals. Sensitization to peach and the LTP mixture did not discriminate between Sola l 3-positive and Sola l 3-negative patients. This study confirms that LTP, not only from peach but also from other fruit and vegetables, including tomato, is an important allergen in the Mediterranean area. Sensitization to Sola l 3 is associated with more symptoms in tomato-sensitized patients

Tomato nsLTP as an 'In Vivo' Diagnostic Tool: Sensitization in a Mediterranean Population.  
Lopez-Matas MA, Larramendi CH, Huertas AJ, Ferrer A, Moya R, Pagan JA, Navarro LA, Garcia-Abujeta JL, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):196-204

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity to tomato in peach-allergic patients: rPrup 3 and rPrup 1 are predictive of symptom severity.
This study evaluated the relationship between severe allergic reactions to peach and tomato and between tomato allergy symptoms and the pattern of IgE positivity for rPru p 1, rPru p 3, rPru p 4, rBetv 1, rBetv 2, rBetv4, rPhl p 1, and rPhl p 12 in order to identify the role of recombinant allergens in the severity of reactions to tomato. Peach-allergic patients with clinical reactions to tomato were studied by performing an open food challenge, skin prick test, and determination of serum specific IgE to tomato and to recombinant peach, birch, and grass allergens. A significant association between severe reactions to tomato and severe reactions to peach (P = .01 7) were found and levels of IgE to rPru p3 (P = .029) and between mild tomato allergy symptoms and levels of IgE to rPru p1 (P = .047), anti-rBetv 1 (P = .0414), anti-rBetv 2 (P = .0457), and Phleum pratense (P = .0022). IgE positivity for rPru p3 seems to be a surrogate biochemical marker for severe tomato allergy, whereas the presence of anti-rPru p 1 IgE may be an indicator of mild tomato allergy.

Hypersensitivity to tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) in peach-allergic patients: rPrup 3 and rPrup 1 are predictive of symptom severity.  
Mascheri A, Farioli L, Pravettoni V, Piantanida M, Stafylaraki C, Scibilia J, Mirone C, Preziosi D, Nichelatti M, Pastorello EA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):183-189

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The new latex allergen Hev b 15: IgE-binding properties of a recombinant serine protease inhibitor.
Serum samples from 21 health care workers with allergic symptoms to natural rubber latex were tested for specific IgE (sIgE) to SPI (|Hev b 15) and 12 available latex allergen components. Values with sIgE >0.35 kUA/L were considered positive. 7 sera (33%) displayed sIgE to SPI (range, 0.56-13.60 kUA/L). Monosensitization to SPI was not observed.

The new latex allergen Hev b 15: IgE-binding properties of a recombinant serine protease inhibitor.  
Rihs HP, Sander I, Heimann H, Meurer U, Bruning T, Raulf M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):160-162

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis in a child after ingestion of persimmon.
An 8-year-old boy experienced pruritus, generalized itching, urticaria, labial and palpebral edema, dyspnea, and wheeze while eating Sharon fruit. Until then he had eaten persimmon without problems and tolerated banana, avocado, kiwi, chestnut, and peach, as well as other fruits and nuts. He also tolerated contact with latex. Prick-prick testing with persimmon was positive with both the peel (10 mm) and the flesh (22 mm). Total IgE was 517 kUA/L. Specific IgE testing was positive for a range of tests and 53.40 kUA/L for peach LTP (Pru p 3). IgE-reactive bands were observed in both the peel and the flesh extracts. Bands of lower intensity (molecular weights of approximately 22 and 45 kDa) were present in both extracts. However, a band of approximately 12 kDa was observed in the peel only. Pru p 3 was unable to inhibit binding of the patient’s serum to the persimmon band. Different degrees of sequence identity have been found for LTP among family members of different species [9]. These range from 30% to 95%, although in the present case, given that immunoblotting inhibition of Pru p 3 was unable to inhibit binding of the patient’s serum to the persimmon band, there may not have been sufficient structural and sequence identity between peach LTP and persimmon LTP.

Anaphylaxis in a child after ingestion of persimmon.  
Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Nunez AB, Ledesma A, Cava SB, Kindelan-Recarte C, Dominguez-Ortega J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):142-144

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic reaction to undeclared lupin in a chocolate.
A 30-year-old atopic woman who developed an itchy throat, cough, and shortness of breath shortly after eating a pepper and lemon chocolate. The prick- prick test was positive for lupin (10 mm) and the pepper and lemon chocolate (5 mm). The serological study showed specific IgE (sIgE) for lupin (42.2 kUA/L).

Allergic reaction to undeclared lupin in a chocolate.  
Eguiluz G, Martinez Gonzalez de LB, Rubio-Perez M, Ruiz-Gimenez L, Recio BL, Pastor-Vargas C, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):140-142

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational asthma to fish (Yellow?n sole).
A 31-year-old worker who developed occupational asthma following exposure to sole ?sh (Yellow?n sole). She had been working in a restaurant’s kitchen, cooking different types of products including ?sh, most often sole. In the last 3 years, this worker had developed erythema and pruritus of the hands and forearms while she was manipulating ?shes such as sole. In the month before being assessed at our Centre, she had increasing symptoms of dyspnoea, chest tightness and wheezing when she was exposed to cooking fumes from sole ?sh. She also reported symp- toms suggestive of localised angioedema developing when she was eating ?sh. Skin prick tests were positive to a range of allergens including sole extract. Bronchoprovocation test with sole ?sh extract resulted in a cough, chest tightness and dyspnoea, associated with a 30% fall in FEV1.

Occupational asthma to fish.  
Boulet LP, Laberge F.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Nov;71(11):804

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wheat allergy in a pediatric population from the Mediterranean area.
The research performed by Nilsson et al. highlighted the role of not routinely tested molecules (HMW and LMW glutenins) in addition to omega-5 gliadin in the diagnosis of wheat allergy (WA) in a population of children from the North of Europe (Sweden). Nevertheless omega-5 gliadin showed the best diagnostic performance in the outcome of the oral food challenge (OFC) with wheat, the additional analysis of further wheat components was helpful in predicting the positivity of OFC. In their conclusions, authors suggested the importance of these molecules in the diagnosis and follow-up of children with WA. Our study showed comparable results to those presented by Nilsson et al. concerning the relevant role of rTri a 19 as a diagnostic tool in WA, also in patients from a different geographical area (Italy). Interestingly, despite the high prevalence of the wheat nsLTP(rTri a 14) in our study population (58%), this allergen wasn't useful in predicting adverse reactions in wheat allergic patients, highlighting the controversial role of this molecule as a food allergen.

Wheat allergy in a pediatric population from the Mediterranean area.  
Calamelli E, Ricci G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 14;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of allergy to cow's milk proteins in children younger than 3 years of the city of Constantine (Algeria)
A study whose main objective was to estimate the prevalence of CMPA in a paediatric population in Constantine, Algeria, involved involved 770 children from 0 to 3 years of age seen in three centres for maternal and child health. The survey revealed the prevalence of CMPA to be 3.64% in this population. A significant difference in the distribution of this allergy according to sex was noted, being present 2.11 times more often in boys. The chief clinical manifestations were cutaneous (in 57.14%), digestive (in 46.42%), respiratory (in 25%) and anaphylactic (in 14.28%). CMPA was usually reported to appear early: 42.85% of the cases developed the disease during their first month of life, and the rate reached 75% by the third month.

Prévalence de l’allergie aux protéines du lait de vache chez des enfants âgés de moins de 3 ans de la ville de Constantine (Algérie) / Prevalence of allergy to cow's milk proteins in children younger than 3 years of the city of Constantine (Algeria)  
H. Boughellout, L. Benatallah, M.N. Zidoune
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(4):288-292

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular, proteomic and immunological parameters of allergens provide inclusion criteria for new candidates within established grass and tree homologous group
Our knowledge of allergen structure and function continues to rise and new scientific data on the homology and cross-reactivity of allergen sources should be considered to extend the work of Lorenz et al. and the concept of homologous groups. In addition to this, sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) are increasingly utilised to better characterise the complex mix and nature of allergen extracts. Homology models were used of Fag s 1 (Beech) and Cyn d 1 (Bermuda grass) and compared with template crystal structures of Bet v 1 and Phl p 1 from the ‘exemplar’ species of Birch and Timothy grass, respectively. ELISA experiments were performed to assess cross-reactivity of Beech (tree) and Bermuda (grass) extracts to rabbit sera raised to either “3-Tree” (Birch, Alder and Hazel) extract or “Grass” (12-grass mix extract), respectively. Allergen cross-reactivity and/or structural homology have been described providing justification for inclusion of Beech within the Birch homologous tree group. Data from Bermuda grass (Cyn d 1) provides further justification for the inclusion of this species into the homologous group of the sweet grasses. However, further characterisation of relevant allergens from Bermuda grass and, in particular, comparison of cross-reactive patterns between subjects specifically in areas with high abundance of both Pooideae and Chloridoideae is sought. MS allows the possibility to identify individual proteins or allergens from complex mixes by mass and/or sequence, and this has been extensively applied to the allergen field.

Molecular, proteomic and immunological parameters of allergens provide inclusion criteria for new candidates within established grass and tree homologous group  
Health MD, Collis J, Batten T, Hutchings JW, Swan N, Skinner MA
WAO Journal 2015;8:21-

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anomalous cutaneous absorption of allergens as cause of skin prick testing adverse reactions in adult patients.
Paediatric age, active eczema and high number of allergens tested in poly-sensitized patients have been pinpointed as possible risk factors of systemic reactions by skin prick testing. As far as atopic eczema concerns, the higher penetration of the allergens into the skin because of the scraping or micro-injuries is an intuitive rationalization. The purpose of the present study was to provide documentary evidence that adverse reactions elicited by anomalous absorption of allergens can occur also in adult patients with apparently normal skin. The study adds clinical and experimental evidences that localized impairments of permeability can occur in adult patients with apparently normal skin. Special precautions should be taken when a change of the drops' normal shape and cohesion is seen, because allergy prick-testing in such areas is potentially associated with increased risk of large local or systemic reactions.

Anomalous cutaneous absorption of allergens as cause of skin prick testing adverse reactions in adult patients. Clinical and experimental evidence.  
Antico A, Arisi M, Lima G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jul;47(4):126-131

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergological characterisation of the storage mite Acarus gracilis
Storage mites of the genus Acarus can be responsible for allergic sensitisation in domestic environments. Acarus gracilis is a frequent species in some geographical regions of the Iberian Peninsula. Since the allergenicity of this mite has not been described before, the objectives of this study were to characterise it immunologically, and to compare it with the closely related and more extensively studied species Acarus siro. Extracts of both species showed a very similar protein and allergenic profile. Allergens at 14 and 17kDa were clearly recognised in both extracts by serum samples. Immunoblot-inhibition studies demonstrated that both extracts were totally inhibited by the opposite one. Enzymatic activity was similar in both cases with the most important differences being in kallikrein, serine protease and collagenase activities.

Allergological characterisation of the storage mite Acarus gracilis (Acari: Acaridae).  
Iraola V, Prados M, Pinto H, Morales M, Leonor JR, Carnes J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jul;43(4):332-338

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Determinants of nocebo effect during oral drug provocation tests.
A "nocebo" effect is defined as troublesome symptoms after the administration of placebo. The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of nocebo responses and related factors. Patients with a reliable history of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions subjected to placebo-controlled oral drug provocation tests and reacted to placebo, were consecutively included in this case-control study. Controls consisted of the randomly selected subjects who had a history of drug hypersensitivity reaction but did not react to placebo. A structured questionnaire was performed by an allergy specialist. There were 137 subjects (mean age: 43.10±12.65 years), with nocebo and 91 subjects (42.38±12.18 years) without any reaction to placebo. Most nocebo reactions (71.5%, n=98) were classified as subjective, with local pruritus as the most common finding. A minority of nocebo reactions (11.7%, n=16) were objective as cutaneous reactions including flushing and urticaria. Factors related with nocebo risks were university graduation (OR: 2.96, 95% CI: 1.27-6.93, p=0.012) and non-atopy (OR: 2.12, 95% CI: 1.02-4.40, p=0.043). In terms of the time of first and last historical reaction to drugs, each 1-unit (a month) increase in first reaction time (OR: 1.008, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02, p=0.001) and last reaction time (OR: 1.019, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03, p<0.001) were associated with increased nocebo risk. In conclusion, subjects with high education, non-atopy, and older drug hypersensitivity reactions history seem to be more likely to experience nocebo effect during oral drug provocation tests. These risk factors should be considered and managed accordingly to complete the drug provocation procedure successfully.

Determinants of nocebo effect during oral drug provocation tests.  
Bavbek S, Aydin O, Sozener ZC, Yuksel S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jul;43(4):339-345

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Epitope specificity determines cross-protection of a SIT-induced IgG antibody.
These results demonstrate that a small number of amino acid differences among cross-reactive allergens can reduce the affinity of binding by a SIT-induced IgG and thus limit cross-protection. The authors studied epitope specificity, cross-reactivity, affinity and cross-protection of mAb102.1F10 (Phl p 7-specific IgG4 antibody) towards homologous calcium-binding pollen allergens. Allergens from Timothy grass (Phl p 7), Alder (Aln g 4), Birch (Bet v 4), Turnip rape (Bra r 1), Lamb's quarter (Che a 3) and Olive (Ole e 3, Ole e 8) showed high sequence similarity and cross-reacted with allergic patients' IgE. mAb102.1F10 bound the C-terminal portion of Phl p 7 in a calcium-dependent manner. It cross-reacted with high affinity with Ole e 3 whereas binding and affinity to the other allergens was low.

Epitope specificity determines cross-protection of a SIT-induced IgG antibody.  
Gadermaier E, James LK, Shamji MH, Blatt K, Fauland K, Zieglmayer P, Garmatiuk T, Focke-Tejkl M, Villalba M, Beavil R, Keller W, Valent P, Durham SR, Gould HJ, Flicker S, Valenta R.
Allergy 2015 Jul 29;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the alpha-Gal glycan.
Galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-Gal) is a mammalian carbohydrate with significance in a novel type of food allergy. Patients with IgE against alpha-Gal report severe allergic symptoms 3 to 6 hours after red meat consumption. We investigated whether IgE from red meat allergic patients recognize other mammalian glycans than alpha-Gal or glycans from the plant kingdom and insects of importance in allergy. We found that all 24 red meat allergic patients neither had an IgE antibody response against the other abundant mammalian glycan N-glycolylneuraminic acid nor against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants from plant or venom sources (nCup a 1, nArt v 1 and MUXF3). Deglycosylation of an alpha-Gal containing protein, bovine thyroglobulin, significantly reduced the IgE response. In conclusion we show that red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the alpha-Gal glycan found in red meat.

Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the alpha-Gal glycan.  
Apostolovic D, Tran TA, Sanchez-Vidaurre S, Cirkovic VT, Starkhammar M, Hamsten C, van HM.
Allergy 2015 Jul 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization pattern of crustacean allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs.
This study investigated the sensitization pattern of crustacean allergic patients according to tolerance to molluscs. Thirty-one patients with anaphylaxis to crustaceans (14 with mollusc allergy and 17 with mollusc tolerance) were studied using skin prick tests (SPTs), specific IgEs (sIgE) and SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. Patients with mollusc allergy presented more frequently SPTs positive to molluscs and higher sIgE titres in response to both molluscs and crustaceans. Shrimp-sIgE and rPen a1-sIgE values of 1.57 kUA /L and 4.38 kUA /L respectively, showed positive likelihood ratios of 4.3 and 10.9 for identification of mollusc allergy. Patients with mollusc allergy reacted more frequently to tropomyosin in immunoblots than did patients without it (93% versus 35% respectively, P=0.004). Reactivity to proteins other than tropomyosin (n=14) was not different between the two groups. Among patients with crustacean anaphylaxis, patients with mollusc allergy and mollusc tolerance show a different pattern of sensitization, something that may help identify them.

Sensitization pattern of crustacean allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs.  
Vidal C, Bartolome B, Rodriguez V, Armisen M, Linneberg A, Gonzalez-Quintela A.
Allergy 2015 Jul 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tree pollen allergens - an update from a molecular perspective.
It is estimated that pollen allergies affect approximately 40% of allergic individuals. In general, tree pollen allergies are mainly elicited by allergenic trees belonging to the orders Fagales, Lamiales, Proteales and Pinales. Over 25 years ago, the gene encoding the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 was the first such gene to be cloned and its product characterized. Since that time, 53 tree pollen allergens have been identified and acknowledged by the WHO/IUIS allergen nomenclature subcommittee. Molecule-based profiling of allergic sensitization has helped to elucidate the immunological connections of allergen cross-reactivity, whereas advances in biochemistry have revealed structural and functional aspects of allergenic proteins. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge of the molecular aspects of tree pollen allergens. We analyze the geographic distribution of allergenic trees, discuss factors pivotal for allergic sensitization, and describe the role of tree pollen panallergens. Novel allergenic tree species as well as tree pollen allergens are continually being identified, making research in this field highly competitive and instrumental for clinical applications.

Tree pollen allergens - an update from a molecular perspective.  
Asam C, Hofer H, Wolf M, Aglas L, Wallner M.
Allergy 2015 Jul 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar.
Genetic modification of allergenic foods such as apple has the potential to reduce their clinical allergenicity, but this has never been studied by oral challenges in allergic individuals. Oral food challenges were conducted in 21 apple-allergic individuals with Elstar apples which had undergone gene silencing of the major allergen of apple, Mal d 1. Gene silencing produced two genetically modified apple lines expressing Mal d 1.02 and other Mal d 1 gene mRNA levels which were extensively downregulated, that is only 0.1-16.4% (e-DR1) and 0.2-9.9% (e-DR2) of those of the wild-type Elstar, respectively. Challenges with these downregulated apple lines produced significantly less intense maximal symptoms to the first dose (Vmax1) than with Elstar (Vmax1 Elstar 3.0 mm vs 0.0 mm for e-DR1, P = 0.017 and 0.0 mm for e-DR2, P = 0.043), as well as significantly less intense mean symptoms per dose (meanV/d) than with Elstar (meanV/d Elstar 2.2 mm vs 0.2 mm for e-DR1, P = 0.017 and 0.0 mm for e-DR2, P = 0.043). Only one subject (5%) remained symptom-free when challenged with the Elstar apple, whereas 43% did so with e-DR1 and 63% with e-DR2.

First successful reduction of clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar.  
Dubois AE, Pagliarani G, Brouwer RM, Kollen BJ, Dragsted LO, Eriksen FD, Callesen O, Gilissen LJ, Krens FA, Visser RG, Smulders MJ, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Flokstra-de Blok BJ, van de Weg WE.
Allergy 2015 Jul 1;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnostic use of recombinant Tha p 2 in the allergy to Thaumetopoea pityocampa.
Recombinant Tha p 2 (Pine Processionary Caterpillar) was produced and used in an ELISA validated with 15 allergic patients. Subsequently, 42 subjects recruited from a random sampling cross-sectional study were analysed. The ELISA sensitivity and specificity were 93.3% and 100%, respectively, for the allergic patients and 71.4% and 95.3%, respectively, for the epidemiological study. The positive ELISA results correlated with the skin prick test areas with the whole body and the setae extracts.

Diagnostic use of recombinant Tha p 2 in the allergy to Thaumetopoea pityocampa.  
Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Carballeda-Sangiao N, Vega JM, Garcia-Ortiz JC, Roques A, Moneo I, Gonzalez-Munoz M.
Allergy 2015 Jun 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lipid transfer protein sensitization: reactivity profiles and clinical risk assessment in an Italian cohort.
Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) represent a major cause of systemic food allergic reactions in the Mediterranean area. This study investigate hierarchical patterns and cluster relationships of IgE sensitization to different nsLTPs, and the relationship to clinical allergy in a large Italian cohort. A total of 568 nsLTP-positive subjects after IgE ImmunoCAP-ISAC microarray analysis with Ara h 9, Art v 3, Cor a 8, Jug r 3, Pla a 3, Pru p 3 and Tri a 14 allergens were studied. IgE inhibition experiments were carried out with mugwort and plane tree pollen extracts. Eighty-two per cent of nsLTP-positive participants (94% if <6 years old) were Pru p 3(pos) , and 71% were Jug r 3(pos) . Participants who reacted to >5 nsLTPs reported a higher incidence of food-induced systemic reactions. Only Art v 3 and Pla a 3 (mugwort and plane tree nsLTPs, respectively) were associated with respiratory symptoms, and a correlation was observed between sensitization to pollen and plant food nsLTPs, particularly between Pla a 3 and tree nut/peanut nsLTPs. Co-sensitization to Par j 2 and PR-10 or profilin pan-allergens was associated with a lower prior prevalence of severe food-induced reactions. In inhibition assays, plane and mugwort pollen extracts inhibited 50-100% of IgE binding to food nsLTPs in microarrays.

Lipid transfer protein sensitization: reactivity profiles and clinical risk assessment in an Italian cohort.  
Scala E, Till SJ, Asero R, Abeni D, Guerra EC, Pirrotta L, Paganelli R, Pomponi D, Giani M, De PO, Cecchi L.
Allergy 2015 Aug;70(8):933-943

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Risk factors in pediatric shrimp allergy.
The prevalence of shellfish allergy is approximately 1.3% in the United States, with shrimp most commonly reported. The objective of this study was to describe the rate of anaphylaxis among children with shrimp allergy, demographics, clinical presentation, and cross-reactive sensitization utilising a retrospective chart review of children

Risk factors in pediatric shrimp allergy.  
Chokshi NY, Maskatia Z, Miller S, Guffey D, Minard CG, Davis CM.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jul;36(4):65-71

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization.
Our data demonstrate that in vitro testing is not sensitive enough in determining drug sensitization to penicillin. In vivo tests should be performed to detect sensitization and indeed with skin tests our results confirmed that sensitization to aminopenicillin may develop within infectious mononucleosis

Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization.  
Onodi-Nagy K, Kinyo A, Meszes A, Garaczi E, Kemeny L, Bata-Csorgo Z.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):1

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
First case of airborne-induced anaphylaxis triggered by fruit (fig).
A 10-year-old boy who was playing and handling ?gs under a ?g tree (striking them with a racket as if they were tennis balls), suddenly presented with itching on the upper limbs and face, sneezing, eyelid and lip edema, followed by dysphagia, coughing with dyspnea, and audible wheezing but without dizziness. A few months previously he presented an episode of skin lesions that were diagnosed as acute urticaria after playing in the garden where the tree grew. He tolerated eating figs. Skin prick tests were positive only for olive tree pollen. An extract from a ?g and a leaf from the implicated ?g tree was was positive. Total IgE level of 93.6 kU/L. An IgE-binding protein with cysteine protease activity was identified as the causative allergen. However, immunoblotting performed with ?cin, a cysteine protease, was negative. This appears to be a new undescribed protein.

First case of airborne-induced anaphylaxis triggered by fruit.  
Macias EM, Sierra-Salgado O, Bartolome B, Pastor-Vargas C, Munoz-Bellido FJ, Davila I.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis induced by Goji berries.
A case of goja berry-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis is reported in a 37-year-old man. After ingesting GBs in a meal, a few minutes after starting the warm-up, he felt sick, and soon after hives started to appear all over his body accompanied by wheezing. Skin prick tests were positive for grass, ragweed, mugwort, pellitory, birch, and olive tree and negative for latex. A subsequent skin prick test for GB was positive as well as for tomato, peanut, and hazelnut (in previous reports tomato and nut test results were positive in approximately 30% and 24% of GB-positive cases, respectively).

Anaphylaxis induced by Goji berries.  
Zauli D, Mirarchi MG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun;114(6):535-536

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Stability and potency of raw and boiled shrimp extracts for skin prick test.
The difference of stability between raw and boiled shrimp extracts used in prick tests has never been investigated despite its potential consequences in tests development. The aim of this study was to compare the raw and boiled shrimp extracts of two species; Macrobrachium rosenbergii (freshwater shrimp) and Penaeus monodon (seawater shrimp) held at 4 C for different periods of time for their stability and potency in vivo by using the skin prick test (SPT) method.

The shrimp extracts of all storage times yielded positive skin test results in the range of 90% - 100%. Raw P. monodon extracts induced larger wheals than boiled extracts at all storage times. There was no significant difference of MWD between raw and boiled M. rosenbergii extracts on day 1, 7, and 14. Significant correlations between MWD of PTP to fresh shrimps and SPT to all shrimp extracts were observed. All shrimp extracts were sterile at all storage times.

Stability and potency of raw and boiled shrimp extracts for skin prick test.  
Pariyaprasert W, Piboonpocanun S, Jirapongsananuruk O, Visitsunthorn N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):136-142

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pro j 2 is mesquite profilin: molecular characteristics and specific IgE binding activity.
This study aimed to clone, express and purify the mesquite pollen profilin (Pro j 2) as well as evaluating its nucleotide sequence homology in order to predict allergenic cross-reactivity with profilins of common allergenic plants. Seventeen patients (17/35, 48.57%) had significant specific IgE level for rPro j 2. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that puri?ed rPro j 2 might be similar as that in the crude extract.

Pro j 2 is mesquite profilin: molecular characteristics and specific IgE binding activity.  
li-Sadeghi H, Khodadadi A, Amini A, Assarehzadegan MA, Sepahi N, Zarinhadideh F.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):90-98

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular-based allergy diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized Japanese patients.
The levels of IgE to Asp f 1 and/or Asp f 2 can effectively differentiate ABPA from Af-sensitized asthma, suggesting that the amounts of IgE specific for these molecules are markers for genuine Af-sensitization in ABPA. However, comorbid AD must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of high IgE to Asp f 6. Establishing of IgE-sensitization profiles using panel of Af-allergen components provides valuable information for distinguishing genuine versus cross-reactive sensitization in Af-sensitized patients.

Molecular-based allergy diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized Japanese patients.  
Tanimoto H, Fukutomi Y, Yasueda H, Takeuchi Y, Saito A, Watai K, Sekiya K, Tsuburai T, Asano K, Taniguchi M, Akiyama K.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jun 27;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Accidental exposures to peanut in a large cohort of Canadian children with peanut allergy.
This Canadian authors previously estimated that the annual rate of accidental exposure to peanut in 1411 children with peanut allergy, followed for 2227 patient-years, was 11.9% . This cohort has increased to 1941 children, contributing 4589 patient-years, and we determined the annual incidence of accidental exposure, described the severity, management, location, and identified associated factors. Children with physician-confirmed peanut allergy were recruited from Canadian allergy clinics and allergy advocacy organizations from 2004 to May 2014. Parents completed questionnaires regarding accidental exposure to peanut over the preceding year. Five hundred and sixty-seven accidental exposures occurred in 429 children over 4589 patient-years, yielding an annual incidence rate of 12.4%. Of 377 accidental exposures that were moderate or severe, only 109 (28.9%) sought medical attention and of these 109, only 40 (36.7%) received epinephrine. Of the 181 moderate/severe accidental exposures treated outside a health care facility, only 11.6% received epinephrine. Thirty-seven percent of accidental exposures occurred at home. Age >/= 13 years at study entry and living with a single parent increased the risk.

Accidental exposures to peanut in a large cohort of Canadian children with peanut allergy.  
Cherkaoui S, Ben-Shoshan M, Alizadehfar R, Asai Y, Chan E, Cheuk S, Shand G, St-Pierre Y, Harada L, Allen M, Clarke A.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;516

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The development of a standardised diet history tool to support the diagnosis of food allergy.
The disparity between reported and diagnosed food allergy makes robust diagnosis imperative. The allergy-focussed history is an important starting point, but published literature on its efficacy is sparse. Using a structured approach to connect symptoms, suspected foods and dietary intake, a multi-disciplinary task force of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology developed paediatric and adult diet history tools. Both tools are divided into stages using traffic light labelling (red, amber and green). The red stage requires the practitioner to gather relevant information on symptoms, atopic history, food triggers, foods eaten and nutritional issues. The amber stage facilitates interpretation of the responses to the red-stage questions, thus enabling the practitioner to prepare to move forward. The final green stage provides a summary template and test algorithm to support continuation down the diagnostic pathway. These tools will provide a standardised, practical approach to support food allergy diagnosis, ensuring that all relevant information is captured and interpreted in a robust manner. Future work is required to validate their use in diverse age groups, disease entities and in different countries, in order to account for differences in health care systems, food availability and dietary norms

The development of a standardised diet history tool to support the diagnosis of food allergy.  
Skypala IJ, Venter C, Meyer R, deJong NW, Fox AT, Groetch M, Oude Elberink JN, Sprikkelman A, Diamandi L, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;57

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.
Histamine fish poisoning, also known as scombroid poisoning, is the most common cause of ichythyotoxicosis worldwide and results from the ingestion of histamine-contaminated fish in the Scombroidae and Scomberesocidae families, including mackerel, bonito, albacore, and skipjack. This disease was first described in 1799 in Britain and re-emerged in the medical literature in the 1950s when outbreaks were reported in Japan. The symptoms associated with histamine fish poisoning are similar to that of an allergic reaction. In fact, such histamine-induced reactions are often misdiagnosed as IgE-mediated fish allergy. Indeed, histamine fish poisoning is still an underrecognized disease. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of scombroid disease. Because more than 80 % of fish consumed in the USA is now imported from other countries, the disease is intimately linked with the global fish trade (National Marine Fisheries Service, 2012). Preventing future scombroid outbreaks will require that fishermen, public health officials, restaurant workers, and medical professionals work together to devise international safety standards and increase awareness of the disease. The implications of scombroid poisoning go far beyond that of fish and have broader implications for the important issues of food safety

Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.  
Feng C, Teuber S, Gershwin ME.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 27;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis caused by argan oil
An 8-year-old girl attended a Halloween party where her face was decorated with a colour make-up pen- cil. On removing the make-up, she developed erythema- tous, scaly, itchy patches on the cheeks and perioral area. Her mother applied argan oil on the lesions for some days, which caused a worsening of the rash. Use of the argan oil was discontinued, and the eruption resolved in few days. A + reaction was seen to the colour pencil and +++ reaction to the argan oil with patch testing.

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by argan oil in an infant.  
Barrientos N, Moreno d, Dominguez J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):316-317

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to insect venom allergens: role of molecular diagnostics.
Anaphylaxis due to Hymenoptera stings is one of the most severe consequences of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. Although allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings are often considered as a general model for the underlying principles of allergic disease, diagnostic tests are still hampered by a lack of specificity and venom immunotherapy by severe side effects and incomplete protection. In recent years, the knowledge about the molecular composition of Hymenoptera venoms has significantly increased and more and more recombinant venom allergens with advanced characteristics have become available for diagnostic measurement of specific IgE in venom-allergic patients. These recombinant venom allergens offer several promising possibilities for an improved diagnostic algorithm. Reviewed here are the current status, recent developments, and future perspectives of molecular diagnostics of venom allergy. Already to date, it is foreseeable that component-resolution already has now or will in the future have the potential to discriminate between clinically significant and irrelevant sensitization, to increase the specificity and sensitivity of diagnostics, to monitor immunotherapeutic intervention, and to contribute to the understanding of the immunological mechanisms elicited by insect venoms

Anaphylaxis to insect venom allergens: role of molecular diagnostics.  
Ollert M, Blank S.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 May;15(5):527

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Delayed anaphylaxis involving IgE galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.
This review will present the history and biology of alpha-gal and discuss our current approach to management of the mammalian meat allergy and delayed anaphylaxis

Delayed anaphylaxis involving IgE galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.  
Platts-Mills TA, Schuyler AJ, Hoyt AE, Commins SP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Apr;15(4):512

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
New causes of immunologic occupational asthma, 2012-2014.
There are more than 400 known causes of IOA and the list grows continuously with the development of new technologies and better recognition of the diagnosis by physicians. IgE-mediated sensitization was confirmed in all new cases involving high-molecular-weight agents and in two of the three new cases involving low-molecular-weight agents. Symptoms of rhinitis were often associated with both types of agents. Physicians should stay alert and suspect occupational asthma in any adult with new-onset asthma or with newly uncontrolled asthma

New causes of immunologic occupational asthma, 2012-2014.  
Cartier A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr;15(2):117-123

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.
Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis), blue-green microalgae, has high content in proteins, gamma-linoleic acid and vitamins and therefore gained popularity as food supplement. A 17-year-old male developed anaphylaxis the first time he ingested a Spirulina tablet. Skin prick test with diluted Spirulina tablet was positive. Further skin prick testing with separated ingredients (Spirulina platensis algae, silicon dioxide, inulin and magnesium stearate) was only positive for Spirulina platensis algae. This case report shows that diagnosis of Spirulina allergy can safely be made by skin prick test with dilutions of the A. platensis or even more simple by skin prick test with the diluted tablet.

Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.  
Le TM, Knulst AC, Rockmann H.
Food Chem Toxicol 2014 Dec;74309-310

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Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.  
Castells MC.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):335-348
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Perioperative anaphylaxis: diagnosis, evaluation, and management.  
Kannan JA, Bernstein JA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):321-334
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Mast cell activation syndromes presenting as anaphylaxis.  
Akin C.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):277-285
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Anaphylaxis to food.  
Fishbein AB, Makhija MM, Pongracic JA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):231-245
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A recombinant Sal k 1 isoform as an alternative to the polymorphic allergen from Salsola kali pollen for allergy diagnosis.  
Mas S, Boissy P, Monsalve RI, Cuesta-Herranz J, az-Perales A, Fernandez J, Colas C, Rodriguez R, Barderas R, Villalba M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 22;167(2):83-93

Identification of allergens in the Box jellyfish Chironex yamaguchii that cause sting dermatitis.  
Horiike T, Nagai H, Kitani S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 22;167(2):73-82

Exploring Perceptions and Experiences of Food Allergy among New Canadians from Asia  
Stephanie K. Lu, Susan J. Elliott, and Ann E. Clarke
J Allergy Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 964504, 7 pages
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Frequent episodes of adult soybean allergy during and following the pollen season.  
Minami T, Fukutomi Y, Saito A, Sekiya K, Tsuburai T, Taniguchi M, Akiyama K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):441-442

Clinical reactivity to soy is best identified by component testing to Gly m 8.  
Kattan JD, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 8;

Minor Determinants Are Essential for Optimal Penicillin Allergy Testing: A Pro/Con Debate.  
Solensky R, Macy E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 8;

Importance of specific inhalation challenge in the diagnosis of occupational asthma induced by quaternary ammonium compounds.  
Bellier M, Barnig C, Renaudin JM, Sbinne B, Lefebvre F, Qi S, de BF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 8;

Shrimp serology: we need tests with more and less cross-reactivity.  
Aalberse RC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul;3(4):530-531

Drug-induced anaphylaxis in Latin American countries.  
Jares EJ, Baena-Cagnani CE, Sanchez-Borges M, Ensina LF, rias-Cruz A, Gomez M, Cuello MN, Morfin-Maciel BM, De FA, Barayazarra S, Bernstein JA, Serrano C, Monsell S, Schuhl J, Cardona-Villa R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 1;

Critique on the quantitative nature of IgE antibody measurements.  
Merkel PA, O'Sullivan MD, Ridge C, Knight V.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 1;

A case of systemic contact dermatitis secondary to edetate disodium.  
Rajan JP, Cornell R, White AA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul;3(4):607-608

Management of acquired peanut allergy following solid-organ transplant.  
Word C, Klaffky E, Ortiz C, Palacios T, Pelletier S, Oliveira W, Greb B, Workman L, Platts-Mills T, Wisniewski J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul;3(4):612-614

High similarity between lentil and other lentil-like-proteins (dal) complicates recommendations on avoidance in lentil allergic patients.  
Andreae DA, Grishina G, Sackesen C, Ibanez MD, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 24;

Statin allergy: Clinical experience and structural relation as a framework for evaluation.  
Ogai YA, Banks TA, Gada SM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Jul 24;

Exercise-induced anaphylaxis after consumption of red meat in a patient with IgE antibodies specific for galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.  
Knight ME, Wyatt K, James HC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May 28;

Response to: 'Evidence on pseudoallergen-free diet for chronic urticaria'.  
Murzaku EC, Bronsnick T, Rao BK.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2015 Jun;72(6):e183

Evidence on pseudoallergen-free diet for chronic urticaria.  
Yeung H, Swerlick RA.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2015 Jun;72(6):e181

Adverse reactions triggered by amaranth allergens-what we know so far from a molecular perspective  
Michael Wallner and Heidi Hofer
J Aller Ther 2015;6(3):e108
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Environmental and food allergens reactivity and its association with total IgE, age and gender in Karachi, Pakistan  
Noreen Abbas, Ahmed Raheem, Farooq Ghani
J Aller Ther 2015;6(3):215
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Fading due the unfading: repeated anaphylaxis caused by amaranth grains  
Claudia Pföhler, Andreas Merkoureas, Cornelia SL Müller and Thomas Vogt
J Aller Ther 2015;6(2):205
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Temporary tattoos with lasting consequences  
Jonathan Cubitt, Marc C Swan and Michael P Tyler
J Aller Ther 2015;6(2):206
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Propofol Induced Anaphylaxis-A Case Report  
Angela Carmezim Mota, Filipa Pereira, Judite Guimaraes, Esmeralda Neves, Paula Sa, Miguel Paiva, Julio Guimaraes and Humberto Machado
J Aller Ther 2015;6(2):209
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

An Unusual Case of Contact Allergy to 4-Tert-Butylphenolformaldehyde Resin  
Dabo Liu, Zhenyun Huang and Yaping Huang
J Aller Ther 2014;5(6):194
Click to view abstract

A role for pathogenesis-related proteins in poly-sensitized allergic patients with eosinophilic esophagitis: clinical and endoscopic features  
Erminia Ridolo, Marcello Montagni, Valerie Melli, Elisa Olivieri, Fabiola Fornaroli, Gian Luigi De’ Angelis, Cristoforo Incorvaia and Giorgio Walter Canonica
J Aller Ther 2014;5(6):199
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Human saliva acting as an allergen  
William Frankland and Jill A Warner
J Aller Ther 2014;5(5):193
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Ige-Mediated Allergy in Children: Specific Ige by Component-Based-Allergen Microarray  
Francesca Rea, Leila Emma D’Urbano, Rosa Luciano, Marta Muraca, Luigi Dall’Oglio, Giovanni Cavagni and Paola De Angelis
J Aller Ther 2014;5(4):180
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Buckwheat allergy: an emerging clinical problem in Europe  
Enrico Heffler, Stefano Pizzimenti, Iuliana Badiu, Giuseppe Guida and Giovanni Rolla
J Aller Ther 2014;5(2):181
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Bet v 2 responsibility in birch-induced symptoms  
Metz Favre C, Pauli G, Castro L, Valenta R and de Blay F
J Aller Ther 2014;5(2):169
Click to view abstract

100 Years later: Celebrating the contributions of x-ray crystallography to allergy and clinical immunology.  
Pomes A, Chruszcz M, Gustchina A, Minor W, Mueller GA, Pedersen LC, Wlodawer A, Chapman MD.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jul;136(1):29-37

Time trends in Australian hospital anaphylaxis admissions in 1998-1999 to 2011-2012.  
Mullins RJ, Dear KB, Tang ML.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 24;
Click to view abstract

Peanut defensins: Novel allergens isolated from lipophilic peanut extract.  
Petersen A, Kull S, Rennert S, Becker WM, Krause S, Ernst M, Gutsmann T, Bauer J, Lindner B, Jappe U.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 30;
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergic multiorgan disease induced by wheat flour.  
Gomez-Torrijos E, Rodriguez-Sanchez J, az-Perales A, Garcia R, Feo JF, Garcia C, Pineda F, Quirce S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 26;

Evaluation of allergen-microarray-guided dietary intervention as treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.  
van Rhijn BD, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Versteeg SA, Akkerdaas JH, van Ree R, Terreehorst I, Sprikkelman AB, Verheij J, Smout AJ, Bredenoord AJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 29;

IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins: Cross-reactivity and tolerability of alternative cephalosporins.  
Romano A, Gaeta F, Valluzzi RL, Maggioletti M, Zaffiro A, Caruso C, Quaratino D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 27;
Click to view abstract

Analysis of glutathione S-transferase allergen cross-reactivity in a North American population: Relevance for molecular diagnosis.  
Mueller GA, Pedersen LC, Glesner J, Edwards LL, Zakzuk J, London RE, Arruda LK, Chapman MD, Caraballo L, Pomes A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 27;
Click to view abstract

Vehicular exhaust particles promote allergic airway inflammation through an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-notch signaling cascade.  
Xia M, Viera-Hutchins L, Garcia-Lloret M, Noval RM, Wise P, McGhee SA, Chatila ZK, Daher N, Sioutas C, Chatila TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Mar 27;
Click to view abstract

Allergen characterization of chia seeds (Salvia hispanica), a new allergenic food.  
Garcia JS, Pastor VC, de las HM, Sanz MA, Vivanco F, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):55-56

Pollen-food syndrome involving allergy to tiger nut.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Mohedano-Vicente E, Gandolfo-Cano M, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):197-198

Allergy workup for suspected folic acid hypersensitivity.  
Schrijvers R, Chiriac AM, Demoly P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):233-236

Vespa velutina nigritorax: a new causative agent in anaphylaxis.  
Chugo S, Lizaso MT, Alvarez MJ, Arroabaren E, Lizarza S, Tabar AI.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):231-232

A case of heparin allergy with good tolerability to fondaparinux during pregnancy.  
Buonomo A, Nucera E, De CS, De S, Pascolini L, Di PE, Betti S, Schiavino D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):229-231

Kiwifruit anaphylaxis: the usefulness of molecular-based allergy diagnostics.  
Tosca MA, Pistorio A, Accogli A, Silvestri M, Rossi GA, Ciprandi G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):227-229

Epigenetic Regulation Analyses of FOXP3 in Olive Pollen Allergy.  
Calzada D, Aguerri M, Baos S, Lahoz C, Cardaba B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):222-224

Ondansetron hypersensitivity: a clinical diagnosis protocol and cross-reactivity study.  
Garcia N, gaba Marmol MA, Reina AE.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):221-222

No cross-reactivity with cephalosporins in patients with penicillin allergy.  
Martinez Tadeo JA, Perez RE, Almeida SZ, Callero VA, Garcia Robaina JC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):216-217

Tomato nsLTP as an 'In Vivo' Diagnostic Tool: Sensitization in a Mediterranean Population.  
Lopez-Matas MA, Larramendi CH, Huertas AJ, Ferrer A, Moya R, Pagan JA, Navarro LA, Garcia-Abujeta JL, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):196-204
Click to view abstract

Comparison of molecular multiplex and singleplex analysis of IgE to grass pollen allergens in untreated German grass pollen-allergic patients.  
Ahlgrim C, Gutermuth J, Onell A, Borres MP, Schaffner I, Darsow U, Pfab F, Brockow K, Ring J, Behrendt H, Jakob T, Huss-Marp J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):190-195
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity to tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) in peach-allergic patients: rPrup 3 and rPrup 1 are predictive of symptom severity.  
Mascheri A, Farioli L, Pravettoni V, Piantanida M, Stafylaraki C, Scibilia J, Mirone C, Preziosi D, Nichelatti M, Pastorello EA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):183-189
Click to view abstract

Cross-sectional validation of a quality of life questionnaire in Spanish for patients allergic to hymenoptera venom.  
Armisen M, Guspi R, Alfaya T, Cruz S, Fernandez S, Dominguez-Noche C, Alonso A, Dalmau G, Marques L, Vega A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(3):176-182
Click to view abstract

The new latex allergen Hev b 15: IgE-binding properties of a recombinant serine protease inhibitor.  
Rihs HP, Sander I, Heimann H, Meurer U, Bruning T, Raulf M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):160-162

Fixed drug eruption due to atorvastatin.  
Huertas AJ, Ramirez-Hernandez M, Merida-Fernandez C, Chica-Marchal A, Pajaron-Fernandez MJ, Carreno-Rojo A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):155-156

Chlorhexidine: a retrospective observational study of a potentially life-threatening molecule.  
Bubenhofer M, Fricker M, Weber-Mani U, Helbling A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):152-154

Prevalence of sensitization to pollen from trees planted in Barcelona City.  
Puiggros A, Munoz-Cano R, Roger RA, Raga E, Belmonte J, Valero A, sensio de la CO, Eseverri Asin JL, Guell FE, San Miguel Moncin MM, Torredemer PA, Bartra J, Tella R, Sala-Cunill A, Dalmau G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):150-151

First case report of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to labetalol.  
Gomez TE, Garcia RC, Sanchez Caminero MP, Castro JA, Garcia RR, Feo-Brito F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):148-149

Occupational asthma to dried tobacco leaves: a very delayed diagnosis.  
Penven E, Poussel M, Thaon I, Paris C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):144-145

Anaphylaxis in a child after ingestion of persimmon.  
Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Nunez AB, Ledesma A, Cava SB, Kindelan-Recarte C, Dominguez-Ortega J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):142-144

Allergic reaction to undeclared lupin in a chocolate.  
Eguiluz G, Martinez Gonzalez de LB, Rubio-Perez M, Ruiz-Gimenez L, Recio BL, Pastor-Vargas C, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):140-142

Relationship between serum total IgE and disease severity in patients with allergic asthma in Spain.  
Davila I, Valero A, Entrenas LM, Valveny N, Herraez L.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(2):120-127

Occupational asthma to fish.  
Boulet LP, Laberge F.
Occup Environ Med 2014 Nov;71(11):804

Recognition pattern of kiwi seed storage proteins in kiwifruit allergic children.  
Nilsson C, Brostedt P, Hidman J, van OJ, Borres MP, Sjolander S, Englund H.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 16;

Wheat allergy in a pediatric population from the Mediterranean area.  
Calamelli E, Ricci G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 14;

The relationship between the season of birth and early-onset food allergies in children.  
Tanaka K, Matsui T, Sato A, Sasaki K, Nakata J, Nakagawa T, Sugiura S, Kando N, Nishiyama T, Kojima S, Ito K.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 14;

Caregivers of children with no food allergy - their experiences and perception of food allergy.  
Yamamoto-Hanada K, Futamura M, Takahashi O, Narita M, Kobayashi F, Ohya Y.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 14;

Idiopathic Anaphylaxis and Histamine Intolerance.  
Ivkovic-Jurekovic I.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 1;

Outcome of mixed nut biscuit challenges in low risk patients who are on tree nut exclusion diet.  
Thalayasingam M, Noble V, Franzmann A, O'Sullivan M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Jul 1;

Diagnostic accuracy of patch test in children with food allergy.  
Caglayan SS, Povesi DC, Gioia E, Mastrorilli C, Rizzuti L, Caffarelli C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Mar 23;
Click to view abstract

Prévalence de l’allergie aux protéines du lait de vache chez des enfants âgés de moins de 3 ans de la ville de Constantine (Algérie) / Prevalence of allergy to cow's milk proteins in children younger than 3 years of the city of Constantine (Algeria)  
H. Boughellout, L. Benatallah, M.N. Zidoune
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(4):288-292
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxie sévère à l’amoxicilline avec tests cutanés et biologiques négatifs. Comment l’expliquer ? / Severe Anaphylaxis to amoxicillin with negative skin tests and biological. How to explain it?  
M. Salvidant, A.-L. Legeay, J.-P. Jacquier, F. Hacard, J.-F. Nicolas, F. Bérard
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(4):297-300
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie aux œufs de saumon sans allergies croisées au poisson, trois cas pédiatriques / Allergy to salmon eggs without cross fish allergies, three pediatric cases  
Pagès AS, Leduc V, De Lacoste de Laval A, Nelson JR, Péré B, Rondeleux E.
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(4):301-304
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Le syndrome orange-cyprès / The orange-cypress syndrome  
Martinez S, Gouitaa M, Tummino C, Chanez P, Charpin D.
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(4):305-307
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Molecular, proteomic and immunological parameters of allergens provide inclusion criteria for new candidates within established grass and tree homologous groups.  
Heath MD, Collis J, Batten T, Hutchings JW, Swan N, Skinner MA.
World Allergy Organ J 2015;8(1):21
Click to view abstract

Molecular, proteomic and immunological parameters of allergens provide inclusion criteria for new candidates within established grass and tree homologous group  
Health MD, Collis J, Batten T, Hutchings JW, Swan N, Skinner MA
WAO Journal 2015;8:21-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Asparagus-induced fixed food eruptions mimicking cutaneous lupus.  
Gaus BM, Scheiba N, Schakel K.
Acta Derm Venereol 2014 Nov;94(6):731-732

Anomalous cutaneous absorption of allergens as cause of skin prick testing adverse reactions in adult patients. Clinical and experimental evidence.  
Antico A, Arisi M, Lima G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jul;47(4):126-131
Click to view abstract

Cross-reactivity of a new food ingredient, dun pea, with legumes, and risk of anaphylaxis in legume allergic children.  
Richard C, Jacquenet S, Sergeant P, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jul;47(4):118-125
Click to view abstract

Allergological characterisation of the storage mite Acarus gracilis (Acari: Acaridae).  
Iraola V, Prados M, Pinto H, Morales M, Leonor JR, Carnes J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jul;43(4):332-338
Click to view abstract

Determinants of nocebo effect during oral drug provocation tests.  
Bavbek S, Aydin O, Sozener ZC, Yuksel S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jul;43(4):339-345
Click to view abstract

Food anaphylaxis in children: Peculiarity of characteristics.  
Tosca MA, Pistorio A, Accogli A, Rossi GA, Ciprandi G.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jul;43(4):421-423

Analysis of profitability in the diagnosis of allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Ferre-Ybarz L, Salinas AR, Gomez GC, Duocastella SP, Nevot FS.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Jul;43(4):369-375
Click to view abstract

Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis among junior high school students: A 14-year epidemiological comparison.  
Manabe T, Oku N, Aihara Y.
Allergol Int 2015 Jul;64(3):285-286

Improved sensitivity to venom specific-immunoglobulin E by spiking with the allergen component in Japanese patients suspected of Hymenoptera venom allergy.  
Yoshida N, Hirata H, Watanabe M, Sugiyama K, Arima M, Fukushima Y, Ishii Y.
Allergol Int 2015 Jul;64(3):248-252
Click to view abstract

Epitope specificity determines cross-protection of a SIT-induced IgG antibody.  
Gadermaier E, James LK, Shamji MH, Blatt K, Fauland K, Zieglmayer P, Garmatiuk T, Focke-Tejkl M, Villalba M, Beavil R, Keller W, Valent P, Durham SR, Gould HJ, Flicker S, Valenta R.
Allergy 2015 Jul 29;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis and Ethnicity: Higher Incidence in British South Asians.  
Buka RJ, Crossman RJ, Melchior CL, Huissoon AP, Hackett S, Dorrian S, Cooke MW, Krishna MT.
Allergy 2015 Jul 27;
Click to view abstract

Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the alpha-Gal glycan.  
Apostolovic D, Tran TA, Sanchez-Vidaurre S, Cirkovic VT, Starkhammar M, Hamsten C, van HM.
Allergy 2015 Jul 17;
Click to view abstract

Sensitization pattern of crustacean allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs.  
Vidal C, Bartolome B, Rodriguez V, Armisen M, Linneberg A, Gonzalez-Quintela A.
Allergy 2015 Jul 17;
Click to view abstract

Tree pollen allergens - an update from a molecular perspective.  
Asam C, Hofer H, Wolf M, Aglas L, Wallner M.
Allergy 2015 Jul 17;
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.  
Pillon R, Ziberna F, Badina L, Ventura A, Longo G, Quaglia S, De LL, Vatta S, Martelossi S, Patano G, Not T, Berti I.
Allergy 2015 Jul 14;
Click to view abstract

Bee venom enhances the differentiation of human regulatory T-cells.  
Caramalho I, Melo A, Pedro E, Barbosa MM, Victorino RM, Pereira Santos MC, Sousa AE.
Allergy 2015 Jul 14;
Click to view abstract

First successful reduction of clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar.  
Dubois AE, Pagliarani G, Brouwer RM, Kollen BJ, Dragsted LO, Eriksen FD, Callesen O, Gilissen LJ, Krens FA, Visser RG, Smulders MJ, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Flokstra-de Blok BJ, van de Weg WE.
Allergy 2015 Jul 1;
Click to view abstract

Diagnostic use of recombinant Tha p 2 in the allergy to Thaumetopoea pityocampa.  
Rodriguez-Mahillo AI, Carballeda-Sangiao N, Vega JM, Garcia-Ortiz JC, Roques A, Moneo I, Gonzalez-Munoz M.
Allergy 2015 Jun 25;
Click to view abstract

Lipid transfer protein sensitization: reactivity profiles and clinical risk assessment in an Italian cohort.  
Scala E, Till SJ, Asero R, Abeni D, Guerra EC, Pirrotta L, Paganelli R, Pomponi D, Giani M, De PO, Cecchi L.
Allergy 2015 Aug;70(8):933-943
Click to view abstract

Allergic sensitization to pegylated interferon-alpha results in drug eruptions.  
Meller S, Gerber PA, Kislat A, Hevezi P, Gobel T, Wiesner U, Kellermann S, Bunemann E, Zlotnik A, Haussinger D, Erhardt A, Homey B.
Allergy 2015 Jul;70(7):775-783
Click to view abstract

Drug hypersensitivity in clonal mast cell disorders: ENDA/EAACI position paper.  
Bonadonna P, Pagani M, Aberer W, Bilo MB, Brockow K, Oude EH, Garvey L, Mosbech H, Romano A, Zanotti R, Torres MJ.
Allergy 2015 Jul;70(7):755-763
Click to view abstract

Precautionary allergen labelling: perspectives from key stakeholder groups.  
DunnGalvin A, Chan CH, Crevel R, Grimshaw K, Poms R, Schnadt S, Taylor SL, Turner P, Allen KJ, Austin M, Baka A, Baumert JL, Baumgartner S, Beyer K, Bucchini L, Fernandez-Rivas M, Grinter .
Allergy 2015 Mar 24;
Click to view abstract

Quality-of-life issues in survivors to anaphylactic reactions to drugs.  
Baiardini I, Gaeta F, Molinengo G, Braido F, Canonica GW, Romano A.
Allergy 2015 Jul;70(7):877-879
Click to view abstract

Risk factors in pediatric shrimp allergy.  
Chokshi NY, Maskatia Z, Miller S, Guffey D, Minard CG, Davis CM.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Jul;36(4):65-71
Click to view abstract

Diagnostic decision points of specific IgE titers in patients with food allergy: are they appropriate in all clinical settings?  
Song TW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jul;7(4):309-311

Basophil activation tests: a diagnostic break-through in opiate allergy.  
Uyttebroek A, Van GA, Sabato V, Bridts C, Ebo D.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jul;7(4):416-417

Basophil Activation Tests Based on CD193 Marker in Dipyrone Allergy.  
Chirumbolo S.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Jul;7(4):414-415

Food dependant exercise induced anaphylaxis a retrospective study from 2 allergy clinics in Colombo, Sri Lanka.  
de Silva NR, Dasanayake WM, Karunatilleke C, Malavige GN.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):22
Click to view abstract

Allergy to cooked, but not raw, peas: a case series and review.  
Abrams EM, Gerstner TV.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):10
Click to view abstract

Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization.  
Onodi-Nagy K, Kinyo A, Meszes A, Garaczi E, Kemeny L, Bata-Csorgo Z.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):1
Click to view abstract

Asthma and respiratory symptoms among hairdressers in Denmark: results from a register based questionnaire study.  
Lysdal SH, Mosbech H, Johansen JD, Sosted H.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Dec;57(12):1368-1376
Click to view abstract

Asthma associated with pesticide exposure among women in rural Western Cape of South Africa.  
Ndlovu V, Dalvie MA, Jeebhay MF.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Dec;57(12):1331-1343
Click to view abstract

Inception cohort study of workers exposed to toluene diisocyanate at a polyurethane foam factory: initial one-year follow-up.  
Gui W, Wisnewski AV, Neamtiu I, Gurzau E, Sparer JA, Stowe MH, Liu J, Slade MD, Rusu OA, Redlich CA.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Nov;57(11):1207-1215
Click to view abstract

Acute symptoms associated with chemical exposures and safe work practices among hospital and campus cleaning workers: a pilot study.  
Lee SJ, Nam B, Harrison R, Hong O.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Nov;57(11):1216-1226
Click to view abstract

Is the incidence of aliphatic amine-induced occupational rhinitis and asthma underestimated?  
Laborde-Casterot H, Rosenberg N, Dupont P, Garnier R.
Am J Ind Med 2014 Dec;57(12):1303-1310
Click to view abstract

First case of airborne-induced anaphylaxis triggered by fruit.  
Macias EM, Sierra-Salgado O, Bartolome B, Pastor-Vargas C, Munoz-Bellido FJ, Davila I.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun 17;

Anaphylaxis induced by Goji berries.  
Zauli D, Mirarchi MG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jun;114(6):535-536

Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.  
Patel A, Bahna SL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul 23;
Click to view abstract

Probability curves for predicting symptom severity during oral food challenge with milk.  
Yoneyama M, Nomura T, Kato T, Sobajima T, Tanida H, Morishita T, Sugiura S, Suda Y, Hirabayashi Y, Misawa C, Kamioka N, Tanaka H, Mizuno M, Terada A, Kanda Y, Saitoh S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul 21;

Anaphylaxis as a delayed reaction of methimazole therapy.  
Shtessel M, Toh J, Gavrilova T.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul 7;

Allergen of the Month-Assassin Bug.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul;115(1):A9

Effect of poverty, urbanization, and race/ethnicity on perceived food allergy in the United States.  
McGowan EC, Matsui EC, McCormack MC, Pollack CE, Peng R, Keet CA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul;115(1):85-86

Basophil activation test in the diagnosis of patent blue V anaphylaxis.  
Boita M, Mietta S, Bommarito L, Rolla G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul;115(1):78-79

Pediatric emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to food-induced anaphylaxis in Illinois.  
Dyer AA, Lau CH, Smith TL, Smith BM, Gupta RS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul;115(1):56-62
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis after application of topical bacitracin-neomycin powder.  
Bommarito L, Mietta S, Cadario G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Jul;115(1):74-75

Stability and potency of raw and boiled shrimp extracts for skin prick test.  
Pariyaprasert W, Piboonpocanun S, Jirapongsananuruk O, Visitsunthorn N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):136-142
Click to view abstract

Assessing the efficacy of a novel temperature and humidity control machine to minimize house dust mite allergen exposure and clinical symptoms in allergic rhinitis children sensitized to dust mites: a pilot study.  
Manuyakorn W, Padungpak S, Luecha O, Kamchaisatian W, Sasisakulporn C, Vilaiyuk S, Monyakul V, Benjaponpitak S.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):129-135
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Dust mite infestation in cooking flour: experimental observations and practical recommendations.  
Suesirisawad S, Malainual N, Tungtrongchitr A, Chatchatee P, Suratannon N, Ngamphaiboon J.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):123-128
Click to view abstract

Pro j 2 is mesquite profilin: molecular characteristics and specific IgE binding activity.  
li-Sadeghi H, Khodadadi A, Amini A, Assarehzadegan MA, Sepahi N, Zarinhadideh F.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):90-98
Click to view abstract

Allergy for tree pollens and crustaceans: testing and treatment.  
Palaga T.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Jun;33(2):69-70

Pathogenesis of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy.  
Berin MC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jul 28;
Click to view abstract

Utility of skin testing in children with a history of non-immediate reactions to amoxicillin.  
Barni S, Mori F, Sarti L, Pucci N, Rossi EM, de MM, Novembre E.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Jul 14;
Click to view abstract

Basophil allergen threshold sensitivity and component resolved diagnostics improve hazelnut allergy diagnosis.  
Brandstrom J, Nopp A, Johansson SG, Lilja G, Sundqvist AC, Borres MP, Nilsson C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Feb 24;

Further studies on the biological activity of hazelnut allergens.  
Blanc F, Bernard H, Ah-Leung S, Przybylski-Nicaise L, Skov PS, Purohit A, de BF, Ballmer-Weber B, Fritsche P, Rivas MF, Reig I, Sinaniotis A, Vassilopoulou E, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Vi.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;526

Self-reported adverse reactions and IgE sensitization to common foods in adults with asthma.  
Rentzos G, Johanson L, Sjolander S, Telemo E, Ekerljung L.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;525

Accidental exposures to peanut in a large cohort of Canadian children with peanut allergy.  
Cherkaoui S, Ben-Shoshan M, Alizadehfar R, Asai Y, Chan E, Cheuk S, Shand G, St-Pierre Y, Harada L, Allen M, Clarke A.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;516
Click to view abstract

Pollen allergies in humans and their dogs, cats and horses: differences and similarities.  
Jensen-Jarolim E, Einhorn L, Herrmann I, Thalhammer JG, Panakova L.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;515
Click to view abstract

Food allergy in the Netherlands: differences in clinical severity, causative foods, sensitization and DBPCFC between community and outpatients.  
Le TM, van HE, Kummeling I, Potts J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Lebens AF, Lidholm J, Lindner TM, Mackie A, Mills EC, van RR, Vieths S, Fernandez-Rivas M, Burney PG, Knulst AC.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;58
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of the applicability of the Immuno-solid-phase allergen chip (ISAC) assay in atopic patients in Singapore.  
Santosa A, Andiappan AK, Rotzschke O, Wong HC, Chang A, Bigliardi-Qi M, Wang DY, Bigliardi PL.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;59
Click to view abstract

The development of a standardised diet history tool to support the diagnosis of food allergy.  
Skypala IJ, Venter C, Meyer R, deJong NW, Fox AT, Groetch M, Oude Elberink JN, Sprikkelman A, Diamandi L, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;57
Click to view abstract

Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.  
Feng C, Teuber S, Gershwin ME.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2015 Jan 27;
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Allergic contact dermatitis caused by argan oil in an infant.  
Barrientos N, Moreno d, Dominguez J.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Nov;71(5):316-317

Allergic reaction caused by acesulfame potassium in foods.  
Katsue H, Higashi Y, Baba N, Aoki M, Sakanoue M, Matsushita S, Kanekura T.
Contact Dermatitis 2014 Oct;71(4):251-252

Recent trends in occupational contact dermatitis.  
Wiszniewska M, Walusiak-Skorupa J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Jul;15(7):543

Control process for manufacturing and standardization of allergenic molecules.  
Carnes J, Iraola V, Gallego M, Leonor JR.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Jul;15(7):541

Technological innovations for high-throughput approaches to in vitro allergy diagnosis.  
Chapman MD, Wuenschmann S, King E, Pomes A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Jul;15(7):539

Utility of component-resolved diagnostics in food allergy.  
Tuano KS, Davis CM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Jun;15(6):534

Anaphylaxis to insect venom allergens: role of molecular diagnostics.  
Ollert M, Blank S.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 May;15(5):527

Perioperative anaphylaxis: what should be known?  
Dewachter P, Mouton-Faivre C, Hepner DL.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 May;15(5):522

Presentation and diagnosis of hypersensitivity to platinum drugs.  
Caiado J, Castells M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Apr;15(4):515
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Controlled allergen challenge facilities and their unique contributions to allergic rhinitis research.  
North ML, Soliman M, Walker T, Steacy LM, Ellis AK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Apr;15(4):514
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Delayed anaphylaxis involving IgE galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.  
Platts-Mills TA, Schuyler AJ, Hoyt AE, Commins SP.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Apr;15(4):512
Click to view abstract

An Introduction to laboratory investigations for allergic conditions  
M Lloyd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):84-89
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Interpretation of IgE-mediated allergy tests (RAST)  
M Lloyd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):90-95
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A practical diagnostic approach to inhalant allergy tests  
M Lloyd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):96-99
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A practical diagnostic approach to food allergies  
M Lloyd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):100-103
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Component testing: a new era in allergy diagnostics  
M Lloyd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):104-111
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Iodine allergy: a medical myth  
M Lloyd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):112-113
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The role of food allergy in rhinitis and nasal polyposis  
RY Seedat
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(2):114
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New causes of immunologic occupational asthma, 2012-2014.  
Cartier A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr;15(2):117-123
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Identification and practical management of latex allergy in occupational settings.  
Caballero ML, Quirce S.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 23;1-16
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Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.  
Le TM, Knulst AC, Rockmann H.
Food Chem Toxicol 2014 Dec;74309-310
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Purification, characterization and immunoreactivity of beta'-component, a major allergen from the roe of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea).  
Liu YY, Cao MJ, Zhang ML, Hu JW, Zhang YX, Zhang LJ, Liu GM.
Food Chem Toxicol 2014 Oct;72111-121
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