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 Allergy Advisor Digest - April 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Anaphylaxis after hymenoptera sting: is it venom allergy, a clonal disorder, or both?
Read Consensus document on the approach to children with allergic reactions after vaccination or allergy to vaccine components.
Read Prevalences of specific IgE to wheat gliadin components in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Diagnostic utility of concentrated Mus m 1 allergen extract in humans.
Read The utility of specific IgE testing to chlorhexidine in the investigation of perioperative adverse reactions.
Read Occupational asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by melon plant allergy.
Read Prevalence of blueberry allergy in a Turkish population.
Read Jackfruit anaphylaxis in a latex allergic patient.
Read Evaluation of basophil allergen threshold sensitivity (CD-sens) to peanut and Ara h 8 in children IgE-sensitized to Ara h 8.
Read Anaphylaxis to the carbohydrate side chain Alpha-gal.
Read Anaphylaxis caused by flaxseed.
Read Pyruvate kinase and phosphopyruvate hydratase as novel IgE reactive proteins in prawn.
Read Prospective, multicenter clinical trial to validate new products for skin tests in the diagnosis of allergy to penicillin.
Read Airborne contact dermatitis from Dittrichia viscosa (False Yellowhead, Sticky Fleabane).
Read Occupational asthma in seafood manufacturing and food allergy to seafood.
Read Impact of glutathione on the allergenicity of the peach lipid transfer protein Pru p 3.
Read Anaphylaxis due to Eruca sativa (Rocket / Arugula)
Read In vivo and in vitro testing with rAni s 1 can facilitate diagnosis of Anisakis simplex allergy.
Read Amaranthaceae pollens: review of an emerging allergy in the Mediterranean area.
Read Occupational allergic rhinoconjunctivitis induced by Matricaria chamomilla with tolerance of chamomile tea.
Read Venom-dependent vibration-induced anaphylaxis following large local reactions from hymenoptera stings.
Read Occupational rhinitis due to inhalation of chicken meat protein.
Read Allergen profile of Protophormia terraenovae, other species of calliphoridae, and Lumbricus terrestris in anglers allergic to maggots in Caceres, Spain.
Read Immunoglobulin E reactivity and allergenic potency of Morus papyrifera (paper mulberry) pollen.
Read Identification of new potential allergens from Nile perch (Lates niloticus) and cod (Gadus morhua).
Read In vitro methods for diagnosing nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions to drugs.
Read Cit s 3 as an occupational aeroallergen in an orange farmer.
Read Evaluation and comparison of commercially available latex extracts for skin prick tests.
Read Occupational allergy to aquarium fish food: red midge larva, freshwater shrimp, and earthworm.
Read Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.

Abstracts shared in April 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Incidence and natural history of challenge-proven cow's milk allergy in European children -EuroPrevall birth cohort.
Read Unintended allergens in precautionary labelled and unlabelled products pose significant risks to UK allergic consumers.
Read Identification of major allergens of Paper Mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera) pollens and purification of novel 40 kDa allergen protein
Read Using a gluten oral food challenge protocol to improve diagnosis of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Marihuana allergy
Read Anaphylaxis mediated by thaumatin-like proteins.
Read Chronic urticaria in a celiac patient: role of buckwheat allergy.
Read Tick bite anaphylaxis in a patient allergic to bee venom.
Read Urticaria caused by ingestion of pasta and bread containing buckwheat flour.
Read Occupational allergy to Spanish omelet.
Read Performance of different in vitro techniques in the molecular diagnosis of peanut allergy.
Read A first assessment of France allergens rodents in public buildings
Read Skin sensitization causing an immediate allergy ofloxacin ofloxacin orally
Read Urticarial vasculitis induced by Yohimbine found in OTC diet pills

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis after hymenoptera sting: is it venom allergy, a clonal disorder, or both?
A 47-year-old man presented with loss of consciousness 5 minutes after being stung by a yellow jacket in his backyard. Allergy evaluation revealed specific IgE to yellow jacket and honeybee, and the patient was started on venom immunotherapy. He had systemic reactions during buildup and a severe anaphylactic episode requiring 3 doses of intramuscular epinephrine at maintenance doses. Immunotherapy was discontinued. Serum tryptase level after 1 such episode was 29 ng/mL, with a baseline level of 25 ng/mL 4 weeks later. The physical examination was unremarkable including no skin lesions of cutaneous mastocytosis. Because of elevated baseline tryptase level, a bone marrow biopsy was performed, which revealed multifocal dense infiltrates of mast cells. A diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis was made.

Anaphylaxis after hymenoptera sting: is it venom allergy, a clonal disorder, or both?  
Castells MC, Hornick JL, Akin C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Apr 7;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Consensus document on the approach to children with allergic reactions after vaccination or allergy to vaccine components.
Vaccinations are one of the main public health tools for the control of vaccine-preventable diseases. If a child is identified as having had an allergic reaction to a vaccine, subsequent immunisations will probably be suspended - with the risks such a decision implies. The incidence of severe allergic reactions is very low, ranging between 0.5 and 1 cases/100,000 doses. Rather than the vaccine antigens as such, the causes of allergic reactions to vaccines are often residual protein components of the manufacturing process such as gelatine or egg, and less commonly yeasts or latex. Most vaccine reactions are mild and circumscribed to the injection site; although in some cases severe anaphylactic reactions can be observed. If an immediate-type allergic reaction is suspected at vaccination, or if a child with allergy to some of the vaccine components is scheduled for vaccination, a correct diagnosis of the possible allergic process must be made. The usual vaccine components must be known in order to determine whether vaccination can be safely performed

Consensus document on the approach to children with allergic reactions after vaccination or allergy to vaccine components.  
Echeverria-Zudaire LA, Ortigosa-Del CL, onso-Lebrero E, varez-Garcia FJ, Cortes-Alvarez N, Garcia-Sanchez N, Martorell-Aragones A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Apr 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalences of specific IgE to wheat gliadin components in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Prevalences of specific IgE to wheat gliadin components in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis were evaluated. Sera were collected from 60 WDEIA patients and 14 healthy controls. The diagnosis of conventional WDEIA (CO-WDEIA), was given for nine patients by provocation testing. The other 51 patients were diagnosed as having HWP-WDEIA according to diagnostic criteria as reported previously. In CO-WDEIA patients, positive rates of alpha/beta-, gamma-, omega1,2-, and omega5-gliadin-specific IgE were 33, 44, 33, and 78%, respectively. For HWP-WDEIA patients, the positive rates of the above gliadins were 26, 47, 26, and 14%, respectively. The highest levels observed were for gamma-gliadin in HWP-WDEIA (47%) and for omega5-gliadin in CO-WDEIA (78%). These results are similar to the authors previous observations. Anti-gamma-gliadin IgE levels were significantly higher than those for omega5-gliadin in HWP-WDEIA patients, whereas they were lower than those for anti-omega5-gliadin IgE in CO-WDEIA patients, suggesting that measuring IgE antibodies specific to gamma-gliadin, in addition to omega5-gliadin, may be beneficial in assessing the clinical type of WDEIA patients. However, from the perspective of HWP-WDEIA diagnosis, detecting anti-HWP IgE is the most sensitive.

Prevalences of specific IgE to wheat gliadin components in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Yokooji T, Okamura Y, Chinuki Y, Morita E, Harada S, Hiragun M, Hide M, Matsuo H.
Allergol Int 2015 Apr;64(2):206-208

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnostic utility of concentrated Mus m 1 allergen extract in humans.
The major mouse allergens belong to the lipocalin family of proteins that are synthesized in the mouse liver and secreted in the urine. The major mouse allergen is known as Mus m 1 in the allergen nomenclature. Although detectable in serum and pelt extracts, Mus m 1 concentration is 10 times greater in mouse urine than serum.3 Yet, currently the only commercially available mouse extracts are mouse epithelial extracts that contain varying low concentrations of the major mouse allergen Mus m 1 (0.5-8 mg/mL). The purpose of the study was to develop a new method for preparing mouse urine allergen extract and assess its diagnostic properties in humans. Despite the improved purity, the mouse urine extract did not demonstrate a clear improvement in diagnostic performance over the previously published data of the diagnostic performance of the mouse epithelial extract. These results may suggest that Mus m 1 is not the only allergen that causes clinical symptoms to mice.

Diagnostic utility of concentrated Mus m 1 allergen extract in humans.  
Norton A, Smith K, James K, Hoskins A, Scott TA, Plunkett G, Fahrenholz J, Dworski R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):391-392

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The utility of specific IgE testing to chlorhexidine in the investigation of perioperative adverse reactions.
This study concludes that sIgE testing to chlorhexidine by the ImmunoCAP method shows this to be a reliable diagnostic method to use in addition to skin testing in the investigation of perioperative allergy. Adjustment of the cutoff threshold also can increase sensitivity without significantly affecting specificity. However, results should be evaluated with caution in the presence of total IgE levels higher than 500 kU/L and particularly at levels higher than 2,000 kU/L.

The utility of specific IgE testing to chlorhexidine in the investigation of perioperative adverse reactions.  
Anderson J, Rose M, Green S, Fernando SL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Mar 3;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by melon plant allergy.
Occupational asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by melon plant allergy is reported in a 27-year-old agricultural worker, who presented with rhinoconjunctivitis, dry cough, and shortness of breath that had developed during the previous 3 years only when she worked in the melon harvest (July to October). She also complained of contact urticaria to melon rind on her arms. She had neither oral allergy syndrome nor respiratory symptoms in the spring and tolerated all foods including melon. Prick-prick testing with melon plant and fruit showed the following results: 7.5 mm for leaves, 14.7 mm for petal, 6.4 mm for pollen, 3.3 mm for melon pulp, and 7.5 mm for rind. A rubbing test produced positive results with melon rind but negative results with its pulp.Total IgE level was 73 kU/L, Peach LTP (Pru p 3) levelwas 37.10 kU/L. A conjunctival test and a bronchial challenge test with the melon flower extract were positive. immunoblotting showed a protein with a similar molecular weight of 10 to 12 kDa in the leaves and flower extracts. The immunoblotting inhibition test showed no cross-reactivity between this protein and peach LTP. Thihs study demonstrated sensitization to a protein that, according to its molecular weight (10e12 kDa), appears to be an LTP present in different parts of the melon plant (leaves and flower) and has recently been described in melon rinds. Although cross-reactivity is normal among pan-allergens, it is highly variable among LTPs fromdifferent sources, so that, at times, it is low or does not exist.

Occupational asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by melon plant allergy.  
Gomez TE, Garcia RC, Garci aR, Mendez DY, Feo Brito FJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Mar 3;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of blueberry allergy in a Turkish population.
Blueberry allergy status was evaluated in children in a community-based study of a region of Turkey where blueberries are most produced and consumed. Of 20,800 randomly selected 6- to 18-year-old urban schoolchildren, 15,783 (75.9%) returned a completed

questionnaire. History of blueberry allergy was positive in 8 children (6 female, 2 male). The prevalence of self-reported IgE-mediated blueberry allergy was 0.00051%. 3 of 8 subjects had a positive prick-to-prick test. Of the 3 subjects with a positive prick-to-prick test, 1 was found to have a positive DBPCFC reaction.

Prevalence of blueberry allergy in a Turkish population.  
Dereci S, Orhan F, Koca T, Akcam M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Mar;114(3):259-260

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Jackfruit anaphylaxis in a latex allergic patient.
A 34-year old nurse developed anaphylaxis following the ingestion of dried jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus). The patient had a history of chronic eczema on both hands resulting from a regular wear of latex gloves. Skin prick tests were positive for jackfruit, latex glove, kiwi and papaya, but negative for banana.

Jackfruit anaphylaxis in a latex allergic patient.  
Wongrakpanich S, Chantaphakul H, Ruxrungtham K.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Mar;33(1):65-68

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of basophil allergen threshold sensitivity (CD-sens) to peanut and Ara h 8 in children IgE-sensitized to Ara h 8.
This study evaluated basophil allergen threshold sensitivity (CD-sens) to peanut, Ara h 8 and Gly m 4 in relation to an oral peanut challenge in children IgE-sensitized to birch, peanut and Ara h 8 avoiding peanuts. Twenty children IgE-sensitized to birch pollen and Ara h 8, but not to Ara h 1, Ara h 2 or Ara h 3 were challenged orally with roasted peanuts. All children passed challenge without objective symptoms, but mild oral allergy syndrome (OAS) symptoms were reported in 6/20 children. Nineteen of twenty children were negative in CD-sens to peanut but 17/20 were positive to rAra h 8. Eleven of twenty children were positive in CD-sens to rGly m 4. Positive CD-sens to rAra h 8 show that the Ara h 8 IgE-ab sensitized basophils can be activated by a rAra h 8 allergen and initiate an allergic inflammation despite a negative challenge. Hence, children sensitized to Ara h 8 but not to peanut storage proteins may be at risk for systemic allergic reaction when eating larger amounts of peanuts but most likely don't have to fear smaller amounts.

Evaluation of basophil allergen threshold sensitivity (CD-sens) to peanut and Ara h 8 in children IgE-sensitized to Ara h 8.  
Glaumann S, Nilsson C, Johansson SG, Asarnoj A, Wickman M, Borres MP, Nopp A.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;13(1):5

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to the carbohydrate side chain Alpha-gal.
A review:

In 2007, the monoclonal antibody cetuximab caused severe hypersensitivity reactions during the first infusion in a region of the southeastern United States. Investigation of pretreatment sera established that they contained immunoglobulin (Ig) E against the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), which is present on the Fab of cetuximab. Alpha-gal is a blood group substance of nonprimate mammals. These IgE antibodies are also associated with delayed anaphylaxis to red meat (ie, to meat or organs of animals that carry this oligosaccharide). Evidence shows that the primary cause of these IgE antibodies is bites from the tick Amblyomma americanum or its larvae.

Anaphylaxis to the carbohydrate side chain Alpha-gal.  
Platts-Mills TA, Schuyler AJ, Tripathi A, Commins SP.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):247-260

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis caused by flaxseed.
A 61 year old ingested two flaxeed seeds and immediately experinced dyspnea, and facial angioedema. He experienced ocular pruritus when he cleaned his canary bird feeders. The patient brought bird feed to be inspected and flaxseed was found, among other seeds. He also experienced oral pruritus after eating multigrain bread. A prick-to-prick test with flaxseed yielded positive. Total IgE was 158 kU/L and specific IgE to profilin and LTP was less than 0.35 kU/L. The immunoblot detected IgE-binding proteins of 25, 43, 53 and 62 kDa. ELISA was positive for IgE for flaxeed.

Anaphylaxis caused by flaxseed.  
varez-Perea A, Perez D, Doleo MA, Baeza ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):446-447

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pyruvate kinase and phosphopyruvate hydratase as novel IgE reactive proteins in prawn.
A 27-year-old man experienced angioedema, dyspnea, and urticaria following the ingestion of cooked prawns. Although total IgE was 268 kU/L, specific IgE for prawn was only 0.47 kU/L. Interestingly, high specific IgE for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (9.98 kU/L) was detected, possibly due to tropomyosin cross-reactivity, but specific IgE for the major prawn allergen Pen a 1 was low (tropomyosin, 0.21 kU/L). It was therefore decided to analyze additional putative allergens from Marsupenaeus japonicus (Kuruma prawn). Pyruvate kinase and phosphopyruvate hydratase were characterised as novel IgE reactive proteins in prawn. Pyruvate kinase is a cytosolic protein of about 68 kDa and, according to the 2D gel analysis, of relatively high abundance. Phosphopyruvate hydratase, also called enolase, is a cytosolic protein of about 50 kDa involved in glycolysis and was one of the most abundant proteins in the sample.

Pyruvate kinase and phosphopyruvate hydratase as novel IgE reactive proteins in prawn.  
Tomm JM, Krause C, Simon JC, Treudler R, von BM, Averbeck M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):443-445

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prospective, multicenter clinical trial to validate new products for skin tests in the diagnosis of allergy to penicillin.
Diagnosis for penicillin allergy is currently confirmed using skin tests with benzylpenicillin reagents, ie, penicilloyl-polylysine (PPL) as the major determinant of benzylpenicillin and benzylpenicillin, benzylpenicilloate and benzylpenilloate as a minor determinant mixture (MDM). The objective of this study was to synthesize and assess the diagnostic capacity of 2 new benzylpenicillin reagents in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to B-lactams: benzylpenicilloyl octa-L-lysine (BP-OL) as the major determinant and benzylpenilloate (penilloate) as the minor determinant. The study sample comprised 94 allergic patients: 31 (35.23%) presented anaphylaxis, 4 (4.55%) anaphylactic shock, 51 (58.04%) urticaria, and 2 (2.27%) no specific condition. The culprit 8-lactams were amoxicillin in 63 cases (71.60%), benzypencillin in 14 cases (15.89%), cephalosporins in 2 cases (2.27%), other drugs in 3 cases (3.42%), and unidentified agents in 6 cases (6.82%). The results of testing with BP-OL were positive in 46 cases (52.3%); the results of testing with penilloate were positive in 33 cases (37.5%). When both reagents were taken into consideration, sensitivity reached 61.36% and specificity 100%. Skin testing with penilloate was significantly more often negative when the interval between the reaction and the study was longer. The sensitivity of BP-OL and penilloate was 61%. Considering that amoxicillin was the culprit drug in 71% of reactions, these results indicate that most patients were allergic to the whole group of penicillins. These data support the use of benzylpenicillin determinants in the diagnosis of allergy to beta-lactams, even in predominantly amoxicillin-allergic populations.

Prospective, multicenter clinical trial to validate new products for skin tests in the diagnosis of allergy to penicillin.  
Fernandez J, Torres MJ, Campos J, rribas-Poves F, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):398-408

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Airborne contact dermatitis from Dittrichia viscosa (False Yellowhead, Sticky Fleabane).
Airborne contact dermatitis from Dittrichia viscosa is described. Dittrichia viscosa, also known as False Yellowhead, Sticky Fleabane, Woody Fleabane and Yellow Fleabane, is a flowering plant in the daisy family. This perennial plant is common throughout the Mediterranean Basin.

Airborne contact dermatitis from Dittrichia viscosa.  
Galindo-Bonilla PA, faya-Arias T, Bartolome-Zavala B, De lR, Garcia-Rodriguez C, Feo-Brito F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):67-68

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational asthma in seafood manufacturing and food allergy to seafood.
A 38-year-old woman with latex allergy and contact dermatitis to black rubber, carba, and thiuram who had been working as a seafood-packing assistant for 10 years was seen at our clinic. Her duties consisted of handling squid, octopus, shrimp, cod, and catfish while wearing nitrile gloves. Skin tests (prick by prick) with shrimp, octopus, squid, hake, cod, and trout were positive. Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Phadia) was positive to octopus (1.63 kU/L), squid (12.8 kU/L), sardines (1.23 kU/L), sole (2.43 kU/L), and latex (8.47 kU/L), and negative to shrimp (<0.35 kU/L) and anisakis (<0.35 kU/L). Further investigation resulted in a diagnosis of occupational asthma to sodium metabisulphite and other seafood products (cephalopods, fish, and crustaceans) in conjunction with food allergy to these foods.

Occupational asthma in seafood manufacturing and food allergy to seafood.  
Uriarte SA, Fernandez-Nieto M, Arochena L, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):59-60

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Impact of glutathione on the allergenicity of the peach lipid transfer protein Pru p 3.
Glutathione (GSH) is a reducing agent that is used as an antioxidant in food products. This study concludes that GSH can at least transiently reduce Pru p 3. The effect of reduction on the allergenicity of Pru p 3 varied. Therefore, as an additive, GSH does not seem to eliminate the risk of reactions for peach-allergic patients.

Impact of glutathione on the allergenicity of the peach lipid transfer protein Pru p 3.  
Gomez-Casado C, Tordesillas L, Kinkel J, Starkl P, Cuesta-Herranz J, Roth-Walter F, az-Perales A, Jensen-Jarolim E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):47-54

Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis due to Eruca sativa (Rocket / Arugula)
Anaphylaxis due to Eruca sativa (Rocket / Arugula) is reported in a 35-year-old woman presented with generalized urticaria, angioedema, and bronchospasm requiring treatment in the emergency room immediately after ingestion of arugula and goat cheese salad. E sativa belongs to the Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) family, which includes other common foods, such as cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, turnip, and mustard. She tolerated all except experiences oral allergy syndrome with tree nuts and raw cabbage. STP and prick to prick test results were positive to, among other, arugula, raw onion, raw cabbage, raw cauliflower, raw broccoli, and raw turnip. Specific IgE was positive to, among other, rPru p 3 (7.66 kU/L), Platanus acerifolia, Olea europea, mustard (5.12 kU/L), arugula (0.29 kU/L), broccoli (1.28 kU/L), cauliflower (2.32 kU/L), and cabbage (3.17 kU/L). Total serum IgE was 380 kU/L. The arugula extract revealed several bands, the most prominent at 15 and 45 kDa, and bands at approximately 25, 40, and 66 kDa. Inhibition studies with cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli showed partial inhibition of the main recognized bands, with the clearest inhibitor being broccoli.

Anaphylaxis due to Eruca sativa.  
Ruiz GM, Carnes J, Cedena JR, Nieto MF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):453-454

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vivo and in vitro testing with rAni s 1 can facilitate diagnosis of Anisakis simplex allergy.
The aim of this study was to compare tests used in component-resolved diagnosis in 34 patients with allergy to A simplex, 15 patients with acute urticaria who were sensitized to A simplex but had no clinical history of allergy to A simplex, and 10 patients allergic to seafood. With the A simplex whole extract, SPT, slgE, and BAT yielded specificity values of 72%, 68%, and 70%, respectively, with a cutoff (wheal size) of 11.2 mm, an slgE value of 7.9 kUAIL, and a stimulation index of 1.9. Specificity increased to 100% using the molecular component rAni s 1 with SPT, slgE by ELISA, and ISAC-112. Neither rAni s 3 sensitization nor cross-reactivity with Pen m 1 was observed in patients sensitized to A simplex. rAni s 1 was recognized by 100% of the patients and was able to distinguish between patients allergic to A simplex and patients with acute urticaria who are sensitized to A simplex but have no clinical history of allergy to this parasite.

In vivo and in vitro testing with rAni s 1 can facilitate diagnosis of Anisakis simplex allergy.  
Martinez-Aranguren RM, Gamboa PM, Garcia-Lirio E, Asturias J, Goikoetxea MJ, Sanz ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):431-438

Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Amaranthaceae pollens: review of an emerging allergy in the Mediterranean area.
The Amaranthaceae family is composed of about 180 genera and 2500 species. These common weeds have become increasingly relevant as triggers of allergy in the last few years, as they are able to rapidly colonize salty and arid soils in extensive desert areas. The genera Chenopodium, Salsola, and Amaranthus are the major sources of pollinosis from the Amaranthaceae family in southern Europe, western United States, and semidesert areas of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Iran. In Spain, Salsola kali is one of the most relevant causes of pollinosis, together with olive and grasses. To date, 9Amaranthaceae pollen allergens from Chenopodium album, Salsola kali, and Amaranthus retroflexus have been described and are listed in the International Union of Immunological Societies allergen nomenclature database.The major allergens ofAmaranthaceae pollen belong to the pectin methylesterase, Ole e 1-like, and profilin panallergen families, whereas the minor allergens belong to the cobalamin- independent methionine synthase and polcalcin panallergen families. These relevant allergens have been characterized physicochemically, and immunologically at different levels. Recombinant forms, allergenic fusion recombinant proteins, and hypoallergenic derivatives of these allergens have been expressed in bacteria and yeast and compared with their natural proteins from pollen. In this review, we provide an extensive overview ofAmaranthaceae pollen allergens, focusing on their physicochemical, and immunological properties and on their clinical significance in allergic patients. We also review studies where these recombinant allergens and their hypoallergenic derivatives have been used in clinical diagnosis and their potential use in personalized therapy

Amaranthaceae pollens: review of an emerging allergy in the Mediterranean area.  
Villalba M, Barderas R, Mas S, Colas C, Batanero E, Rodriguez R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):371-381

Click to view abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergic rhinoconjunctivitis induced by Matricaria chamomilla with tolerance of chamomile tea.
Chamomile has been described as an elicitor of type-IV delayed and anaphylactic reactions after ingestion of tea. A case of occupational allergic rhinoconjunctivitis induced by M chamomilla in a 47-year-old woman who tolerated ingestion of chamomile tea. She was in charge of packing herbal teas at a herbalist’s for 10 years reported episodes of intense rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal and ocular itching, conjunctival erythema, and watery eyes for 3 years. The symptoms disappeared during weekends and holidays. Skin prick tests and ImmunoCAP were positive for chamomile pollen (16.4 kU/L), peppermint (0.59 kU/L), fennel (0.50 kU/L), and tea plant (Camellia sinensis) (0.24 kU/L). Prick-to-prick tests performed with extracts from herbs handled by the patient were positive for chamomile (22x21 mm), peppermint (10x16 mm), and fennel (4x6 mm). Nasal provocation resulted in hydrorrhea, sneezing fits, and a 60% decrease in peak nasal inspiratory flow with chamomile extract. No recognizable protein bands were seen on immunoblot, but a diffuse smear in all extracts. IgE immunoblotting showed that the patient’s serum detected allergens from 175 to 25 kDa in the 3 extracts. Digestion of the chamomile extracts with simulated gastric fluid eliminated the detection.

Occupational allergic rhinoconjunctivitis induced by Matricaria chamomilla with tolerance of chamomile tea.  
Benito P, Rodriguez-Perez R, Garcia F, Juste S, Moneo I, Caballero ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):369-370

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Venom-dependent vibration-induced anaphylaxis following large local reactions from hymenoptera stings.
The main clinical finding in the case reported is that patients with large local reactions (LLRs) following a hymenoptera sting can develop life-threatening anaphylaxis induced by early but transient hypersensitivity to vibration. The patient was a 49-year-old man was stung by a wasp on his right forearm. Two hours later, he developed an LLR with mild local pain and itching.

The following morning, 17 hours after the sting, the symptoms appeared to have resolved, so the patient personally tested a new, high-speed (3600-rpm) buttonholing machine. After about 30 minutes, he felt a notable increase in the swelling at the site of the LLR along with generalized itching and dyspnea. Less than 10 minutes later the patient lost consciousness and was taken to the emergency department.

Venom-dependent vibration-induced anaphylaxis: A new hazard following large local reactions from hymenoptera stings.  
Astarita C, Savoia A, De BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):282-283

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational rhinitis due to inhalation of chicken meat protein.
Occupational rhinitis due to inhalation of chicken meat protein. A 58-year-old man who worked as a butcher, had a 4-year history of symptoms of nasal congestion, sneezing, and copious rhinorrhea, mainly in the morning, with a good response to topical intranasal corticosteroids, which he used intermittently. During a 4-month period without working, the patient was asymptomatic. When he returned to work, his symptoms reappeared, generally when he was handling meat, mainly chicken. Prick by prick tests were performed with raw chicken, beef, pork, and lamb; the results were positive, and negative to cooked extracts. A nasal challenge test with raw chicken was positive and negative to cooked extract. Total serum IgE levels were 98 IU/mL. Specific IgE was positive to raw meat extracts from chicken (5.6 kUA/L, class 2), pork (0.6 kUA/L, class 1), beef (0.7 kUA/L, class 2), rabbit (0.7 kUA/L, class 2), and lamb (0.8 kUA/L, class 2). Specific IgE against alpha-gal was negative. immunoblotting revealed an IgE-binding band with a molecular mass of 36-37 kDa in all the assayed raw meat extracts. The IgE-binding band was shown to be glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) in all 3 extracts.

Occupational rhinitis due to inhalation of chicken meat protein.  
Lobera LT, Gonzalez M, Del PG, Venturini DM, Blasco SA, Pastor-Vargas C, Vivanco F, Bartolome ZB.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):278-279

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen profile of Protophormia terraenovae, other species of calliphoridae, and Lumbricus terrestris in anglers allergic to maggots in Caceres, Spain.
These researchers previously found that up to 7% of amateur anglers in Caceres, Spain may be allergic to the larvae of Protophormia terraenovae used as live bait for fishing. This study identified the pattern of major allergens in P terraenovae and other species of Calliphoridae. Extracts of P terraenovae, Calliphora vomitoria, Lucilia sericata and Lumbricus terrestris were characterized in individual sera from 24 patients with a positive skin test result and/or specific IgE determination (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) to P terraenovae. ELISA and IgE-immunoblotting inhibition studies were also performed to identify potential cross-reactive allergens between these species. IgE-immunoblotting with P terraenovae showed a band of 15.3 kDa recognized by 15 patients, in addition to 2 further allergens of 22.8 kDa and 69 kDa. For C vomitoria, 5 bands of 73, 46, 40, 28, and 14 kDa were observed. For L sericata, 2 major allergens of 73 kDa and 14 kDa were observed. In the case of L terrestris, IgE from 13 patients recognized 1 allergen of around 15.5 kDa. IgE-immunoblotting and ELISA inhibition revealed the presence of cross-reactivity, mainly between L terrestris and P terraenovae. P terraenovae appears to have species-specific allergens and allergens shared with C vomitoria and L sericata. Striking immunological cross-reactivity was observed between P terraenovae and L terrestris. An allergen of 15-16 kDa could be involved in this phenomenon.

Allergen profile of Protophormia terraenovae, other species of calliphoridae, and Lumbricus terrestris in anglers allergic to maggots in Caceres, Spain.  
Porcel Carreno SL, Pineda de la LF, Frontera Carrion EM, Sanchez Gonzalez AB, Rodriguez ME, Jimenez TS, Alvarado AM, de la Hoz CB, eguez Pastor MC, Hernandez Arbeiza FJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):176-182

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunoglobulin E reactivity and allergenic potency of Morus papyrifera (paper mulberry) pollen.
Paper mulberry (Morus papyrifera) pollen is considered to be one of the most clinically relevant aeroallergens in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to characterize the sensitization profile of mulberry-allergic patients and the proteins of paper mulberry pollen contributing to pollinosis in the Pakistani population. IgE sensitization to mulberry pollen was confirmed by positive ImmunoCAP results to pollen from Morus alba (white mulberry) in 23 out of 29 mulberry pollen-allergic patients. A 10-kDa protein from the paper mulberry pollen extract was considered a major allergen, along with additional IgE-reactive proteins. Sera from 79% of the patients reacted to the 10-kDa allergen. The amino acid sequence showed with no homology to known proteins.

Immunoglobulin E reactivity and allergenic potency of Morus papyrifera (paper mulberry) pollen.  
Micheal S, Wangorsch A, Wolfheimer S, Foetisch K, Minhas K, Scheurer S, Ahmed A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):168-175

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of new potential allergens from Nile perch (Lates niloticus) and cod (Gadus morhua).
Contact with a patient who was allergic to Nile perch (Lates niloticus) prompted the investigation of the immunoglobulin (Ig) E-reactive proteins that could be allergens of this species. The index patient had low levels of IgE binding to parvalbumins. However, 8 putative allergens other than parvalbumin from L niloticus and 5 from G morhua were identified including enolase, aldolase, adenylate kinase, apolipoprotein, actin, creatine kinase and phosphoglucomutase. Cross-sensitivity to enolase 3 from L niloticus in 7 of the 12 fish-allergic individuals (58%), whereas 11 of the 12 patients (92%) were sensitized to enolase 3 from G morhua. However, atopic control patients were also sensitized to enolase 3 from L niloticus and G morhua.

Identification of new potential allergens from Nile perch (Lates niloticus) and cod (Gadus morhua).  
Tomm JM, van DT, Jende C, Simon JC, Treudler R, von BM, Averbeck M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):159-167

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vitro methods for diagnosing nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions to drugs.
Nonimmediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are difficult to manage in daily clinical practice, mainly owing to their heterogeneous clinical manifestations and the lack of selective biological markers. In vitro methods are necessaryto establish a diagnosis, especially given the low sensitivity of skin tests and the inherent risks of drug provocation testing. In vitro evaluation of nonimmediate DHRs must include approaches that can be applied during the different phases of the reaction. In this review, members of the Immunology and Drug Allergy Committee of the Spanish Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEAIC) provide an overview of the most widely used in vitro tests for evaluating nonimmediate DHRs

In vitro methods for diagnosing nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions to drugs.  
Mayorga C, Sanz ML, Gamboa P, Garcia-Aviles MC, Fernandez J, Torres MJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):213-225

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cit s 3 as an occupational aeroallergen in an orange farmer.
The first report of occupational allergy due to interaction with the orange tree, in which Cit s 3 acts as an aeroallergen. A 21-year-old farmer who for about 4 years, had been experiencing increasingly intense recurrent episodes of dyspnea, coughing, wheezing, and contact urticaria while working in his fields during the months that orange trees bloom (April to July), especially when pruning, grafting, or rolling. He tolerated handling and peeling oranges and ingestion of pulp and juice. Prick-prick test with extract from orange tree branch, leaf, and blossom and to orange pulp and peel were positive. Spirometry during the blooming season found that the patient had a lower baseline PEFR (500 L/min), which decreased further while he was pruning and grafting, but especially when he was rolling 2 hours after commencing work. Total IgE was 600 kUA/L. Extracts from orange tree branch, leaf, and blossom tested positive for the 3 allergen sources (leaf, 8.0 kUA/L; blossom, 8.3 kUA/L; branch, 6.4 kUA/L). One IgE- binding band of approximately 9-10 kDa were shown in all of the extracts. An inhibition assay was able to inhibit the onset of the 9- to 10-kDa IgE-binding band, suggesting that the allergenic protein described was an LTP.

Cit s 3 as an occupational aeroallergen in an orange farmer.  
de lM, Felix R, Martorell C, Cerda JC, Bartolome B, Martorell A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):510-512

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation and comparison of commercially available latex extracts for skin prick tests.
Crude latex extracts are commonly used in skin prick tests (SPT) for the diagnosis of natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy. Nevertheless, variations in protein and allergen composition between latex extracts from different manufacturers can hamper a correct diagnosis. Seven latex SPT extracts were analyzed for protein content. The 4 major allergens Hev b 1, Hev b 3, Hev b 5, and Hev b 6.02 were also quantified. The protein content of the extracts varied widely from 8.0 microg/mL to 526.5 microg/mL. SDS-PAGE revealed broad differences in protein profiles between the extracts. Marked variability in the contents of all 4 major allergens was observed, and Hev b 3 and Hev b 5 were undetectable in some extracts. Microarray inhibition assays and SPT demonstrated relevant differences in allergenic capacity between the extracts.

Evaluation and comparison of commercially available latex extracts for skin prick tests.  
Gabriel MF, Tavares-Ratado P, Peixinho CM, Romeira AM, Taborda-Barata L, Postigo I, Martinez J, Tomaz CT.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):478-486

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergy to aquarium fish food: red midge larva, freshwater shrimp, and earthworm.
The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of occupational sensitization to 3 different arthropod species used as components of aquarium fish food. Eight workers from a fish food packing department were assessed. Prick tests with extracts of red midge larva (Chironomus thummi), freshwater shrimp (Gammarus species), earthworm (Tubifex species), and other arthropod species and a battery of common inhalant allergens were conducted. Prick test results were positive to red midge larvae in 7 patients (87.5%), Gammarus in 5 (62.5%), Tubifex in 3 (37.5%), and mites in 6 (75%). In the mite-allergic controls, 30% had positive prick test results to red midge larvae. PEFR decreased > or = 20% during the packing process in all patients, and in 1 patient it indicated a dual asthmatic response. Nasal challenge tests performed in 4 patients were positive in all 4. Specific IgE to red midge larvae was detected in 62.5%, Gammarus in 50%, and Tubifex in 16%. Bands of approximately 14-15 kDa and 31 kDa were observed in Gammarus and red midge larvae extracts. Cross-reactivity assays demonstrated that Gammarus totally inhibited red midge larvae, while Tubifex did so partially. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus showed very low inhibitory capacity.

Occupational allergy to aquarium fish food: red midge larva, freshwater shrimp, and earthworm. A clinical and immunological study.  
Meseguer AJ, Villajos IM, Iraola V, Carnes J, Fernandez CE.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):462-470

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.
A native allergen protein (Der f 24, 90 kDa) was purified from D. farinae. It was identified as an alpha-actinin containing a CaM-like domain with EF-hand motifs. Der f 24 reacted to sera from 85.4% (35/41) of patients. It reduced ~20% sera IgE reactivity to D. farinae extracts on a competitive ELISA. Eighty percent (8/10) of patients with D. farinae allergy showed positive reactions to Der f 24 in skin prick test.

Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.  
An S, Shen C, Liu X, Chen L, Xu X, Rong M, Liu Z, Lai R.
Miscellaneous 592 2013 Dec 6;8(12):e81377.

Abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Close Positive Correlation between the Lymphocyte Response to Hen Egg White and House Dust Mites in Infants with Atopic Dermatitis.  
Kimura M, Meguro T, Ito Y, Tokunaga F, Hashiguchi A, Seto S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Apr 11;166(3):161-169
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Fatal hypersensitivity pneumonitis from exposure to Fusarium vasinfectum in a home environment: a case report.  
Dickson SD, Tankersley MS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Apr 2;166(2):150-153
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Characterization of two pollen allergens of the london plane tree in Shanghai.  
Chen Z, Yang Y, Chen X, Wu Z, Li S.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr;14(2):139-148
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Common aeroallergens in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis living in southwestern part of Iran: based on skin prick test reactivity.  
Farrokhi S, Gheybi MK, Movahed A, Tahmasebi R, Iranpour D, Fatemi A, Etemadan R, Gooya M, Zandi S, Ashourinejad H, Alavizadeh S, Khoddami S.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr;14(2):133-138
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Fish is a major trigger of solid food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Spanish children.  
Vila L, Garcia V, Rial MJ, Novoa E, Cacharron T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Apr 10;

Anaphylaxis after hymenoptera sting: is it venom allergy, a clonal disorder, or both?  
Castells MC, Hornick JL, Akin C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Apr 7;
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Consensus document on the approach to children with allergic reactions after vaccination or allergy to vaccine components.  
Echeverria-Zudaire LA, Ortigosa-Del CL, onso-Lebrero E, varez-Garcia FJ, Cortes-Alvarez N, Garcia-Sanchez N, Martorell-Aragones A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Apr 16;
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A case of contact urticaria inducing anaphylaxis due to liliaceae vegetables in a hand eczema patient.  
Kobayashi T, Ito T, Egusa C, Maeda T, Numata T, Okubo Y, Tsuboi R.
Allergol Int 2015 Apr;64(2):211-213

Prevalences of specific IgE to wheat gliadin components in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Yokooji T, Okamura Y, Chinuki Y, Morita E, Harada S, Hiragun M, Hide M, Matsuo H.
Allergol Int 2015 Apr;64(2):206-208

Fatal anaphylaxis to wheat after gluten-free diet in an adolescent with celiac disease.  
Dondi A, Ricci G, Matricardi PM, Pession A.
Allergol Int 2015 Apr;64(2):203-205

Two cases of allergic contact dermatitis due to skin-whitening cosmetics.  
Numata T, Kobayashi Y, Ito T, Harada K, Tsuboi R, Okubo Y.
Allergol Int 2015 Apr;64(2):194-195

Familial kiwi fruit allergy: A case report.  
Ozturk AB, Ozyigit LP.
Allergol Int 2015 Apr;64(2):190-191

Incidence and natural history of challenge-proven cow's milk allergy in European children -EuroPrevall birth cohort.  
Schoemaker AA1, Sprikkelman AB, Grimshaw KE, Roberts G, Grabenhenrich L, Rosenfeld L, Siegert S, Dubakiene R, Rudzeviciene O, Reche M, Fiandor A, Papadopoulos NG, Malamitsi-Puchner A, Fiocchi A, et al
Allergy 2015 Apr 11;
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Early-life house dust mite allergens, childhood mite sensitization, and respiratory outcomes.  
Casas L, Sunyer J, Tischer C, Gehring U, Wickman M, Garcia-Esteban R, Lehmann I, Kull I, Reich A, Lau S, Wijga A, Anto JM, Nawrot TS, Heinrich J, Keil T, Torrent M.
Allergy 2015 Apr 8;
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NSAID exacerbated respiratory disease: a meta-analysis evaluating prevalence, mean provocative dose of aspirin and increased asthma morbidity.  
Morales DR, Guthrie B, Lipworth BJ, Jackson C, Donnan PT, Santiago VH.
Allergy 2015 Apr 8;
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Unintended allergens in precautionary labelled and unlabelled products pose significant risks to UK allergic consumers.  
Remington BC, Baumert JL, Blom WM, Houben GF, Taylor SL, Kruizinga AG.
Allergy 2015 Apr 3;
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Sensitization to workplace respiratory allergens among bakery workers in Douala, Cameroon: a cross-sectional study.  
Mbatchou Ngahane BH, Nde F, Ngomo E, Afane ZE.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;11(1):13
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Ambient air pollution exposure and incident adult asthma in a nationwide cohort of U.S. women.  
Young MT, Sandler DP, DeRoo LA, Vedal S, Kaufman JD, London SJ.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2014 Oct 15;190(8):914-921
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Diagnostic utility of concentrated Mus m 1 allergen extract in humans.  
Norton A, Smith K, James K, Hoskins A, Scott TA, Plunkett G, Fahrenholz J, Dworski R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):391-392

The utility of specific IgE testing to chlorhexidine in the investigation of perioperative adverse reactions.  
Anderson J, Rose M, Green S, Fernando SL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Mar 3;

Occupational asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by melon plant allergy.  
Gomez TE, Garcia RC, Garci aR, Mendez DY, Feo Brito FJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Mar 3;

Prevalence of blueberry allergy in a Turkish population.  
Dereci S, Orhan F, Koca T, Akcam M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Mar;114(3):259-260

Intraoperative anaphylaxis likely due to Gelfoam in a pediatric patient undergoing liver biopsy.  
Robbins KA, Keet CA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr 14;

Ketotifen use in a patient with fire ant hypersensitivity and mast cell activation syndrome.  
Asawa A, Simpson KH, Bonds RS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr 10;

Novel antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum relevant in serodiagnosis of occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in machinists.  
Chandra H, Lockey J, Yadav JS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr 8;

Urban-rural differences in the prevalence of allergen sensitization and self-reported rhinitis in the elderly population.  
Song WJ, Sohn KH, Kang MG, Park HK, Kim MY, Kim SH, Lim MK, Choi MH, Kim KW, Cho SH, Min KU, Chang YS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr 8;
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Allergen of the month-annual wormwood.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr;114(4):A23

Correlations between basophil activation, allergen-specific IgE with outcome and severity of oral food challenges.  
Song Y, Wang J, Leung N, Wang LX, Lisann L, Sicherer SH, Scurlock AM, Pesek R, Perry TT, Jones SM, Li XM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr;114(4):319-326
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Occupational sensitization to African penguin serum and mucus proteins.  
Potter PC, Ehrlich R, van Rooyen C, Fenemore B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Apr;114(4):345-347

The management of peanut allergy.  
Anagnostou K, Clark A.
Arch Dis Child 2015 Jan;100(1):68-72
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Environmental tobacco smoke exposure and risk of allergic sensitisation in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Feleszko W, Ruszczynski M, Jaworska J, Strzelak A, Zalewski BM, Kulus M.
Arch Dis Child 2014 Nov;99(11):985-992
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Jackfruit anaphylaxis in a latex allergic patient.  
Wongrakpanich S, Chantaphakul H, Ruxrungtham K.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Mar;33(1):65-68
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Rationale for specific allergen testing of patients with asthma in the clinical pulmonary office setting.  
Schulman ES, Pohlig C.
Chest 2015 Jan;147(1):251-258
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Objective eliciting doses of peanut allergic adults and children can be combined for risk assessment purposes.  
Klemans RJ, Blom WM, van Erp FC, Masthoff LJ, Rubingh CM, van der Ent CK, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Houben GF, Pasmans SG, Meijer Y, Knulst AC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Apr 21;
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Welcome to a new era for Clinical and Molecular Allergy.  
Maggi E.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;13(1):6

Evaluation of basophil allergen threshold sensitivity (CD-sens) to peanut and Ara h 8 in children IgE-sensitized to Ara h 8.  
Glaumann S, Nilsson C, Johansson SG, Asarnoj A, Wickman M, Borres MP, Nopp A.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;13(1):5
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Identification of major allergens of Paper Mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera) pollens and purification of novel 40 kDa allergen protein  
MS Aslam, T Khalid, I Gull, Z Abbas, MA Athar
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(1):36-41
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Clothing contact dermatitis  
B Kakande
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(1):46-53
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Diagnostic Allergy testing  
S Emanuel, D Hawarden
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(1):54-58
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

-omic sciences: new horizons in food allergy.  
Fiocchi A, Wang J.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 16;

Food for thought: progress in understanding the causes and mechanisms of food allergy.  
Ashley S, Dang T, Koplin J, Martino D, Prescott S.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 16;
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Proteomic applications in food allergy: food allergenomics.  
Di Girolamo F, Muraca M, Mazzina O, Lante I, Dahdah L.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 16;
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Anaphylaxis to Drugs.  
Kuruvilla M, Khan DA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):303-319
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Anaphylaxis to Insect Stings.  
Golden DB.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):287-302
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Anaphylaxis to the carbohydrate side chain Alpha-gal.  
Platts-Mills TA, Schuyler AJ, Tripathi A, Commins SP.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2015 May;35(2):247-260
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Identification of the cysteine protease Amb a 11 as a novel major allergen from short ragweed.  
Bouley J, Groeme R, Le MM, Jain K, Chabre H, Bordas-Le F, Couret MN, Bussieres L, Lautrette A, Naveau M, Baron-Bodo V, Lombardi V, Mascarell L, Batard T, Nony E, Moingeon P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 10;
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Clinical laboratories worldwide need to report IgE antibody results on clinical specimens as analytical results and not use differential positive thresholds.  
Hamilton RG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr 9;

Is the localized seminal plasma hypersensitivity the mucosal aspect of protein contact dermatitis?  
Calogiuri G, Nettis E, DiLeo E, Foti C, Vacca A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr;135(4):1090-1091

Using a gluten oral food challenge protocol to improve diagnosis of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Brockow K, Kneissl D, Valentini L, Zelger O, Grosber M, Kugler C, Werich M, Darsow U, Matsuo H, Morita E, Ring J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Apr;135(4):977-984
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Recurrent anaphylaxis associated with solitary bee sting (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in a patient with mastocytosis.  
Merida FC, Carreno RA, Iraola V, Ramirez-Hernandez M, Pajaron-Fernandez MJ, Huertas AJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):196-197

Occupational asthma caused by exposure to Ceratitis capitata (Mediterranean fruit fly).  
de lM, Felix R, Martorell C, Cerda JC, Bartolome B, Martorell A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):194-196

Usefulness of specific-IgG4 to Hymenoptera venom in the natural history of hymenoptera stings.  
Hayashi Y, Hirata H, Watanabe M, Yoshida N, Yokoyama T, Kakuta T, Murayama Y, Sugiyama K, Arima M, Fukushima Y, Fukuda T, Ishii Y.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):192-194

Identification of Plantago lanceolata pollen allergens using an immunoproteomic approach.  
Sousa R, Osorio H, Duque L, Ribeiro H, Cruz A, Abreu I.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):177-183
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The allergenic structure of the thaumatin-like protein Ole e 13 is degraded by processing of raw olive fruits.  
Torres M, varez-Garcia E, Bartra J, Alcantara M, Palomares O, Villalba M, Rodriguez R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):162-168
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Trends in hypersensitivity drug reactions: more drugs, more response patterns, more heterogeneity.  
Dona I, Barrionuevo E, Blanca-Lopez N, Torres MJ, Fernandez TD, Mayorga C, Canto G, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):143-153
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Anaphylaxis caused by flaxseed.  
varez-Perea A, Perez D, Doleo MA, Baeza ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):446-447

Pyruvate kinase and phosphopyruvate hydratase as novel IgE reactive proteins in prawn.  
Tomm JM, Krause C, Simon JC, Treudler R, von BM, Averbeck M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):443-445

Occupational asthma due to polyvinyl chloride and methyl methacrylate in a plumber.  
Uriarte SA, Fernandez-Nieto M, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):437-438

Prospective, multicenter clinical trial to validate new products for skin tests in the diagnosis of allergy to penicillin.  
Fernandez J, Torres MJ, Campos J, rribas-Poves F, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(6):398-408
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IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to ketoprofen: a case report.  
De PT, Buonomo A, Illuminati I, D'Alo S, Pucci S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):79-80

Oral tolerance induction with wheat: a valid therapeutic option in allergic patients.  
Vila L, Garcia V.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):77-78

Simultaneous oral mite anaphylaxis (pancake syndrome) in a father and daughter and a review of the literature.  
Mangodt EA, Van Gasse AL, Bridts CH, Sabato V, Ebo DG.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):75-76

Marihuana allergy: beyond the joint.  
Faber M, Van GA, Sabato V, Hagendorens MM, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):70-72

Aspirin does not preferentially potentiate IgE-dependent basophil CD63 upregulation in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Medrala W, Barg W, Radlinska A, Skotny A, Siwak E, Zbrojewicz E, Nadobna G, Nittner-Marszalska M, Wolanczyk-Medrala A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):68-70

Airborne contact dermatitis from Dittrichia viscosa.  
Galindo-Bonilla PA, faya-Arias T, Bartolome-Zavala B, De lR, Garcia-Rodriguez C, Feo-Brito F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):67-68

Allergic contact dermatitis from ethylhexyl salicylate.  
Miralles JC, Escudero AI, Carbonell A, Martinez A, Fernandez E, Cardona P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):66-67

Occupational asthma and dermatitis induced by eugenol in a cleaner.  
Lopez-Saez MP, Carrillo P, Huertas AJ, Fernandez-Nieto M, Lopez JD.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):64-65

Occupational asthma and eosinophilic esophagitis in a patient with egg-bird syndrome.  
Gomez TE, Garcia RC, Rodriguez J, De la RF, Cardenas R, Alfaya F, Pineda F, Feo Brito JF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):61-62

Occupational asthma in seafood manufacturing and food allergy to seafood.  
Uriarte SA, Fernandez-Nieto M, Arochena L, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):59-60

Domestic mites on the hair/scalp, pillows, and mattresses of mite-sensitized children in a subtropical area.  
Iraola V, Carrillo-Diaz T, Cruz-Niesvaara D, Garcia-Dumpierrez A, Suarez L, Hernandez SH, Fernandez-Caldas E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):57-59

Allergen characterization of chia seeds (Salvia hispanica), a new allergenic food.  
Garcia JS, Pastor VC, de las HM, Sanz MA, Vivanco F, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):55-56

Impact of glutathione on the allergenicity of the peach lipid transfer protein Pru p 3.  
Gomez-Casado C, Tordesillas L, Kinkel J, Starkl P, Cuesta-Herranz J, Roth-Walter F, az-Perales A, Jensen-Jarolim E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):47-54
Click to view abstract

Diagnostic performance of the atopy patch test with inhalant allergens.  
Fuiano N, Diddi G, Delvecchio M, Incorvaia C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):34-39
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactams: relevance of hapten-protein conjugates.  
Ariza A, Mayorga C, Fernandez TD, Barbero N, Martin-Serrano A, Perez-Sala D, Sanchez-Gomez FJ, Blanca M, Torres MJ, Montanez MI.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2015;25(1):12-25
Click to view abstract

Naproxen increases the severity of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a case report.  
Medrala W, Cieslik K, Barg W, Skotny A, Siwak E, Wolanczyk-Medrala A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):461-462

Occupational allergy to Ephestia kuehniella in the biological control industry.  
Moreno Escobosa MC, Bartolome ZB, Amat LJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):459-460

Anaphylaxis due to pentoxifylline.  
Carballada F, Guitian L, Nunez R, Lopez R, Pineda F, Boquete M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):457-458

Allergy to rabbit meat after sensitization by inhalation.  
Martorell CC, Morales RC, Bartolome ZB, Ortega SS, Raducan I, Pelaez HA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):455-456

Anaphylaxis due to Eruca sativa.  
Ruiz GM, Carnes J, Cedena JR, Nieto MF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):453-454

Allergy to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose: Clinical features and the diagnostic value of cetuximab.  
Martinez AA, udicana Berasategui MT, Longo AN, Ibanez EF, Balza d, Velasco AM, Reyes Dominguez SM, Munoz LD.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):450-452

Anaphylaxis mediated by thaumatin-like proteins.  
Azofra GJ, Cuesta-Herranz J, Perea LN, az-Perales A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):448-449

Delayed hypersensitivity to ribavirin confirmed by provocation test.  
Barreira P, Cadinha S, Malheiro D, da Silva JP.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):441-442

In vivo and in vitro testing with rAni s 1 can facilitate diagnosis of Anisakis simplex allergy.  
Martinez-Aranguren RM, Gamboa PM, Garcia-Lirio E, Asturias J, Goikoetxea MJ, Sanz ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):431-438
Click to view abstract

The impact of double-blind placebo- controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) on the socioeconomic cost of food allergy in Europe.  
Cerecedo I, Zamora J, Fox M, Voordouw J, Plana N, Rokicka E, Fernandez-Rivas M, Vazquez CS, Reche M, Fiandor A, Kowalski M, Antonides G, Mugford M, Frewer LJ, De la HB.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):418-424
Click to view abstract

Amaranthaceae pollens: review of an emerging allergy in the Mediterranean area.  
Villalba M, Barderas R, Mas S, Colas C, Batanero E, Rodriguez R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(6):371-381
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergic rhinoconjunctivitis induced by Matricaria chamomilla with tolerance of chamomile tea.  
Benito P, Rodriguez-Perez R, Garcia F, Juste S, Moneo I, Caballero ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):369-370

Immediate hypersensitivity to heparins: a cross-reactivity study.  
Gonzalez P, de la Sen ML, Venegas I, Ramon A, Soriano V, Cueva B, Fernandez J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):367-368

High baseline blood histamine levels and lack of cross-reactivity in a patient with ranitidine-induced anaphylaxis.  
Makris M, Aggelides X, Chliva C, Katoulis A, Papamichael K, Tiligada E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):361-363

Allergy to boxwood.  
Carballada F, Prat M, Nunez R, Martin J, Ledesma A, Lombardero M, Boquete M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):359-361

Chronic urticaria in a celiac patient: role of food allergy.  
Heffler E, Bruna E, Rolla G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):356-357

Diagnosis and natural history of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in children from a tertiary hospital in central Spain.  
Ruiz-Garcia M, Diez CE, Garcia SS, del Rio PR, Ibanez MD.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):354-356

Nasal inflammation in Parietaria-allergic patients is associated with pollen exposure.  
Gelardi M, Ciprandi G, Buttafava S, Quaranta N, Squeo V, Incorvaia C, Frati F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):352-353

Cross-reactivity and tolerability of cephalosporins in patients with cell-mediated allergy to penicillins.  
Buonomo A, Nucera E, Pecora V, Rizzi A, Aruanno A, Pascolini L, Ricci AG, Colagiovanni A, Schiavino D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):331-337
Click to view abstract

Practical guidelines for diagnosing hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.  
Ortega N, Dona I, Moreno E, Audicana MT, Barasona MJ, Berges-Gimeno MP, Blanca-Lopez N, Lobera T, Padial A, Rosado A, Torres MJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(5):308-323
Click to view abstract

Tick bite anaphylaxis in a patient allergic to bee venom.  
Sanchez M, Venturini M, Blasco A, Lobera T, Bartolome B, Oteo JA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):284-285

Venom-dependent vibration-induced anaphylaxis: A new hazard following large local reactions from hymenoptera stings.  
Astarita C, Savoia A, De BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):282-283

Occupational rhinitis due to inhalation of chicken meat protein.  
Lobera LT, Gonzalez M, Del PG, Venturini DM, Blasco SA, Pastor-Vargas C, Vivanco F, Bartolome ZB.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):278-279

Anaphylaxis after oxaliplatin allergy skin testing.  
Martin-Lazaro J, Firvida JL, Berges-Gimeno P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):269-270

Characterization of profilin and polcalcin panallergens from ash pollen.  
Mas S, Garrido-Arandia M, Batanero E, Purohit A, Pauli G, Rodriguez R, Barderas R, Villalba M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):257-266
Click to view abstract

Short-term effects of airborne ragweed pollen on clinical symptoms of hay fever in a panel of 30 patients.  
Caillaud D, Thibaudon M, Martin S, Segala C, Besancenot JP, Clot B, Francois H.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):249-256
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to biological drugs.  
Corominas M, Gastaminza G, Lobera T.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(4):212-225
Click to view abstract

Pork-cat syndrome as a cause of occupational asthma.  
varez-Perea A, Caralli ME, Zubeldia JM, Baeza ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):209-211

Allergy to red meat in adulthood: a case report.  
Carrapatoso I, Bartolome ZB, Ribeiro F, Martinez QJ, Segorbe LA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):206-208

Analysis of the IgE response to pine nut allergens in Italian allergic patients.  
Asero R, Bresciani M, Cervone M, Minale P, Murzilli F, Quercia O, Ridolo E, Savi E, Villalta D, Voltolini S, Amato S, Mistrello G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):204-206

Proteins responsible for nut allergies.  
Azofra GJ, Martinez BJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2014;24(3):203-204

Specific IgE to honeybee venom in patients with hypersensitivity to Asian giant honeybee (Apis dorsata).  
Lao-araya M, Dankai D, Trakultivakorn M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(5):365-366

Anaphylactic reactions requiring hospitalization among Bedouin and Jewish children in southern Israel.  
Elkarat S, Leibovitz E, Givon-Lavi N, Gershon E, Broides A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(5):363-364

Allergenicity of recombinant profilins from Japanese hop, Humulus japonicus.  
Jeong KY, Han IS, Choi SY, Lee JH, Lee JS, Hong CS, Park JW.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(5):345-350
Click to view abstract

A multicenter study of sensitization profiles in an allergic pediatric population in an area with high allergen exposure.  
Feliu A, Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Gonzalez E, Rodriguez B, Ruiz-Hornillos J, Jimeno L, de la TF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(5):337-344
Click to view abstract

Validation of total and specific IgE measurements in induced sputum.  
Araujo L, Palmares C, Beltrao M, Pereira AM, Fonseca J, Moreira A, Delgado L.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(5):330-336
Click to view abstract

Quality of life in patients with respiratory allergy is influenced by the causative allergen.  
Delgado J, Davila ID, Dominguez-Ortega J, Quirce S, Marti-Guadano E, Valero A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(5):309-314
Click to view abstract

Chronic urticaria caused by allergy to peach lipid transfer protein.  
Asero R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):208-209

Urticaria caused by ingestion of pasta and bread containing buckwheat flour.  
Guillen D, Fiandor-Roman A, Caballero T, Garcia-Vena E, Pastor S, Quirce S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):206-207

Pollen-food syndrome involving allergy to tiger nut.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Mohedano-Vicente E, Gandolfo-Cano M, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):197-198

Skin test-positive immediate hypersensitivity reaction to iodinated contrast media: the role of controlled challenge testing.  
Prieto-Garcia A, Tomas M, Pineda R, Tornero P, Herrero T, Fuentes V, Zapatero L, de BM.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):183-189
Click to view abstract

Allergen profile of Protophormia terraenovae, other species of calliphoridae, and Lumbricus terrestris in anglers allergic to maggots in Caceres, Spain.  
Porcel Carreno SL, Pineda de la LF, Frontera Carrion EM, Sanchez Gonzalez AB, Rodriguez ME, Jimenez TS, Alvarado AM, de la Hoz CB, eguez Pastor MC, Hernandez Arbeiza FJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):176-182
Click to view abstract

Immunoglobulin E reactivity and allergenic potency of Morus papyrifera (paper mulberry) pollen.  
Micheal S, Wangorsch A, Wolfheimer S, Foetisch K, Minhas K, Scheurer S, Ahmed A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):168-175
Click to view abstract

Identification of new potential allergens from Nile perch (Lates niloticus) and cod (Gadus morhua).  
Tomm JM, van DT, Jende C, Simon JC, Treudler R, von BM, Averbeck M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):159-167
Click to view abstract

Soy aeroallergens in thoracic fraction particles (PM10).  
Gomez-Olles S, Untoria MD, Villalbi JR, Munoz X, Morell F, Cruz MJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):152-158
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of asthma and severity of allergic rhinitis comparing 2 perennial allergens: house dust mites and Parietaria judaica pollen.  
Sala-Cunill A, Bartra J, Dalmau G, Tella R, Botey E, Raga E, Valero A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(3):145-151
Click to view abstract

Occupational wheat contact dermatitis and treatment with omalizumab.  
Mur GP, Martin IA, Lombardero VM, Bautista MP, Ventura LP.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):287-288

Occupational contact dermatitis to methacrylates in an orthopaedic operating room nurse.  
Ponce V, Munoz-Bellido F, Gonzalez A, Gracia M, Moreno A, Macias E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):286

Fixed drug eruption due to dextromethorphan with tolerance to other opioids.  
vila-Fernandez G, Vazquez-Cortes S, Moreno-De Vega MJ, Chamorro-Gomez M, Elices-Apellaniz A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):281-282

Nonallergic airway hyperresponsiveness and allergen-specific IgE levels are the main determinants of the early and late asthmatic response to allergen.  
Barnig C, Purohit A, Casset A, Sohy C, Lieutier-Colas F, Sauleau E, de BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):267-274
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of fungal extracts to determine immunomodulatory properties.  
Ranta K, Nieminen K, Saariaho T, Kortekangas-Savolainen O, Kumpula EK, Kosonen J, Pasanen AL, Savolainen J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):226-233
Click to view abstract

In vitro methods for diagnosing nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions to drugs.  
Mayorga C, Sanz ML, Gamboa P, Garcia-Aviles MC, Fernandez J, Torres MJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(4):213-225
Click to view abstract

Commercial dehydrated egg white for specific oral tolerance induction (SOTI): an easier treatment for egg allergy.  
Ruiz GM, Haroun E, Landivar ME, Torres Hernandez JA, Sastre J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(7):529-531

Cross-reactivity between cypress pollen and latex assessed using skin tests.  
Caimmi D, Raschetti R, Pons P, Dhivert-Donnadieu H, Bousquet J, Demoly P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(7):525-526

Occupational allergy to Spanish omelet.  
Antolin-Amerigo D, Gandolfo-Cano M, Gonzalez-de OD, Jimeno NL, Gonzalez-Mancebo E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(7):522-523

Sensitization to Anisakis simplex species in the population of northern Morocco.  
Abattouy N, Valero A, Martin-Sanchez J, Penalver MC, Lozano J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(7):514-519
Click to view abstract

Performance of different in vitro techniques in the molecular diagnosis of peanut allergy.  
Javaloyes G, Goikoetxea MJ, Garcia N, Sanz ML, Blanca M, Scheurer S, Vieths S, Ferrer M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(7):508-513
Click to view abstract

The putative serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 from Apis mellifera venom: recombinant and structural evaluation.  
Michel Y, McIntyre M, Ginglinger H, Ollert M, Cifuentes L, Blank S, Spillner E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(7):476-484
Click to view abstract

Cit s 3 as an occupational aeroallergen in an orange farmer.  
de lM, Felix R, Martorell C, Cerda JC, Bartolome B, Martorell A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):510-512

Cross-cultural adaptation and linguistic validation of the Spanish version of the drug hypersensitivity quality of life questionnaire.  
Gastaminza G, Herdman M, Baiardini I, Braido F, Corominas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):508-510

Evaluation and comparison of commercially available latex extracts for skin prick tests.  
Gabriel MF, Tavares-Ratado P, Peixinho CM, Romeira AM, Taborda-Barata L, Postigo I, Martinez J, Tomaz CT.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):478-486
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergy to aquarium fish food: red midge larva, freshwater shrimp, and earthworm. A clinical and immunological study.  
Meseguer AJ, Villajos IM, Iraola V, Carnes J, Fernandez CE.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):462-470

Recommendations for the use of in vitro methods to detect specific immunoglobulin E: are they comparable?  
Goikoetxea MJ, Sanz ML, Garcia BE, Mayorga C, Longo N, Gamboa PM, Barber D, Caballero MT, de la Calle TA, Escribano ML, Garcia Martinez JM, Labrador M, Lopez HM, Martinez QJ, Monteseirin MJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2013;23(7):448-454

Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.  
An S, Shen C, Liu X, Chen L, Xu X, Rong M, Liu Z, Lai R.
Miscellaneous 592 2013 Dec 6;8(12):e81377.
Abstract

Existe-t-il réellement une fenêtre d’opportunité pour la diversification alimentaire ? / Is there really a window of opportunity for food diversification? The example of celiac disease in the light of recent publications  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(1):1-4
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Une première évaluation en France de la présence d’allergènes de rongeurs dans les bâtiments publics / A first assessment of France allergens rodents in public buildings  
T. Piret, C. Tummino, D. Charpin
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(1):5-12
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Syndrome d’entérocolite induite par les protéines de viandes, chez un nourrisson de sept mois, suivi pendant onze ans / Induced enterocolitis syndrome meat proteins in an infant of seven months followed for eleven years  
M. Pétrus, C. Dormoy, L. Rival, G. Dutau
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(1):39-41
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensibilisation cutanée à l’ofloxacine à l’origine d’une allergie immédiate à l’ofloxacine per os / Skin sensitization causing an immediate allergy ofloxacin ofloxacin orally  
A.-L. Legeay, M. Salvidant, F. Hacard, J.-F. Nicolas, F. Berard
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(1):42-44
Click to view abstract

Urticarial vasculitis induced by OTC diet pills: a case report  
Cherrez-Ojeda I, Loayza E, Greiding L, Calderon JC, Cherrez A, Adum F
WAO Journal 2015;8:12
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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