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 Allergy Advisor Digest - May 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Male-specific submaxillary gland protein, a lipocalin allergen of the golden hamster, differs from the lipocalin allergens of siberian and roborovski dwarf hamsters.
Read Anaphylaxis induced by a drug containing lysozyme and papain: influence of papain on the IgE response.
Read IgE to poppy seed and morphine are not useful tools to diagnose opiate allergy.
Read Stinging insect allergy: state of the art 2015.
Read Large local reactions to insect stings.
Read Ash pollen immunoproteomics: Identification, immunologic characterization, and sequencing of 6 new allergens.
Read Variation of the group 5 grass pollen allergen content of airborne pollen in relation to geographic location and time in season.
Read Celiac disease.
Read Natural history of peanut allergy and predictors of resolution in the first 4 years of life
Read Anaphylaxis to galacto-oligosaccharides - an evaluation in an atopic population in Singapore.
Read IgE reactivity to carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins in wheat allergy.
Read Allergenic characterization of a novel allergen, homologous to chymotrypsin, from German cockroach.
Read Factors associated with negative histamine control for penicillin allergy skin testing in the inpatient setting.
Read Anaphylaxis due to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 13-year-old boy.
Read Dietary management of peanut and tree nut allergy: what exactly should patients avoid?
Read A compendium of causative agents of occupational asthma.
Read Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with refractory ulcer disease and gastrointestinal bleeding as a rare manifestation of seronegative gastrointestinal food allergy.
Read The dangers of the elimination diet in atopic infant, about a case
Read Food allergy secondary millet sensitization by inhalation
Read Description of a series of French patients suspected of having anti-alpha-gal IgE

Abstracts shared in May 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Component-resolved IgE profiles in Austrian patients with a convincing history of peanut allergy.
Read Utility of Ara h 2 sIgE levels to predict peanut allergy in Canadian children.
Read Sensitization to cashew nut 2S albumin, Ana o 3, is highly predictive of cashew and pistachio allergy in Greek children.
Read Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy.
Read Diamine oxidase levels in different chronic urticaria phenotypes.
Read Sensitive detection of major food allergens in breast milk: first gateway for allergenic contact during breastfeeding.
Read A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of orange.
Read Objective eliciting doses of peanut allergic adults and children can be combined for risk assessment purposes.
Read Allergenicity of pasteurized whole raw Hen's egg compared with fresh whole raw Hen's egg.
Read Oral anaphylaxis by ingestion of mite contaminated food in Panama City
Read Delayed allergy to mammalian meat in two patients with severe allergic wasp venoms
Read Anaphylaxis to yuzu (Citrus junos)

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Male-specific submaxillary gland protein, a lipocalin allergen of the golden hamster, differs from the lipocalin allergens of siberian and roborovski dwarf hamsters.
In the Golden hamster, male-specific submaxillary gland protein (MSP), a lipocalin expressed in a sex- and tissue-specific manner in the submaxillary and lacrimal glands, is secreted in the saliva, tears and urine. The purpose of this study was to determine if MSP is an allergen, to identify IgE-reactive proteins of different hamster species and to analyse potential cross-reactivities. Fur extracts were prepared from four hamster species. Four patients had IgE-antibodies against 20.5-kDa and 24-kDa proteins of Golden hamster fur extract, which were identified as MSP. IgE-reactive MSP-like proteins were detected in European hamster fur extract. Three patient sera showed IgE-reactive bands at 17-21 kDa in Siberian and Roborovski hamster fur extracts. These proteins were identified as two closely related lipocalins. Immunoblot inhibition experiments showed that they are cross-reactive and are different from MSP. MSP lipocalin of the Golden hamster was identified as an allergen, and it is different from the cross-reactive lipocalin allergens of Siberian and Roborovski hamsters.

Male-specific submaxillary gland protein, a lipocalin allergen of the golden hamster, differs from the lipocalin allergens of siberian and roborovski dwarf hamsters.  
Hilger C, Dubey VP, Lentz D, Davril C, Revets D, Muller CP, Diederich C, De La BH, Codreanu-Morel F, Morisset M, Lehners C, De PK, Hentges F.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;166(1):30-40

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis induced by a drug containing lysozyme and papain: influence of papain on the IgE response.
This paper reports the case of an egg-allergic pediatric patient who, once desensitized to egg following a successful rush oral immunotherapy protocol, could also tolerate Lizipaina(R), a drug containing lysozyme (LYS) and papain, which had previously caused him a severe allergic reaction. Because the LYS amount that elicited the anaphylactic reaction (5 mg) was much lower than that tolerated during a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (corresponding to approximately 60 mg of LYS), the possibility that the presence of papain could increase the allergenic potential of LYS was investigated. The SDS-PAGE pattern of LYS treated with papain under nonreducing conditions showed the presence of intact LYS that partially disappeared following reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol, releasing IgE-reactive fragments as determined by Western blotting. MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed that papain degraded LYS, giving rise to three IgE-binding fragments: LYS (22-129), LYS (34-96) and LYS (62-128) that likely remained linked through the disulfide bonds present in the LYS molecule. Therefore the combined administration of LYS with proteolytic enzymes such as papain may have developed a severe allergic reaction in the patient studied, underlining the importance of considering all the components and their interactions when drugs are to be consumed by allergic persons.

Anaphylaxis induced by a drug containing lysozyme and papain: influence of papain on the IgE response.  
Benede S, Perez-Rangel I, Lozano-Ojalvo D, Molina E, Ibanez MD, Lopez-Fandino R, Lopez-Exposito I.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(2):83-90

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE to poppy seed and morphine are not useful tools to diagnose opiate allergy.
Recently, it has been suggested that sIgE to poppy seed extract and morphine would be reliable in the diagnosis of opiate allergy. This study aimed at verifying the predictive value of positive poppy seed and morphine sIgE assays results. 22 individuals with a positive sIgE to poppy seed or morphine were selected. All had controlled drug challenges with increasing doses of morphine and/or codeine. Of these, 18 patients had an additional basophil activation test (BAT) with morphine and codeine.None of the 22 patients demonstrated objective or subjective symptoms on provocation with morphine and/or codeine. Positive sIgE results to poppy seed and morphine are therefore not per se predictive for genuine opiate allergy and should not be used in isolation to diagnose morphine or codeine allergy.

IgE to poppy seed and morphine are not useful tools to diagnose opiate allergy.  
Van Gasse AL, Hagendorens MM, Sabato V, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):396-399

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Stinging insect allergy: state of the art 2015.
Stinging insect allergy is responsible for more than 10% of all cases of anaphylaxis. The potential culprit insects are diverse and vary with geography. The incidence of insect allergy is declining in some areas and increasing in others, possibly due to effects of climate change, introduction of species into new areas, outdoor recreational activities, and movement of human populations that brings insects into contact with a greater number of people. Flying Hymenoptera and imported fire ant stings are responsible for the majority of patients evaluated for insect anaphylaxis. The most efficient means of identifying allergy to insects is skin testing although falsely positive and negative results occur. The limitations of testing coupled with the natural temporal variability of allergic sensitivity complicate the interpretation of test results. The clinical history is of paramount importance to be certain that the test results are relevant; therefore, screening or testing before a history of a sting reaction is not advisable. Mast cell disorders are associated with severe anaphylaxis from insect stings and should be considered in affected subjects. Insect immunotherapy, using venoms for most insects and whole-body extracts for imported fire ants, is proven effective in reducing the likelihood of anaphylaxis due to subsequent stings from 40%-60% to less than 5%.

Stinging insect allergy: state of the art 2015.  
Tankersley MS, Ledford DK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):315-322

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Large local reactions to insect stings.
Large local reactions (LLRs) are IgE-mediated late-phase inflammatory reactions that can cause great morbidity but are associated with a relatively low risk of future anaphylaxis. Patients with LLR may benefit from consultation with an allergist to help clarify the relative risk, to plan the best treatment for future stings, and to determine whether or not to pursue testing or venom immunotherapy (VIT). The chance of anaphylaxis to future stings is <5%, so VIT is not generally recommended to people who have had LLR.

Large local reactions to insect stings.  
Golden DB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):331-334

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ash pollen immunoproteomics: Identification, immunologic characterization, and sequencing of 6 new allergens.
25 ash pollen–sensitized patients with IgE reactivity to ash and olive pollen extracts as assessed. IgG-reactive proteins were identified and named as Fra e 1, Fra e 2, Fra e 3, Fra e 6, Fra e 7, Fra e 9, Fra e 11, and Fra e 12. Fra e 10 was detected only by 1. The findings suggested high sequence identity between olive and ash pollen allergens. To confirm this hypothesis, 6 ash pollen allergens not previously reported (Fra e 2, Fra e 3, Fra e 6, Fra e 10, Fra e 11, and Fra e 12) were amplified by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. The sequence identity between ash and olive pollen allergens ranged from 84% to 97%, and sequence similarity ranged from 94% to 99%, except for Fra e 11, which presented the lowest identity and similarity (79% and 90%, respectively) with its olive counterpart. The deduced prevalence for the cross-reactive ash allergens ranged between 64% and 92% for the major allergens Fra e 1, Fra e 2, Fra e 9, and Fra e 11 and between 4% and 32% for the minor allergens Fra e 3, Fra e 6, Fra e 7, Fra e 10, and Fra e 12. These findings are in accordance with previous reports involving related and nonrelated allergenic sources, except for Fra e 10, which was previously described as a major allergen in olive pollen.

Ash pollen immunoproteomics: Identification, immunologic characterization, and sequencing of 6 new allergens.  
Mas S, Torres M, Garrido-Arandia M, Salamanca G, Castro L, Barral P, Purohit A, Pauli G, Rodriguez R, Batanero E, Barderas R, Villalba M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 10;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Variation of the group 5 grass pollen allergen content of airborne pollen in relation to geographic location and time in season.
This study investigated the natural variability in release of the major group 5 allergen from grass pollen across Europe. Airborne pollen and allergens were simultaneously collected daily with a volumetric spore trap and a high-volume cascade impactor at 10 sites across Europe for 3 consecutive years. Group 5 allergen levels were determined with a Phl p 5-specific ELISA in 2 fractions of ambient air. On average, grass pollen released 2.3 pg of Phl p 5 per pollen. Allergen release per pollen (potency) varied substantially, ranging from less than 1 to 9 pg of Phl p 5 per pollen. The main variation was locally day to day. Average potency maps across Europe varied between years. Variation in allergen release is in addition to variations in pollen counts.

Variation of the group 5 grass pollen allergen content of airborne pollen in relation to geographic location and time in season.  
Buters J, Prank M, Sofiev M, Pusch G, Albertini R, nnesi-Maesano I, Antunes C, Behrendt H, Berger U, Brandao R, Celenk S, Galan C, Grewling L, Jackowiak B, Kennedy R, Rantio-Lehtimaki A, Rees.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 6;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Celiac disease.
This review will focus on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease (CD). Given an increasing awareness of gluten-related disorders, medical professionals of all varieties are encountering patients with a diagnosis of CD or who are thought to have food intolerance to gluten. The prevalence of CD among the general population is estimated to be 1% in Western nations, and there is growing evidence for underdiagnosis of the disease, especially in non-Western nations that were traditionally believed to be unaffected. The development of serologic markers specific to CD has revolutionized the ability both to diagnose and monitor patients with the disease. Additionally, understanding of the clinical presentations of CD has undergone a major shift over the past half century. Although it is well understood that CD develops in genetically predisposed subjects exposed to gluten, the extent of other environmental factors in the pathogenesis of the disease is an area of continued research. Currently, the main therapeutic intervention for CD is a gluten-free diet; however, novel nondietary agents are under active investigation. Future areas of research should also help us understand the relationship of CD to other gluten-related disorders

Celiac disease.  
Green PH, Lebwohl B, Greywoode R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;135(5):1099-1106

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Natural history of peanut allergy and predictors of resolution in the first 4 years of life
Previous studies of predictors of tolerance development have been biased by failure to challenge high-risk children when IgE antibody levels are high, therefore potentially introducing bias to persistent allergy. This study sought to describe the natural history of peanut allergy between 1 and 4 years of age and develop thresholds for skin prick test (SPT) results and specific IgE (sIgE) levels measured at age 1 and 4 years that have 95% positive predictive value (PPV) or negative predictive value for the persistence or resolution of peanut allergy. One-year-old infants with challenge-confirmed peanut allergy (n = 156) from the population-based, longitudinal HealthNuts Study (n = 5276) were followed up at 4 years of age with repeat oral food challenges, SPTs, and sIgE measurements (n = 103). Peanut allergy resolved in 22% of children by age 4 years. Decreasing wheal size predicted tolerance, and increasing wheal size was associated with persistence. Thresholds for SPT responses and sIgE levels at age 1 year with a 95% PPV for persistent peanut allergy are an SPT-induced response of 13 mm or greater and an sIgE level of 5.0 kU/L or greater. Thresholds for SPT and sIgE results at age 4 years with a 95% PPV for persistent peanut allergy are an SPT response of 8 mm or greater and an sIgE level of 2.1 kU/L or greater. Ara h 2, tree nut, and house dust mite sensitization; coexisting food allergies; eczema; and asthma were not predictive of persistent peanut allergy.

Natural history of peanut allergy and predictors of resolution in the first 4 years of life: A population-based assessment.  
Peters RL, Allen KJ, Dharmage SC, Koplin JJ, Dang T, Tilbrook KP, Lowe A, Tang ML, Gurrin LC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;135(5):1257-1266

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to galacto-oligosaccharides - an evaluation in an atopic population in Singapore.
Anaphylaxis to galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), a prebiotic, has been described in atopic patients following its supplementation in commercial milk formula in South-East Asia. The epidemiology of this usual allergy to a carbohydrate is unknown. This study evaluated the prevalence of allergy to two formulations of commercial GOS, Vivinal GOS (vGOS) and Oligomate , in an atopic cohort. Atopic subjects (n = 487) from two specialist allergy clinics were surveyed via structured questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests to GOS. Subjects with positive skin prick tests to GOS (n = 30, 6.2%) underwent basophil activation tests, and a subset (n = 13) underwent oral challenge tests to both formulations of GOS. Six subjects had positive challenges to vGOS; and none to Oligomate. By extrapolating the BAT and oral challenge results, the prevalence of allergy to vGOS is estimated at up to 3.5% (95% CI 2.2-5.5%) of our atopic population. Our findings show that GOS allergy may be common amongst atopics in Singapore

Anaphylaxis to galacto-oligosaccharides - an evaluation in an atopic population in Singapore.  
Soh JY, Huang CH, Chiang WC, Llanora GV, Lee AJ, Loh W, Chin YL, Tay VY, Chan YH, Dianne D, Lee BW.
Allergy 2015 May 7;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE reactivity to carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins in wheat allergy.
Carbohydrate moieties of different glycoproteins, such as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) and galactose alpha-1,3-galactose, can induce IgE reactivity with varied clinical significance. In this study, the possible participation of glycan from wheat gliadin, with respect to its IgE-binding capacity, was investigated in children with food allergies to wheat. Gliadin-specific IgE was detected and correlated with wheat-specific IgE in the symptomatic, never-exposed, and asymptomatic groups. The glycan range overlapped significantly with the gliadin range. Deglycosylation of gliadin reduced the allergenicity of gliadin. In gliadin, the allergenicity of the glycan portion was greater in the symptomatic group than in the never-exposed and asymptomatic groups. The authors concluded that N-glycan in gliadin might exhibit allergenicity as a possible carbohydrate epitope in wheat allergy in children.

IgE reactivity to carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins in wheat allergy.  
Song TW, Hong JY, Lee KE, Kim MN, Kim YH, Lee SY, Kim KW, Sohn MH, Kim KE.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 May;36(3):192-199

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergenic characterization of a novel allergen, homologous to chymotrypsin, from German cockroach.
Various protease allergens have been identified by proteomic analysis of German cockroach fecal extract. In this study, a novel allergen was characterized, a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. A recombinant chymotrypsins from the German cockroach and house dust mite (Der f 6) were expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence of German cockroach chymotrypsin showed 32.7 to 43.1% identity with mite group 3 (trypsin) and group 6 (chymotrypsin) allergens. Sera from 8 of 28 German cockroach allergy subjects (28.6%) showed IgE binding to the recombinant protein. IgE binding to the recombinant cockroach chymotrypsin was inhibited by house dust mite chymotrypsin Der f 6, while it minimally inhibited the German cockroach whole body extract. The novel allergen homologous to chymotrypsin was identified from the German cockroach and was cross-reactive with Der f 6.

Allergenic characterization of a novel allergen, homologous to chymotrypsin, from German cockroach.  
Jeong KY, Son M, Lee JH, Hong CS, Park JW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 May;7(3):283-289

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Factors associated with negative histamine control for penicillin allergy skin testing in the inpatient setting.
Identification of factors adversely affecting the utility of allergy skin testing is important in optimizing patient care. Inpatient penicillin skin test data demonstrate that up to 20% of attempted penicillin skin tests are indeterminate owing to a negative histamine test response, despite exclusion of H1 antagonists. Critical illness, vasopressors, steroid use, and psychotropic medications have been postulated to influence outcomes, but large studies are lacking. This study's objective was to identify factors associated with a negative histamine test response for the inpatient setting. Fifty-two cases were identified with a negative histamine response after penicillin skin testing in the absence of antihistamine therapy for 72 hours before testing. One hundred twenty-five controls with a normal histamine response were randomly selected from same population. The study concludes that regression analysis supports ICU stay during skin testing as associated with a high OR for a negative histamine response independent of age. Systemic corticosteroids, H2 blockers, and older age are associated with a significant OR for a negative histamine response.

Factors associated with negative histamine control for penicillin allergy skin testing in the inpatient setting.  
Geng B, Thakor A, Clayton E, Finkas L, Riedl MA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 May 7;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis due to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 13-year-old boy.
This study reports on a case of a child hospitalized due to pneumonia who developed anaphylaxis as a result of the rupture of a pulmonary hydatid cyst

Anaphylaxis due to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 13-year-old boy.  
Ozdemir A, Bozdemir SE, Akbiyik D, Daar G, Korkut S, Korkmaz L, Bastug O.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Apr;5(2):128-131

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dietary management of peanut and tree nut allergy: what exactly should patients avoid?
In peanut or tree nut-allergic children, introduction of specific nuts to which the child is not allergic may improve quality of life and should be considered in patients with multiple foods allergies, vegan or ethnic-specific diets, in whom nuts are an important source of protein. Nut-allergic consumers do not just need to avoid foods containing nuts as an ingredient, but also contend with pre-packed foods which frequently have precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) referring to possible nut contamination. Although the published rate of peanut contamination in 'snack' foods with PAL ranges from 0.9-32.4%, peanut contamination in non-snack items with PAL is far less common. We propose that in some peanut-allergic patients (depending on history of reactivity to trace levels of peanut, reaction severity, other medical conditions, willingness to always carry adrenaline, etc.), consideration may be given to allow the consumption of non-snack foods containing PAL following discussion with the patient's (and their family's) specialist. More work is needed to provide consumers with clearer information on the risk of potential nut contamination in pre-packed food. We also draw attention to the change in legislation in December 2014 that require mandatory disclosure of allergens in non-pre-packed foods

Dietary management of peanut and tree nut allergy: what exactly should patients avoid?  
Brough HA, Turner PJ, Wright T, Fox AT, Taylor SL, Warner JO, Lack G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May;45(5):859-871

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A compendium of causative agents of occupational asthma.
The objective of this study was to provide an evidence-based compendium of allergenic and irritant agents that are known to cause occupational asthma in order to improve diagnostics and disease management. Approximately 3,000 relevant papers were identified, which covered 372 different causes of allergic and 184 different causes of irritant occupational asthma. This work comprises the largest compendium and evaluation of agents and worksites causing allergic or irritant occupational asthma from the literature assessed in an evidence-based manner. Using the modified RCGP three-star grading system, the strongest evidence of association with an individual agent or worksite ('***') was found for exposure to laboratory animals. Associations with moderate evidence level ('**') were obtained for a) the allergenic agents or worksites: alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae, various enzymes from Bacillus subtilis, papain, bakeries, western red cedar, latex, psyllium, storage mites, rat, carmine, egg proteins, Atlantic salmon, fishmeal, Norway lobster, prawn, snow crab, seafood, trout and turbot, reactive dyes, b) the irritant agents or worksites: benzene-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid, 1,2- anhydride [trimellitic anhydride], chlorine, cobalt, cement, environmental tobacco smoke, grain, welding fumes, construction work, swine confinement, World Trade Center disaster 2001, and c) agents or worksites causing allergic as well as irritant occupational asthma, included farming, poultry confinement, various isocyanates and platinum salts. A low evidence level (RCGP) was obtained for 84 agents or worksites (42 from each group), providing a total of 141 conditions with a low, moderate or strong evidence level. (Baur 2013 ref.30754 7)

A compendium of causative agents of occupational asthma.  
Baur X.
Miscellaneous J Occup Med Toxicol 2013 May 24;8(1):15.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with refractory ulcer disease and gastrointestinal bleeding as a rare manifestation of seronegative gastrointestinal food allergy.
A 22 year old patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding from multilocular non-healing ulcers of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum over a period of four years. Extensive gastroenterological and allergological standard diagnostic procedures showed benign ulcerative lesions with tissue eosinophilia, but no conclusive diagnosis. Multiple diagnostic procedures were performed, until finally, endoscopically guided segmental gut lavage identified locally produced, intestinal IgE antibodies at the intestinal level were found to be more-fold increased for total IgE and food-specific IgE against nuts, rye flour, wheat flour, pork, beef and egg yolk compared with healthy controls. A diet eliminating these allergens was introduced which resulted in complete healing of the multilocular ulcers with resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. All gastrointestinal lesions disappeared and total serum IgE levels dropped to normal within 9 months. (Raithel 2014 ref.30757 7)

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with refractory ulcer disease and gastrointestinal bleeding as a rare manifestation of seronegative gastrointestinal food allergy.  
Raithel M, Hahn M, Donhuijsen K, Hagel AF, Nägel A, Rieker RJ, Neurath MF, Reinshagen M.
Miscellaneous Nutr J 2014 Sep 17;13:93.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The dangers of the elimination diet in atopic infant, about a case
We report the history of an infant with difficult-to-control eczema who was put on a diet without cow's milk and then became strongly sensitized and allergic to cow's milk, eggs, wheat and peanuts. In the light of the work of Gideon Lack's group, we review the mechanisms of food allergy (sensitization through the skin and tolerance by the oral route) and insist on the importance of diversification of foods in the diet of infants between four and six months, a window of opportunity for the induction of tolerance.

Les dangers du régime d’éviction chez le nourrisson atopique, à propos d’un cas / The dangers of the elimination diet in atopic infant, about a case  
D. Sabouraud-Leclerc
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):71-74

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy secondary millet sensitization by inhalation
The various published cases show that food allergy occurs most often millet after sensitization by inhalation. There are not necessarily pre respiratory or skin allergy. This demonstrates once again that questions regarding the patient's environment should be asked in case of food reaction. They help to explain why reactions occur during the first consumption of the food.

Allergie alimentaire au millet secondaire à une sensibilisation par voie respiratoire / Food allergy secondary millet sensitization by inhalation [Abstract]  
J. Flabbee, B. Mouget, P. Sergeant, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):214

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Description of a series of French patients suspected of having anti-alpha-gal IgE
"We find in France the Association tick bite (Ixodes ricinus) / IgE anti-alpha-gal even though these are not the same as in the US ticks (Amblyomma americanum) and Australia (Ixodes holocyclus). It is interesting to note that anti-alpha-gal IgE can be found in 9/13 patients who had idiopatiques shocks."

Description d’une série de patients français suspectés d’avoir des IgE anti-alpha-gal / Description of a series of French patients suspected of having anti-alpha-gal IgE [Abstract]  
Richard C, D. Maurice, P. Salloignon, R. De Lagesnestre, M. Epstein, F. Bord, S. Jacquenet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):221

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Long-term exposure to house dust mite leads to the suppression of allergic airway disease despite persistent lung inflammation.  
Bracken SJ, Adami AJ, Szczepanek SM, Ehsan M, Natarajan P, Guernsey LA, Shahriari N, Rafti E, Matson AP, Schramm CM, Thrall RS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Apr 28;166(4):243-258

A novel multipeptide microarray for the specific and sensitive mapping of linear IgE-binding epitopes of food allergens.  
Kuhne Y, Reese G, Ballmer-Weber BK, Niggemann B, Hanschmann KM, Vieths S, Holzhauser T.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 Apr 24;166(3):213-224

Male-specific submaxillary gland protein, a lipocalin allergen of the golden hamster, differs from the lipocalin allergens of siberian and roborovski dwarf hamsters.  
Hilger C, Dubey VP, Lentz D, Davril C, Revets D, Muller CP, Diederich C, De La BH, Codreanu-Morel F, Morisset M, Lehners C, De PK, Hentges F.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;166(1):30-40

Component-resolved IgE profiles in Austrian patients with a convincing history of peanut allergy.  
Ackerbauer D, Bublin M, Radauer C, Varga EM, Hafner C, Ebner C, Szepfalusi Z, Froschl R, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Eiwegger T, Breiteneder H.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;166(1):13-24

Anaphylaxis induced by a drug containing lysozyme and papain: influence of papain on the IgE response.  
Benede S, Perez-Rangel I, Lozano-Ojalvo D, Molina E, Ibanez MD, Lopez-Fandino R, Lopez-Exposito I.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2014;165(2):83-90

Anti-amoxicillin immunoglobulin E, histamine-2 receptor antagonist therapy and mast cell activation syndrome are risk factors for amoxicillin anaphylaxis.  
Pastorello EA, Stafylaraki C, Mirone C, Preziosi D, Aversano MG, Mascheri A, Losappio LM, Ortolani V, Nichelatti M, Farioli L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 May 6;166(4):280-286
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Histamine and its relation to allergens in the skin prick test.  
Moller C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015 May 9;166(4):241-242

Moxifloxacin hypersensitivity: Uselessness of skin testing.  
Uyttebroek AP, Sabato V, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):443-445

Frequent episodes of adult soybean allergy during and following the pollen season.  
Minami T, Fukutomi Y, Saito A, Sekiya K, Tsuburai T, Taniguchi M, Akiyama K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):441-442

IgE to poppy seed and morphine are not useful tools to diagnose opiate allergy.  
Van Gasse AL, Hagendorens MM, Sabato V, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):396-399
Click to view abstract

Considerations about pollen used for the production of allergen extracts.  
Codina R, Crenshaw RC, Lockey RF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May 21;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to medications containing meat byproducts in an alpha-gal sensitized individual.  
Muglia C, Kar I, Gong M, Hermes-DeSantis ER, Monteleone C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May 13;

Contact dermatitis: a practice parameter-update 2015.  
Fonacier L, Bernstein DI, Pacheco K, Holness DL, Blessing-Moore J, Khan D, Lang D, Nicklas R, Oppenheimer J, Portnoy J, Randolph C, Schuller D, Spector S, Tilles S, Wallace D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3 Suppl):S1-S39
Click to view abstract

Stinging insect allergy: state of the art 2015.  
Tankersley MS, Ledford DK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):315-322
Click to view abstract

Utility of Ara h 2 sIgE levels to predict peanut allergy in Canadian children.  
Leo SH, Dean JM, Jung B, Kuzeljevic B, Chan ES.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May 1;

Large local reactions to insect stings.  
Golden DB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):331-334
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis after cystoscopy.  
Lieberman P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 May;3(3):469-470

Ash pollen immunoproteomics: Identification, immunologic characterization, and sequencing of 6 new allergens.  
Mas S, Torres M, Garrido-Arandia M, Salamanca G, Castro L, Barral P, Purohit A, Pauli G, Rodriguez R, Batanero E, Barderas R, Villalba M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 10;

Evolution pathways of IgE responses to grass and mite allergens throughout childhood.  
Custovic A, Sonntag HJ, Buchan IE, Belgrave D, Simpson A, Prosperi MC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 8;
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to cashew nut 2S albumin, Ana o 3, is highly predictive of cashew and pistachio allergy in Greek children.  
Savvatianos S, Konstantinopoulos AP, Borga A, Stavroulakis G, Lidholm J, Borres MP, Manousakis E, Papadopoulos NG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 8;

Different IgE recognition of mite allergen components in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children.  
Resch Y, Michel S, Kabesch M, Lupinek C, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 5;
Click to view abstract

Variation of the group 5 grass pollen allergen content of airborne pollen in relation to geographic location and time in season.  
Buters J, Prank M, Sofiev M, Pusch G, Albertini R, nnesi-Maesano I, Antunes C, Behrendt H, Berger U, Brandao R, Celenk S, Galan C, Grewling L, Jackowiak B, Kennedy R, Rantio-Lehtimaki A, Rees.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May 6;
Click to view abstract

Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy.  
Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Katz Y, Mehr SS, Koletzko S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;135(5):1114-1124
Click to view abstract

Celiac disease.  
Green PH, Lebwohl B, Greywoode R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;135(5):1099-1106
Click to view abstract

Natural history of peanut allergy and predictors of resolution in the first 4 years of life: A population-based assessment.  
Peters RL, Allen KJ, Dharmage SC, Koplin JJ, Dang T, Tilbrook KP, Lowe A, Tang ML, Gurrin LC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;135(5):1257-1266
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis in child with odontoiatric face-mask.  
Tammaro A, Cortesi G, Giulianelli V, Parisella FR, Persechino S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;47(3):103-104

Immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to Mannitol as drug excipient (E421): a case report.  
Calogiuri GF, Muratore L, Nettis E, Casto AM, Di LE, Vacca A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;47(3):99-102
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Proposal of a skin tests based approach for the prevention of recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media.  
la-Torre E, Berti A, Yacoub MR, Guglielmi B, Tombetti E, Sabbadini MG, Voltolini S, Colombo G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 May;47(3):77-85
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Molecular-based diagnosis of respiratory allergic diseases in children from Curitiba, a city in Southern Brazil.  
Araujo LM, Rosario NA, Mari A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 May 13;
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Diamine oxidase levels in different chronic urticaria phenotypes.  
Daschner A, Gonzalez-Fernandez J, Valls A, de FC, Rodero M, Cuellar C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 May 13;
Click to view abstract

Exposure to pets and risk of sensitisation to house dust mite, cat and dog allergens in a pre-school children population of an Andalusian seaside town.  
Colli LG, Perez-Frias J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 May 13;

Amelioration of some immunological disorders caused by the faeces of the dominant true house dust mites in El-Minia Governorate, Egypt.  
bdel-Salam BK, Shoker NI, Mohamad AM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 May 13;
Click to view abstract

Actual drug allergy during childhood: Five years' experience at a tertiary referral centre.  
Tugcu GD, Cavkaytar O, Sekerel BE, Sackesen C, Kalayci O, Tuncer A, Soyer O.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 May 8;
Click to view abstract

Factors associated with different results of allergy tests in children with dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis.  
Fuiano N, Delvecchio M, Incorvaia C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 May;43(3):238-242
Click to view abstract

Sensitive detection of major food allergens in breast milk: first gateway for allergenic contact during breastfeeding.  
Pastor-Vargas C, Maroto AS, Díaz-Perales A, Villaba M, Casillas Diaz N, Vivanco F, Cuesta-Herranz J.
Allergy 2015 May 7;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to galacto-oligosaccharides - an evaluation in an atopic population in Singapore.  
Soh JY, Huang CH, Chiang WC, Llanora GV, Lee AJ, Loh W, Chin YL, Tay VY, Chan YH, Dianne D, Lee BW.
Allergy 2015 May 7;
Click to view abstract

Pollen-derived adenosine is a necessary cofactor for ragweed allergy.  
Wimmer M, Alessandrini F, Gilles S, Frank U, Oeder S, Hauser M, Ring J, Ferreira F, Ernst D, Winkler JB, Schmitt-Kopplin P, Ohnmacht C, Behrendt H, Schmidt-Weber C, Traidl-Hoffmann C, Guterm.
Allergy 2015 May 2;
Click to view abstract

IgE reactivity to carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins in wheat allergy.  
Song TW, Hong JY, Lee KE, Kim MN, Kim YH, Lee SY, Kim KW, Sohn MH, Kim KE.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 May;36(3):192-199
Click to view abstract

Effect of chemical modifications on allergenic potency of peanut proteins.  
Bencharitiwong R, van der Kleij HP, Koppelman SJ, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 May;36(3):185-191
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Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and allergic proctocolitis.  
Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 May;36(3):172-184
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Mold allergens in respiratory allergy: from structure to therapy.  
Twaroch TE, Curin M, Valenta R, Swoboda I.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 May;7(3):205-220
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Allergenic characterization of a novel allergen, homologous to chymotrypsin, from German cockroach.  
Jeong KY, Son M, Lee JH, Hong CS, Park JW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 May;7(3):283-289
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis and epinephrine in North Carolina public schools.  
Wright BL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 May 8;

Factors associated with negative histamine control for penicillin allergy skin testing in the inpatient setting.  
Geng B, Thakor A, Clayton E, Finkas L, Riedl MA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 May 7;
Click to view abstract

Allergen of the month-white bursage.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 May;114(5):A17

A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of orange. [Japanese]  
Ono R, Motomura C, Takamatsu N, Kondo Y, Akamine Y, Matsuzaki H, Murakami Y, Amimoto Y, Taba N, Honjyo S, Shibata R, Odajima H.
Arerugi 2015 Mar;64(2):149-155
Click to view abstract

Utility of the allerport(R) hrt in the diagnosis of hen's egg allergy: a pediatric multicenter challenge study. [Japanese]  
Sato S, Ito K, Urisu A, Kando N, Nakagawa T, Tsuge I, Kondo Y, Ito S, Ebisawa M.
Arerugi 2015 Mar;64(2):136-148
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis due to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst in a 13-year-old boy.  
Ozdemir A, Bozdemir SE, Akbiyik D, Daar G, Korkut S, Korkmaz L, Bastug O.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Apr;5(2):128-131
Click to view abstract

Clinical manifestation and sensitization of allergic children from Malaysia.  
Yadav A, Naidu R.
Asia Pac Allergy 2015 Apr;5(2):78-83
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Objective eliciting doses of peanut allergic adults and children can be combined for risk assessment purposes.  
Klemans RJ, Blom WM, van Erp FC, Masthoff LJ, Rubingh CM, van der Ent CK, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Houben GF, Pasmans SG, Meijer Y, Knulst AC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Apr 21;

Ragweed pollen: is climate change creating a new aeroallergen problem in the UK?  
Pashley CH, Satchwell J, Edwards RE.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May 22;
Click to view abstract

What makes an allergen?  
Scheurer S, Toda M, Vieths S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May 18;
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Naturally occurring tolerance acquisition to foods in previously allergic children is characterized by antigen specificity and associated with increased subsets of Regulatory T cells.  
Qamar N, Fishbein AB, Erickson KA, Cai M, Szychlinski C, Bryce PJ, Schleimer RP, Fuleihan RL, Singh AM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May 18;
Click to view abstract

Dampness, indoor mould, fungal DNA and respiratory health - molecular methods in indoor epidemiology.  
Norback D, Cai GH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May;45(5):840-843

Dietary management of peanut and tree nut allergy: what exactly should patients avoid?  
Brough HA, Turner PJ, Wright T, Fox AT, Taylor SL, Warner JO, Lack G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 May;45(5):859-871
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of positive atopy patch test in an unselected pediatric population.  
Fuiano N, Diddi G, Delvecchio M, CI C.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;13(1):2
Click to view abstract

Eosinophilic drug allergy.  
Kuruvilla M, Khan DA.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2015 May 26;
Click to view abstract

Monitoring the impact of cow's milk allergy on children and their families with the FLIP questionnaire - a six-month follow-up study.  
Mikkelsen A, Mehlig K, Borres MP, Oxelmark L, Bjorkelund C, Lissner L.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May 13;
Click to view abstract

Time to symptom improvement using elimination diets in non-IgE mediated gastrointestinal food allergies.  
Chebar LA, Meyer R, De KC, Dziubak R, Godwin H, Reeve K, Dominguez OG, Shah N.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May 11;
Click to view abstract

Patch test results in children and adolescents across Europe Analysis of the ESSCA Network feminine 2002-2010.  
Belloni FA, Cooper SM, Spiewak R, Fontana E, Schnuch A, Uter W.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May 5;
Click to view abstract

Is immunoglobulin E to staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins associated with asthma at 20 years?  
Sintobin I, Keil T, Lau S, Grabenhenrich L, Holtappels G, Reich A, Wahn U, Bachert C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May 5;
Click to view abstract

The use of the MeDALL-chip to assess IgE sensitization: a new diagnostic tool for allergic disease?  
Skrindo I, Lupinek C, Valenta R, Hovland V, Pahr S, Baar A, Carlsen KH, Mowinckel P, Wickman M, Melen E, Bousquet J, Anto JM, Lodrup Carlsen KC.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May;26(3):239-246
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity of pasteurized whole raw Hen's egg compared with fresh whole raw Hen's egg.  
Netting M, Donato A, Makrides M, Gold M, Quinn P, Penttila I.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May;26(3):234-238
Click to view abstract

An unusual case of penile non-pigmenting fixed drug eruption in a child.  
Keli-Bhija Z, de BJ, Ponvert C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 May;26(3):294-296

Allergic hypersensitivity to antiretroviral drugs: etravirine, raltegravir and darunavir. [Spanish]  
Sanchez-Olivas MA, Valencia-Zavala MP, Vega-Robledo GB, Sanchez-Olivas JA, Velazquez-Samano G, Sepulveda-Velazquez G.
Rev Alerg Mex 2015 Apr;62(2):142-148
Click to view abstract

Oral anaphylaxis by ingestion of mite contaminated food in Panama City, 2011-2014. [Spanish]  
Barrera OM, Murgas IL, Bermudez S, Miranda RJ.
Rev Alerg Mex 2015 Apr;62(2):112-117
Click to view abstract

Profile of sensitization to allergens in children with atopic dermatitis assisting to Allergology Service of University Hospital, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. [Spanish]  
Yong-Rodriguez A, ias-Weinmann A, Palma-Gomez S, rias-Cruz A, Perez-Vanzzini R, Gutierrez-Mujica JJ, Gonzalez-Diaz SN.
Rev Alerg Mex 2015 Apr;62(2):98-106
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Est-ce que l’allergie alimentaire a toujours existé ? / Did food allergy always exist?  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):45-47
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Étude à long terme de l’efficacité de différents supports textiles imprégnés d’acaricides dans le contrôle des allergènes d’acariens en conditions réelles /Long-term study of the efficacy of different textile materials impregnated with acaricide in contro  
C. Leduc, S. Qi, S. Bouzoubaa, M. Ott, A. Dazy, F. de Blay
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):57-63
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Coma resulting from a grade IV anaphylactic reaction to atracurium  
E. Biskup, C. Qu, X. Guo, A. Taegtmeyer
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):64-67
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Hypersensibilité immédiate généralisée déclenchée par un prick-test à l’amoxicilline / Generalized immediate hypersensitivity triggered by a prick test to amoxicillin  
C. Cherih, A. Bernede, A.-L. Breton, P. Pralong, J.-F. Nicolas, F. Berard
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):68-70
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les dangers du régime d’éviction chez le nourrisson atopique, à propos d’un cas / The dangers of the elimination diet in atopic infant, about a case  
D. Sabouraud-Leclerc
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):71-74
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Hypersensibilité retardée aux héparines : du diagnostic à la prise en charge / Delayed hypersensitivity to heparins: from diagnosis to management  
S. Lefèvre, A. Pinazo, A. Castellano, J.-P. Oster
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):78-82
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Hazelnut anaphylaxis: The usefulness of molecular-based allergy diagnostics  
G. Ciprandi, A. Pistorio, M. Silvestri, G.A. Rossi, M.A. Tosca
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(2):83-99
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Phénotype des allergies alimentaires / Phenotype food allergies  
A. Deschildre, M. Cap, C. Mordacq, C. Thumerelle
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):110-111
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les acariens et l’allergie / Mites and allergy  
A.-B. Tonnel
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):115-117
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Acariens : quelles stratégies thérapeutiques ? / Mites: Which therapeutic strategies?  
F. Lavaud, J.M. Pérotin
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):118-120
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Épigénétique et allergie alimentaire / Epigenetics and food allergy  
K. Adel-Patient
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):121-122
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’exploration biologique de l’allergie alimentaire, intérêt et limite : les allergènes moléculaires / The biological exploration of food allergy, interest and limits: molecular allergens  
E. Bidat, G. Benoist
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):128-130
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les tests cellulaires dans l’exploration biologique de l’allergie alimentaire : interet et limite / Cell tests in the biological exploration of food allergy: interest and limits  
S. Viel, P. Rouzaire, L. Garnier, J. Bienvenu, S.-A. André Gomez, F. Bienvenu
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):131-133
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Un test inutile : le dosage des IgG spécifiques anti-aliments / A useless test: the dosage of anti-food-specific IgG  
H. Chabane
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):134-136
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Enjeux et risques dans la prise en charge diététique des enfants poly-allergiques alimentaires / Challenges and risks in the dietary management of multi-food-allergic children  
L. Jouannic, F. Lemoine
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):143-145
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie de contact chez les « geeks » / Contact allergy among the "geeks"  
J.L. Bourrain
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):146-147
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergies de contact et nouveaux animaux de compagnie / Contact allergies and new pets  
C. Pecquet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):148-149
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie de contact et phytothérapie / Contact allergy and phytotherapy  
M. Avenel-Audran
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):150-152
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Réactions croisées et produits de contraste iodés / Cross-reactions and iodinated contrast agents  
A. Barbaud, B. Lerondeau, P. Trechot, C. Paris
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):153-156
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les produits de comblement / The fillers  
A. Pons-Guiraud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):157-159
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergies respiratoires professionnelles aux épices et aromates / Occupational respiratory allergies to spices and herbs  
C. Lemiere
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):163-164
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergies cutanées retardées aux épices et aromates / Skin allergies delayed spices and herbs  
C. Poreaux, J. Waton, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):165-167
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les allergènes des mammifères / Allergens mammals  
C. Hilger
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):168-170
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les allergies de contact aux produits naturels des cosmétiques / Contact allergies to natural products of cosmetics  
A. Goossens
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):171-173
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les protéines de transfert lipidique : actualités et implications cliniques / Lipid transfer proteins: news and clinical implications  
Fontaine J.-F.
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):176-177
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Tests unitaires ou multiplex en allergie / Unit tests or allergy multiplex  
J. Bienvenu, L. Garnier, F. Bienvenu
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):196-197
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les fruits exotiques : vers une mondialisation de l’allergie / Exotic fruits: towards allergy globalization  
E. Florent
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):198-199
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Arthropodes venimeux et vénéneux en milieu tropical / Venomous and venomous arthropods in the tropics  
J.-M. Bérenger
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):204-206
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

À la recherche d’un conservateur idéal : la nature versus les molécules de synthèse ? Le point de vue du chimiste / in search of an ideal preservative: nature versus synthetic molecules? The view of the chemist  
E. Giménez-Arnau
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):210-211
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Deux phénotypes d’allergie sévère à l’arachide provenant de la population de l’étude MIRABEL / Two phenotypes of severe allergy to peanuts from the population of the study MIRABEL [Abstract]  
J. Just, C.-F. Elegbede, A. Deschildre, D.-A. Moneret-Vautrin, A. Crepet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):212
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Le syndrome d’entérocolite induite par les protéines alimentaires : une série française de 81 enfants / Enterocolitis syndrome induced by dietary protein: a French series of 81 children [Abstract]  
S. Blanc, D. De Boissieu, T. Bourrier, F. Campeotto, M.P. Cordier-Collet, L. Giovannini-Chami, C. Piccini-Bailly, C. Dupont
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):212
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie à l’arachide chez l’enfant méditerranéen : un profil complexe pour le diagnostic et le suivi / Peanut allergy in the Mediterranean child: a complex profile for the diagnosis and monitoring [Abstract]  
C. Agabriel, O. Ghazouani, J. Birnbaum, V. Liabeuf, F. Porri, M. Gouitaa, I. Cleach, J.J. Grob, P. Bongrand, J.J. Sarles, J. Vitte
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):213
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Comparaison de la qualité de vie des enfants mono-allergiques à l’arachide ou aux fruits à coque ou bien poly-allergiques à l’arachide et aux fruits à coque / Comparison of quality of life for single children allergic to peanuts or tree nuts or poly-aller  
H. Dubail, M. Verdaguer, J.C. Meurice, J. Mulliez Petitpas
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):214
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie alimentaire au millet secondaire à une sensibilisation par voie respiratoire / Food allergy secondary millet sensitization by inhalation [Abstract]  
J. Flabbee, B. Mouget, P. Sergeant, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):214
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dépistage biologique de l’allergie aux protéines de lait de vache chez le nourrisson de moins de 6 mois : place aux urgences pédiatriques / Biological markers of allergy to cow's milk proteins in infants under 6 months: up to pediatric emergencies  
B. Sterling, C. Agabriel, V. Liabeuf, P. Chanez, P. Bongrand, J. Vitte
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):214-215
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Évaluation de la qualité de vie parentale et pédiatrique des enfants âgés de 0 à 12 ans présentant une allergie alimentaire IgE médiée / Assessment of the quality of parental and pediatric life of children aged 0-12 years with IgE-mediated food allergy  
M. Cap, G. Pouessel, M. Lubret, A. Le Mee, C. Thumerelle, A. Deschildre, E. Drumez
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):215
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Allergie à la viande de poulet par sensibilisation à des allergènes mineurs thermosensibles chez une patiente tolérant le poulet rôti / Allergy awareness by chicken meat temperature sensitive minor allergens in a patient tolerant roast chicken [Abstract]  
S. Silcret-Grieu, A. Seringulian, A. Kuehn, C. Hilger, H. Chabane
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):215
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Facteurs de risque de persistance de l’allergie aux protéines de lait de vache / Risk factors for persistent allergy to cow's milk protein [Abstract]  
N. Siala, I. Fetni, Z. Khlayfia, R. Hassouna, O. Azzabi, O. Rebah, S. Halioui, A. Maherzi
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):216
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Protéines du lait camelin et allergie aux protéines du lait de vache / Proteins camel milk and allergy to cow's milk protein [Abstract]  
H. Boughellout, L. Benatallah, M.N. Zidoune
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):216
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie retardée aux viandes de mammifères chez deux patients allergiques sévères aux venins de guêpe / Delayed allergy to mammalian meat in two patients with severe allergic wasp venoms [Abstract]  
C. Chatain, P. Pralong, J.P. Jacquier, M.T. Leccia
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):216
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Impact de l’allergie alimentaire sur la décision, l’organisation et le déroulement d’un séjour à l’étranger chez une personne allergique / Food Allergy impact on the decision, the organization and conduct of a stay abroad in an allergic person [Abstract]  
D. Dano, M. Michel, C. Astier, P. Couratier, N. Steenbeek, P.Y. Sarr, M. Bonnefoy, M. Boulangé, G. Kanny
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):217
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’exposition aux traces d’arachide réduit-il le risque de réaction accidentelle ? / Exposure to peanut traces it reduces the risk of accidental reaction? [Abstract]  
J. Potier, M. Dumont, M. Waked, M. Russier, D. Nouar, C. Hoarau
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):217-218
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Induction de tolérance orale aux rosacées en cas de double sensibilisation PR-10 et LTP / Oral tolerance induction to the Rosaceae if dual awareness and PR-10 LTP [Abstract]  
E. Bradatan, L.M. Vandezande, X. Van Der Brempt
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):218
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Moisissures et levures : allergies croisées respiratoires et alimentaires : à propos de 6 cas / Molds and yeasts: respiratory and food cross allergies: about 6 cases [Abstract]  
C. Rochefort, M.L. Hamon, M. Drouet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):218
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Un cas pédiatrique d’œsophagite à éosinophiles induite par réintroduction alimentaire / A case of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis induced food reintroduction [Abstract]  
S. Blanc, C. Dupont, T. Bourrier
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):218-219
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Profil de sensibilisation moléculaire aux protéines du lait de vache : évolution de 0 à 16 ans / Molecular sensitization profile to cow's milk protein: evolution from 0 to 16 years [Abstract]  
A. Boutin, V. Liabeuf, C. Agabriel, I. Cleach, J. Vitte
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):218-219
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxie au yuzu (Citrus junos) / Anaphylaxis to yuzu (Citrus Junos) [Abstract]  
Lefèvre S, S. Jacquenet, K. Astafieff, L. Peru, Y. Froelicher, G. Kanny
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):219-220
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Diagnostic et suivi d’enfants allergiques aux protéines du lait de vache dans un service de gastro-entérologie et nutrition pédiatriques à Oran / Diagnosis and monitoring of children allergic to cow's milk protein in a gastroenterology department in Oran  
A. Bouchetara, K. El Mecherfi, S.M. Azzouz, R. Rezak, M. Bessahraoui, G. Boudraa, M. Touhami
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):220
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Accoutumance au lait de vache : comparaison de l’expérience de deux CHU français / Habituation cow's milk: comparison of the experience of two French CHU [Abstract]  
O. Leuret, N. Faure, E. Rigal, G. Gaillet, M. Drouet, C. Hoarau
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):220
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Outils biologiques dans le pollinose aux Cupressaceae : extraits ou allergène, lequel choisir ? / Biological tools in the Cupressaceae pollinosis: extracts or allergen, which to choose? [Abstract]  
C.K. Klingebiel, J.V. Vitte
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):221
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Description d’une série de patients français suspectés d’avoir des IgE anti-alpha-gal / Description of a series of French patients suspected of having anti-alpha-gal IgE [Abstract]  
Richard C, D. Maurice, P. Salloignon, R. De Lagesnestre, M. Epstein, F. Bord, S. Jacquenet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):221
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Pertinence clinique de l’Hev b 12, la protéine de transfert lipidique (LTP) du latex naturel (Hevea brasiliensis) / Clinical Relevance of Hev b 12, the lipid transfer protein (LTP) of natural latex (Hevea brasiliensis) [Abstract]  
A.L. Van Gasse, M.A. Faber, V. Sabato, C.H. Bridts, A. Nayak, D.H. Beezhold, D.G. Ebo
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):222
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Production et caractérisation d’Amb a 11 mature, un nouvel allergène majeur du pollen d’ambroisie (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) avec une activité cystéine protéase / Production and characterization of 11 Amb a mature, a new major allergen of ragweed pollen  
R. Groeme, J. Jaekel, M. Le Mignon, K. Jain, E. Nony, V. Baron-Bodo, P. Briozzo, V. Bordas-Le Floch, L. Mascarell, P. Moingeon
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):222
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Cosensibilisation à Alt a 1 et Act d 2 : une association fortuite ? Cosensitisation to Alt a 1 and Act d 2: A fortuitous association? [Abstract]  
M. Degaud, S. Viel, M. Lleres, L. Garnier, A. Barre, P. Rougé, J. Bienvenu, F. Bienvenu
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):222-223
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Cas cliniques d’allergie au pollen de cyprès : le syndrome cyprès/agrume / Clinical cases of allergy to pollen from cypress cypress syndrome / citrus [Abstract]  
Martinez S, M. Gouitaa, M. Alter, C. Longé, R. Couderc, H. Sénéchal, J.P. Sutra, D.A. Charpin, P. Poncet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):223
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Allergie à la sève de figuier / Allergy to the sap of fig tree [Abstract]  
Abdellaziz R, S. Medjras, D. Arab, M. Lemdani, H. Douagui
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):225
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Les allergies de contact aux produits naturels des cosmétiques / Contact allergies to natural products of cosmetics2 [Abstract]  
A. Goossens
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):225
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Allergène ou protéine IgE réactive ? Conséquences pour le diagnostic moléculaire / Reactive protein allergen or IgE? Consequences for molecular diagnosis [Abstract]  
H. Malandain
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):226
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Exploration floristique, immunoallergologique des plantes et pollens allergisants en Côte d’Ivoire / Floristic exploration, immuno-allergological plants and allergenic pollens in Ivory Coast [Abstract]  
C.C.A. Yapo-Crezoit, M.W. Koné, M. Dosso
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):226
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Profil allergologique des patients sensibilisés aux pollens de mimosa dans la région de Casablanca / Profile of allergy patients sensitized to pollen mimosa in the Casablanca region [Abstract]  
N. Souki, W. El Khattabi, H. Jabri, L. Qassimi, H. Afif
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):226
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Hydrolyse pepsique, trypsique et chymotrypsique de la lactoferrine bovine après traitements thermiques / Hydrolysis pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin from bovine lactoferrin after heat treatments [Abstract]  
H. Negaoui, D. Yssad, K.E. Elmecherfi, A. Chikhi, O. Kheroua, D. Saidi
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):226-227
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Cas clinique : allergie aux haricots verts / Clinical case: allergy to green beans [Abstract]  
C. Karila, D. Maurice, S. Jacquenet, C. Richard
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):227
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Standardisation des critères de détermination d’une saison pollinique / Standardization of criteria for determining a pollen season [Abstract]  
M. Thibaudon, G. Oliver
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):227
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Les pollens de bouleau : indicateur santé du changement climatique / The birch pollen: Health indicator of climate change [Abstract]  
M. Thibaudon, S. Monnier
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):228
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Cas clinique d’allergie à l’arachide : apport de l’allergologie moléculaire / Clinical case of peanut allergy: contribution of Molecular Allergology [Abstract]  
C. Longé, M. Alter, H. Bouakkadia, M.A. Selva, R. Couderc, C. Vaquin, F. Amat, J. Just, C. Boursier, J.P. Sutra, H. Sénéchal, P. Poncet
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):228
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Profils épidémiologiques de la sensibilisation aux pneumallergènes à l’est d’Alger / Epidemiological profiles of sensitization to inhalant east of Algiers [Abstract]  
D. Ihadadene, N. Alliche, M. Jaafar, M. Gharnaout
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):228-229
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Allergie croisée « escargots-acariens » Cross-allergy "snail-mite" [Abstract]  
A. Sebbar, H. Benjelloun, N. Zaghba, A. Bakhatar, N. Yassine
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):229
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La polysensibilisation chez les patients ayant une allergie respiratoire / Polysensitization in patients with respiratory allergy [Abstract]  
S. Ben Saad, I. Mejri, F. Chermiti, M. Ben Khelifa, H. Daghfous, F. Tritar
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):229
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Évolution l’allergie aux acariens en Tunisie au cours des 20 dernières années / Evolution mite allergy in Tunisia over the past 20 years [Abstract]  
F. Yangui, H. Khouani, M. Abouda, R. Ayari, M. Triki, E. Guermazi, M.R. Charfi
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):229-230
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Dermatoses professionnelles des mains chez les coiffeurs / Occupational skin diseases in hairdressers hands [Abstract]  
L. Bousquet-Rouanet, D. Tennstedt, N. Raison-Peyron
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):231
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Les affections cutanées d’origine professionnelle induites par le latex en milieu dentaire, Tizi Ouzou, Algérie / The occupational skin diseases induced by latex dental community, Tizi Ouzou, Algeria [Abstract]  
A. Zatout, K. Si-Ahmed, N. Kechir, A. Tibiche, A. Arib, D. Brahimi
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):231
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Allergie aux acrylates / Allergy acrylates [Abstract]  
F. Castelain, P. Girardin, F. Aubin, P. Humbert, P. Fabien
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(3):232
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