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 Allergy Advisor Digest - April 2014
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read IgE antibodies to alpha-gal in the general adult population. Relationship with tick bites, atopy, and cat ownership.
Read Chemical modification of peanut conglutin reduces IgE reactivity but not T cell reactivity in peanut-allergic patients.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis to cotoneaster species.
Read Allergic contact cheilitis caused by carnauba wax in a lip balm.
Read Recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy.
Read Cross-reactivity of peanut allergens.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis in children: review of the past decade.
Read Hair dyes and temporary tattoos are a real hazard for adolescents?
Read Allergens on desktop surfaces in preschools and elementary schools of urban children with asthma.
Read Update of the WHO/IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Database based on analysis of allergen sequences.
Read International consensus on drug allergy.
Read Allergic sensitization to ornamental plants in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.
Read Relationship between urine dichlorophenol levels and asthma morbidity.
Read Pollen count and presentation of Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.
Read Anaphylaxis to cat in a child with exclusive sensitivity to Fel d 1.
Read Alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms are common in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease.
Read Prevalence of sensitivity to food and drug additives in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria.
Read IgE and IgG Binding Patterns and T-cell Recognition of Fel d 1 and Non-Fel d 1 Cat Allergens.
Read Ara h 2 is the best predictor for peanut allergy in adults.
Read Clinical characterization and IgE profiling of Birch (Betula verrucosa)-allergic individuals suffering from allergic reactions to raw fruits and vegetables.
Read Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization.
Read The basophil activation test identified carminic acid as an allergen inducing anaphylaxis.
Read Systemic contact dermatitis to ethanol.
Read International study of risk-mitigating factors and in-flight allergic reactions to peanut and tree nut.
Read Perplexing cases of allergy to salami.
Read Comparative study of clinical phenotypes of allergy to fish according to the profiles of molecular awareness parvalbumin, the enolase, and aldolase in fish gelatin.
Read Anaphylaxis to pine nut: twenty cases reported Allergo Vigilance Network
Read Occupational allergies winemaker
Read Wheat allergens

Abstracts shared in April 2014 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Exclusively breastfed infants at risk for false negative double blind placebo controlled milk challenge.
Read Detection of 20 kDa and 32 kDa IgE-binding proteins as the major allergens in Italian sesame seed allergic patients.
Read Systematic review on cashew nut allergy.
Read Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by a lipid transfer protein and not by omega-5 gliadin.
Read Anaphylaxis to gum arabaic in a soda (Mountain Dew Code Red)
Read Anaphylaxis to peanuts in a 16-year-old girl with birch pollen allergy and with monosensitization to Ara h 8.
Read Cross-reactivity between royal jelly and Dermato-phagoides pteronyssinus.
Read Near fatal anaphylaxis from orally administered gelatin capsule.
Read Plantago lanceolata: An important trigger of summer pollinosis with limited IgE cross-reactivity.
Read Six children with allergic contact dermatitis to methylisothiazolinone in wet wipes (baby wipes).
Read The induction of oral tolerance in allergy to Rosaceae

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE antibodies to alpha-gal in the general adult population. Relationship with tick bites, atopy, and cat ownership.
The carbohydrate alpha-gal epitope is present in many animal proteins, including those of red meat and animal immunoglobulins, such as cat IgA. Systemic anaphylaxis to the alpha-gal epitope has recently been described. This study investigated and compared the prevalence of alpha-gal-specific(s)IgE and its associated factors in the general adult population from two separated (Northern and Southern) European regions (Denmark and Spain, respectively). A cross-sectional study of 2297 and 444 randomly selected adults from 11 municipalities in Denmark and one in Spain was conducted. Alpha-gal-sIgE was assessed by ImmunoCAP to bovine thyroglobulin. The prevalence of positive (>/=0.1 kUA /L) sIgE to alpha-gal was 5.5% and 8.1% in the Danish and Spanish series, respectively. The prevalence of sIgE >/=0.35 kUA /L was 1.8% and 2.2% in Denmark and Spain, respectively. Alpha-gal-sIgE positivity was associated with pet ownership in both series, and particularly cat ownership. Alpha-gal-sIgE positivity was associated with atopy (SPT-positivity) in both series, although it was not associated with SPT positivity to cat or dog dander. Alpha-gal-sIgE positivity was strongly associated with a history of tick bites.

IgE antibodies to alpha-gal in the general adult population. Relationship with tick bites, atopy, and cat ownership.  
Gonzalez-Quintela A, Dam Laursen AS, Vidal C, Skaaby T, Gude F, Linneberg A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Chemical modification of peanut conglutin reduces IgE reactivity but not T cell reactivity in peanut-allergic patients.
This study aimed to analyze the immunogenicity and allergenicity of modified peanut conglutin. Native peanut conglutin and two modifications thereof were generated (RA and RAGA). Chemical modification of peanut conglutin by RA retains immunogenicity and reduces allergenicity, and may be a promising approach for development of a curative treatment for peanut allergy.

Chemical modification of peanut conglutin reduces IgE reactivity but not T cell reactivity in peanut-allergic patients.  
van Hoffen E, van der Kleij HP, den Hartog Jager CF, van Doorn WA, Knol EF, Opstelten DJ, Koppelman SJ, Knulst AC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis to cotoneaster species.
Allergic contact dermatitis to cotoneaster species. A 41-year-old policewoman who 5 months previously, had suffered an acute severe flare of facial eczema requiring treatment with oral steroids. Began with intense facial and periorbital pruritus half an hour after she had pruned cotoneaster and ivy in her garden. Open patch testing

and prick testing with cotoneaster bark and leaf and ivy leaf were negative. Patch tests with crushed fresh cotoneaster bark and leaf from the patient’s garden was positive. The species implicated was Cotoneaster simonsii. Only a few case reports of cutaneous reactions to different Cotoneaster species (Cotoneaster microphyllia, Cotoneaster lacteus, and Cotoneaster horizontalis) have been cited, either as contact urticaria or as allergic contact dermatitis.

Allergic contact dermatitis to cotoneaster species.  
Rakvit P, Green CM, Hearn RM.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):117-118

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact cheilitis caused by carnauba wax in a lip balm.
A 33-year-old woman developed desquamative cheilitis with perioral dermatitis after she started using a lip balm for ‘cracked lips’. Patch tests were positive for the hypoallergenic lip balm ‘for cracked lips’ (Uriage). Patch testing for the ingredients of the lip balm was positive only to copernicia cerifera cera (carnauba wax).

Allergic contact cheilitis caused by carnauba wax in a lip balm.  
Alrowaishdi F, Colomb S, Guillot B, Raison-Peyron N.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Nov;69(5):318-319

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy.
Molecular cloning of cockroach allergens and their expression as recombinant proteins have allowed a better understanding of the mechanisms of cockroach allergic disease. Recombinant cockroach allergens have been used for skin testing or in vitro methods to measure IgE antibody levels in serum. Early studies evaluating selected U.S. patients revealed that a cocktail of four cockroach allergens, Bla g 1, Bla g 2, Bla g 4, and Bla g 5, would identify 95 % of cockroach allergic patients. More recent studies pointed to an important role of sensitization to tropomyosin among certain populations, and suggested that a cocktail of five allergens Bla g 1 and/or Per a 1, Bla g 2, Bla g 4, Bla g 5, and Bla g 7, and/or Per a 7, would be expected to diagnose 50- 64 % of cockroach-allergic patients worldwide. Variation in IgE reactivity profiles could be in part due to IgE responses to cross-reactive homologous allergens from different origins. The availability of purified natural or recombinant cockroach allergens provides the capacity to improve diagnosis of cockroach allergy and to develop novel forms of immunotherapy for cockroach-allergic patients

Recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy.  
Arruda LK, Barbosa MC, Santos AB, Moreno AS, Chapman MD, Pomes A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):428

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactivity of peanut allergens.
This article describes the classification and molecular biology of peanut seed allergens with particular reference to their cross-reactivities. Currently, the IUIS allergen nomenclature subcommittee accepts 12 peanut allergens. Two allergens belong to the cupin and four to the prolamin superfamily, and six are distributed among profilins, Bet v 1-like proteins, oleosins, and defensins. Clinical observations frequently report an association of peanut allergy with allergies to legumes, tree nuts, seeds, fruits and pollen. Molecular cross-reactivity has been described between members of the Bet v 1-like proteins, the non-specific lipid transfer proteins, and the profilins. This review also addresses the less well-studied cross-reactivity between cupin and prolamin allergens of peanuts and of other plant food sources and the recently discovered cross-reactivity between peanut allergens of unrelated protein families.

Cross-reactivity of peanut allergens.  
Bublin M, Breiteneder H.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):426

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis in children: review of the past decade.
Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction. The prevalence of positive patch tests in referred children with suspected ACD ranges from 27 to 95.6 %. The most common allergens in children in North America are nickel, neomycin, cobalt, fragrance, Myroxylon pereirae, gold, formaldehyde, lanolin/wool alcohols, thimerosal, and potassium dichromate.

Allergic contact dermatitis in children: review of the past decade.  
Admani S, Jacob SE.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):421

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hair dyes and temporary tattoos are a real hazard for adolescents?
Temporary tattoos, in addition to hair dyes include paraphenylenediamine (PPD). PPD is a well-known skin sensitizer, which causes allergic contact dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis skin lesions from PPD are mostly seen as erythema multiforme-like eruption, a bullous contact dermatitis or as an exudative erythema. This study reports on a 15 year-old adolescent female who had been unaware of being previously sensitized to PPD from a black henna tattoo, and angioedema-like reaction which occurred after her first exposure to hair dye.

Hair dyes and temporary tattoos are a real hazard for adolescents?  
Haluk AH, Adatepe S, Tahan F, Solmaz I.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):35-37

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens on desktop surfaces in preschools and elementary schools of urban children with asthma.
Desktop dust has been studied as a source of food allergen, but not as a source of potential aeroallergen exposure. Thirty-six wiped samples from desktop surfaces were collected from preschools and schools. Samples were analyzed for detectable levels of common aeroallergens including Alternaria, cockroach, dog, dust mite, cat, mouse, and rat allergens by immunoassay. Mouse allergen was the most prevalent, detectable in 97.2% of samples. Cat allergen was detectable in 80.6% of samples, and dog allergen was detectable in 77.8% of samples.

Allergens on desktop surfaces in preschools and elementary schools of urban children with asthma.  
Kanchongkittiphon W, Sheehan WJ, Friedlander J, Chapman MD, King EM, Martirosyan K, Baxi SN, Permaul P, Gaffin JM, Kopel L, Bailey A, Fu C, Petty CR, Gold DR, Phipatanakul W.
Allergy 2014 Apr 18;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Update of the WHO/IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Database based on analysis of allergen sequences.
The IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Sub-Committee, under the auspices of the World Health Organization and the International Union of Immunological Societies, maintains the systematic nomenclature of allergenic proteins and publishes a database of approved allergen names on its Web site, www.allergen.org. In this paper, we summarize updates of allergen names approved at the meetings of the committee in 2011 through 2013. These changes reflect recent progress in identification, cloning, and sequencing of allergens. The goals of this update were to increase consistency in the classification of allergens, isoallergens, and variants and in the incorporation of the evolutionary classification of proteins into allergen nomenclature, while keeping changes of established names to a minimum in the interest of continuity. Allergens for which names have been updated include respiratory allergens from birch and ragweed pollen, midge larvae, and horse dander; food allergens from peanut, cow's milk, and tomato; and cereal grain allergens. The IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Sub-Committee encourages researchers to use these updated allergen names in future publications

Update of the WHO/IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Database based on analysis of allergen sequences.  
Radauer C, Nandy A, Ferreira F, Goodman RE, Larsen JN, Lidholm J, Pomes A, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Rozynek P, Thomas WR, Breiteneder H.
Allergy 2014 Apr;69(4):413-419

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
International consensus on drug allergy.
Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. The International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL) has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of DHRs.

International consensus on drug allergy.  
Demoly P, Adkinson NF, Brockow K, Castells M, Chiriac AM, Greenberger PA, Khan DA, Lang DM, Park HS, Pichler W, Sanchez-Borges M, Shiohara T, Thong BY.
Allergy 2014 Apr;69(4):420-437

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic sensitization to ornamental plants in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.
Ornamental plants (OPs) can lead to immediate-type sensitization and even asthma and rhinitis symptoms in some cases. This study aimed to evaluate sensitization to OPs in patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and to determine the factors affecting the rate of sensitization to OPs. Skin tests by 'prick-to-prick' method with the leaves of 15 Ops, which are known to lead to allergenic sensitization, were performed. Skin tests with OPs were positive in 80 patients (47.1%). Skin test positivity rate for OPs was significantly high in atopic subjects, patients with allergic rhinitis, food sensitivity, and indoor OP exposure, but not in patients with pollen and latex allergy. Most sensitizing OPs were Yucca elephantipes (52.5%), Dieffenbachia picta (50.8%), and Euphorbia pulcherrima (47.5%). Additional trials on the relationship between sensitization to Ops and allergic symptoms are needed

Allergic sensitization to ornamental plants in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.  
Aydin O, Erkekol FO, Misirligil Z, Demirel YS, Mungan D.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2014 Mar;35(2):9-14

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Relationship between urine dichlorophenol levels and asthma morbidity.
Dichlorophenols are used as intermediates in the manufacture of more complex chemical compounds, including the common herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). This study tested the association between urine levels of 2 dichlorophenols (2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenols) and asthma morbidity in atopic and nonatopic wheezers and between total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. Data from a sample of 2,125 participants at least 6 years old from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005 to 2006 were analyzed. The study concludes that the findings indicate that in patients with atopy and a history of wheezing, asthma morbidity is associated with high urinary dichlorophenol levels. Increased urine dichlorophenol levels are associated with higher total serum IgE.

Relationship between urine dichlorophenol levels and asthma morbidity.  
Jerschow E, Parikh P, McGinn AP, de VG, Jariwala S, Hudes G, Rosenstreich D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr 10;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen count and presentation of Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.
This study concludes that patients with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-associated angioedema are more likely to present with this adverse drug event during months when pollen counts are increased

Pollen count and presentation of Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.  
Straka B, Nian H, Sloan C, Byrd JB, Woodard-Grice A, Yu C, Stone E, Steven G, Hartert T, Teo KK, Pare G, McCarty CA, Brown NJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Sep;1(5):468-473

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to cat in a child with exclusive sensitivity to Fel d 1.
A 4-year-old boy with systemic allergic reactions that occurred on 2 separate occasions after playing with a cat. On the first occasion, he developed hives, periorbital swelling, cough, and dyspnea with wheezing within minutes after contact with a cat at a friend’s house. Before the initial episode he was asymptomatic without prodromal illness. On the second cat exposure, his symptom onset was rapid and more severe, including generalized hives, marked difficulty breathing with wheezing, and abdominal pain, despite administering oral diphenhydramine. Skin prick tests and antigen-specific IgE levels to common inhalant and food allergens were negative, except to cat. Serum IgE was positive for cat dander (Fel d 1) but not Fel d 2.

Anaphylaxis to cat in a child with exclusive sensitivity to Fel d 1.  
Casale TB, Cruz C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):416-417

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms are common in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease.
A large percentage of patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) report the development of alcohol-induced respiratory reactions, but the true prevalence of respiratory reactions caused by alcoholic beverages in these patients was not known. A questionnaire designed to assess alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms was administered to patients. The prevalence of alcohol-induced upper (rhinorrhea and/or nasal congestion) respiratory reactions in patients with AERD was 75% compared with 33% with aspirin-tolerant asthma, 30% with chronic rhinosinusitis, and 14% with healthy controls. The prevalence of alcohol-induced lower (wheezing and/or dyspnea) respiratory reactions in AERD was 51% compared with 20% in aspirin-tolerant asthma and with 0% in both chronic rhinosinusitis and healthy controls. These reactions were generally not specific to one type of alcohol and often occurred after ingestion of only a few sips of alcohol.

Alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms are common in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Cardet JC, White AA, Barrett NA, Feldweg AM, Wickner PG, Savage J, Bhattacharyya N, Laidlaw TM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Mar;2(2):208-213

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of sensitivity to food and drug additives in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria.
Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is defined as the presence of urticaria most days of the week for a period of 6 weeks or longer. There have been reports of food additive sensitivity in CIU previously, but the prevalence has not been precisely determined. This study determined the prevalence of reactions to food and drug additives in patients with CIU. 100 patients were challenged to the 11 additives most commonly associated with reactions: tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5), potassium metabisulfite, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, sodium benzoate, methyl paraben, butylated hydroxy anisole, butylated hydroxy toluene, FD&C Yellow 6, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite. Of 100 subjects, only 2 had a positive urticarial response on single-blind challenge. Neither of these patients had a positive urticarial response on double-blind placebo-controlled challenge. There were no gastrointestinal, respiratory, or other symptom, and no patients reported late reactions.

Prevalence of sensitivity to food and drug additives in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria.  
Rajan JP, Simon RA, Bosso JV.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Mar;2(2):168-171

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE and IgG Binding Patterns and T-cell Recognition of Fel d 1 and Non-Fel d 1 Cat Allergens.
Thhis study compared IgE and IgG antibody binding and T-cell recognition of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 with other cat proteins with known IgE binding properties. IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 antibody to Fel d 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and the undesignated IgE binding proteins haptoglobin and S100A12 were measured in the plasma of 96 individuals with cat allergy and 78 individuals without cat allergy. An allergen other than Fel d 1 had the highest IgE binding specificity for 35% of individuals with cat allergy, and it bound more than 50% of their IgE antibody in 70% of these sera. Fel d 4, 7, and 8 were identified as the main contributors to the non-Fel d 1 IgE binding response and elicited inflammatory Th2 cytokines to a similar degree as Fel d 1. As expected, the average percentage of IgE binding to Fel d 1 for individuals was 55%. IgG4 binding to Fel d 1 was detected in both subjects with allergy (30%) and subjects without allergy (19%). The study concludes that Fel d 4, 7, and 8 are allergens that should be included in the diagnosis and investigation of cat allergy.

IgE and IgG Binding Patterns and T-cell Recognition of Fel d 1 and Non-Fel d 1 Cat Allergens.  
Hales BJ, Chai LY, Hazell L, Elliot CE, Stone S, O'Neil SE, Smith WA, Thomas WR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):656-665

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ara h 2 is the best predictor for peanut allergy in adults.
Specific IgE to Ara h 2 as a clinical predictor for peanut allergy in children has a diagnostic value whereas in adults, the diagnostic value of peanut components has not yet been studied.

This study concludes that sIgE to Ara h 2 has the best discriminative ability of all diagnostic tests. It can accurately diagnose peanut allergy in 28% of patients but cannot be used to exclude a peanut allergy in an adult population.

Ara h 2 is the best predictor for peanut allergy in adults.  
Klemans RJ, Broekman HC, Knol EF, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Otten HG, Pasmans SG, Knulst AC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):632-638

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical characterization and IgE profiling of Birch (Betula verrucosa)-allergic individuals suffering from allergic reactions to raw fruits and vegetables.
Hypersensitivity to raw fruits and vegetables is often associated with respiratory allergy to birch (Betula verrucosa) pollen and is considered to be the most prevalent form of food allergy in adults sensitized to birch pollen. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of clinical allergy and IgE profiles in individuals with birch pollen allergy and hypersensitivity to raw fruits and vegetables. 59 adults with clinical and skin prick test confirmed birch pollen allergy were included in the study. 54 (92%) had positive prick-prick test with raw potato, carrot, apple, and/or hazelnut, and the skin prick test was always positive when the corresponding skin challenge was defined as positive. Specific IgE in the ImmunoCAP and inhibition assays with rMal d 1 and rBet v 1 demonstrated that Bet v 1 is driving the sensitization against pathogenesis related-10 proteins. However, positive IgE in vitro results could not be used to predict clinical reactivity to raw fruits and vegetables. The present study showed that component-based IgE profiling does not enhance the diagnostic potential in case of pollen-food syndrome, which may be associated with other as yet unidentified components.

Clinical characterization and IgE profiling of Birch (Betula verrucosa)-allergic individuals suffering from allergic reactions to raw fruits and vegetables.  
Tolkki L, Alanko K, Petman L, Blem SM, Gronager MP, Seppala U, Ranki A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):623-631

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization.
This study reports the first documentation of a high prevalence of quaternary ammonium (QA) sensitization in patients with quinolone allergic hypersensitivity. These results suggest a new way for neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) sensitization. It thus seems appropriate to investigate NMBA sensitization when quinolone allergic hypersensitivity is diagnosed

Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization.  
Rouzaire P, Nosbaum A, Mullet C, Diot N, Dubost R, Bienvenu F, Guilloux L, Piriou V, Bienvenu J, Berard F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 May;1(3):273-279

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The basophil activation test identified carminic acid as an allergen inducing anaphylaxis.
A 39-year-old Japanese woman developed allergic reactions after ingestion of a commercial bottled supplement that contained vitamin Bs and C and fruit ?avors. The reactions occurred 3 times, at 1-month intervals. The ?rst 2 episodes were mild and consisted of an itchy throat and localized hives on her lower extremities. However, after drinking the aforementioned supplement every day for 3 months, she manifested more severe symptoms of anaphylactic shock, with an itchy throat, generalized urticaria, diarrhea, and low blood pressure. Each of the allergic reactions was associated with her menstrual period. Skin prick tests were negative. The basophil activation test (BAT) was positive only to cochineal dye of the drinks constituents. BAT was highly sensitive and selective, because obvious induction of basophil surface CD203c was observed with 10to 640-fold dilutions of the supplement, the corresponding dose of cochineal dye and its main constituent, carminic acid, but not with a protein extracted from Coccus cacti.

The basophil activation test identified carminic acid as an allergen inducing anaphylaxis.  
Sugimoto N, Yamaguchi M, Tanaka Y, Nakase Y, Nagase H, Akiyama H, Ohta K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):197-199

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Systemic contact dermatitis to ethanol.
A 25-year-old woman was evaluated for a history of a recurrent rash after drinking alcoholic beverages. Her initial reaction was after her ?rst exposure to ethanol at age 18 when she developed a rash 8 to 12 hours after ingesting a malt liquor beverage. Over the next several years she developed recurrence of the same rash after drinking small amounts of beer, wine, and champagne on separate occasions. With each exposure, the rash appeared with shorter latency, although the distribution, appearance, and symptoms of the rash remained unchanged. She had no reported sensitivity to topical alcohol preparations, that is, hand sanitizer (62% ethanol) or alcohol prep pads (70% isopropanol). The patient was given 45 mL of 40% ethanol by volume, additive-free vodka in a single dose and observed in the clinic. Three and one-half hours after ingestion she developed erythematous, pruritic papules on her upper and lower back over the exact distribution as described with previous ethanol ingestion.

Systemic contact dermatitis to ethanol.  
Wolverton W, Gada S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):195-196

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
International study of risk-mitigating factors and in-flight allergic reactions to peanut and tree nut.
This study evaluated international in-flight experience of peanut/tree nut reactions and determined the efficacy of certain risk-mitigation strategies. 349 reactions were reported among 3273 respondents from 11 countries; 13.3% received epinephrine as treatment. Flight crews were notified about 50.1% of reactions. Sixty-nine percent of all respondents reported making a preflight accommodation request, although just 55% of reactors did so compared with 71.6% of nonreactors. Eight risk-mitigating behaviors associated with lower odds of a reported reaction were reported, including requesting a peanut/tree nut-free meal, wiped their tray table, avoided airline pillows or blankets, requested a buffer zone, requested other passengers not consume peanut/tree nut-containing products.

International study of risk-mitigating factors and in-flight allergic reactions to peanut and tree nut.  
Greenhawt M, MacGillivray F, Batty G, Said M, Weiss C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):186-194

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Perplexing cases of allergy to salami.
A 5-year-old boy with atopic dermatitis, seasonal allergic rhinitis, and pollen-food syndrome and no history of b-lactam allergy who developed urticaria and swollen eyelids shortly after eating Salami Tipo Milano. A 10-year-old boy with peanut allergy, seasonal allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and sensitisation to HDM, and no history of b-lactam allergy developed retro-sternal pain and the sensation of food blockage after eating Salametto Milano. He had previously experienced similar feelings after eating raclette cheese. Both children tolerated the foods listed as ingredients in these salamis (including pork, beef, salt, skimmed milk powder, sugar, spices, pepper, garlic, ascorbic acid, sodium nitrite, potassium nitrite). Skin prick testing with the ingredient were negative but positive with the skin of the salami. The mold in the salami skin which they identi?ed as Penicillium chrysogenum/notatum. During the drying and curing phase the skin of the salami is often sprayed with a Penicillium species mold starter to promote ?avor and to try to prevent harmful bacteria from multiplying. The second patient, who was sensitized to both P notatum and house dust mite, in previous studies shown to also be responsible for reactions to salami.

Perplexing cases of allergy to salami.  
Ludman S, Perrin Y, Caubet JC, Wassenberg J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):97-98

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Comparative study of clinical phenotypes of allergy to fish according to the profiles of molecular awareness parvalbumin, the enolase, and aldolase in fish gelatin.
The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of using a panel of fish allergens in component-resolved diagnosis of fish-allergic patients. Sixty-two patients fish-allergic patients with positive skin prick-tests and specific IgE to fish extracts (cod, salmon and tuna) were investigated. Allergen-specific IgE levels to fish parvalbumin, enolase, aldolase and gelatin were quantified by Elisa. Forty-five of 62 patients were sensitized to parvalbumin. Among the cod parvalbumin-sensitized patients, 50% were also sensitized to both enolase and aldolase. Of the patients with positive skin tests to salmon and to tuna (75.6% and 67.6%, respectively), isolated sensitization to parvalbumin was observed. Mean levels of specific IgE to cod and enolase parvalbumin were positively correlated with the severity of the patients’ clinical symptoms; not the case for cod aldolase. Patients were clustered into three groups according to their parvalbumin-specific IgE-reactivity. In the first group, the 36 patients who were sensitized to three different fish reported mild to severe symptoms; their symptoms were correlated with the presence of IgE to total cod extract and to cod parvalbumin. The second group of 9 mono-sensitized patients had only minor symptoms of fish allergy, most often to salmon; their symptoms were positively correlated with specific IgE levels of salmon extract and cod parvalbumin-specific IgE. The third group consisted of 17 patients who were sensitized to a small number of fish; they had moderate to severe symptoms. While this group of patients had no detectable parvalbumin-specific IgE, 70.6% of them were found to have IgE specific for fish aldolase, enolase or gelatin; in this group, the presence of IgE specific for cod was rarely observed. The use of a panel with a number of allergenic fish proteins may contribute to the improvement of the diagnosis of fish allergy.

Comparative study of clinical phenotypes of allergy to fish according to the profiles of molecular awareness parvalbumin, the enolase, and aldolase in fish gelatin. [French]  
A. Kuehn, C. Metz-Favre, G. Pauli, C. Lehners-Weber, F. Codreanu-Morel, F. Hentges, P. Auriol, F. Bienvenu, C. Braun, C. Crepin, A. Foessel, et al.
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):51-60

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to pine nut: twenty cases reported Allergo Vigilance Network
Pine nut is the seed of the umbrella pine (Pinus pinea), found in Western Europe and North Africa. Pine nut is increasingly used in food, and often hidden in processed foods. Pine nut allergy is rare, but its frequency is increasing gradually. Reactions are often severe and with a high risk. The authors report a series of 20 cases of pine nut anaphylaxis which were reported to the Allergy Vigilance Network from 2002 to 2013; the largest series ever published. Cases include children and young adults, mostly men (13/20). All the reactions were severe (anaphylaxis grade II or III), occurring immediately after eating pine nuts. Pine nuts were hidden in food in 14 of these cases. Ten cases were monosensitized to pine nuts and 5 cases were also sensitized to peanuts. Monosensitized cases are the most common. Cross-sensitivity with other tree nuts, peanuts, pine pollen or mugwort has been described, but cross-reactivity has not yet been proven. The allergens involved in pine nut allergy are still unknown.

Anaphylaxie au pignon de pin : à propos de vingt cas déclarés au Réseau Allergo Vigilance / Anaphylaxis to pine nut: about twenty cases reported Allergo Vigilance Network  
P. Pralong, D.A. Moneret Vautrin, F. Pirson, A. Juchet, Y.P. Massabie, P. Beaumont, C. Langlet, C. Chappard
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):61-65

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergies winemaker
Vineyard workers remain exposed to many allergens in spite of the greater use of mechanization in their work and greater awareness of the risks in the use of pesticides. Certain allergens such as weed pollen, grapevine pollen and moulds are specific for vineyard workers. The role of spider mites in the respiratory symptoms of occupational asthma and rhinitis has been suspected for many years. With regard to the skin, vineyard workers are exposed to the toxic or allergenic action of pesticides and to environmental conditions, which increase their toxicity and allergenicity. Vineyard workers are in a population, which lacks access to preventive actions and to occupational physicians.

Allergies professionnelles du vigneron / Occupational allergies winemaker  
F. Lavaud, J.-M. Pérotin, J.-F. Fontaine
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):103-106

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wheat allergens
The genetic diversity of wheat may be used for the selection of wheat species with a lower content of allergens. The major allergens in exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) due to common wheat, ?5-gliadins, are not expressed in some bread wheat varieties carrying a translocation with rye. For patients suffering from EIA, in vitro IgE reactivity to gliadins extracted from these varieties with the translocation is greatly decreased; however, residual reactivity remains, mainly due to low Mr glutenin subunits. Lipid transfer protein (LTP) can also be involved in a few cases of EIA due to wheat. Allergic patients may be tempted to eat older wheat species (such as einkorn, spelt or Kamut®); however, these wheat species are not devoid of ?5-gliadins or other wheat allergens. Consequently, there is currently no wheat flour, which is completely safe for wheat-sensitive patients who suffer from EIA.

Quelles farines pour les anaphylaxies à l’effort ? / What meal for anaphylaxis effort?  
S. Denery-Papini
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):116-119

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

The changing pattern of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine uptake in egg allergic children.  
Fox AT, Swan KE, Perkin M, Toit GD, Lack G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr 19;
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IgE antibodies to alpha-gal in the general adult population. Relationship with tick bites, atopy, and cat ownership.  
Gonzalez-Quintela A, Dam Laursen AS, Vidal C, Skaaby T, Gude F, Linneberg A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr 19;
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Chemical modification of peanut conglutin reduces IgE reactivity but not T cell reactivity in peanut-allergic patients.  
van Hoffen E, van der Kleij HP, den Hartog Jager CF, van Doorn WA, Knol EF, Opstelten DJ, Koppelman SJ, Knulst AC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr 9;

Goat's milk allergy without cow's milk allergy: suppression of non-cross-reactive epitopes on caprine beta-casein.  
Hazebrouck S, Ah-Leung S, Bidat E, Paty E, Drumare MF, Tilleul S, del-Patient K, Wal JM, Bernard H.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr;44(4):602-610
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The degree of whey hydrolysis does not uniformly affect in vitro basophil and T cell responses of cow's milk-allergic patients.  
Meulenbroek LA, Oliveira S, den Hartog Jager CF, Klemans RJ, Lebens AF, van BT, Knulst AC, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Garssen J, Knippels LM, van HE.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Apr;44(4):529-539
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Allergic sensitization: screening methods.  
Ladics GS, Fry J, Goodman R, Herouet-Guicheney C, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Madsen CB, Penninks A, Pomes A, Roggen EL, Smit J, Wal JM.
Clin Transl Allergy 2014;4(1):13
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Fungal allergy in asthma-state of the art and research needs.  
Denning DW, Pashley C, Hartl D, Wardlaw A, Godet C, Del GS, Delhaes L, Sergejeva S.
Clin Transl Allergy 2014 Apr 15;4(1):14
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Allergic sensitization: food- and protein-related factors.  
McClain S, Bowman C, Fernandez-Rivas M, Ladics GS, Ree R.
Clin Transl Allergy 2014;4(1):11
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Sensitizing properties of proteins: executive summary.  
Poulsen LK, Ladics GS, McClain S, Doerrer NG, van Ree R.
Clin Transl Allergy 2014;4(1):10
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Re-visiting Hypersensitivity Reactions to Taxanes: A Comprehensive Review.  
Picard M, Castells MC.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2014 Apr 17;
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Allergic contact dermatitis to cotoneaster species.  
Rakvit P, Green CM, Hearn RM.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):117-118

Allergic contact cheilitis caused by carnauba wax in a lip balm.  
Alrowaishdi F, Colomb S, Guillot B, Raison-Peyron N.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Nov;69(5):318-319

Recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy.  
Arruda LK, Barbosa MC, Santos AB, Moreno AS, Chapman MD, Pomes A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):428
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Cross-reactivity of peanut allergens.  
Bublin M, Breiteneder H.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):426

Occupational irritant and allergic rhinitis.  
Shusterman D.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):425
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Allergic contact dermatitis in children: review of the past decade.  
Admani S, Jacob SE.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2014 Apr;14(4):421
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Individual pollen exposure measurements: are they feasible?  
Berger U, Kmenta M, Bastl K.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Apr 15;
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Risk factors for nonwork-related adult-onset asthma and occupational asthma: a comparative review.  
Jeebhay MF, Ngajilo D, le MN.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Apr;14(2):84-94
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IgE antibodies in occupational asthma: are they causative or an associated phenomenon?  
Quirce S.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Apr;14(2):100-105
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Molecular diagnosis and the Italian Board for ISAC.  
Nettis E, Bonifazi F, Bonini S, Di LE, Maggi E, Melioli G, Passalacqua G, Senna G, Triggiani M, Vacca A, Canonica GW.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Mar;46(2):68-73

NSAIDs are the most frequent medicaments involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions.  
Dona I, Blanca-Lopez N, Cornejo-Garcia J.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):63

Skin prick test: the only predictive tool of anaphylaxis? A case report.  
Giannetti A, Meglio P, Ricci G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):49-52

A case of anaphylaxis to Pollinex(R) Quattro MPL-4.  
Borgonovo L, Piconi S, Fusi A, Iemoli E.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):46-48

Exclusively breastfed infants at risk for false negative double blind placebo controlled milk challenge.  
Petrus N, Kole E, Schoemaker A, van AW, Sprikkelman A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):43-45

The needle in the haystack: allergic anaphylaxis caused by the local anesthetic articaine.  
Wieshuber C, Stoevesandt J, Trautmann A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):38-40

Hair dyes and temporary tattoos are a real hazard for adolescents?  
Haluk AH, Adatepe S, Tahan F, Solmaz I.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):35-37

Component resolved diagnosis in real life: the risk assessment of food allergy using microarray-based immunoassay.  
Antonicelli L, Massaccesi C, Braschi M, Cinti B, Bilo M, Bonifazi F.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):30-34

Detection of 20 kDa and 32 kDa IgE-binding proteins as the major allergens in Italian sesame seed allergic patients.  
Asero R, Cecchi L, Cervone M, Crivellaro M, Lodi RF, Pravettoni V, Quercia O, Amato S, Mistrello G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):22-25

Evaluation of house dust mite allergy in real life: patients' characteristics and satisfaction with treatment.  
Frati F, Scurati S, Dell'albani I, Puccinelli P, Incorvaia C, Passalacqua G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):17-21

Sensitization to cockroach allergens in the urban atopic populations living in Campania district (southern Italy). A multicenter study.  
Liccardi G, Baldi G, Ciccarelli A, Cutajar M, D'Amato M, Gargano D, Giannattasio D, Leone G, Lo SM, Madonna F, Montera C, Piccolo A, Pio A, Russo M, Stanziola A, D'Amato G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;46(1):12-16

Allergens on desktop surfaces in preschools and elementary schools of urban children with asthma.  
Kanchongkittiphon W, Sheehan WJ, Friedlander J, Chapman MD, King EM, Martirosyan K, Baxi SN, Permaul P, Gaffin JM, Kopel L, Bailey A, Fu C, Petty CR, Gold DR, Phipatanakul W.
Allergy 2014 Apr 18;
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Update of the WHO/IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Database based on analysis of allergen sequences.  
Radauer C, Nandy A, Ferreira F, Goodman RE, Larsen JN, Lidholm J, Pomes A, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Rozynek P, Thomas WR, Breiteneder H.
Allergy 2014 Apr;69(4):413-419
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Epicutaneously applied Der p 2 induces a strong T 2-biased antibody response in C57BL/6 mice, independent of functional TLR4.  
Stremnitzer C, Manzano-Szalai K, Starkl P, Willensdorfer A, Schrom S, Singer J, Reichart U, Akira S, Jensen-Jarolim E.
Allergy 2014 Apr 16;
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Systematic review on cashew nut allergy.  
van der Valk JP, Dubois AE, Gerth van WR, Wichers HJ, de Jong NW.
Allergy 2014 Apr 15;
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EAACI Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines. Primary prevention of food allergy.  
Muraro A, Halken S, Arshad SH, Beyer K, Dubois AE, Du Toit G, Eigenmann PA, Grimshaw KE, Hoest A, Lack G, O'Mahony L, Papadopoulos NG, Panesar S, Prescott S, Roberts G, de Silva D, Venter C, et al.
Allergy 2014 May;69(5):590-601
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International consensus on drug allergy.  
Demoly P, Adkinson NF, Brockow K, Castells M, Chiriac AM, Greenberger PA, Khan DA, Lang DM, Park HS, Pichler W, Sanchez-Borges M, Shiohara T, Thong BY.
Allergy 2014 Apr;69(4):420-437
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The evaluation of drug provocation tests in pediatric allergy clinic: A single center experience.  
Vezir E, Erkocoglu M, Civelek E, Kaya A, Azkur D, Akan A, Ozcan C, Toyran M, Ginis T, Misirlioglu ED, Kocabas CN.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2014 Mar;35(2):156-162
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An epidemic of over diagnosing drug allergies.  
Stevenson DD, Kowalski ML.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2014 Mar;35(2):92-94

Allergic sensitization to ornamental plants in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma.  
Aydin O, Erkekol FO, Misirligil Z, Demirel YS, Mungan D.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2014 Mar;35(2):9-14
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Drug allergies in primary care practice in Romania: a questionnaire - based survey.  
Leru PM.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2014;10(1):16
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A simple animal model of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm in sinusitis.  
Jia M, Chen Z, Du X, Guo Y, Sun T, Zhao X.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2014 Mar;28(2):115-119
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Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by a lipid transfer protein and not by omega-5 gliadin.  
Pastorello EA, Farioli L, Stafylaraki C, Scibilia J, Mirone C, Pravettoni V, Ottolenghi AI, Conio S, Mascheri A, Losappio L, Capocchi A, Fontanini D, De GC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Feb 5;

Identification of peamaclein as a marker allergen related to systemic reactions in peach allergy.  
Inomata N, Okazaki F, Moriyama T, Nomura Y, Yamaguchi Y, Honjoh T, Kawamura Y, Narita H, Aihara M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Feb;112(2):175-177

Code red: a case of anaphylaxis to a soda.  
James C, Horbal J, Tcheurekdjian H, Hostoffer R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Mar 18;

Changes in cat specific IgE and IgG antibodies with decreased cat exposure.  
Erwin EA, Woodfolk JA, James HR, Satinover SM, Platts-Mills TA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr 9;
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Relationship between urine dichlorophenol levels and asthma morbidity.  
Jerschow E, Parikh P, McGinn AP, de VG, Jariwala S, Hudes G, Rosenstreich D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr 10;
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Allergen of the month-Western dock.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):A13

Response to the 'allergen of the month-melaleuca'.  
Lockey RF, Jelks ML.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):395

Diagnostic utility of concentrated Mus m 1 allergen extract in humans.  
Norton A, Smith K, James K, Hoskins A, Scott TA, Plunkett G, Fahrenholz J, Dworski R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):391-392

Detection of IgE binding component to infliximab in a patient with infliximab-induced anaphylaxis.  
Hwang SH, Yoo HS, Yoon MK, Park HS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):393-394

Effect of inhalation exposure to wheat flour on sputum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.  
Castano R, Welman M, Trudeau C, Castellanos L, Maghni K.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Apr;112(4):389-390

IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to ondansetron and safe use of palonosetron.  
Leung J, Guyer A, Banerji A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Sep;1(5):526-527

Pollen count and presentation of Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.  
Straka B, Nian H, Sloan C, Byrd JB, Woodard-Grice A, Yu C, Stone E, Steven G, Hartert T, Teo KK, Pare G, McCarty CA, Brown NJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Sep;1(5):468-473
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Re: does omitted history misrepresent OIT role for food allergy today?  
Mansfield LE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):423

Anaphylaxis to cat in a child with exclusive sensitivity to Fel d 1.  
Casale TB, Cruz C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):416-417

Ceftazidime-induced drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.  
Picard M, Fernandez MI, Des RA, Begin P, Paradis J, Paradis L, Le DF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):409-412

A child with allergic contact dermatitis due to para-phenylenediamine.  
Akelma AZ, Cizmeci MN, Sarifakioglu E, Mete E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):399-400

Relationship of dog- and cat-specific IgE and IgG4 levels to allergic symptoms on pet exposure.  
Burnett M, Wegienka G, Havstad S, Kim H, Johnson CC, Ownby D, Zoratti E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):350-353
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Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: insights from review of a large referral population.  
Ruffner MA, Ruymann K, Barni S, Cianferoni A, Brown-Whitehorn T, Spergel JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):343-349
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The management of eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Greenhawt M, Aceves SS, Spergel JM, Rothenberg ME.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):332-340
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Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES): current management strategies and review of the literature.  
Jarvinen KM, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):317-322
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Anaphylactic reaction to white-faced hornet sting and elevated baseline (asymptomatic) serum tryptase.  
Lieberman P, Schwartz LB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 May;1(3):315

Systemic allergy to EDTA in local anesthetic and radiocontrast media.  
Russo PA, Banovic T, Wiese MD, Whyte AF, Smith WB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Mar;2(2):225-229

Alcohol-induced respiratory symptoms are common in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease.  
Cardet JC, White AA, Barrett NA, Feldweg AM, Wickner PG, Savage J, Bhattacharyya N, Laidlaw TM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Mar;2(2):208-213
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Prevalence of sensitivity to food and drug additives in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria.  
Rajan JP, Simon RA, Bosso JV.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Mar;2(2):168-171
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A pediatric case of chronic idiopathic urticaria induced by antihistamines.  
Fung IN.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Jan;2(1):114-115

Clinical and laboratory improvement after intravenous immunoglobulin in drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms.  
Galvao VR, Aun MV, Kalil J, Castells M, Giavina-Bianchi P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Jan;2(1):107-110

Antibiotic allergies in children and adults: from clinical symptoms to skin testing diagnosis.  
Romano A, Caubet JC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Jan;2(1):3-12
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Practical advances in drug hypersensitivity.  
Castells MC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2014 Jan;2(1):1-2

On the question of the association between immediate hypersensitivity to quinolones and neuromuscular blocking drug sensitization.  
Baldo BA, Pham NH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):709-710

Anaphylaxis to peanuts in a 16-year-old girl with birch pollen allergy and with monosensitization to Ara h 8.  
Glaumann S, Nopp A, Johansson SG, Borres MP, Lilja G, Nilsson C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):698-699

A 58-year-old man with respiratory insufficiency after a 50-year history of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pulmonary Aspergillus infections.  
Segerer F, Morbach H, Hassold N, Kleinert S, Tony HP, Roesler J, Liese J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):677-680

IgE and IgG Binding Patterns and T-cell Recognition of Fel d 1 and Non-Fel d 1 Cat Allergens.  
Hales BJ, Chai LY, Hazell L, Elliot CE, Stone S, O'Neil SE, Smith WA, Thomas WR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):656-665
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Ara h 2 is the best predictor for peanut allergy in adults.  
Klemans RJ, Broekman HC, Knol EF, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Otten HG, Pasmans SG, Knulst AC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):632-638
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Clinical characterization and IgE profiling of Birch (Betula verrucosa)-allergic individuals suffering from allergic reactions to raw fruits and vegetables.  
Tolkki L, Alanko K, Petman L, Blem SM, Gronager MP, Seppala U, Ranki A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):623-631
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Physician compliance with updated practice parameters for influenza vaccination in individuals with egg allergies.  
Greenhawt M, Wang J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Nov;1(6):602-607
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Re: Integrated research on the association between climate change and Bjerkandera allergy.  
Ogawa H, Fujimura M, Satoh K, Makimura K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Sep;1(5):543

Natural resolution of peanut allergy: A 12-year longitudinal follow-up study.  
Begin P, Paradis L, Paradis J, Picard M, Des RA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Sep;1(5):528-530

Immediate allergic hypersensitivity to quinolones associates with neuromuscular blocking agent sensitization.  
Rouzaire P, Nosbaum A, Mullet C, Diot N, Dubost R, Bienvenu F, Guilloux L, Piriou V, Bienvenu J, Berard F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 May;1(3):273-279
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The time for penicillin skin testing is here.  
Solensky R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 May;1(3):264-265

Safely diagnosing clinically significant penicillin allergy using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine, penicillin, and oral amoxicillin.  
Macy E, Ngor EW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 May;1(3):258-263
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Treatment of patients with a history of penicillin allergy in a large tertiary-care academic hospital.  
Picard M, Begin P, Bouchard H, Cloutier J, Lacombe-Barrios J, Paradis J, Des RA, Laufer B, Paradis L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 May;1(3):252-257
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Cross-reactivity between royal jelly and Dermato-phagoides pteronyssinus.  
Vila L, Bartolome B, Moreno A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):200-201

The basophil activation test identified carminic acid as an allergen inducing anaphylaxis.  
Sugimoto N, Yamaguchi M, Tanaka Y, Nakase Y, Nagase H, Akiyama H, Ohta K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):197-199

Systemic contact dermatitis to ethanol.  
Wolverton W, Gada S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):195-196

International study of risk-mitigating factors and in-flight allergic reactions to peanut and tree nut.  
Greenhawt M, MacGillivray F, Batty G, Said M, Weiss C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Mar;1(2):186-194
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A patient experiencing anaphylaxis and urticaria, in some cases preceded by ingestion of red meat.  
Lieberman P, Commins SP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):107-108

Evaluation of Ara h2 IgE thresholds in the diagnosis of peanut allergy in a clinical population.  
Keet CA, Johnson K, Savage JH, Hamilton RG, Wood RA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):101-103

Near fatal anaphylaxis from orally administered gelatin capsule.  
Land MH, Piehl MD, Burks AW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):99-100

Perplexing cases of allergy to salami.  
Ludman S, Perrin Y, Caubet JC, Wassenberg J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):97-98

The utility of peanut components in the diagnosis of IgE-mediated peanut allergy among distinct populations.  
Lieberman JA, Glaumann S, Batelson S, Borres MP, Sampson HA, Nilsson C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):75-82
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Evaluation of food allergy in patients with atopic dermatitis.  
Bergmann MM, Caubet JC, Boguniewicz M, Eigenmann PA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):22-28
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Advances in diagnosing peanut allergy.  
Sicherer SH, Wood RA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jan;1(1):1-13
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Ovomucoid is not superior to egg white testing in predicting tolerance to baked egg.  
Bartnikas LM, Sheehan WJ, Larabee KS, Petty C, Schneider LC, Phipatanakul W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2013 Jul;1(4):354-360
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Drug hypersensitivity syndrome in a patient receiving vismodegib.  
Lam T, Wolverton SE, Davis CL.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2014 Mar;70(3):e65-e66

Biphasic skin reactions during telaprevir-based therapy of Japanese patients infected with hepatitis C virus.  
Kishi A, Hayashi N, Ohara K, Aoki K, Yamada I, Ikeda K, Kumada H.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2014 Mar;70(3):584-586

Alcohol-induced vasculitis: case report and commentary.  
Abuabara K, Samimi S, Chu EY, Bluebond ND, James WD, Merkel PA.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2014 Feb;70(2):e42-e43

Gluten sensitivity: celiac lite versus celiac like.  
Husby S, Murray JA.
J Pediatr 2014 Mar;164(3):436-438

Clinical, serologic, and histologic features of gluten sensitivity in children.  
Francavilla R, Cristofori F, Castellaneta S, Polloni C, Albano V, Dellatte S, Indrio F, Cavallo L, Catassi C.
J Pediatr 2014 Mar;164(3):463-467
Click to view abstract

Plantago lanceolata: An important trigger of summer pollinosis with limited IgE cross-reactivity.  
Gadermaier G, Eichhorn S, Vejvar E, Weilnbock L, Lang R, Briza P, Huber CG, Ferreira F, Hawranek T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Apr 1;

Allergen challenge in allergic rhinitis rapidly induces increased peripheral blood type 2 innate lymphoid cells that express CD84.  
Doherty TA, Scott D, Walford HH, Khorram N, Lund S, Baum R, Chang J, Rosenthal P, Beppu A, Miller M, Broide DH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Apr;133(4):1203-1205

Occupational risk factors for asthma among adult men and women in India.  
Agrawal S, Pearce N, Millett C, Subramanian S, Ebrahim S.
J Asthma 2014 Apr 9;
Click to view abstract

IgE versus IgG4 epitopes of the peanut allergen Ara h 1 in patients with severe allergy.  
Bogh KL, Nielsen H, Eiwegger T, Madsen CB, Mills EN, Rigby NM, Szepfalusi Z, Roggen EL.
Mol Immunol 2014 Apr;58(2):169-176

Six children with allergic contact dermatitis to methylisothiazolinone in wet wipes (baby wipes).  
Chang MW, Nakrani R.
Pediatrics 2014 Feb;133(2):e434-e438
Click to view abstract

Pathophysiology of multiple chemical sensitivity. [French]  
Barnig C, de BF.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Jun;30(6):446-450
Click to view abstract

Pathophysiology of multiple chemical sensitivity: in search of a biomarker. [French]  
Charpin D.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Jun;30(6):443

Le pignon de pin : allergène nouveau ? Allergène émergent ? / The pine nuts: new allergen? Emerging allergen?  
G. Dutau, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):41-43
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Contamination fongique de l’habitat Lorrain : enquête préliminaire au domicile des patients / Fungal contamination of habitat Lorrain: preliminary investigation in patients' homes  
A. Rivier, M. Guillaso, J.A. Flabbée
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):44-50
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Comparative study of clinical phenotypes of allergy to fish according to the profiles of molecular awareness parvalbumin, the enolase, and aldolase in fish gelatin. [French]  
A. Kuehn, C. Metz-Favre, G. Pauli, C. Lehners-Weber, F. Codreanu-Morel, F. Hentges, P. Auriol, F. Bienvenu, C. Braun, C. Crepin, A. Foessel, et al.
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):51-60
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxie au pignon de pin : à propos de vingt cas déclarés au Réseau Allergo Vigilance / Anaphylaxis to pine nut: about twenty cases reported Allergo Vigilance Network  
P. Pralong, D.A. Moneret Vautrin, F. Pirson, A. Juchet, Y.P. Massabie, P. Beaumont, C. Langlet, C. Chappard
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):61-65
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie alimentaire : quel certificat rédiger ? / Food allergy: how to write certificate?  
G. Guyon, N. Petit, L. Garbacz, L. Lepeltier, H. Coudane, G. Kanny, F. Claudot
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(2):82-85
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Pollinoses d’arbres : quels traitements ? / Pollinosis trees: what treatment?  
J.-M. Perotin, D. Jorge, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):88-91
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergies professionnelles du vigneron / Occupational allergies winemaker  
F. Lavaud, J.-M. Pérotin, J.-F. Fontaine
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):103-106
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Quelles farines pour les anaphylaxies à l’effort ? / What meal for anaphylaxis effort?  
S. Denery-Papini
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):116-119
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’induction de tolérance orale dans l’allergie aux rosacées / The induction of oral tolerance in allergy to Rosaceae  
M. Bouvier, X. Van Der Brempt, A. Nosbaum, J.-M. Cordier, C. Cherih, A. Frappaz, C. Berion, S. Grande, P. Pralong, J.-F. Nicolas, F. Bérard
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):127-133
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’allergie au cannabis : bien plus qu’un voyage stupéfiant / Allergy cannabis much more than amazing journey  
A.L. Van Gasse, V. Sabato, C.H. Bridts, D.G. Ebo
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):144-147
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Comment tester un eczéma des mains ? / How to test a hand eczem  
M. Castelain, F. Castelain
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):160-163
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Où et comment induire la tolérance chez l’enfant allergique alimentaire à l’arachide ? / Where and how to induce tolerance in food allergic child to peanuts?  
C. Delebarre Sauvage, A.-C. Vilain
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):188-191
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergènes cachés dans les cosmétiques / Hidden allergens in cosmetics  
J. Waton
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):207-209
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Bases chimiques et pharmacologiques des AINS / Chemical and pharmacological bases of NSAIDs  
P. Tréchot, J.-Y. Jouzeau
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):212-217
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergies et photo-allergies de contact aux AINS topiques / Allergies and photo-contact allergy to topical NSAIDs  
M. Avenel-Audran
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):218-222
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Un intolérant aux AINS peut-il prendre de l’aspirine à doses anti-agrégantes ? / Intolerant to NSAIDs can it take aspirin to anti-aggregating doses?  
A. Vial-Dupuy
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):223-226
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Étude MIRABEL : description d’une population de 680 enfants allergiques à l’arachide (résultats préliminaires) / MIRABEL study: description of a population of 680 children with peanut allergy (preliminary results)  
A. Deschildre, J. Just, A. Papadopoulos, O. Bruyère, F. Elegbede, A. Crépet, D.-A. Moneret-Vautrin
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):227-228
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Risque allergique des insectes en alimentation humaine / Allergic risk of insect food  
M. Mairesse, F. Debaugnies, V. Doyen, C. Ledent, O. Michel, F. Corazza, F. Francis
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):228
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie alimentaire liée à la présence d’IgE anti-galactose-a-1,3-galactose (a.Gal). À propos de 6 observations / Food allergy associated with the presence of anti-IgE a-galactose-1,3-galactose (a.Gal). About 6 comments  
M. Mairesse, C. Ledent, V. Doyen
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):228
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

IgE spécifiques anti-aGAL : à propos de 11 cas / Specific IgE anti-Agal: about 11 cases  
C. Simon, A. Sarrat, S. Guez
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):228-229
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensibilisation aux protéines de transfert lipidique (LTP) dans une population consultant pour une suspicion d’allergie alimentaire / Awareness lipid transfer proteins (LTP) in a population looking for suspected food allergy  
M.C. Leoni, M. Verdù Benhamú, M.P. Demoly, A.M. Chiriac, P. Demoly
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):229
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Vingt ans d’allergie aux laits caprins : à propos de 14 cas / Twenty years of allergy to milk goats: about 14 cases  
F. Alauzet, T. Bourrier
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):229-230
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Tolérance de l’œuf cuit chez les enfants sensibilisés à l’œuf suivis au CHU de Poitiers / Tolerance of cooked egg in children sensitized to egg followed CHU Poitiers  
D. Kabirova, M. Verdaguer, J.C. Meurice, J. Mulliez
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3): 230
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie aux protéines de lait de vache persistante chez l’enfant / Allergy to milk proteins persistent cow in children  
N. Siala, I. Fetni, O. Rebah, O. Azzabi, Y. Dridi, I. Selmi, S. Halioui, A. Maherzi
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3): 230-231
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Le syndrome orange-cyprès / Orange cypress syndrome  
S. Martinez, M. Gouitaa, C. Tummino, A. Palot, D. Charpin, P. Chanez
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):231
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Étude des allergènes impliqués dans deux cas d’allergie à la pomme de terre fraîche / Study of allergens involved in two cases of allergy to fresh potato  
C. Ledent, M. Mairesse, V. Leduc, D. Kosmalski, K. Lièvre
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):231
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie au blé chez le nourrisson / Wheat allergy in infants  
N. Elhafidi, F. Benbrahim, S. Benchekroun, A. Asermouh, C. Mahraoui
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):231
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Réaction immédiate à l’alcool / Immediate reaction to alcohol  
F. Libon, B. Dézfoulian, A.F. Nikkels
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):232
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie alimentaire chez l’enfant au Sénégal / Food allergy in children in Senegal  
M. Diallo-Chauvin
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):232
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Caractéristiques de l’allergie respiratoire à Blomia tropicalis / Characteristics of respiratory allergy Blomia tropicalis  
N. Souki, W. El Khattabi, H. Sellal, I. Lhafiane, H. Afif, A. Aichane
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):233
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensitivity and specificity of the three solutions of allergen extracts for diagnosing allergy by skin tests (skin prick test)  
C. Radu, F. De Blay, A. Didier, F. Lavaud, M. Mélac, A. Viatte, M.P. Furrer, R.K. Zeldin
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):233-234
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensibilisation au pollen de palmier-dattier à Marrakech / Pollen sensitization of date palm in Marrakech  
A. Alaoui Yazidi, H. Sajiai, H. Serhane, L. Maliki, G. Hamzaoui, L. Amro
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):234
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Absence d’utilité clinique des Prick-test et des taux d’IgEs spécifiques dans l’allergie au sésame / Lack of clinical usefulness of prick test and specific rates of IgEs in sesame allergy  
D. Dano, S. Jacquenet, S. Verdun, G. Kanny, B. Bihain, C. Astier
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):234
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Amélioration des performances diagnostiques de l’allergie à l’arachide grâce à de nouveaux allergènes moléculaires / Improved diagnostic performance of peanut allergy through new molecular allergens  
C. Richard, N. Couturier, O. Roitel, G. Knierim, B. Thouvenot, C. Astier, F. Codreanu, G. Kanny, D.A. Moneret-Vautrin, B. Bihain, S. Jacquenet
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):234-235
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Cor a 14 et Cor a 9 : marqueurs d’allergie sévère à la noisette chez l’enfant ? / Cor a 14 et Cor a 9 : severe allergy to hazelnut in children markers?  
L. Garnier, C. Massip, S. Viel, J. Bienvenu, A. Lachaux, F. Bienvenu
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):235
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Asthme aux grillons chez une terrariophile, une allergie liée aux NAC / Asthma crickets in a terrarium, allergy-related NAC  
N. Jaques-Thauvin, K. Lallemand, V. Leduc
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):235-236
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensibilisation cutanée aux pollens d’olivier à Casablanca / Skin sensitization to pollens olive Casablanca  
M. Lahroussi, H. Sellal, W. El Khattabi, H. Afif, A. Aichane
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):235
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Impact des campagnes de lutte contre l’ambroisie sur les quantités de ces pollens / Impact of campaigns against ragweed on the quantities of these pollens  
M. Thibaudon, Q. Martinez, C. Sindt, G. Oliver, S. Pocachard, B. Chauvel
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):236
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Production of recombinant proteins rDer p 1 and p 2 rDer for molecular diagnostic components mite allergy in humans. [French]  
O. Roitel, G. Douchin, N. Couturier, C. Richard, B. Thouvenot, B. Bihain, S. Jacquenet
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):236-237
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’anaphylaxie au moustique est-elle indicatrice de mastocytose ? / Anaphylaxis the mosquito is it indicative of mastocytosis?  
M. Drouet, M.E. Sarre, C. Lavigne, C. Beauvillain, G. Renier
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):237
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Réactions croisées entre pollen et graine de Brassica napus : implication des allergènes non hydrosolubles / Cross-reactivity between pollen and seed of Brassica napus: involvement of non-water-soluble allergens  
O. Rivera Martos, J.P. Sutra, H. Sénéchal, S. D’andréa, P. Poncet
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):237
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Amb a 11 : un nouvel allergène majeur du pollen d’ambroisie / Amb a 11: a new major allergen of ragweed pollen  
E. Nony, J. Bouley, M. Le Mignon, M.N. Couret, L. Bussières, R. Groeme, A. Lautrette, S. Mariano, V. Baron-Bodo, V. Bordas, H. Chabre, T. Batard, P. Moingeon
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):237
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dermatophagoïdes microceras, une espèce redondante ? / Dermatophagoides microceras, redundant species?  
V. Leduc, C. Aparicio, K. Lièvre
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):239
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Euroglyphus maynei et Dermatophagoïdes sp, des petits frères ! / Euroglyphus maynei and Dermatophagoides sp, little brothers!  
V. Leduc, K. Lièvre, C. Aparicio
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):239
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Prévalence de l’allergie respiratoire aux pneumallergènes dans la région de Marrakech. Résultats préliminaires de l’étude MARRALLERG (programme PHC Volubilis) / Prevalence of respiratory allergy to airborne in the region of Marrakech. Preliminary results  
A. Alaoui Yazidi, H. Serhane, H. Sajiai, L. Hamzaoui, L. Amro, B. Admou, F. Bienvenu, J. Bienvenu
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):239
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

La sensibilisation aux pneumallergènes domestiques et sévérité de l’asthme chez les enfants asthmatiques à Annaba (Algérie) / Awareness to domestic allergens and asthma severity in children with asthma in Annaba (Algeria)  
S. Meharzi, A. Boumendjel, N. Bouchair, A. Belgharssa, M. Messarah
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):239-240
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Utilisation des allergènes moléculaires dans l’allergie à l’arachide : l’expérience du CHU de Rouen / Use of molecular allergens in peanut allergy: the experience of the CHU de Rouen  
V. Bobée, F. Renosi, J. Martinet, O. Boyer
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):240
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Local intestinal response in Ussing chamber of BALB / c mice sensitized to bovine milk proteins after a preventive regime based on a hypoallergenic formula milk marketed. [French]  
H. Abbas, D. Saidi, K.E. Elmecherfi
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):240
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Effet des oméga-3 sur l’allergie aux protéines du lait de vache chez la souris Balb/c / Effect of omega-3 allergy to cow's milk proteins in the Balb / c mice  
A. Haddi, A.M. Temimi, M. Guendouz, L. Amier, O. Khéroua, D. Saidi
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):240-241
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Approche moléculaire par une technique de microarray de l’allergie alimentaire de l’enfant / Molecular approach by microarray technique of food allergy in children  
V. Boutchkova, B. Lepage, P.A. Apoil, A. Broué-Chabbert, A. Juchet, A. Blancher, C. Mailhol, F. Bienvenu, A. Didier
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):241
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Production des protéines recombinantes rAna o 3, rJug r 1 et rCor a 8 en vue d’un diagnostic moléculaire différentiel des allergies aux fruits à coque  
O. Roitel, B. Thouvenot, C. Richard, B. Bihain, G. Kanny, S. Jacquenet
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):243
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dermite professionnelle aux protéines issues des produits de la mer, qui est le plus touché : le pêcheur ou le cuisinier ? / Occupational dermatitis with protein from seafood, which is most affected: the fisherman or the cook?  
B. Lodde, P. Cros, A.M. Roguedas-Contios, J.D. Dewitte, L. Misery
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):243
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Stick à lèvres Dermophil® : ce n’est pas le Pérou ! / Lipstick Dermophil ®: it is not Peru!  
M.E. Sarre, M. Guérin-Moreau, J.P. Lepoittevin, L. Martin, M. Avenel-Audran
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):243
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dermatoses de contact allergiques au cocamide DEA : une nouvelle épidémie ? / Allergic contact dermatoses in cocamide DEA: a new epidemic?  
A. Badaoui, A. Soria, N. Raison-Peyron, C. Pecquet, C. Francès
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):243-244
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Eczéma de contact professionnel au zoo / Eczema professional contact zoo  
C. Poreaux, E. Penven, E. Langlois, C. Paris, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):244
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Eczéma de contact aéroporté aux pénicillines chez un éleveur de bovins / Airborne contact dermatitis to penicillins in a cattle  
C. Poreaux, E. Penven, F. François, C. Paris, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):244
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Eczéma de contact professionnel lié aux jeux de grattage / Professional contact dermatitis associated with scratch games  
E. Fréling, C. Poreaux, A. Valois, F. François, J.L. Schmutz, A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):245
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Évaluation prospective du Conseil médical en environnement intérieur en Bourgogne auprès de 546 patients : réduction significative de la consommation de médicaments neuf mois après la visite  
L. Blanchon, M. Bochaton, P. Scherer, I. Sullerot, G. Reboux, P. Bonniaud, G. Gardin
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):246
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Objets textiles pré-traités par des acaricides : effet à 1 et 3 ans sur les allergènes d’acariens / Textile objects pre-treated with acaricides: Effect 1 and 3 years of mite allergens  
S.S. Qi, S. Bouzoubaa, M. Ott, A. Dazy, A. Poirot, F. De Blay
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):247
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Pustulose éxanthématique aigue localisée à la moutarde des champs (Sinapis arvensis) / Exanthematous pustulosis acute localized mustard (Sinapis arvensis)  
O. Boudghene Stambouli
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):247
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Le Pollinarium sentinelle® : proposition d’une amélioration de l’approche diagnostique et thérapeutique de la maladie pollinique / The Sentinel ® Pollinarium: proposal for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the pollen disease  
L.C. Antoine, D. Chevallier, C. Figureau, B. Dubegny, J.L. Bouchereau, J.C. Bonneau, O. Morin
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):248
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Moisissures de l’environnement domestique et effet sur la sévérité de l’asthme chez une population pédiatrique asthmatique à Annaba (Algérie) / Mold from the home environment and effect on the severity of asthma in asthmatic Annaba (Algeria)  
S. Meharzi, A. Boumendjel, R. Mansouri, M. Messarah
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):248
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Respiratory allergen from house dust mite is present in human milk and primes for allergic sensitization in a mouse model of asthma  
P. Macchiaverni, A. Rekima, M. Turfkruyer, L. Mascarell, S. Airouche, P. Moingeon, K. Adel-Patient, A. Condino-Neto, I. Annesi-Maesano, S. Prescott, M. Tulic, V. Verhasselt
Rev Fr Allergol 2014;54(3):248
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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