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 Allergy Advisor Digest - August 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines for the management of egg allergy.
Read Molecular diagnosis in allergy.
Read Contact allergy to gold as a model for clinical-experimental research.
Read Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics in the USA and in Europe.
Read Dermatitis from common ivy in Europe: past, present, and future.
Read Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.
Read Contact urticaria with systemic symptoms due to hexylene glycol in a topical corticosteroid.
Read Contact allergy to metals and bone cement components in patients with intolerance of arthroplasty.
Read Identification of a major yolk protein as an allergen in sea urchin roe.
Read Pitfalls in the diagnosis of latex allergy.
Read Mugwort-Sensitized Individuals from North Europe, South Europe and North America Show Different IgE Reactivity Patterns.
Read Characterization and stability of specific IgE to white egg's, gliadin's and peanut's proteins among children.
Read Association between peanut allergy and asthma morbidity.
Read Safe vaccination of patients with egg allergy with an adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccine.
Read Component-resolved diagnosis for Phleum allergy: the role of recombinants.
Read Sequential sensitization to different occupational compounds in a young woman.
Read Asthma induced by chloramine T in nurses: case report
Read Severe asthma with fungal sensitization in a child.
Read Safety of influenza vaccine administration in egg-allergic patients.
Read Occupational type I allergies--comparison of skin prick test solutions from different manufacturers
Read Parental occupation is a risk factor for childhood wheeze and asthma.
Read IgE reactivity to common cypress (C. sempervirens) pollen extracts: evidence for novel allergens.

Abstracts shared in August 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Lupin allergy: a hidden killer in the home.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis due to cinnamon oil in galenic vaginal suppositories.
Read Food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) to wheat proteins, particularly to rTri alpha19-Omega-5-Gliadin, and light sensitization to crustaceans and house dust mite.
Read Fixed food eruption caused by liquorice.
Read Allergy to pumpkin and crossreactivity to pollens and other foods.
Read Detection of sensitization to lipid transfer proteins in food allergy using component-based diagnostic approach.
Read Low molecular weight glutenins in wheat-dependant, exercise-induced anaphylaxis
Read Amaranthus retroflexus pollen extract: extensive cross-reactive allergenic components among the four species of Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae.
Read "Hidden allergens" of latex.
Read Young infants with atopic dermatitis can display sensitization to Cor a 9 from hazelnut

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines for the management of egg allergy.
"This guideline advises on the management of patients with egg allergy. Most commonly, egg allergy presents in infancy, with a prevalence of approximately 2% in children and 0.1% in adults. A clear clinical history and the detection of egg white-specific IgE (by skin prick test or serum assay) will confirm the diagnosis in most cases. Egg avoidance advice is the cornerstone of management. Egg allergy often resolves and re-introduction can be achieved at home if reactions have been mild and there is no asthma. Patients with a history of severe reactions or asthma should have reintroduction guided by a specialist. All children with egg allergy should receive measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination. Influenza and yellow fever vaccines should only be considered in egg-allergic patients under the guidance of an allergy specialist. This guideline was prepared by the Standards of Care Committee (SOCC) of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI) and is intended for allergists and others with a special interest in allergy. The recommendations are evidence-based but where evidence was lacking consensus was reached by the panel of specialists on the committee. The document encompasses epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and co-morbid associations."

British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines for the management of egg allergy.  
Clark AT, Skypala I, Leech SC, Ewan PW, Dugue P, Brathwaite N, Huber PA, Nasser SM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug;40(8):1116-1129

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular diagnosis in allergy.
"Development and progress made in the field of recombinant allergens have allowed for the development of a new concept in allergy diagnosis, molecular diagnosis (MD), which makes it possible to identify potential disease-eliciting molecules. Microarray-based testing performed with a small amount of serum sample enables clinicians to determine specific-IgE antibodies against multiple recombinants or purified natural allergen components. Performance characteristics of allergens so far tested are comparable with current diagnostic tests, but have to be confirmed in larger studies. The use of allergen components and the successful interpretation of test results in the clinic require some degree of knowledge about the basis of allergen components and their clinical implications. Allergen components can be classified by protein families based on their function and structure. This review provides a brief overview of basic information on allergen components, recombinants or purified, currently available or soon to become commercially available in ImmunoCAP or ISAC(®) systems, including names, protein family and function. Special consideration is given to primary or species-specific sensitization and possible cross-reactivity, because one of the most important clinical utility of MD is its ability to reveal whether the sensitization is genuine in nature (primary, species-specific) or if it is due to cross-reactivity to proteins with similar protein structures, which may help to evaluate the risk of reaction on exposure to different allergen sources. MD can be a support tool for choosing the right treatment for the right patient with the right timing. Such information will eventually give clinicians the possibility to individualize the actions taken, including an advice on targeted allergen exposure reduction, selection of suitable allergens for specific immunotherapy, or the need to perform food challenges. Nevertheless, all in vitro tests should be evaluated together with the clinical history, because allergen sensitization does not necessarily imply clinical responsiveness."

Molecular diagnosis in allergy.  
Sastre J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug 2;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to gold as a model for clinical-experimental research.
Contact allergy to gold is statistically correlated to the presence of dental gold. But in many case reports it has also been attributed to wearing gold jewellery, albeit not statistically demonstrated. Epicutaneous testing with gold salts increases the blood gold level, and by intramuscular injection systemic contact dermatitis is provoked in an allergic individual. In coronary heart disease, gold-coated intravascular stents have been shown to be correlated to contact allergy and even to an increased risk of restenosis. Gold is far from inert

Contact allergy to gold as a model for clinical-experimental research.  
Moller H.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):193-200

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics in the USA and in Europe.
Cosmetics are an important source of contact with formaldehyde. This study acquired data on the frequency of use of formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics sold in the USA and Europe and their use concentrations. Enquiries with Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Cosmetics Association, and the Dutch Cosmetics Association. Reading the labels of skin care cosmetics in a local drugstore. The FDA provided data on the presence of formaldehyde and releasers. Nearly one fifth of all cosmetics contain a releaser. In 25% of 496 examined skin care products, releasers were present. In comparable FDA data categories, the percentage was 24. No data were found on use concentrations of the releasers in cosmetics in either the USA or Europe.

Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics in the USA and in Europe.  
de Groot AC, Veenstra M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):221-224

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dermatitis from common ivy in Europe: past, present, and future.
It has been suggested that allergic contact dermatitis from Common ivy may be under-diagnosed, partly due to lack of commercial patch test allergens. The objective of the article is to present the results of aimed patch testing with the main common ivy allergen, falcarinol, during a 16-year period and review the newer literature. Of 127 Danish patients tested with falcarinol, 10 (7.9%) tested positive. Seven were occupationally sensitized. Between 1994 and 2009, 28 new cases of contact dermatitis from ivy were reported, 2 of which were occupational. Only 11 of the 28 patients were tested with pure allergens. Falcarinol is not only widely distributed in the ivy family, but also in the closely related Apiaceae. Sensitization may occur in childhood or in adults pruning ivy plants or handling them in an occupational setting. In view of the ubiquity of falcarinol-containing plants and the relatively high prevalence of positive reactions in aimed patch testing, falcarinol should be the next plant allergen to be commercially available and included in the plant series worldwide

Dermatitis from common ivy (Hedera helix L. subsp. helix) in Europe: past, present, and future.  
Paulsen E, Christensen LP, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):201-209

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.
Reactions after topical corticosteroid administration to the skin have been known for decades, appearing as an eczematous lesion and with diagnosis by patch testing. New data have appeared about cutaneous symptoms after inhaled and systemically administered corticosteroids. In this review, the authors point out that T-cell involvement in a generalized maculopapular exanthema induced by inhaled budesonide has recently been demonstrated by lymphocyte transformation tests and that T-cell involvement has also been shown in skin biopsies from a group of patients with urticaria and maculopapular exanthema after systemically administered corticosteroids. They argue that generalized cutaneous symptoms after corticosteroid administration occur with both IgE and T-cell involvement. Skin testing, in-vitro testing and drug provocation tests are useful diagnostic tools.

Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.  
Torres MJ, Canto G.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;10(4):273-279

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact urticaria with systemic symptoms due to hexylene glycol in a topical corticosteroid.
Severe contact urticaria with systemic involvement resembling an anaphylactic reaction following the application of a topical corticosteroid. This was caused by hexylene glycol, an excipient in the formulation. Glycols are widely used in cosmetics, foods and topical and systemic drugs. In particular, glycols are present in many topical drugs used by dermatologists. To the authors knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of a potentially life-threatening immediate-type reaction in the context of a contact urticaria syndrome due to hexylene glycol.

Contact urticaria with systemic symptoms due to hexylene glycol in a topical corticosteroid: case report and review of hypersensitivity to glycols.  
Spoerl D, Scherer K, Bircher AJ.
Dermatology 2010;220(3):238-242

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to metals and bone cement components in patients with intolerance of arthroplasty.
Contact allergy rates to metals and potential bone cement components are higher in arthroplasty patients with complications than in the general population.

Contact allergy to metals and bone cement components in patients with intolerance of arthroplasty. [German]  
Eben R, Dietrich KA, Nerz C, Schneider S, Schuh A, Banke IJ, Mazoochian F, Thomas P.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2010 Jul;135(28-29):1418-1422

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of a major yolk protein as an allergen in sea urchin roe.
The aim of this study was to identify the major allergens of sea urchin roe. An IgE-binding protein was detected using serum from a patient with previous anaphylaxis to sea urchin roe. Immunoblot analysis of sea urchin extracts showed that a 160-kDa protein, and recognized by the patient's IgE. It was shown to be the major yolk protein (152 kDa) of sea urchins. (Yamasaki 2010 ref.25201 3)

Identification of a major yolk protein as an allergen in sea urchin roe.  
Yamasaki A, Higaki H, Nakashima K, Yamamoto O, Hein KZ, Takahashi H, Chinuki Y, Morita E.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 May;90(3):235-8.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pitfalls in the diagnosis of latex allergy.
The authors of this paper point out that screening patients for latex allergy prior to surgery is an important but intensive procedure and that sensitivity and specificity of both skin and serum tests are influenced by patient-specific factors or manufacturing processes that alter the clinically relevant allergens in skin testing solutions. In this study, total IgE and latex-specific IgE testing was utilised as a screening test. Skin prick testing was done on patients with a high probability of latex allergy and negative specific IgE with total IgE <100kU/L. Non-ammoniated latex (NAL) and newly introduced ammoniated latex (AL) reagents were assessed for the clinically relevant allergens. 51 patients had a total IgE <100 (range, 2.8-99.0kU/L), and 10% had a positive skin test. 60% of positive skin tests would have been missed with lower total IgE cut-offs of 50kU/L (6% of referrals). SDS-PAGE of the NAL solution showed 3 prominent bands with molecular weights of approximately 20, 24 and 42kDa that correlated with Hev b 6, Hev b 3 and Hev b 7/13, respectively. In contrast, the AL solution showed 3 very faint higher molecular weights bands that did not correlate with clinically relevant antigens. The authors conclude that increasing the cut-off value of total IgE for allergen-specific IgE testing increased the sensitivity of the specific IgE test. The NAL reagent had a greater number of clinically significant allergens at higher concentrations than AL, which may have implications for the clinical sensitivity of the newer AL reagent.

Pitfalls in the diagnosis of latex allergy.  
Khan S, Holding S, Dore P, Sewell C.
Allergol Int 2010 Sep;59(3):305-308

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mugwort-Sensitized Individuals from North Europe, South Europe and North America Show Different IgE Reactivity Patterns.
IgE reactivity to the major mugwort allergen Art v 1 in relation to allergens from other weed pollen and cross-reactive components in mugwort-sensitized subjects was studied. Using purified Art v 1 (mugwort) and Amb a 1 (Ragweed - short), samples from North Europe (n = 50), South Europe (n = 19) and North America (n = 41) were analyzed for IgE against mugwort pollen, weed allergen components, pan-allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs). The prevalence of IgE reactivity (>0.35 kU(A)/l) to Art v 1 was significantly higher in samples from North Europe than in those from North America. IgE to Amb a 1 was more common in North America than in North and South Europe, while IgE to Par j 2 (wall pellitory) was common in South Europe, less common in North America, and absent in North Europe. IgE to Art v 3 in mugwort-allergic patients was more common in North Europe than in South Europe and North America, while IgE to Sal k 1 (Saltwort) was similar between the areas. Subjects with an Art v 1/mugwort-specific IgE ratio <0.5 had more often IgE to Amb a 1, profilin, polcalcin and CCDs than subjects with a ratio >0.5. Therefore mugwort-sensitized subjects have different IgE reactivity profiles to weed allergens, reflecting their exposure to various pollens. Subjects with a low ratio between the IgE levels to Art v 1 and mugwort have a diverse IgE reactivity profile, indicating a role for cross-reactive allergens in their mugwort sensitization.

Mugwort-Sensitized Individuals from North Europe, South Europe and North America Show Different IgE Reactivity Patterns.  
Moverare R, Larsson H, Carlsson R, Holmquist I.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Aug 24;154(2):164-172

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization and stability of specific IgE to white egg's, gliadin's and peanut's proteins among children.
The aim of the present study was to characterize allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) among children in Fez region in Morocco. Of 81children recruited, allergen-specific IgE measurement indicated more positive values for gliadins (46.9% up to 2IU/ml) than egg white's (29.6%) and peanut's proteins (22.2%). According to predictive values published by Sampson (2001), 14.3% of children are sensitive to egg white's proteins, 4.1% to gliadins and 2.7% to peanut's proteins. Allergen-specific IgE measurement indicates that children from Fez region are more sensitive to EWP than peanut's proteins and gliadins.

Characterization and stability of specific IgE to white egg's, gliadin's and peanut's proteins among children.  
Ouahidi I, El Youbi EA, Bouyahyaoui Y, Mernissi FZ, Aarab L.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;9(2):97-102

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Association between peanut allergy and asthma morbidity.
This study assessed the association of peanut allergy with asthma morbidity in children beyond age 3 years. A Poisson regression model was used to compare the frequency of systemic steroid use and of hospitalization for asthma beyond age 3 years in children with asthma with and without peanut allergy. Children with peanut allergy had a 2.32-times greater rate of hospitalization and a 1.59-times greater rate of systemic steroid use after controlling for covariates. Therefore peanut allergy serves as an early marker for asthma morbidity. Early prevention and intervention can improve quality of care

Association between peanut allergy and asthma morbidity.  
Simpson AB, Yousef E, Hossain J.
J Pediatr 2010 May;156(5):777-81, 781

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Safe vaccination of patients with egg allergy with an adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccine.
Although anaphylaxis after influenza immunization is a theoretic risk, vaccination of patients with egg allergy with an adjuvanted monovalent pH1N1 influenza vaccine resulted in no cases of anaphylaxis and on that basis appears safe

Safe vaccination of patients with egg allergy with an adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccine.  
Gagnon R, Primeau MN, Des RA, Lemire C, Kagan R, Carr S, Ouakki M, Benoit M, De SG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;126(2):317-323

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Component-resolved diagnosis for Phleum allergy: the role of recombinants.
The objective of this study was to evaluate serum IgE in patients with grass-induced allergic rhinitis (AR) or AR with asthma (ARA), comparing assays with natural or recombinant grass allergens. Sixty patients (33 AR, 27 ARA) positive with SPT and serum IgE for Phleum pratense were enrolled. Serum IgE specific for conventional and recombinant Phleum pratense: rPhl p 1, rPhl p 2, nPhl p 4, rPhl 5b, rPhl p 6, rPhl p 7, rPhl p 11, rPhl p 12, were measured. IgE concentrations assessed with recombinant allergens were significantly higher in ARA patients (p = .05) than in AR patients. A value >5.8 kU/L is the optimal cut-off to discriminate AR and ARA patients. Model specificity was 76%, sensitivity 78%, and efficiency 77%. The authors conclude that the study shows that IgEs for natural and recombinant grass pollen allergens are significantly higher in patients with AR and asthma, and that using recombinant allergens it is possible to define a prediction model for diagnosis with 77% efficiency.

Component-resolved diagnosis for Phleum allergy: the role of recombinants.  
De AM, Alesina R, Moratti R, Ciprandi G.
J Asthma 2010 Aug 23;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sequential sensitization to different occupational compounds in a young woman.
An interesting report of a young woman who developed occupational asthma due to sensitization to two different agents, exposure to which occurred in different time periods: first to methylene diisocyanate (MDI) and later to flour dust.

Sequential sensitization to different occupational compounds in a young woman. [Italian]  
Talini D, Novelli F, Bacci E, de SM, Paggiaro PL.
Med Lav 2010 Jan;101(1):49-54

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Asthma induced by chloramine T in nurses: case report
Chloramine T is used in hospitals as a disinfectant and for sterilization of endoscopy instruments.

A 43 year-old male nurse, exposed to glutaraldehyde and Chloramine T to disinfect surgical and endoscopy instruments, noticed the onset of asthmatic reactions after exposure to the disinfectant. Skin test with Chloramine T was positive. An inhalation test with glutaraldehyde gave negative results for both asthma and rhinitis. Inhalation test with Chloramine T 0.5% resulted in a significant biphasic decrease in FEV1. This case demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosing occupational asthma due to Chloramine T in health care workers. It may very well be that the frequency of occupational asthma due to sensitization to Chloramine T in nurses is underestimated.

Asthma induced by chloramine T in nurses: case report. [Italian]  
Sartorelli P, Paolucci V, Rendo S, Romeo R, Murdaca F, Mariano A.
Med Lav 2010 Mar;101(2):134-138

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe asthma with fungal sensitization in a child.
"People with severe asthma with fungal sensitization may represent an underdiagnosed subset of patients with refractory disease. It is important to know that such patients may benefit from adjunct treatment with antifungal agents. We describe here the case of a child with refractory asthma, persistent airway obstruction, a serum immunoglobulin E level of >20000 IU/mL, and severe eosinophilic airway infiltration. Although he did not meet diagnostic criteria for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, he demonstrated evidence of sensitization to several fungi and responded dramatically to the addition of itraconazole therapy. We also discuss emerging hypotheses regarding fungal-induced asthma."

Severe asthma with fungal sensitization in a child: response to itraconazole therapy.  
Vicencio AG, Muzumdar H, Tsirilakis K, Kessel A, Nandalike K, Goldman DL.
Pediatrics 2010 May;125(5):e1255-e1258

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Safety of influenza vaccine administration in egg-allergic patients.
"The results of our study suggest that egg-allergic patients without anaphylaxis to egg may safely receive the influenza vaccine in a 2-dose, graded fashion without a vaccine skin test."

Safety of influenza vaccine administration in egg-allergic patients.  
Chung EY, Huang L, Schneider L.
Pediatrics 2010 May;125(5):e1024-e1030

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational type I allergies--comparison of skin prick test solutions from different manufacturers
The aim of this study was to compare SPT solutions from different manufacturers for selected occupational allergens. 125 bakers and 21 subjects exposed to natural rubber latex (NRL) were examined with four flour SPT solutions and two NRL SPT solutions, respectively. Additionally, five SPT solutions for TYROPHAGUS PUTRESCENTIAE (Tp) were tested in two farmers. All SPT solutions were analysed IN-VITRO for protein and antigen content. IN-VITRO analyses resulted in differences for all SPT solutions depending on the manufacturer. The optimal cut-off for the flour and NRL SPT solutions was a wheal >or= 1.5 mm. Sensitivities of flour SPT solutions ranged from 38 % to 95 %, specificities from 77 % to 98 %. Both NRL SPT solutions reached a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 92 %. SPT results with the different Tp SPT solutions were variable. The study concludes that while both NRL SPT solutions exhibited a fairly good quality, the flour and Tp SPT solutions showed differences between manufacturers. As a rule solutions with higher protein and antigen contents gave better results.

Diagnostics of occupational type I allergies--comparison of skin prick test solutions from different manufacturers for selected occupational allergens. [German]  
van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Sander I, Merget R.
Pneumologie 2010 May;64(5):271-277

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Parental occupation is a risk factor for childhood wheeze and asthma.
The present birth cohort study investigated whether or not childhood wheeze and asthma are associated with parental exposure to occupational sensitisers that cause asthma. Maternal post-natal occupational exposure to latex and/or biocides/fungicides increased the likelihood of childhood wheeze and asthma. High levels of latex or biocide/fungicide exposure were associated with an OR of 1.26 and 1.22, respectively, for wheezing up to 81 months. Combined maternal latex and biocide/fungicide exposure increased the likelihood of childhood wheeze 1.22 and asthma. High paternal occupational flour dust exposure was associated with an increased likelihood of wheeze after 30 months (2.31) and asthma by 91 months (3.23). Maternal occupational exposure to latex and/or biocides and paternal exposure to flour dust increases the risk of childhood asthma.

Parental occupation is a risk factor for childhood wheeze and asthma.  
Tagiyeva N, Devereux G, Semple S, Sherriff A, Henderson J, Elias P, Ayres JG.
Eur Respir J 2010 May;35(5):987-993

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE reactivity to common cypress (C. sempervirens) pollen extracts: evidence for novel allergens.
The aim of this study was to determine some of the main allergens implicated in the common cypress (C. sempervirens) pollen allergy. Five predominant allergens with apparent molecular masses ranging from 14 to 94 kDa were detected. Two principal IgE-binding patterns were clearly distinguishable: a first one represents patients with a heterogeneous IgE reactivity to several allergens with molecular masses ranging from 35 to 94 kDa (HMW). The second one corresponds to little less than 50 percent of tested patients with specific IgE binding to 2-3 spots of about 14 kDa and weak or no reactivity to HMW allergens.

IgE reactivity to common cypress (C. sempervirens) pollen extracts: evidence for novel allergens.  
Shahali, Youcef; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Peltre, Gabriel; Charpin, Denis; Sénéchal, Hélène; Poncet, Pascal
WAO Journal 2010;3(8):229-234

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) regulates haem oxygenase-1/ferritin expression: implications for toluene diisocyanate-induced asthma.  
Kim SH, Choi GS, Ye YM, Jou I, Park HS, Park SM.
Clin Exp Immunol 2010 Jun;160(3):489-497
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Cbl-b regulates airway mucosal tolerance to aeroallergen.  
Oh SY, Park JU, Zheng T, Kim YK, Wu F, Cho SH, Barber D, Penninger J, Zhu Z.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug 25;
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British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines for the management of egg allergy.  
Clark AT, Skypala I, Leech SC, Ewan PW, Dugue P, Brathwaite N, Huber PA, Nasser SM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug;40(8):1116-1129
Click to view abstract

Lupin allergy: a hidden killer in the home.  
Sanz ML, de LM, Fernandez J, Gamboa PM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug 3;
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How do teenagers manage their food allergies?  
Monks H, Gowland MH, Mackenzie H, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, King R, Lucas JS, Roberts G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug 2;
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Molecular diagnosis in allergy.  
Sastre J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Aug 2;
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Allergic contact dermatitis due to cosmetics containing vitamin K1 oxide.  
Garcia-Gavin J, Goossens A, Tennstedt D.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):248-250

Twenty-five years quaternium-15 in the European baseline series: does it deserve its place there?  
de Groot AC, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):210-220
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to gold as a model for clinical-experimental research.  
Moller H.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):193-200
Click to view abstract

Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics in the USA and in Europe.  
de Groot AC, Veenstra M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):221-224
Click to view abstract

Assessment of nickel release from earrings randomly purchased in China and Thailand using the dimethylglyoxime test.  
Hamann CR, Hamann DJ, Hamann QJ, Hamann CP, Boonchai W, Li LF, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):232-240
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Dermatitis from common ivy (Hedera helix L. subsp. helix) in Europe: past, present, and future.  
Paulsen E, Christensen LP, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Apr;62(4):201-209
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.  
Torres MJ, Canto G.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;10(4):273-279
Click to view abstract

Elevated baseline mast cell tryptase: a marker of severe insect venom anaphylaxis.  
Heine RG, Freeman T.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;10(4):309-311

The role of the gut mucosal immunity in the development of tolerance versus development of allergy to food.  
Chahine BG, Bahna SL.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;10(4):394-399
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Phenytoin-associated hypersensitivity syndrome with features of DRESS and TEN/SJS.  
Viera MH, Perez OA, Patel JK, Jones I, Berman B.
Cutis 2010 Jun;85(6):312-317
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Contact urticaria with systemic symptoms due to hexylene glycol in a topical corticosteroid: case report and review of hypersensitivity to glycols.  
Spoerl D, Scherer K, Bircher AJ.
Dermatology 2010;220(3):238-242
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to metals and bone cement components in patients with intolerance of arthroplasty. [German]  
Eben R, Dietrich KA, Nerz C, Schneider S, Schuh A, Banke IJ, Mazoochian F, Thomas P.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2010 Jul;135(28-29):1418-1422
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis due to cinnamon oil in galenic vaginal suppositories.  
Lauriola MM, De BA, Sena P.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 Mar;90(2):187-188

Identification of a major yolk protein as an allergen in sea urchin roe.  
Yamasaki A, Higaki H, Nakashima K, Yamamoto O, Hein KZ, Takahashi H, Chinuki Y, Morita E.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 May;90(3):235-8.
Abstract

Editorial: Anaphylaxis – the killer amongst allergies  
J. Ring
Allergologie 2010;33(7):
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Epidemiology of anaphylaxis  
M. Worm
Allergologie 2010;33(7):
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Risk factors in Hymenoptera venom allergy  
F. Ruëff, J. Kroth und B. Przybilla
Allergologie 2010;33(7):
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anti-inflammatory therapy of atopic dermatitis in children  
K. Lau und P.H. Höger
Allergologie 2010;33(4):
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Food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) to wheat proteins, particularly to rTri alpha19-Omega-5-Gliadin, and light sensitization to crustaceans and house dust mite (so-called “house dust mite-crustaceans-syndrome”).  
B. Wüthrich und T. Hofer
Allergologie 2010;33(5):205–210
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Food allergy and dietetic implications  
I. Reese
Allergologie 2010;33(6):
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Editorial: Anaphylaxie – der Killer unter den Allergien  
J. Ring
Allergologie 2010;33(7):
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Epidemiologie der Anaphylaxie  
M. Worm
Allergologie 2010;33(7):
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Risikofaktoren bei Insektengiftallergie  
F. Ruëff, J. Kroth und B. Przybilla
Allergologie 2010;33(7):
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Pitfalls in the diagnosis of latex allergy.  
Khan S, Holding S, Dore P, Sewell C.
Allergol Int 2010 Sep;59(3):305-308
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The psychosocial impact of food allergy and food hypersensitivity in children, adolescents and their families: a review.  
Cummings AJ, Knibb RC, King RM, Lucas JS.
Allergy 2010 Aug;65(8):933-945
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In vitro evaluation of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones.  
Aranda A, Mayorga C, Ariza A, Dona I, Rosado A, Blanca-Lopez N, Andreu I, Torres MJ.
Allergy 2010 Aug 17;
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Natural killer-dendritic cell interaction in lymphocyte responses in hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams.  
Chaves P, Torres MJ, Aranda A, Lopez S, Canto G, Blanca M, Mayorga C.
Allergy 2010 Aug 17;
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What are the 'ideal' features of an adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injector in the treatment of anaphylaxis?  
Frew AJ.
Allergy 2010 Aug 17;
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Fixed food eruption caused by liquorice. [French]  
Benomar S, Ismaili N, Koufane J, Senouci K, Hassam B.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 Feb;137(2):121-123
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Allergic risk during paediatric anaesthesia. [French]  
Dewachter P, Mouton-Faivre C.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2010 Mar;29(3):215-226
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Anaphylactic shock after injection of antitetanus. [French]  
Chouaib N, Bensghir M, Azendour H, Balkhi H, Haimeur C.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2010 Apr;29(4):314-315

Allergy to pumpkin and crossreactivity to pollens and other foods.  
La Shell MS, Otto HF, Whisman BA, Waibel KH, White AA, Calabria CW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Feb;104(2):178-180

Use of commercial anti-penicillin IgE fluorometric enzyme immunoassays to diagnose penicillin allergy.  
Macy E, Goldberg B, Poon KY.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Aug;105(2):136-141
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Severe anaphylaxis to hymenoptera stings: does the basal serum tryptase concentration really matter?  
Seidel S, Voller B, Geusau A, Wohrl S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Aug;105(2):185-187

Clinical efficacy of asian ladybug whole-body extract skin testing.  
Goetz DW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Aug;105(2):182-183

Usefulness of skin prick test using bifurcated needle for the diagnosis of food allergy among infantile atopic dermatitis--second report. In the case of cow's milk allergy. [Japanese]  
Ogata M, Shukuya A, Sugizaki C, Ikematsu K, Imai T, Tachimoto H, Ebisawa M.
Arerugi 2010 Jul;59(7):839-846
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Component-based diagnostic approach. Detection of sensitization to lipid transfer proteins in food allergy. [German]  
Brans R, Merk HF.
Hautarzt 2010 May;61(5):382-385
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Nasal blown secretion evaluation in specific occupational nasal challenges.  
Pignatti P, Pala G, Pisati M, Perfetti L, Banchieri G, Moscato G.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2010 Feb;83(2):217-223
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Relationship between indoor chemical concentrations and subjective symptoms associated with sick building syndrome in newly built houses in Japan.  
Takigawa T, Wang BL, Saijo Y, Morimoto K, Nakayama K, Tanaka M, Shibata E, Yoshimura T, Chikara H, Ogino K, Kishi R.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2010 Feb;83(2):225-235
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Mugwort-Sensitized Individuals from North Europe, South Europe and North America Show Different IgE Reactivity Patterns.  
Moverare R, Larsson H, Carlsson R, Holmquist I.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Aug 24;154(2):164-172
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Ability of Pollen Cytoplasmic Granules to Induce Biased Allergic Responses in a Rat Model.  
Abou CO, Rogerieux F, Poncet P, Sutra JP, Peltre G, Senechal H, Lacroix G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Aug 24;154(2):128-136
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Antigen-Specific IgG and IgA, but Not IgE, Activate the Effector Functions of Eosinophils in the Presence of Antigen.  
Muraki M, Gleich GJ, Kita H.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Aug 24;154(2):119-127
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Low molecular weight glutenins in wheat-dependant, exercise-induced anaphylaxis: allergenicity and antigenic relationships with Omega 5-Gliadins.  
Bouchez-Mahiout I, Snégaroff J, Tylichova M, Pecquet C, Branlard G, Laurière M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;153(1):35-45.

Characterization and stability of specific IgE to white egg's, gliadin's and peanut's proteins among children.  
Ouahidi I, El Youbi EA, Bouyahyaoui Y, Mernissi FZ, Aarab L.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;9(2):97-102
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Immunochemical characterization of Amaranthus retroflexus pollen extract: extensive cross-reactive allergenic components among the four species of Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae.  
Tehrani M, Sankian M, Assarehzadegan MA, Falak R, Jabbari F, Varasteh A.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;9(2):87-95
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Drug-induced linear IgA bullous dermatosis demonstrating the isomorphic phenomenon.  
McDonald HC, York NR, Pandya AG.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 May;62(5):897-898

Solar urticaria: photoprotection from a naphthoquinone-modified dihydroxyacetone Maillard reaction.  
Fusaro RM, Rice EG.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 May;62(5):886

Retrospective analysis of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: a study of 27 patients.  
Ang CC, Wang YS, Yoosuff EL, Tay YK.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Aug;63(2):219-227
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Varenicline-induced drug eruption with resulting palmar/plantar hyperhidrosis and dysesthesia.  
Nicholas MW, Isenstein A, Dasher D, Granko RP, Lugo-Somolinos A, Groben P, Morrell DS.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Jul;63(1):e5-e7

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by lanolin (wool) alcohol contained in an emollient in three postsurgical patients.  
Nguyen JC, Chesnut G, James WD, Saruk M.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Jun;62(6):1064-1065

Association between peanut allergy and asthma morbidity.  
Simpson AB, Yousef E, Hossain J.
J Pediatr 2010 May;156(5):777-81, 781
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Peanut allergy saves a patient with cold-induced hypotension and urticaria.  
Bird JA, Burks W.
J Pediatr 2010 Apr;156(4):687

Safe vaccination of patients with egg allergy with an adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccine.  
Gagnon R, Primeau MN, Des RA, Lemire C, Kagan R, Carr S, Ouakki M, Benoit M, De SG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;126(2):317-323
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Indoor pet exposure and the outcomes of total IgE and sensitization at age 18 years.  
Wegienka G, Johnson CC, Havstad S, Ownby DR, Zoratti EM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;126(2):274-9, 279
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The prostaglandin D(2) receptor CRTH2 is important for allergic skin inflammation after epicutaneous antigen challenge.  
He R, Oyoshi MK, Wang JY, Hodge MR, Jin H, Geha RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug 14;
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Component-resolved diagnosis for Phleum allergy: the role of recombinants.  
De AM, Alesina R, Moratti R, Ciprandi G.
J Asthma 2010 Aug 23;
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Quantification of airborne Aspergillus allergens: redefining the approach.  
Vermani M, Vijayan VK, Kausar MA, Agarwal MK.
J Asthma 2010 Aug 18;
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A case of suspected occupational asthma from exposure to Anisakis simplex. [Italian]  
Bertuccio O, Calabro C, Galati P, Bertuccio C, Riario-Sforza GG, Incorvaia C.
Med Lav 2010 Jan;101(1):73-74

Sequential sensitization to different occupational compounds in a young woman. [Italian]  
Talini D, Novelli F, Bacci E, de SM, Paggiaro PL.
Med Lav 2010 Jan;101(1):49-54
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Asthma induced by chloramine T in nurses: case report. [Italian]  
Sartorelli P, Paolucci V, Rendo S, Romeo R, Murdaca F, Mariano A.
Med Lav 2010 Mar;101(2):134-138

In-depth exploration of Hevea brasiliensis latex proteome and "hidden allergens" via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.  
D'Amato A, Bachi A, Fasoli E, Boschetti E, Peltre G, Sénéchal H, Sutra JP, Citterio A, Righetti PG.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 May 7;73(7):1368-80.
Abstract

Mapping of a conformational epitope on the cashew allergen Ana o 2: a discontinuous large subunit epitope dependent upon homologous or heterologous small subunit association.  
Xia L, Willison LN, Porter L, Robotham JM, Teuber SS, Sathe SK, Roux KH.
Mol Immunol 2010 May;47(9):1808-16.
Abstract

Young infants with atopic dermatitis can display sensitization to Cor a 9, an 11S legumin-like seed-storage protein from hazelnut (Corylus avellana).  
Verweij MM, Hagendorens MM, De Knop KJ, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Stevens WJ, Ebo DG
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 23. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Severe asthma with fungal sensitization in a child: response to itraconazole therapy.  
Vicencio AG, Muzumdar H, Tsirilakis K, Kessel A, Nandalike K, Goldman DL.
Pediatrics 2010 May;125(5):e1255-e1258
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Safety of influenza vaccine administration in egg-allergic patients.  
Chung EY, Huang L, Schneider L.
Pediatrics 2010 May;125(5):e1024-e1030
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Diagnostics of occupational type I allergies--comparison of skin prick test solutions from different manufacturers for selected occupational allergens. [German]  
van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Sander I, Merget R.
Pneumologie 2010 May;64(5):271-277
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Parental occupation is a risk factor for childhood wheeze and asthma.  
Tagiyeva N, Devereux G, Semple S, Sherriff A, Henderson J, Elias P, Ayres JG.
Eur Respir J 2010 May;35(5):987-993
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IgE reactivity to common cypress (C. sempervirens) pollen extracts: evidence for novel allergens.  
Shahali, Youcef; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Peltre, Gabriel; Charpin, Denis; Sénéchal, Hélène; Poncet, Pascal
WAO Journal 2010;3(8):229-234
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