Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance InformationAllergy AdvisorAllergy Resources International
Allergy and Intolerance InformationAllAllergy.net
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Index Allergens and Substances List Allergy Advisor Digest Contents of Journals Allergen and Substance Search
Phadia Allergy, Asthma and intolerance information
 Allergy Advisor Digest - December 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

Journals List | Journals Captured this Month | ALL Articles captured this Month

Previous Issues | All
May 2012   June 2012   July 2012   August 2012   September 2012   October 2012   November 2012   December 2012   January 2013   February 2013   March 2013   April 2013   May 2013   June 2013   July 2013   August 2013   September 2013   October 2013   November 2013   December 2013   January 2014   February 2014   March 2014   April 2014   May 2014   June 2014   July 2014  

This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
Want to subscribe to our reminder service? 

Read Maternal antenatal peanut consumption and peanut and rye sensitization in the offspring at adolescence.
Read Immunoglobulin E antibody reactivity to bacterial antigens in atopic dermatitis patients.
Read Work-related allergy and asthma to inhaled spices - a review
Read Immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions and associated risk factors in an adult Turkish men population.
Read Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel.
Read Diagnosis and rationale for action against cow's milk allergy (Dracma).
Read Structural and immunologic cross-reactivity among filarial and mite tropomyosin: Implications for the hygiene hypothesis.
Read Food allergy to egg with the onset at adult age.
Read Contact urticaria caused by a fluorescent dye.
Read Interventions to reduce Staphylococcus aureus in the management of atopic eczema: an updated Cochrane review.
Read Cross reactivity between European hornet and yellow jacket venoms.
Read Assessment of airborne soy-hull allergen (Gly m 1) in the Port of Ancona, Italy.
Read Allergen cross reactions: a problem greater than ever thought?
Read Should younger siblings of peanut-allergic children be assessed by an allergist before being fed peanut?
Read Peanut allergy: an overview.
Read Ragweed as an example of worldwide allergen expansion.
Read Aspirin-exacerbated asthma.
Read Occupational contact dermatitis.
Read Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers
Read Pollen allergens do not come alone
Read Differences among heat-treated, raw, and commercial peanut extracts by skin testing and immunoblotting.
Read Molecular insight into IgE-mediated reactions to sesame seed proteins.
Read Two cases of rush specific oral tolerance induction for wheat allergy.
Read Analysis of the risk factors to persistent milk allergy.

Abstracts shared in December 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Cutting-edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance.
Read The role of shellfish proteases in allergic diseases and inflammation.
Read Maternal consumption of peanut during pregnancy is associated with peanut sensitization in atopic infants.
Read Facebook: a new trigger for asthma?
Read Characterizing the relationship between sesame, coconut, and nut allergy in children.
Read Anaphylaxis to apple: is fasting a risk factor for LTP-allergic patients?
Read Anaphylactic reaction following matsutake mushroom ingestion.
Read Panallergens and their impact on the allergic patient.
Read Diagnostic evaluation of food-related allergic diseases.
Read Anaphylaxis to hyperallergenic functional foods.
Read Nonimmunoglobulin e-mediated immune reactions to foods.
Read Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a case related to chickpea ingestion

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Maternal antenatal peanut consumption and peanut and rye sensitization in the offspring at adolescence.
There is considerable controversy whether maternal peanut ingestion during pregnancy might influence sensitization in later life. This study examined whether maternal peanut ingestion during pregnancy might increase sensitization in the offspring. A population-based longitudinal cohort study with 16 years follow-up was conducted (N=373). Maternal antenatal peanut consumption was documented at birth and peanut and rye sensitization were determined by measurement of serum-specific IgE at age 16. Peanut sensitization was common (14%). In the entire cohort (n=310), there was no association between antenatal peanut ingestion and peanut sensitization (P=0.17). However, there was a strong association between antenatal peanut ingestion and decreased risk of rye sensitization and peanut sensitization in those (n=201) without a family history (FH) of asthma (Rye OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.14-0.63, P=0.001 and Peanut OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04-0.78, P=0.02). There was an increased risk of rye sensitization in those (n=108) with a FH of asthma and antenatal peanut ingestion (Rye OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.11-6.51 P=0.03). It was considered that these sensitizations were likely to be related to the presence of IgE antibodies to cross-reacting carbohydrate epitopes common to rye and peanut allergens.

Maternal antenatal peanut consumption and peanut and rye sensitization in the offspring at adolescence.  
Kemp AS, Ponsonby AL, Dwyer T, Cochrane JA, Pezic A, Jones G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 3;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunoglobulin E antibody reactivity to bacterial antigens in atopic dermatitis patients.
Atopic dermatitis (AD patients are often sensitized against a broad variety of allergens and more than 90% of them suffer from skin superinfections with Staphylococcus aureus. Sera from AD patients (n=79), patients suffering only from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n=41) or allergic asthma (n=37) were tested for IgE reactivity to S. aureus, E. coli and gut bacterial antigens. More than 30% of AD patients but not patients suffering only from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma or non-allergic persons exhibited IgE binding to several protein antigens among them DNA-binding and ribosomal proteins and flagellin. Patients with severe skin manifestations showed more frequently IgE reactivity to S. aureus compared with AD patients with mild symptoms. Positive immediate and late skin test reactions could be induced in sensitized AD patients with S. aureus extract.

Immunoglobulin E antibody reactivity to bacterial antigens in atopic dermatitis patients.  
Reginald K, Westritschnig K, Werfel T, Heratizadeh A, Novak N, Focke-Tejkl M, Hirschl AM, Leung DY, Elisyutina O, Fedenko E, Valenta R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 14;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Work-related allergy and asthma to inhaled spices - a review
"Spices have always been the most sought-after ingredients to enhance the flavour of food. In fact, the word spice comes from the same root as species, meaning a class of things having some common characteristics. Spices are derived from taxonomically different plant species and harbour allergenic potency which can induce a wide spectrum of symptoms, ranging from mild local to severe systemic reactions. Aerosolisation of spice dust has been associated with inhalant allergies via IgE cross-reactivity, but direct irritative mechanisms also play a role in the development of respiratory symptomology. This review takes a closer look at the biologically active constituents of spices, exposures, immunological and cross-reactivity patterns, as well as risk factors and potential health effects caused by inhalable spice dust exposure."

Work-related allergy and asthma to inhaled spices - a review  
A van der Walt, MF Jeebhay
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2010;23(4):186-192

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions and associated risk factors in an adult Turkish men population.
The study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions (HRs) to drugs in workers. 1152 questionnaires were obtained from adult men. The prevalence of self-reported drug HRs was 3.6% for all reactions. HRs were most common to beta-lactam antibiotics (51.2%) followed by nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (41.5%). Systemic manifestations of drug HRs were associated with only asthma diagnosis. Risk groups should be followed closely as candidates for immediate type HRs to antibiotics and NSAIDs in also relatively healthy and young aged adult men

Immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions and associated risk factors in an adult Turkish men population.  
Kurt E, Demir AU, Cadirci O.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;9(4):245-250

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel.
"Food allergy is an important public health problem that affects children and adults and may be increasing in prevalence. Despite the risk of severe allergic reactions and even death, there is no current treatment for food allergy: the disease can only be managed by allergen avoidance or treatment of symptoms. The diagnosis and management of food allergy also may vary from one clinical practice setting to another. Finally, because patients frequently confuse nonallergic food reactions, such as food intolerance, with food allergies, there is an unfounded belief among the public that food allergy prevalence is higher than it truly is. In response to these concerns, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, working with 34 professional organizations, federal agencies, and patient advocacy groups, led the development of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy. These Guidelines are intended for use by a wide variety of health care professionals, including family practice physicians, clinical specialists, and nurse practitioners. The Guidelines include a consensus definition for food allergy, discuss comorbid conditions often associated with food allergy, and focus on both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions to food. Topics addressed include the epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, and management of food allergy, as well as the management of severe symptoms and anaphylaxis. These Guidelines provide 43 concise clinical recommendations and additional guidance on points of current controversy in patient management. They also identify gaps in the current scientific knowledge to be addressed through future research."

Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel.  
Boyce JA, Assa'ad A, Burks AW, Jones SM, Sampson HA, Wood RA, Plaut M, Cooper SF, Fenton MJ, Arshad SH, Bahna SL, Beck LA, Byrd-Bredbenner C, Camargo CA, Eichenfield L, Furuta GT, Hanifin JM, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6 Suppl):S1-58

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnosis and rationale for action against cow's milk allergy (Dracma).
"The 2nd Milan Meeting on Adverse Reactions to Bovine Proteins was the venue for the presentation of the first consensus-based approach to the management of cow's milk allergy. It was also the first time that the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development, and Evaluation approach for formulating guidelines and recommendations was applied to the field of food allergy. In this report we present the contributions in allergen science, epidemiology, natural history, evidence-based diagnosis, and therapy synthesized in the World Allergy Organization Diagnosis and Rationale for Action against Cow's Milk Allergy guidelines and presented during the meeting. A consensus emerged between discussants that cow's milk allergy management should reflect not only basic research but also a newer and better appraisal of the literature in the light of the values and preferences shared by patients and their caregivers in partnership. In the field of diagnosis, atopy patch testing and microarray technology have not yet evolved for use outside the research setting. With foreseeable breakthroughs (eg, immunotherapy and molecular diagnosis) in the offing, the step ahead in leadership can only stem from a worldwide organization implementing consensus-based clinical practice guidelines to diffuse and share clinical knowledge."

Diagnosis and rationale for action against cow's milk allergy (Dracma): a summary report.  
Fiocchi A, Schunemann HJ, Brozek J, Restani P, Beyer K, Troncone R, Martelli A, Terracciano L, Bahna SL, Rance F, Ebisawa M, Heine RG, Assa'ad A, Sampson H, Verduci E, Bouygue GR, Baena-Cagna.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6):1119-1128

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Structural and immunologic cross-reactivity among filarial and mite tropomyosin: Implications for the hygiene hypothesis.
Filarial and mite tropomyosins are shown to be very similar, with 72% identity at the amino acid level, and overlapping predicted 3-dimensional structures. The prevalence of IgE and IgG to Der p 10 was increased in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected subjects. There was a strong correlation between serum levels of Ov- and Der p 10-tropomyosin-specific IgE, IgG, and IgG(4) (P < .0001; r > 0.79). Primates experimentally infected with L loa developed IgE that cross-reacted with Der p 10. Therefore filarial infection induces strong cross-reactive antitropomyosin antibody responses that may affect sensitization and regulation of allergic reactivity.

Structural and immunologic cross-reactivity among filarial and mite tropomyosin: Implications for the hygiene hypothesis.  
Santiago HC, Bennuru S, Boyd A, Eberhard M, Nutman TB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec 23;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy to egg with the onset at adult age.
Adult-onset of egg allergy has rarely been mentioned in the literature. A 59-year-old woman with the onset of severe atopic eczema at 53 years due to food allergy to egg and other foods with the suspicion of having the bird-egg syndrome. The patient was sensitized to many aeroallergens including feather and animal dander with clinical symptoms of asthma. Open challenge to egg was positive.

Food allergy to egg with the onset at adult age.  
Celakovská J, Ettlerová K, Ettler K, Krcmová I.
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(8):628-633.

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact urticaria caused by a fluorescent dye.
A 28-year-old man developed urticaria while he was working in the garage. The results of the prick test using the gloves and shoes were positive. A fluorescent dye was found to be present in his gloves and shoes. The results of a prick test using the fluorescent dye were positive. His urticaria improved after he stopped using these gloves and shoes.

Contact urticaria caused by a fluorescent dye.  
Sugiura K, Sugiura M, Sasaki K, Mori A.
Australas J Dermatol 2010 Aug;51(3):208-209

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Interventions to reduce Staphylococcus aureus in the management of atopic eczema: an updated Cochrane review.
An association between the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and atopic eczema has been recognized for many years. Although few would dispute the benefit of systemic antibiotics in people with overtly clinically infected eczema, the clinical role of S. aureus in causing inflammatory flares in clinically uninfected eczema is less clear. To see if atopic eczema can be improved by antistaphylococcal agents, we performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using Cochrane Skin Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (from 2000), EMBASE (from 1980), the metaRegister of Current Controlled Trials (to March 2009), plus manual searching of references and conference proceedings. The review concludes that it failed to find any evidence that commonly used antistaphylococcal interventions are clinically helpful in people with eczema that is not clinically infected. Their continued use should be questioned in such situations, until better and longer-term studies show clear evidence of clinical benefit.

Interventions to reduce Staphylococcus aureus in the management of atopic eczema: an updated Cochrane review.  
Bath-Hextall FJ, Birnie AJ, Ravenscroft JC, Williams HC.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Jul;163(1):12-26

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross reactivity between European hornet and yellow jacket venoms.
Cross-reactions between venoms may be responsible for multiple diagnostic positivities in hymenoptera allergy. There is limited data on the cross-reactivity between Vespula spp and Vespa crabro, which is an important cause of severe reactions in some parts of Europe. Sera from patients with non discriminative skin/CAP positivity to both Vespula and Vespa crabro were collected. Seventeen patients had a severe reaction after Vespa crabro sting and proved skin and CAP positive also to vespula. In 11/17 patients, Vespula venom completely inhibited IgE binding to VC venom, whereas VC venom inhibited binding to Vespula venom only partially (<75%). In 6 subjects the CAP-inhibition provided inconclusive results and their sera were analysed by immunoblotting. The SDS-PAGE identified hyaluronidase, phospholipase A1 and antigen 5 as the main proteins of the venoms. In 5 sera the levels of IgE against antigen 5 of Vespa crabro were higher than IgE against Vespula germanica, thus indicating a true sensitisation to crabro. Therefore in multiple positivities to Vespa crabro and Vespula spp the CAP inhibition is helpful in detecting the cross-reactivities.

Cross reactivity between European hornet and yellow jacket venoms.  
Severino MG, Caruso B, Bonadonna P, Labardi D, Macchia D, Campi P, Passalacqua G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;42(4):141-145

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Assessment of airborne soy-hull allergen (Gly m 1) in the Port of Ancona, Italy.
The aim of this study was to measure the airborne Gly m 1 allergen level in the seaport of Ancona in order assess the soybean-specific allergenic risk for the city. The allergen concentrations detected were low (range = 0.4-171 ng/m3). A decreasing gradient of the airborne allergen from the unloading area (22.1 +/- 41.2 ng/m3) to the control area (0.6 +/- 0.7 ng/m3) was detected. The concentration of the airborne Gly m 1 was not coupled with the presence of the soy-carrying ships in the port. The low level of this allergen seems consistent with the absence of asthma epidemic outbreak.

Assessment of airborne soy-hull allergen (Gly m 1) in the Port of Ancona, Italy.  
Antonicelli L, Ruello ML, Monsalve RI, Gonzalez R, Fava G, Bonifazi F.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct;42(5):178-185

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen cross reactions: a problem greater than ever thought?
Sensitization against some allergens may cause reactions against other seemingly unrelated allergens. Cross reactions are investigated on a per-case basis, analyzing blood serum specific IgE (sIgE) levels and clinical features of patients suffering from cross reactions. In this study, the authors evaluated the level of sIgE compared to patients' total IgE assuming epitope specificity is a consequence of sequence similarity. Cumulating sIgE values of a patient resulted in a median of 25-30% total IgE. Comparing motif cross reactivity predictions to sIgE levels showed that on average three times fewer motifs than extracts were recognized in a given serum. Extracts belonging to the same motif group co-reacted in a high percentage of sera (up to 80% for some motifs). Therefore cumulated sIgE levels are exaggerated because of a high level of observed cross reactions. Thus, not only bioinformatic prediction of allergenic motifs, but also serological routine testing of allergic patients implies that the immune system may recognize only a small number of allergenic structures.

Allergen cross reactions: a problem greater than ever thought?  
Pfiffner P, Truffer R, Matsson P, Rasi C, Mari A, Stadler BM.
Allergy 2010 Dec;65(12):1536-1544

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Should younger siblings of peanut-allergic children be assessed by an allergist before being fed peanut?
The objective of this study was to determine the risk of peanut allergy in siblings of peanut-allergic children. In 2005-2006, 560 households of children born in 1995 in the province of Manitoba, Canada, were surveyed. Twenty-nine (5.6%) index children were peanut allergic. Fifteen of 900 (1.7%) siblings had peanut allergy. Four of 47 (8.5%) were siblings of peanut-allergic children and 11 of 853 (1.3%) were siblings of non-peanut-allergic children. The risk of peanut allergy was markedly increased in siblings of a peanut-allergic child. Siblings of peanut-allergic children are much more likely to be allergic to peanut. An allergy assessment by a qualified allergist should be routinely recommended before feeding peanut to these children.

Should younger siblings of peanut-allergic children be assessed by an allergist before being fed peanut?  
Liem JJ, Huq S, Kozyrskyj AL, Becker AB.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Dec 15;4(4):144-149

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut allergy: an overview.
"Peanut allergies have been increasing in prevalence in most industrialized countries. Onset is typically in early childhood, with a trend towards earlier ages of presentation. The allergy is lifelong in most affected children, although 15-22% will outgrow their peanut allergy, usually before their teenage years. Manifestations of peanut allergy range from mild to severe, and risk factors predisposing to severe reactions are discussed. However, even in the absence of risk factors, peanut allergic individuals may still experience life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Approaches to investigation and treatment, patterns of cross-reactivity and possible causes of rising prevalence are discussed." (Full free article at: http://www.aacijournal.com/content/4/4/139)

Peanut allergy: an overview.  
Al-Ahmed N, Alsowaidi S, Vadas P.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Dec 15;4(4):139-143

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ragweed as an example of worldwide allergen expansion.
Multiple factors are contributing to the expansion of ragweed on a worldwide scale. This review seeks to examine factors that may contribute to allergen expansion with reference to ragweed as a well-studied example. (Full free article at: http://www.aacijournal.com/content/4/3/130)

Ragweed as an example of worldwide allergen expansion.  
Oswalt ML, Marshall GD.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Sep 15;4(3):130-135

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Aspirin-exacerbated asthma.
This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA). The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed. (Full free article at: http://www.aacijournal.com/content/4/2/75)

Aspirin-exacerbated asthma.  
Varghese M, Lockey RF.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Jun 15;4(2):75-83

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational contact dermatitis.
This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. (Full free article at: http://www.aacijournal.com/content/4/2/59)

Occupational contact dermatitis.  
Sasseville D.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Jun 15;4(2):59-65

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers
This data demonstrates the relative safety of administrating of skin prick tests to patients on beta-blocker treatment. Larger prospective studies are needed to substantiate the findings of this study

Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers: a retrospective analysis.  
Fung IN, Kim HL.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2010 Jan;6(1):2

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen allergens do not come alone
"Pollen allergy is characterized by a T(H)2-biased immune response to pollen-derived allergens. However, pollen-exposed epithelia do not encounter pure allergen but rather a plethora of protein and non-protein substances. We demonstrated that pollen liberate lipids with chemical and functional similarities to leukotriens and prostaglandins--the pollen associated lipid mediators (PALMs). To date, two main groups of PALMs have been characterized: The immunostimulatory PALMs activating innate immune cells such as neutrophils and eosinophils, and the immunomodulatory E(1)-phytoprostanes blocking IL-12 production of dendritic cells, resulting in the preferential induction of T(H)2 responses. This article reviews our work in the field of PALMs and their effects on cells of the innate and adoptive immune system. From recent results a general picture starts to emerge in which PALMs (and possibly other pollen-associated substances) may--independently from protein allergens--propagate an overall T(H)2 favoring micromilieu in pollen exposed tissue of predisposed individuals."

Pollen allergens do not come alone: pollen associated lipid mediators (PALMS) shift the human immune systems towards a T(H)2-dominated response.  
Gilles S, Mariani V, Bryce M, Mueller MJ, Ring J, Behrendt H, Jakob T, Traidl-Hoffmann C.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2009 Dec;5(1):3

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Differences among heat-treated, raw, and commercial peanut extracts by skin testing and immunoblotting.
Peanut allergenicity has been reported to be influenced by heat treatment, yet the commonly available extracts for skin prick testing (SPT) are derived from raw extracts. This study assessed the effect of heat treatment on the SPT reactivity and specific IgE binding to peanut using 3 commercial extracts and 3 laboratory-prepared extracts, including raw, roasted, and boiled, for SPT in 19 patients with suspected peanut allergy and in 4 individuals who eat peanut without any symptoms. SPT with the prepared and commercial reagents showed that the boiled extract had the highest specificity (67% vs 42%-63% for the other extracts). The prepared extracts showed similar SPT sensitivity (81%). Three patients with a history of severe reaction and elevated specific IgE levels to peanut to the 3 study extracts had variable SPT reactivity to 1 or more of the commercial extracts. IgE binding to Ara h 2 was found in nearly all patients, regardless of their clinical reactivity. None of the extracts tested showed optimal diagnostic reliability regarding both sensitivity and specificity.The authors suggest that testing should perhaps be performed with multiple individual extracts prepared by different methods.

Differences among heat-treated, raw, and commercial peanut extracts by skin testing and immunoblotting.  
Maleki SJ, Casillas AM, Kaza U, Wilson BA, Nesbit JB, Reimoneqnue C, Cheng H, Bahna SL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):451-457

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular insight into IgE-mediated reactions to sesame seed proteins.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitization profiles of 18 Italian individuals who experienced clinical symptoms after sesame seed consumption, including 4 anaphylactic reactions. The prevalent and almost exclusive reactivity of the sesame 11S globulin was demonstrated. The limited accessibility of this polypeptide chain, unless the interchain disulphide bonds are cleaved, may be one of the reasons for its structural/functional stability and, thus, great potential for induction of IgE reactivity.

Molecular insight into IgE-mediated reactions to sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seed proteins.  
Magni C, Ballabio C, Restani P, Fuggetta D, Alessandri C, Mari A, Bernardini R, Iacono ID, Arlorio M, Duranti M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):458-464

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Two cases of rush specific oral tolerance induction for wheat allergy.
This study reports on the experience of rush specific oral tolerance induction (rush SOTI) for an 8 year-old girl and a 6 year-old boy with severe wheat allergy. Rush SOTI was started at the dose below the measured adverse reaction induced threshold: ingesting wheat (bread) 5 times a day at 30 minutes interval, increasing the dose by 20% every time. The goal of rush SOTI was set as 5.6 g of wheat protein. The girl achieved the goal on the 10th day, and the boy did on the 8th day. During the course, the girl experienced adverse reactions 9 times and the boy did 6 times, and these were treated with oral antihistamine or inhalation of salbutamol. After leaving hospital, they were instructed to ingest the maintenance dose of wheat at least twice a week, and they are ingesting wheat without any problems for 6 months or for 3 months.

Two cases of rush specific oral tolerance induction for wheat allergy. [Japanese]  
Fujino A, Kurihara K.
Arerugi 2010 Nov 30;59(11):1580-1584

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Analysis of the risk factors to persistent milk allergy.
Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms followed by milk intake and persistent high milk-specific IgE titers were associated with persistent milk allergy.

Analysis of the risk factors to persistent milk allergy. [Japanese]  
Takaoka Y, Futamura M, Sakamoto T, Ito K.
Arerugi 2010 Nov 30;59(11):1562-1571

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Maternal antenatal peanut consumption and peanut and rye sensitization in the offspring at adolescence.  
Kemp AS, Ponsonby AL, Dwyer T, Cochrane JA, Pezic A, Jones G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 3;
Click to view abstract

Immunoglobulin E antibody reactivity to bacterial antigens in atopic dermatitis patients.  
Reginald K, Westritschnig K, Werfel T, Heratizadeh A, Novak N, Focke-Tejkl M, Hirschl AM, Leung DY, Elisyutina O, Fedenko E, Valenta R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 14;
Click to view abstract

Recombinant monoclonal human immunoglobulin E to investigate the allergenic activity of major grass pollen allergen Phl p 5.  
Madritsch C, Flicker S, Scheiblhofer S, Zafred D, Pavkov-Keller T, Thalhamer J, Keller W, Valenta R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 10;
Click to view abstract

Strain-specific immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus plantarum strains on birch-pollen-allergic subjects out of season.  
Snel J, Vissers YM, Smit BA, Jongen JM, Van Der Meulen ET, Zwijsen R, Ruinemans-Koerts J, Jansen AP, Kleerebezem M, Savelkoul HF.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 1;
Click to view abstract

The challenges for nut-allergic consumers of eating out.  
Leftwich J, Barnett J, Muncer K, Shepherd R, Raats MM, Hazel GM, Lucas JS.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 1;
Click to view abstract

Efficacy, safety and immunological actions of butanol-extracted Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2 on peanut anaphylaxis.  
Srivastava K, Yang N, Chen Y, Lopez-Exposito I, Song Y, Goldfarb J, Zhan J, Sampson H, Li XM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Dec 1;
Click to view abstract

Cutting-edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance.  
Bizzaro N, Tozzoli R, Villalta D, Fabris M, Tonutti E.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 23;
Click to view abstract

The role of shellfish proteases in allergic diseases and inflammation.  
S Sun, A.L Lopata
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2010;23(4):174-179
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Work-related allergy and asthma to inhaled spices - a review  
A van der Walt, MF Jeebhay
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2010;23(4):186-192
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions and associated risk factors in an adult Turkish men population.  
Kurt E, Demir AU, Cadirci O.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;9(4):245-250
Click to view abstract

Administration of influenza vaccines to patients with egg allergy: Update for the 2010-2011 season.  
Kelso JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6):1302-1304

Food allergy herbal formula 2 protection against peanut anaphylactic reaction is via inhibition of mast cells and basophils.  
Song Y, Qu C, Srivastava K, Yang N, Busse P, Zhao W, Li XM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6):1208-1217
Click to view abstract

Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel.  
Boyce JA, Assa'ad A, Burks AW, Jones SM, Sampson HA, Wood RA, Plaut M, Cooper SF, Fenton MJ, Arshad SH, Bahna SL, Beck LA, Byrd-Bredbenner C, Camargo CA, Eichenfield L, Furuta GT, Hanifin JM, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6 Suppl):S1-58
Click to view abstract

Shea butter contains no IgE-binding soluble proteins.  
Chawla KK, Bencharitiwong R, Ayuso R, Grishina G, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec 10;

Diagnosis and rationale for action against cow's milk allergy (Dracma): a summary report.  
Fiocchi A, Schunemann HJ, Brozek J, Restani P, Beyer K, Troncone R, Martelli A, Terracciano L, Bahna SL, Rance F, Ebisawa M, Heine RG, Assa'ad A, Sampson H, Verduci E, Bouygue GR, Baena-Cagna.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6):1119-1128
Click to view abstract

Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: Summary of the NIAID-Sponsored expert panel report.  
Boyce JA, Assa'ad A, Burks AW, Jones SM, Sampson HA, Wood RA, Plaut M, Cooper SF, Fenton MJ, Arshad SH, Bahna SL, Beck LA, Byrd-Bredbenner C, Camargo CA, Eichenfield L, Furuta GT, Hanifin JM, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6):1105-1118

Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2010.  
Sicherer SH, Leung DY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec 28;
Click to view abstract

Structural and immunologic cross-reactivity among filarial and mite tropomyosin: Implications for the hygiene hypothesis.  
Santiago HC, Bennuru S, Boyd A, Eberhard M, Nutman TB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec 23;
Click to view abstract

IgE-mediated systemic anaphylaxis and impaired tolerance to food antigens in mice with enhanced IL-4 receptor signaling.  
Mathias CB, Hobson SA, Garcia-Lloret M, Lawson G, Poddighe D, Freyschmidt EJ, Xing W, Gurish MF, Chatila TA, Oettgen HC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec 15;
Click to view abstract

Maternal consumption of peanut during pregnancy is associated with peanut sensitization in atopic infants.  
Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Stablein D, Lindblad R, Burks AW, Liu AH, Jones SM, Fleischer DM, Leung DY, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;126(6):1191-1197
Click to view abstract

Asthma symptoms, lung function, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in children exposed to oil refinery pollution.  
Rusconi F, Catelan D, Accetta G, Peluso M, Pistelli R, Barbone F, Di FE, Munnia A, Murgia P, Paladini L, Serci A, Biggeri A.
J Asthma 2010 Dec 29;
Click to view abstract

A case of anaphylaxis to oral minocycline.  
Jang JW, Bae YJ, Kim YG, Jin YJ, Park KS, Cho YS, Moon HB, Kim TB.
J Korean Med Sci 2010 Aug;25(8):1231-1233
Click to view abstract

A well-circumscribed henna tattoo hypersensitivity reaction.  
Craven JA.
J Paediatr Child Health 2010 Jul;46(7-8):372

Researchers look to genetic analyses for new options in treating food allergy.  
Voelker R.
JAMA 2010 Nov 10;304(18):2001

Facebook: a new trigger for asthma?  
D'Amato G, Liccardi G, Cecchi L, Pellegrino F, D'Amato M.
Lancet 2010 Nov 20;376(9754):1740

Characterizing the relationship between sesame, coconut, and nut allergy in children.  
Stutius LM, Sheehan WJ, Rangsithienchai P, Bharmanee A, Scott JE, Young MC, Dioun AF, Schneider LC, Phipatanakul W.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;21(8):1114-1118
Click to view abstract

Predictive factors for the persistence of cow's milk allergy.  
Santos A, Dias A, Pinheiro JA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;21(8):1127-1134
Click to view abstract

Allergy, total serum immunoglobulin E, and airflow in children and adolescents in TENOR.  
Haselkorn T, Szefler SJ, Simons FE, Zeiger RS, Mink DR, Chipps BE, Borish L, Wong DA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;21(8):1157-1165
Click to view abstract

Parental satisfaction with oral peanut food challenges; perception of outcomes and impact on management of peanut allergy.  
Nguyen M, Wainstein BK, Hu W, Ziegler JB.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;21(8):1119-1126
Click to view abstract

Recensement des spores fongiques dans l’atmosphère de la ville de Sousse (Tunisie)  
I. Gargouri, S. Mezghani, A. Hayouni, H. Njima, A. Abdelghani, A. Garrouch, M. Benzarti, H. Razzouk, M. Jerray
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(8):603-610
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dermatite atopique et aéroallergènes  
F. Engel, F. de Blay
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(8):621-627
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Food allergy to egg with the onset at adult age.  
Celakovská J, Ettlerová K, Ettler K, Krcmová I.
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(8):628-633.
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Contact urticaria caused by a fluorescent dye.  
Sugiura K, Sugiura M, Sasaki K, Mori A.
Australas J Dermatol 2010 Aug;51(3):208-209
Click to view abstract

Interventions to reduce Staphylococcus aureus in the management of atopic eczema: an updated Cochrane review.  
Bath-Hextall FJ, Birnie AJ, Ravenscroft JC, Williams HC.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Jul;163(1):12-26
Click to view abstract

Toxic epidermal necrolysis induced by ofloxacin.  
Yoon SY, Bae YJ, Cho YS, Moon HB, Kim TB.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 Sep;90(5):550-551

Labial melanotic macule after application of topical tacrolimus: two case reports.  
Zattra E, Albertin C, Belloni FA.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 Sep;90(5):527

Anaphylaxis to apple: is fasting a risk factor for LTP-allergic patients?  
Arena A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;42(4):155-158
Click to view abstract

Cross reactivity between European hornet and yellow jacket venoms.  
Severino MG, Caruso B, Bonadonna P, Labardi D, Macchia D, Campi P, Passalacqua G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Aug;42(4):141-145
Click to view abstract

The risk of bronchospasm in asthmatics undergoing general anaesthesia and/or intravascular administration of radiographic contrast media. physiopatology and clinical/functional evaluation.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Piccolo A, De N, D'Amato G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct;42(5):167-173
Click to view abstract

Assessment of airborne soy-hull allergen (Gly m 1) in the Port of Ancona, Italy.  
Antonicelli L, Ruello ML, Monsalve RI, Gonzalez R, Fava G, Bonifazi F.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct;42(5):178-185
Click to view abstract

A case of anaphylactic reaction following matsutake mushroom ingestion: demonstration of histamine release reaction of basophils.  
Toda T, Yamaguchi M, Nakase Y, Sugimoto N, Suzukawa M, Nagase H, Ohta K.
Allergol Int 2010 Dec;59(4):417-419
Click to view abstract

The effect of past food avoidance due to allergic symptoms on the growth of children at school age.  
Mukaida K, Kusunoki T, Morimoto T, Yasumi T, Nishikomori R, Heike T, Fujii T, Nakahata T.
Allergol Int 2010 Dec;59(4):369-374
Click to view abstract

Effects of latex avoidance on latex sensitization, atopy and allergic diseases in patients with spina bifida.  
Blumchen K, Bayer P, Buck D, Michael T, Cremer R, Fricke C, Henne T, Peters H, Hofmann U, Keil T, Schlaud M, Wahn U, Niggemann B.
Allergy 2010 Dec;65(12):1585-1593
Click to view abstract

Anti-acid medication as a risk factor for food allergy.  
Pali-Scholl I, Jensen-Jarolim E.
Allergy 2010 Dec 1;
Click to view abstract

Allergen cross reactions: a problem greater than ever thought?  
Pfiffner P, Truffer R, Matsson P, Rasi C, Mari A, Stadler BM.
Allergy 2010 Dec;65(12):1536-1544
Click to view abstract

Rhinorrhea, cough and fatigue in patients taking sitagliptin.  
Baraniuk JN, Jamieson MJ.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2010;6(1):8
Click to view abstract

Should younger siblings of peanut-allergic children be assessed by an allergist before being fed peanut?  
Liem JJ, Huq S, Kozyrskyj AL, Becker AB.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Dec 15;4(4):144-149
Click to view abstract

Peanut allergy: an overview.  
Al-Ahmed N, Alsowaidi S, Vadas P.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Dec 15;4(4):139-143
Click to view abstract

Ragweed as an example of worldwide allergen expansion.  
Oswalt ML, Marshall GD.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Sep 15;4(3):130-135
Click to view abstract

Aspirin-exacerbated asthma.  
Varghese M, Lockey RF.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Jun 15;4(2):75-83
Click to view abstract

Patch testing in non-immediate drug eruptions.  
Romano A, Viola M, Gaeta F, Rumi G, Maggioletti M.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Jun 15;4(2):66-74
Click to view abstract

Occupational contact dermatitis.  
Sasseville D.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2008 Jun 15;4(2):59-65
Click to view abstract

Urticaria and infections.  
Wedi B, Raap U, Wieczorek D, Kapp A.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2009 Dec;5(1):10
Click to view abstract

Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers: a retrospective analysis.  
Fung IN, Kim HL.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2010 Jan;6(1):2
Click to view abstract

Panallergens and their impact on the allergic patient.  
Hauser M, Roulias A, Ferreira F, Egger M.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2010 Jan;6(1):1
Click to view abstract

Diagnostic evaluation of food-related allergic diseases.  
Eckman J, Saini SS, Hamilton RG.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2009 Oct 22;5(1):3.
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to hyperallergenic functional foods.  
Ameratunga R, Woon ST.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2010 Dec 13;6(1):33
Click to view abstract

Food allergy management from the perspective of patients or caregivers, and allergists: a qualitative study.  
Xu YS, Waserman SB, Waserman S, Connors L, Stawiarski K, Kastner M.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2010;6(1):30
Click to view abstract

Nonimmunoglobulin e-mediated immune reactions to foods.  
Spergel JM.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2006 Jun 15;2(2):78-85
Click to view abstract

Critical aspects of the history of occupational asthma.  
Tarlo SM.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2006 Jun 15;2(2):74-77
Click to view abstract

Lack of correlation between severity of clinical symptoms, skin test reactivity, and radioallergosorbent test results in venom-allergic patients.  
Warrington R.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2006 Jun 15;2(2):62-67
Click to view abstract

Skin test reactivity to indoor allergens correlates with asthma severity in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.  
Koshak EA.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2006 Mar 15;2(1):11-19

Importance of basophil activation testing in insect venom allergy.  
Kosnik M, Korosec P.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2009 Dec;5(1):11
Click to view abstract

Pollen allergens do not come alone: pollen associated lipid mediators (PALMS) shift the human immune systems towards a T(H)2-dominated response.  
Gilles S, Mariani V, Bryce M, Mueller MJ, Ring J, Behrendt H, Jakob T, Traidl-Hoffmann C.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2009 Dec;5(1):3
Click to view abstract

Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a case related to chickpea ingestion and review.  
Wong CG, Mace SR.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2007 Dec 15;3(4):134-137
Click to view abstract

Navigating the updated anaphylaxis parameters.  
Kemp SF.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2007 Jun 15;3(2):40-49
Click to view abstract

Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome associated with clindamycin.  
Tian D, Mohan RJ, Stallings G.
Am J Med 2010 Nov;123(11):e7-e8

Cardiac arrest at induction of a patient with thyrotoxicosis. Have you thought of anaphylaxis? [French]  
Muller V, Morell E, Le MC, Pasquier P, Rousseau JM.
Ann Fr Anesth Reanim 2010 Jun;29(6):488-490

Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug intolerance.  
Blumenthal MN.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):407-408

On the cover - false ragweed.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):A4

Differences among heat-treated, raw, and commercial peanut extracts by skin testing and immunoblotting.  
Maleki SJ, Casillas AM, Kaza U, Wilson BA, Nesbit JB, Reimoneqnue C, Cheng H, Bahna SL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):451-457
Click to view abstract

The impact of food allergy and bullying.  
Oppenheimer J, Bender B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):410-411

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by radiocontrast media.  
Kim SJ, Lee T, Lee YS, Bae YJ, Cho YS, Moon HB, Kim TB.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):492-493

Intelliject's novel epinephrine autoinjector: sharps injury prevention validation and comparable analysis with EpiPen and Twinject.  
Guerlain S, Wang L, Hugine A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):480-484
Click to view abstract

Molecular insight into IgE-mediated reactions to sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seed proteins.  
Magni C, Ballabio C, Restani P, Fuggetta D, Alessandri C, Mari A, Bernardini R, Iacono ID, Arlorio M, Duranti M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Dec;105(6):458-464
Click to view abstract

Two cases of rush specific oral tolerance induction for wheat allergy. [Japanese]  
Fujino A, Kurihara K.
Arerugi 2010 Nov 30;59(11):1580-1584
Click to view abstract

Analysis of the risk factors to persistent milk allergy. [Japanese]  
Takaoka Y, Futamura M, Sakamoto T, Ito K.
Arerugi 2010 Nov 30;59(11):1562-1571
Click to view abstract


Previous Issues of Allergy Advisor Digest
January 2010   February 2010   March 2010   April 2010   May 2010   June 2010   July 2010   August 2010   September 2010   October 2010   November 2010   December 2010   January 2011   February 2011   March 2011   April 2011   May 2011   June 2011   July 2011   August 2011   September 2011   October 2011   November 2011   December 2011   January 2012   February 2012   March 2012   April 2012   May 2012   June 2012   July 2012   August 2012   September 2012   October 2012   November 2012   December 2012   January 2013   February 2013   March 2013   April 2013   May 2013   June 2013   July 2013   August 2013   September 2013   October 2013   November 2013   December 2013   January 2014   February 2014   March 2014   April 2014   May 2014   June 2014   July 2014  


To subscribe to future Digest installments , subscribe here, and we will notify you when the new Digest is published.


Allergy and Intolerance Information