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 Allergy Advisor Digest - December 2012
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut.
Read Inhibition of polyethylene glycol-induced histamine release by monomeric ethylene and diethylene glycol: A case of probable polyethylene glycol allergy.
Read Advances in diagnosing peanut allergy
Read The utility of peanut components in the diagnosis of ige-mediated peanut allergy among distinct populations
Read Diagnosing multiple drug hypersensitivity in children.
Read Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.
Read Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach
Read Clinical value of component-resolved diagnostics in peanut-allergic patients.
Read Evaluation and validation of a bee venom sting challenge performed by a micro-syringe.
Read Dichlorophenol-containing pesticides and allergies

Abstracts shared in December 2012 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Frequent baked egg ingestion was not associated with change in rate of decline in egg skin prick test in children with challenge confirmed egg allergy.
Read Exploring the temporal development of childhood IgE profiles to allergen components.
Read Current Immunological and Molecular Biological Perspectives on Seafood Allergy: A Comprehensive Review.
Read Standardizing double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenges
Read False-positive penicillin immunoassay: An unnoticed common problem.
Read Tolerance to wheat in whole-grain cereal biscuit in wheat-allergic children.
Read Perplexing cases of allergy to salami
Read Near fatal anaphylaxis from orally administered gelatin capsule
Read Atopy patch tests are useful to predict oral tolerance in children with gastrointestinal symptoms related to non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy.
Read The influence of the presence of wheat flour on the antigenic activities of egg white proteins.
Read Nile trumpet tree: New entomophilous pollen allergen

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut.
The 11S globulin Sin a 2 is a marker to predict severity of symptoms in mustard allergic patients. The potential implication of Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity with tree nuts and peanut has not been investigated so far. The involvement of the 11S globulin Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut was investigated in 11 well-characterized mustard-allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2. Rabbit anti-Sin a 2 serum showed high affinity and specificity to Sin a 2, which allowed us to demonstrate that Sin a 2 shares IgG epitopes with allergenic 11S globulins from tree nuts (almond, hazelnut, pistachio and walnut) but not from peanut. All the patients included in the study had positive skin prick test to tree nuts and/or peanut and we subdivided them into two different groups according to their clinical symptoms after ingestion of such allergenic sources. 11S globulins contain conserved IgE epitopes involved in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut as well as species-specific IgE epitopes. Therefore the allergenic 11S globulin Sin a 2 from mustard is involved in cross-reactivity at the IgE level with tree nuts and peanut. Although the clinical relevance of the cross-reactive IgE epitopes present in 11S globulins needs to be investigated in further detail, these results contribute to improve the diagnosis and management of mustard allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2. (Sirvent 2012 ref.28531 7)

The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut.  
Sirvent S, Akotenou M, Cuesta-Herranz J, Vereda A, Rodriguez R, Villalba M, Palomares O.
Clin Transl Allergy 2012 Dec 11;2(1):23

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Inhibition of polyethylene glycol-induced histamine release by monomeric ethylene and diethylene glycol: A case of probable polyethylene glycol allergy.
A unique case of allergy to Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) of varying molecular weights and exposure

routes, with responses provoked by intramuscular (Depo-Medrol), per oral (Balancid), and possibly, intradermal administration (via tattooing).

Inhibition of polyethylene glycol-induced histamine release by monomeric ethylene and diethylene glycol: A case of probable polyethylene glycol allergy.  
Wenande EC, Skov PS, Mosbech H, Poulsen LK, Garvey LH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 7;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Advances in diagnosing peanut allergy
Peanut allergy is often severe, potentially fatal, usually persistent, and appears to have increased in prevalence. An accurate diagnosis is essential because there is a significant burden on quality of life. The tools available for diagnosis include the medical history, skin prick test (SPT), determination of serum peanut-specific IgE antibodies (PN-IgE), and medically supervised oral food challenges. Numerous studies, almost exclusively in children, have correlated clinical outcomes against SPTs and PN-IgE with informative results. The diagnostic utility of SPT and PN-IgE is maximized by considering the degree of positive result and consideration of the medical history (a priori estimation of risk). Emerging tests that evaluate IgE binding to specific proteins in peanut (component testing) add important additional diagnostic information in specific settings. Studies are increasingly focused on how the results of tests considered in combination (or performed serially) may increase diagnostic accuracy. Here, we review the utility of currently available tests and provide suggestions on how to best use them to accurately predict peanut allergy. Still, the physician-supervised oral food challenge remains the most definitive test available.

Advances in diagnosing peanut allergy  
Scott H. Sicherer, Robert A. Wood
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):1-13

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The utility of peanut components in the diagnosis of ige-mediated peanut allergy among distinct populations
Increasing data suggest that analysis of IgE to peanut components can be clinically helpful and possibly more accurate than IgE to whole peanut. Not all studies examining this topic, however, have used prospective samples, multiple components, and peanut challenges.This study sought to determine the utility of peanut component testing, using a standardized, commercially available test done before oral peanut challenge in various populations of patients with suspected peanut allergy from 2 different countries. IgE to whole peanut and the recombinant allergen components Ara h 1, 2, 3, and 8 were analyzed from serum samples drawn before double-blind peanut challenge from 4 distinct cohorts of patients with suspected peanut allergy from 2 nations (United States and Sweden). Patients (n = 167; median age, 11.7 years; interquartile range, 7.0-15.0 years) had serum analyzed for peanut components and completed an oral food challenge to peanut. Although IgE to peanut was the most sensitive test (0.93), Ara h 2 was the most specific (0.92) and provided the best positive predictive value (0.94) of all the tests. Ara h 2 was also the best overall diagnostic test by receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve, 0.84; P < .05).

Therefore in patients with suspected peanut allergy, IgE to peanut is a sensitive test but is not specific. IgE to Ara h 2 is a more specific and more accurate diagnostic test in this sampling of patients with suspected peanut allergy.

The utility of peanut components in the diagnosis of ige-mediated peanut allergy among distinct populations  
Jay A. Lieberman, Susanne Glaumann, Sofia Batelson, Magnus P. Borres, Hugh A. Sampson, Caroline Nilsson
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):75-82

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnosing multiple drug hypersensitivity in children.
Multiple drug hypersensitivity (MDH) has been defined as a hypersensitivity to two or more chemically different drugs. Two types of MDH have been reported: the first one, which develops to different drugs administered simultaneously and the second type, in which sensitizations develop sequentially. In children, studies which diagnose MDH on the basis of positive allergologic tests to 2 or more chemically different drugs are lacking. A prospective study evaluating children with histories of MDH by skin tests, patch tests, serum-specific IgE assays, and drug provocation tests was conducted. A MDH was diagnosed in 7 (2.5%) of the 279 children evaluated who completed the study. The responsible drugs were ß-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins) in 5 episodes, ibuprofen and anticonvulsants in 3, and erythromycin, fentanyl, methylprednisolone, and cotrimoxazole in 1. Sensitivity to 2 chemically different drugs was diagnosed in 6 children and to 3 drugs in 1 child. Two of the 7 children presented the first type of MDH, whereas 5 displayed the second one. It is crucial to evaluate children with histories of MDH using both in vivo and in vitro allergologic tests, including challenges. In fact, such approach allows the physician to confirm the diagnosis of MDH in a small percentage of children with histories of MDH, as well as to rule it out in the great majority of them.

Diagnosing multiple drug hypersensitivity in children.  
Atanaskovic-Markovic M, Gaeta F, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M, Cirkovic Velickovic T, Valluzzi RL, Romano A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;23(8):785-791

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.
Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). No acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. These results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. The authors question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop

Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.  
Panda R, Ariyarathna H, Amnuaycheewa P, Tetteh A, Pramod SN, Taylor SL, Ballmer-Weber BK, Goodman RE.
Allergy 2012 Dec 4;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach
Cypress allergy is a typical winter pollinosis and the most frequent one in the South of France. Peach allergy is common too in Southern Europe. Allergic cross-reactions between cypress and peach have been reported, including an oral allergy syndrome. This study investigated whether a cross-reactive allergen between cypress and peach might be responsible for the observed clinical association. 127 patients were assessed. Patients sensitized to peach were mainly positive for the peach-nonspecific lipid-transfer protein. Profilins or thaumatins could not explain the observed clinical association between cypress and peach.

Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area.  
Caimmi D, Barber D, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Amrane H, Bousquet PJ, Dhivert-Donnadieu H, Demoly P.
Allergy 2012 Dec 4;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical value of component-resolved diagnostics in peanut-allergic patients.
The aim of this study was to correlate IgE values with the outcome of peanut challenges. Data from 175 positive and 30 negative peanut challenges in patients aged 1-26 years were retrospectively correlated with the levels of specific IgE to peanut and peanut components (Ara h 1-3, h 8, and h 9). The best correlation between IgE and clinical thresholds was found for Ara h 2. A cutoff of Ara h 2 > 1.63 kU/l yielded a specificity = 1.00, with a corresponding sensitivity of 0.70. The level of IgE toward Ara h 2 can improve diagnostic accuracy by introducing a more clear-cut decision-point with an optimal specificity maintaining a high sensitivity. In our study, this would have reduced the necessary number of challenges to be performed from 205 to 92. Extrapolation between centers is difficult and decision-points need to be addressed in relation to settings and population. Further component-resolved diagnostic cannot replace oral challenge neither in determining thresholds nor in the assessment of severity of symptoms elicited during challenge.

Clinical value of component-resolved diagnostics in peanut-allergic patients.  
Eller E, Bindslev-Jensen C.
Allergy 2012 Dec 14;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation and validation of a bee venom sting challenge performed by a micro-syringe.
This preliminary study suggests that the micro-syringe challenge with honeybee venom is feasible and produces results indistinguishable from those of the traditional sting challenge

Evaluation and validation of a bee venom sting challenge performed by a micro-syringe.  
Cortellini G, Severino M, Francescato E, Turillazzi S, Spadolini I, Rogkakou A, Passalacqua G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):438-441

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dichlorophenol-containing pesticides and allergies
High urine levels of dichlorophenols are associated with the presence of sensitization to foods in a US population. Excessive use of dichlorophenols may contribute to the increasing incidence of food allergies in westernized societies

Dichlorophenol-containing pesticides and allergies: results from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006.  
Jerschow E, McGinn AP, de VG, Vernon N, Jariwala S, Hudes G, Rosenstreich D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):420-425

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Hospital admissions for food-induced anaphylaxis in Italian children.  
Canani RB, Nocerino R, Terrin G, Leone L, Troncone R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Dec;42(12):1813-1814

An unfolded variant of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2 with decreased anaphylactic potential.  
Starkl P, Felix F, Krishnamurthy D, Stremnitzer C, Roth-Walter F, Prickett SR, Voskamp AL, Willensdorfer A, Szalai K, Weichselbaumer M, O'Hehir RE, Jensen-Jarolim E.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Dec;42(12):1801-1812
Click to view abstract

Frequent baked egg ingestion was not associated with change in rate of decline in egg skin prick test in children with challenge confirmed egg allergy.  
Tey D, Dharmage SC, Robinson MN, Allen KJ, Gurrin LC, Tang ML.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Dec;42(12):1782-1790
Click to view abstract

Food allergies in developing and emerging economies: need for comprehensive data on prevalence rates.  
Boye JI.
Clin Transl Allergy 2012 Dec 20;2(1):25

Exploring the temporal development of childhood IgE profiles to allergen components.  
Onell A, Hjalle L, Borres MP.
Clin Transl Allergy 2012 Dec 19;2(1):24
Click to view abstract

The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut.  
Sirvent S, Akotenou M, Cuesta-Herranz J, Vereda A, Rodriguez R, Villalba M, Palomares O.
Clin Transl Allergy 2012 Dec 11;2(1):23

Current Immunological and Molecular Biological Perspectives on Seafood Allergy: A Comprehensive Review.  
Leung NY, Wai CY, Shu S, Wang J, Kenny TP, Chu KH, Leung PS.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec 16;
Click to view abstract

Skin Testing For Beta-Lactam Antibiotics: Impact of the Availability of a Major Determinant.  
Khan FS, Weiss ME.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Dec 13;
Click to view abstract

IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy in children.  
Huang F, Kim JS.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Dec;12(6):630-640
Click to view abstract

Allergen sensitization is associated with increased DNA methylation in older men.  
Sordillo JE, Lange NE, Tarantini L, Bollati V, Zanobetti A, Sparrow D, Vokonas P, Schwartz J, Baccarelli A, Demeo D, Litonjua AA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec 14;161(1):37-43
Click to view abstract

The sensitising capacity of intact beta-Lactoglobulin is reduced by co-administration with digested beta-Lactoglobulin.  
Lindholm BK, Barkholt V, Bernhard MC.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec 13;161(1):21-36
Click to view abstract

Mapping of the IgE and IgG4 Sequential Epitopes of Ovomucoid with a Peptide Microarray Immunoassay.  
Martinez-Botas J, Cerecedo I, Zamora J, Vlaicu C, Dieguez MC, Gomez-Coronado D, de D, Terrados S, de la HB.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec 13;161(1):11-20
Click to view abstract

Cor a 1-reactive T cells and IgE are predominantly cross-reactive to Bet v 1 in patients with birch pollen-associated food allergy to hazelnut.  
Hofmann C, Scheurer S, Rost K, Graulich E, Jamin A, Foetisch K, Saloga J, Vieths S, Steinbrink K, Adler HS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 11;
Click to view abstract

Polistes species venom is devoid of carbohydrate-based cross-reactivity and allows interference-free diagnostics.  
Blank S, Neu C, Hasche D, Bantleon FI, Jakob T, Spillner E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 7;

Allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics.  
Solensky R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;130(6):1442-1442

Standardizing double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenges: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology-European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology PRACTALL consensus report.  
Sampson HA, Gerth van WR, Bindslev-Jensen C, Sicherer S, Teuber SS, Burks AW, Dubois AE, Beyer K, Eigenmann PA, Spergel JM, Werfel T, Chinchilli VM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;130(6):1260-1274

The natural history of milk allergy in an observational cohort.  
Wood RA, Sicherer SH, Vickery BP, Jones SM, Liu AH, Fleischer DM, Henning AK, Mayer L, Burks AW, Grishin A, Stablein D, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 28;
Click to view abstract

Systemic mastocytosis as a risk factor for severe Hymenoptera sting-induced anaphylaxis.  
Alvarez-Twose I, Bonadonna P, Matito A, Zanotti R, González-de-Olano D, Sánchez-Muñoz L, Morgado JM, Orfao A, Escribano L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 28;

False-positive penicillin immunoassay: An unnoticed common problem.  
Johansson SG, Adedoyin J, van HM, Gronneberg R, Nopp A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 24;

Tolerance to wheat in whole-grain cereal biscuit in wheat-allergic children.  
Turner PJ, Wong M, Varese N, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE, Campbell DE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 24;

Olea europaea pollen lipids activate invariant natural killer T cells by upregulating CD1d expression on dendritic cells.  
bos-Gracia B, Gomez Del MM, Lopez-Relano J, Viana-Huete V, Castro L, Villalba M, Martinez-Naves E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 21;
Click to view abstract

Variable yield of allergy patch testing in children with eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Paquet B, Begin P, Paradis L, Drouin E, Des RA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 19;

Nasopharyngeal carriage with Streptococcus pneumoniae augments the immunizing effect of pneumolysin toxoid B.  
Neill DR, Smeaton S, Bangert M, Kadioglu A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 18;

Inhibition of polyethylene glycol-induced histamine release by monomeric ethylene and diethylene glycol: A case of probable polyethylene glycol allergy.  
Wenande EC, Skov PS, Mosbech H, Poulsen LK, Garvey LH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 7;

Replication of genome-wide association study loci for allergic rhinitis and house dust mite sensitization in an Asian population of ethnic Chinese in Singapore.  
Andiappan AK, Wang DY, Anantharaman R, Suri BK, Lee BT, Rotzschke O, Liu J, Chew FT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec 7;

Advances in diagnosing peanut allergy  
Scott H. Sicherer, Robert A. Wood
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):1-13
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

CME exam: advances in diagnosing peanut allergy  

J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):14
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Evaluation of food allergy in patients with atopic dermatitis  
Marcel M. Bergmann, Jean-Christoph Caubet, Mark Boguniewicz, Philippe A. Eigenmann
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):22-28
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Vocal cord dysfunction related to water-damaged buildings  
Kristin J. Cummings, Jordan N. Fink, Monica Vasudev, Chris Piacitelli, Kathleen Kreiss
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):46-50
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

The utility of peanut components in the diagnosis of ige-mediated peanut allergy among distinct populations  
Jay A. Lieberman, Susanne Glaumann, Sofia Batelson, Magnus P. Borres, Hugh A. Sampson, Caroline Nilsson
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):75-82
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Perplexing cases of allergy to salami  
Sian Ludman, Yannick Perrin, Jean-Christoph Caubet, Jacqueline Wassenberg
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):97-98
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Near fatal anaphylaxis from orally administered gelatin capsule  
Michael H. Land, Mark D. Piehl, A. Wesley Burks
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):99-100
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Evaluation of Ara h2 IgE thresholds in the diagnosis of peanut allergy in a clinical population  
Corinne A. Keet, Kristen Johnson, Jessica H. Savage, Robert G. Hamilton, Robert A. Wood
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):101-103
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Addition of mycophenolate mofetil to tacrolimus is associated with decreases in food-specific IgE levels in a pediatric patient with liver transplantation-associated food allergy  
Juan-Carlos Cardet, Joshua A. Boyce
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):104-106
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Ask the expert: a patient experiencing anaphylaxis and urticaria, in some cases preceded by ingestion of red meat  
Phillip Lieberman, Scott P. Commins
J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practise 2013;1(1):107-108
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Diagnosing multiple drug hypersensitivity in children.  
Atanaskovic-Markovic M, Gaeta F, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M, Cirkovic Velickovic T, Valluzzi RL, Romano A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;23(8):785-791
Click to view abstract

Food allergy and anaphylaxis in pediatrics: update 2010-2012.  
Santos AF, Lack G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;23(8):698-706
Click to view abstract

Prevalence and impact of past history of food allergy in atopic dermatitis.  
Kijima A, Murota H, Takahashi A, Arase N, Yang L, Nishioka M, Yamaoka T, Kitaba S, Yamauchi-Takihara K, Katayama I.
Allergol Int 2012 Dec 25;
Click to view abstract

Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.  
Panda R, Ariyarathna H, Amnuaycheewa P, Tetteh A, Pramod SN, Taylor SL, Ballmer-Weber BK, Goodman RE.
Allergy 2012 Dec 4;
Click to view abstract

Understanding the molecular sensitization for Cypress pollen and peach in the Languedoc-Roussillon area.  
Caimmi D, Barber D, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Amrane H, Bousquet PJ, Dhivert-Donnadieu H, Demoly P.
Allergy 2012 Dec 4;
Click to view abstract

Atopy patch tests are useful to predict oral tolerance in children with gastrointestinal symptoms related to non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy.  
Nocerino R, Granata V, Di CM, Pezzella V, Leone L, Passariello A, Terrin G, Troncone R, Berni CR.
Allergy 2012 Dec 4;
Click to view abstract

Mechanisms of peripheral tolerance to allergens.  
Soyer OU, Akdis M, Ring J, Behrendt H, Crameri R, Lauener R, Akdis CA.
Allergy 2012 Dec 18;
Click to view abstract

The multi-faceted role of allergen exposure to the local airway mucosa.  
Golebski K, Roschmann KI, Toppila-Salmi S, Hammad H, Lambrecht BN, Renkonen R, Fokkens WJ, van Drunen CM.
Allergy 2012 Dec 13;
Click to view abstract

Clinical value of component-resolved diagnostics in peanut-allergic patients.  
Eller E, Bindslev-Jensen C.
Allergy 2012 Dec 14;
Click to view abstract

Clinical features of immediate hypersensitivity to isopropylantipyrine.  
Hwang EK, Nam YH, Jin HJ, Shin YS, Ye YM, Park HS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Jan;5(1):55-58

The influence of the presence of wheat flour on the antigenic activities of egg white proteins.  
Shin M, Lee J, Ahn K, Lee SI, Han Y.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Jan;5(1):42-47

Dolichandrone platycalyx: New entomophilous pollen--A report on pollen sensitization in allergic individuals.  
Mridula PA, Mahesh PA, Abraham JN, Amrutha DH, Agashe SN, Sitesh R, Vedanthan PK.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jan-Feb;25(1):e34-8.
Abstract

Identifying intracellular Staphylococcus aureus in chronic rhinosinusitis: A direct comparison of techniques.  
Tan NC, Tran HB, Foreman A, Jardeleza C, Vreugde S, Wormald PJ.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2012 Nov;26(6):444-449
Click to view abstract

Allergen of the month-larch.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):A17

Evaluation and validation of a bee venom sting challenge performed by a micro-syringe.  
Cortellini G, Severino M, Francescato E, Turillazzi S, Spadolini I, Rogkakou A, Passalacqua G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):438-441
Click to view abstract

The prevalence and characteristics of food allergy in urban minority children.  
Taylor-Black S, Wang J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):431-437
Click to view abstract

Safe administration of the seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine to children with severe egg allergy.  
Greenhawt MJ, Spergel JM, Rank MA, Green TD, Masnoor D, Sharma H, Bird JA, Chang JE, Sinh D, Teich E, Kelso JM, Sanders GM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):426-430
Click to view abstract

Dichlorophenol-containing pesticides and allergies: results from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006.  
Jerschow E, McGinn AP, de VG, Vernon N, Jariwala S, Hudes G, Rosenstreich D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Dec;109(6):420-425
Click to view abstract

Variability in skin prick test results performed by multiple operators depends on the device used  
Werther, Rebecca L.; Choo, Sharon; Lee, Katherine J.; Poole, Debra; Allen, Katrina J.; Tang, Mimi L.K.
WAO Journal 2012;5(12):200–204
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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