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 Allergy Advisor Digest - February 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Pre-lethal anaphylaxis to carboxymethylcellulose confirmed by identification of specific IgE
Read In vitro allergy diagnostic tests and cross-reactivity.
Read Stressful life events in childhood and allergic sensitisation.
Read IgE to peanut allergen components: relation to peanut symptoms and pollen sensitization
Read Sesame allergy: role of specific IgE and skin-prick testing in predicting food challenge results.
Read Allergy to Royal Poinciana (Gulmohar tree) and Yellow Poinciana (Yellow flame tree)
Read Identification of a novel 17-kDa protein as a ferret allergen.
Read Allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of salted fish guts made of Sagittated calamari
Read Anti-allergic activity of naringenin chalcone from a tomato skin extract.
Read Should avoidance of foods be strict in prevention and treatment of food allergy?
Read Features of feather duvet lung.
Read A novel major Japanese cedar pollen allergen belonging to the aspartic protease family.
Read Major cat allergen Fel d 1 is maintained among the main anatomical sites of production.
Read Toxocariasis (Roundworm of dogs) resulting in seeming allergy.
Read Caterpillars and moths: Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.
Read Voluntarily reported unintentional injections from epinephrine auto-injectors.
Read Molecular diagnosis of allergy to the management of pediatric patients with allergy to pollen.
Read Detailed proteomic analysis on donkey milk.
Read A novel Cladosporium herbarum allergen - alpha/beta hydrolase
Read Effect of the introduction of solid foods during the first year and allergic sensitization at age 5 years.

Abstracts shared in February 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Insect allergy: house fly, mosquito, horsefly.
Read Numismedica: health problems caused by coins.
Read Pomegranate (Punica granatum) allergy.
Read Work-Related Allergy and Asthma in Spice Mill Workers - the Impact of Processing
Read Allergy or tolerance in children sensitized to peanut: prevalence and differentiation using component-resolved diagnostics.
Read Food allergy due to olive.
Read Diagnosing human anisakiasis: recombinant Ani s 1 and Ani s 7 allergens versus CAP
Read Higher histamine sensitivity in non-atopic subjects by skin prick test may result in misdiagnosis of eggplant allergy.
Read Pine nut anaphylaxis after eating muesli.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pre-lethal anaphylaxis to carboxymethylcellulose confirmed by identification of specific IgE
Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) is used extensively in the pharmaceutical and food industries on account of its various properties. Anaphylactic reactions are rare. It has been reported principally after intra-articular infiltration of sustained-release corticosteroids containing CMC and, very rarely, after barium enema. A case of pre-lethal anaphylactic shock after barium enema was studied by prick-test, intra-dermal reaction (IDR), leukocyte histamine release test (LHRT), basophil activation test (BAT), cystein-leukotriene release test (CAST) and dot-blot analysis. IDR to CMC was positive. BAT and CAST were positive. Specific IgE were identified. This is the third report of CMC-specific IgE and the second of anaphylaxis to CMC associated with a barium suspension in contact with GI tract mucosa. CMC as an excipient in medicinal products may therefore be a risk factor for severe anaphylaxis after injection or following contact with GI tract mucosa.

Pre-lethal anaphylaxis to carboxymethylcellulose confirmed by identification of specific IgE--review of the literature.  
Dumond P, Franck P, Morisset M, Sainte LJ, Kanny G, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2009 Dec;41(6):171-176

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vitro allergy diagnostic tests and cross-reactivity.
"Immunologic cross-reactivity is the binding of antibodies or activation of sensitized T-cells to similar antigens: proteins, carbohydrates, or glycoproteins which contain similar or identical determinants. The similarity may be based on sequential or conformational similarity. Most allergens, particularly allergens of plant origin, are glycoproteins, carrying (frequently) N-glycans and O-glycans. Due to their involvement in a wide spectrum of cross-reactivities, these N-glycans have been named “cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants” (CCD). In contrast to peptide epitopes, glycan epitopes may share significant structural elements with allergens of other, non-related protein families, whereby they induce IgE-cross-reactions between allergens from completely different sources, i.e. plant-derived pollen, natural rubber latex and insect venoms. The clinical relevance of CCDs is still controversial, and they seem to be responsible for decreased specificity of in vitro diagnostic test currently used for allergy diagnosis, which complicates the identification of the allergens responsible for a sometimes severe allergic reaction. Members of certain protein families may cause cross-reactions, i.e. profilins, Bet-v-1-homologous proteins and lipid transfer proteins. Component-resolved diagnosis (CRD) using single allergens allow the molecule-specific detection of IgE. The significance of the results, however, has to be evaluated with regard to the source of allergen in question and with regard to the individual patient. CRD is based on purified natural or recombinant single allergens, which may contain cross-reactive peptide epitopes, as well. In general, the sensitivity of IgE detection increases, but not necessarily the diagnostic specificity. Diagnostic tests for allergy based on human cells indirectly detecting IgE-mediated sensitization are not superior to direct IgE-detection methods with regard to cross-reactivity, for example, via CCD, and are, therefore, indicated for allergy testing in selected cases only. The application of marker allergens, i.e. screening with CCDs and/or CCD-carrying allergens, and inhibition assays with a superior or at least relevant CCD-carrying allergen can help to decrease CCD interference in diagnostic tests of allergy. The well designed use of natural and recombinant allergens may additionally improve the specificity of IgE-detection."

In vitro allergy diagnostic tests and cross-reactivity. [German]  
U. Jappe
Allergologie 2010;33(1):43-

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Stressful life events in childhood and allergic sensitisation.
"Stressful life events evidently have an impact on development of allergic diseases, but the mechanism linking stress to pathological changes of immune system function is still not fully understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between stressful life events, neuropeptide and cytokine concentrations in children as well as the association between early stressful life events and atopic eczema (AE). Within the LISAplus (Life style – Immune system – Allergy) study, blood samples from children of 6 years of age were analyzed for concentration of the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), substance P (SP) and the Th1/Th2 cytokines IFN-g and IL-4. Life events such as severe disease or death of a family member, unemployment or divorce of the parents were assessed with a questionnaire filled in by the parents. Furthermore, lifetime prevalence of AE and incidence after the assessment period of life events were compared. Our data suggest that separation/divorce of parents increase children’s risk of developing AE later in life. Children with separated/divorced parents showed high VIP levels and high concentrations of the Th2 cytokine IL-4 in their blood. Severe diseases and death of a family member were neither associated with neuropeptide levels nor with cytokine concentrations. Unemployment of the parents was associated with decreased IFN-g concentrations in children’s blood but not with neuropeptide levels. Thus, the neuropeptide VIP might be a mediator between stressful life events and immune regulation contributing to the Th2 shifted immune response in children with separated/divorced parents."

Stressful life events in childhood and allergic sensitisation [German]  
G. Herberth, S. Röder, A. Bockelbrink, T. Schäfer, M. Borte, O. Herbarth, U. Krämer, H. Behrendt, S. Sausenthaler, J. Heinrich und I. Lehmann
Allergologie 2010;33(2):55-

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE to peanut allergen components: relation to peanut symptoms and pollen sensitization
The aim was to investigate IgE reactivity to peanut allergen components in children from a birch-rich region in relation to pollen sensitization and peanut symptoms.

Different peanut/birch sensitization phenotypes were defined among 200 selected children. IgE reactivity to peanut and pollen allergen components was analysed using microarray technique. Peanut symptoms were reported in 87% of the children with IgE reactivity to any of the peanut allergens Ara h 1, 2 or 3 but not to Ara h 8 (n = 46) vs 17% of children with IgE reactivity to Ara h 8 but not to Ara h 1, 2 or 3 (n = 23). Furthermore, symptoms were more severe in children with Ara h 1, 2 or 3 reactivity. Children with IgE reactivity both to Ara h 2 and to Ara h 1 or 3 more often reported peanut symptoms than children with IgE only to Ara h 2 (97%vs 70%), particularly respiratory symptoms (50%vs 9%, P = 0.002). Therefore IgE analysis to peanut allergen components may be used to distinguish between peanut-sensitized individuals at risk of severe symptoms and those likely to have milder or no symptoms to peanut if sensitized to pollen allergens and their peanut homologue allergens.

IgE to peanut allergen components: relation to peanut symptoms and pollen sensitization in 8-year-olds.  
Asarnoj A, Moverare R, Ostblom E, Poorafshar M, Lilja G, Hedlin G, van HM, Ahlstedt S, Wickman M.
Allergy 2010 Feb 8;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sesame allergy: role of specific IgE and skin-prick testing in predicting food challenge results.
This USA study examined the correlation of sesame ImmunoCAP and SPT results with oral challenge outcomes in children, aged 2-12 years, suspected of having a sesame food allergy. Thirty-three oral sesame challenges were conducted. Of the 33 challenges performed, 21% (n = 7) failed and 79% (n = 26) passed. A sesame-specific IgE level of > or = 7 kU(A)/L showed specificity of >90%. An SPT wheal size of > or = 6 mm showed specificity of >90%. This study represents the largest number of sesame challenges performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of both sesame-specific IgE and SPT. Based on our sample, both tests are not good predictors of true sesame allergy as determined by an oral challenge. The study was unable to establish a threshold with a 95% positive predictive value for both sesame-specific IgE and SPT.

Sesame allergy: role of specific IgE and skin-prick testing in predicting food challenge results.  
Permaul P, Stutius LM, Sheehan WJ, Rangsithienchai P, Walter JE, Twarog FJ, Young MC, Scott JE, Schneider LC, Phipatanakul W.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2009 Nov;30(6):643-648

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to Royal Poinciana (Gulmohar tree) and Yellow Poinciana (Yellow flame tree)
Delonix regia (Royal Poinciana / Gulmohar tree) and Peltophorum pterocarpum (Yellow Poinciana / Yellow flame tree) pollen are important aeroallergens for type 1 hypersensitivity in the tropics. This study characterized the IgE-binding proteins of D regia pollen and investigated the cross-allergenity with P pterocarpum pollen (Both are Leguminosae). Of a total of 2,234 patients with respiratory allergies in Calcutta, India, skin prick tested with D regia allergen extract, 695 (31.1%) showed a +1 and 130 (5.8%) showed a +2/+3 reaction on SPT. Nine IgE-reactive protein components were found. Maximum IgE reactivity, contained 2 (96 and 66 kDa) IgE-reactive protein components. Marked cross-reactivity between D regia and P pterocarpum pollen was found. Shared IgE-binding components (66, 56, 32, 28, 25, and 23 kDa) were observed between D regia and P pterocarpum pollen extracts, whereas the 96 and 43 kDa components were specific to D regia.

Biomolecular identification of allergenic pollen: a new perspective for aerobiological monitoring?  
Longhi S, Cristofori A, Gatto P, Cristofolini F, Grando MS, Gottardini E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Dec;103(6):508-514

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of a novel 17-kDa protein as a ferret allergen.
29-year-old man had a 3-year history of mild perennial asthma. He reported aggravation of these symptoms in the previous 2 years, coinciding with the entry of 2 ferrets into his house. SPT was positive to, among other, epithelium from cat, dog, horse, and rabbit. Protein bands ranging from 14 to 66 kDa in both types of ferret extracts (ferret hair and ferret urine). Ferret urine immunoblotting showed IgE-binding proteins of 59, 34, 25, and 17 kDa in reducing conditions and 42, 23, 18, 16, and 15 kDa in nonreducing conditions. A 19-kDa IgE-binding band was revealed with extracts from dog dander, cat epithelium, and hamster urine. Inhibition assays with male ferret urine as inhibitor and dog and cat epithelium extracts in solid phase showed total IgE-binding inhibition on 19and 39-kDa bands, respectively. The 17-kDa protein was studied because it was the ferret urine protein with the highest IgE-binding capacity. It did not correspond to any previously reported allergens compared with the databases. The SPT was performed with this purified allergen with positive results.

Identification of a novel 17-kDa protein as a ferret allergen.  
Gonzalez de OD, Pastor VC, Cases OB, Perez-Gordo M, Moral D, Vivanco F, Bartolome B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Aug;103(2):177-178

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of salted fish guts made of Sagittated calamari
A 75-year-old man ingested salted fish guts made of Sagittated calamari which he caught in the daytime, with alcohol and then dozed. Five hours later, he woke up due to itching over his entire body and noticed generalized urticaria and a swollen tongue, which was too large for him to close his mouth. Serum total IgE was 456 IU/ml and ImmunoCAP was positive for anisakis, but negative for squid, shrimp, and ascaris. A skin prick test (SPT) was positive for anisakis extract (10 mg/ml) and house dust mites, but negative for squid and shrimp. He was diagnosed with IgE-mediated allergy due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of salted fish guts made of Sagittated calamari, which had been parasitized by Anisakis simplex. SPT with six extracts of purified or recombinant allergens (Ani s 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8) was performed to identify the causative allergens in this case. Only Ani s 3 (tropomyosin) was positive, indicating that Ani s 3 was the causative allergen in this case. Third stage larvae of the nematode Anisakis simplex often parasitize not only marine fish but also invertebrates, including squid. It is necessary to consider Anisakis simplex allergy for urticarial reactions that develop after the ingestion of squid.

A case of an allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of salted fish guts made of Sagittated calamari: allergen analysis with recombinant and purified Anisakis simplex allergens. [Japanese]  
Shigehira Y, Inomata N, Nakagawara R, Okawa T, Sawaki H, Nakamura K, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K, Ikezawa Z.
Arerugi 2010 Jan;59(1):55-60

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anti-allergic activity of naringenin chalcone from a tomato skin extract.
Tomato skin extract contains naringenin chalcone (trans-2'4'6'4-tetrahydroxychalcone) which strongly inhibits histamine release. Naringenin chalcone inhibited histamine release with an IC(50) value of 68 microg/ml. (Could this influence prick-prick testing? Ed.)

Anti-allergic activity of naringenin chalcone from a tomato skin extract.  
Yamamoto T, Yoshimura M, Yamaguchi F, Kouchi T, Tsuji R, Saito M, Obata A, Kikuchi M.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2004 Aug;68(8):1706-11.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Should avoidance of foods be strict in prevention and treatment of food allergy?
"Recent data indicate that strict allergen avoidance is not always necessary for treatment, exposure may be therapeutic, and extended delay in introduction of food allergens to the diet of young children may increase allergy risks. However, in many circumstances strict avoidance is clearly necessary for treatment. Additional studies are needed to determine the risks and benefits of exposure to tolerated allergen, including identification of biomarkers to identify patients who may benefit."

Should avoidance of foods be strict in prevention and treatment of food allergy?  
Kim JS, Sicherer S.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb 16;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Features of feather duvet lung.
Feather duvet lung (FDL) is a rare subgroup of bird fancier's lung. It is caused by inhalation of organic dust due to goose or duck feathers in duvets or pillows. A retrospective review of the medical records of 13 patients with FDL was performed to assess the specific history and review clinical characteristics of patients with this disease. All patients were female with aged 26-71 years. They were recently exposed to feather duvets (6), pillows (1) or both (6). Specific histories were duvets or pillows filled with raw goose feathers from their own farms (4), intensive contact with goose feathers in youth (3), and bird exposure prior to symptom onset (5). In all patients specific IgG antibodies to goose and/or duck feathers were detected. The clinical findings of FDL are typical of extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Primary sensitization could be due to former exposure to bird antigens at home or goose/duck feather exposure in youth.

Presenting Features of Feather Duvet Lung.  
Koschel D, Wittstruck H, Renck T, Muller-Wening D, Hoffken G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Feb 12;152(3):264-270

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A novel major Japanese cedar pollen allergen belonging to the aspartic protease family.
This study reports the molecular cloning and immunochemical characterization of a novel C. japonica pollen allergen belonging to the aspartic protease family. An approx 40% sequence identity to members of the plant atypical aspartic protease family was shown. The protein was recognized by IgE antibodies in the serum of 58% (18/31) of Japanese cedar pollinosis patients.

Molecular cloning and immunochemical characterization of a novel major Japanese cedar pollen allergen belonging to the aspartic protease family.  
Ibrahim AR, Kawamoto S, Aki T, Shimada Y, Rikimaru S, Onishi N, Babiker EE, Oiso I, Hashimoto K, Hayashi T, Ono K.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Feb 10;152(3):207-218

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Major cat allergen Fel d 1 is maintained among the main anatomical sites of production.
This study aimed at elucidating the polymorphism of Fel d 1 from cat dander from the site of production and the resulting immunological behavior of the allergen. It identified truncated dimers of Fel d 1, probably resulting from proteolytic degradation of both chains and present in all cats. The core fragments were largely distributed among anatomical sites of production and especially well represented in anal sacs They were recognized as intact allergens by antibodies and may therefore introduce discrepancies in allergen measurement depending on the variable amount of intact and degraded Fel d 1 produced by the cat.

Distribution of core fragments from the major cat allergen Fel d 1 is maintained among the main anatomical sites of production.  
Bienboire-Frosini C, Lebrun R, Vervloet D, Pageat P, Ronin C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Feb 10;152(3):197-206

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Toxocariasis (Roundworm of dogs) resulting in seeming allergy.
Toxocara canis is an intestinal nematode affecting dogs and cats that causes human infestations by ingestion of embryonated eggs excreted in dogs' faeces. Humans are transport hosts, in whom the larvae do not develop to adult worms, but may migrate to various tissues and organs, and survive for several years, giving rise to several clinical symptoms, which include allergy-like presentations.

Three cases presenting as dermatitis, rhinitis, asthma, and conjunctivitis which were diagnosed and unsuccessfully treated as allergy are reported. The correct diagnosis was established after detecting anti-Toxocara antibodies. All clinical symptoms showed improvement after starting treatment with mebendazole and subsequent courses of the antiparasitic drug resulted in full recovery. This suggests the possible role of Toxocara canis in inducing chronic symptoms of allergic type. This is particularly important for asthma, where it has been demonstrated that Toxocara canis infection causes allergic inflammation in the lungs associated with bronchial hyperreactivity.

Toxocariasis resulting in seeming allergy.  
Qualizza R, Megali R, Incorvaia C.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Sep;8(3):161-164

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Caterpillars and moths: Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.
Caterpillars and moths (order Lepidoptera) are uncommonly recognized causes of adverse cutaneous reactions, such as localized stings, papular dermatitis, and urticarial wheals. These reactions are typically mild and self-limited; however, in South America, the sting of Lonomia caterpillars can cause a potentially fatal hemorrhagic diathesis related to massive fibrinolysis. Ocular inflammation and prominent arthralgias have been reported to be caused by exposure to caterpillar. Part II of this two-part series on caterpillars and moths reviews the varied symptoms caused by Lepidopteran exposures, the differential diagnosis, and appropriate treatment.

Caterpillars and moths: Part II. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.  
Hossler EW.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Jan;62(1):13-28

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Voluntarily reported unintentional injections from epinephrine auto-injectors.
From 1994 to 2007, a total of 15,190 unintentional injections from epinephrine auto-injectors were reported to US Poison Control Centers, 60% of them from 2003 to 2007. Those unintentionally injected had a median age of 14 years, 55% were female, and 85% were injected in a home or other residence. Management was documented in only 4101 cases (27%), of whom 53% were observed without intervention, 29% were treated, 13% were neither held for observation nor treated, and 4% refused treatment. In contrast, from 1969 to 2007, only 105 unintentional injections from epinephrine auto-injectors were reported to MedWatch. Forty percent of these occurred during attempts to treat allergic reactions. Injuries resulting in permanent sequelae were rarely reported to either US Poison Control Centers or to MedWatch. To prevent these unintentional injections, improved epinephrine auto-injector design is needed, along with increased vigilance in training the trainers and in training and coaching the users, as well as efforts to increase public awareness of the role of epinephrine auto-injectors in the first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis in the community

Voluntarily reported unintentional injections from epinephrine auto-injectors.  
Simons FE, Edwards ES, Read EJ, Clark S, Liebelt EL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2):419-423

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Molecular diagnosis of allergy to the management of pediatric patients with allergy to pollen.
This study assessed the usefulness of molecular diagnosis in childhood allergies. A total of 162 children aged 4-16 years diagnosed with allergic rhinitis or asthma/rhinitis caused by pollen were referred for recombinant allergen-based diagnosis. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E against pollen allergens and purified recombinant Phleum pratense pollen allergens were measured using the recombinant allergens Phl p 1+Phl p 5 as P pratense--specific allergens and Phl p 7+Phl p 12 as cross-reacting allergens. Specific IgE antibodies against P pratense were detected in 99.4% of serum samples, and cross-reacting allergens in 46%. Multiple sensitization to pollen was documented in 38% of patients, with Plantago lanceolata as the main cause. Patients with specific IgE values of 75-80 kU(A)/L to Phl p 1+Phl p 5 were 75% more likely to present values > or = 2 kUA/L to Phl p 7+Phl p 12. The authors conclude that these results show that recombinant DNA technology can help diagnose allergy in cases of multiple sensitization and crossreactivity, and is therefore a promising option for improving prognosis and management of allergic pediatric populations.

Contribution of molecular diagnosis of allergy to the management of pediatric patients with allergy to pollen.  
Casquete-Roman E, Rosado-Gil T, Postigo I, Perez-Vicente R, Fernandez M, Torres HE, Martinez-Quesada J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2009;19(6):439-445

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Detailed proteomic analysis on donkey milk.
A deeper knowledge of proteins in donkey milk (DM) is necessary to evaluate the immunological and physiological properties of this natural substitute for cow's milk. The paper offers a detailed comparative analysis among the protein fractions of DM, CM and human milk, following an extensive proteomic study of the casein and whey proteins of DM. The detailed protein composition and structural features reported in this study provide insight into the molecular reasons for the hypoallergenicity of DM. Whole DM might constitute a valid substitute of CM in feeding children with CM protein allergy and it might also constitute the basis for formulas suitable for allergic subjects in the first year of life.

Detailed proteomic analysis on DM: insight into its hypoallergenicity.  
Bertino E, Gastaldi D, Monti G, Baro C, Fortunato D, Perono Garoffo L, Coscia A, Fabris C, Mussap M, Conti A.
Miscellaneous Front Biosci (Elite Ed) 2010 Jan 1;2:526-36.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A novel Cladosporium herbarum allergen - alpha/beta hydrolase
Screening a C. herbarum cDNA library with IgE antibodies pooled from 3 mold-reactive sera, a novel allergen candidate (29.9kDa) exhibiting considerable (three-dimensional) homology to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold superfamily was isolated. A recombinant non-fusion C. herbarum hydrolase displayed a prevalence of IgE reactivity of approximately 17% in in vitro immunoblot experiments.

Isolation and immunological characterization of a novel Cladosporium herbarum allergen structurally homologous to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold superfamily.  
Rid R, Onder K, Hawranek T, Laimer M, Bauer JW, Holler C, Simon-Nobbe B, Breitenbach M
Mol Immunol 2009 Dec 18. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of the introduction of solid foods during the first year and allergic sensitization at age 5 years.
The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between age at the introduction of solid foods during the first year of life and allergic sensitization in 5-year-old children. Data from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention nutrition study was assessed (994 children with HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes mellitus for whom information on breastfeeding, age at the introduction of solid foods, and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels at 5 years was available.) The study reports that late introduction of solid foods was associated with increased risk of allergic sensitization to food and inhalant allergens.

Age at the introduction of solid foods during the first year and allergic sensitization at age 5 years.  
Nwaru BI, Erkkola M, Ahonen S, Kaila M, Haapala AM, Kronberg-Kippila C, Salmelin R, Veijola R, Ilonen J, Simell O, Knip M, Virtanen SM.
Pediatrics 2010 Jan;125(1):50-59

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

New developments improve food allergy management.  

Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2009 Dec;41(6):190-191

Dynamics in cytokine responses during the development of occupational sensitization to rats.  
Krop EJ, van de Pol MA, Lutter R, Heederik DJ, Aalberse RC, van der Zee JS.
Allergy 2010 Jan 28;
Click to view abstract

Health-related quality of life of food allergic patients measured with generic and disease-specific questionnaires.  
Flokstra-de Blok BM, van d, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Oude Elberink JN, Dunngalvin A, Hourihane JO, Duiverman EJ, Dubois AE.
Allergy 2010 Feb 1;
Click to view abstract

Usefulness of the basophil activation test (BAT) in the diagnosis of life-threatening drug anaphylaxis.  
Garcia-Ortega P, Marin A.
Allergy 2010 Feb 10;

Systemic photoallergy to terbinafine.  
Spiewak R.
Allergy 2010 Jan 28;

Toothpaste-induced anaphylaxis caused by mint (Mentha) allergy.  
Paiva M, Piedade S, Gaspar A.
Allergy 2010 Feb 10;

Anaphylaxis to Raphanus niger.  
Sousa N, Gaspar A, Morais-Almeida M.
Allergy 2010 Feb 10;

Temporal changes in UK birth order and the prevalence of atopy.  
Upchurch S, Harris JM, Cullinan P.
Allergy 2010 Feb 4;
Click to view abstract

IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to pristinamycin - report of a case.  
Rubio M, Bousquet PJ, Demoly P.
Allergy 2010 Feb 4;

Aspirin tolerance in patients with NSAID-hypersensitivity.  
Malskat WS, van der TC, Knulst AC, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Rockmann H.
Allergy 2010 Feb 4;

The allergen Bet v 1 in fractions of ambient air deviates from birch pollen counts.  
Buters JT, Weichenmeier I, Ochs S, Pusch G, Kreyling W, Boere AJ, Schober W, Behrendt H.
Allergy 2010 Feb 4;
Click to view abstract

Effects of omalizumab in patients with food allergy.  
Rafi A, Do LT, Katz R, Sheinkopf LE, Simons CW, Klaustermeyer W.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Jan;31(1):76-83
Click to view abstract

Sesame allergy: role of specific IgE and skin-prick testing in predicting food challenge results.  
Permaul P, Stutius LM, Sheehan WJ, Rangsithienchai P, Walter JE, Twarog FJ, Young MC, Scott JE, Schneider LC, Phipatanakul W.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2009 Nov;30(6):643-648

Biomolecular identification of allergenic pollen: a new perspective for aerobiological monitoring?  
Longhi S, Cristofori A, Gatto P, Cristofolini F, Grando MS, Gottardini E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Dec;103(6):508-514

Allergy to pumpkin with cyclophilin as the relevant allergen.  
De Olano DG, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Macadan SS, Cano MG, Perez-Gordo M, Ortega BC, Vivanco F, Vargas CP.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jan;104(1):98-99

Allergy to prairie dog lipocalins.  
De Olano DG, Bartolome B, Ortega BC, Perez-Gordo M, Vivanco F, Vargas CP.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jan;104(1):97-98

Pomegranate (Punica granatum) allergy: clinical and immunological findings.  
Damiani E, Aloia AM, Priore MG, Nardulli S, Ferrannini A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Aug;103(2):178-180

Identification of a novel 17-kDa protein as a ferret allergen.  
Gonzalez de OD, Pastor VC, Cases OB, Perez-Gordo M, Moral D, Vivanco F, Bartolome B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Aug;103(2):177-178

Latex: a hidden occupational allergen.  
Anibarro B, Seoane FJ, Perpina MA, Carnes J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jan;104(1):94-95

Role of food labels in accidental exposures in food-allergic individuals in Canada.  
Sheth SS, Waserman S, Kagan R, Alizadehfar R, Primeau MN, Elliot S, St PY, Wickett R, Joseph L, Harada L, Dufresne C, Allen M, Allen M, Godefroy SB, Clarke AE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jan;104(1):60-65
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis in the obstetric patient: analysis of a statewide hospital discharge database.  
Mulla ZD, Ebrahim MS, Gonzalez JL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jan;104(1):55-59
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Pinaceae.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jan;104(1):A4

A case of an allergic reaction due to Anisakis simplex after the ingestion of salted fish guts made of Sagittated calamari: allergen analysis with recombinant and purified Anisakis simplex allergens. [Japanese]  
Shigehira Y, Inomata N, Nakagawara R, Okawa T, Sawaki H, Nakamura K, Kobayashi Y, Shiomi K, Ikezawa Z.
Arerugi 2010 Jan;59(1):55-60
Click to view abstract

Regional differences in the prevalence of Japanese cedar-pollen allergy. [Japanese]  
Murayama K, Baba K, Okubo K.
Arerugi 2010 Jan;59(1):47-54
Click to view abstract

The effect of chronic infection with Aspergillus fumigatus on lung function and hospitalization in patients with cystic fibrosis.  
Amin R, Dupuis A, Aaron SD, Ratjen F.
Chest 2010 Jan;137(1):171-176
Click to view abstract

Responses to odors in occupational environments.  
Dalton PH, Jaen C.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb 12;
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Sensitization to Inhaled Ryegrass Pollen by Collateral Priming in a Murine Model of Allergic Respiratory Disease.  
Cadot P, Meyts I, Vanoirbeek JA, Vanaudenaerde B, Bullens DM, Ceuppens JL.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Feb 11;152(3):233-242
Click to view abstract

Long-term characteristics of hazelnut allergy in an adjuvant-free mouse model.  
Gonipeta B, Parvataneni S, Paruchuri P, Gangur V.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Feb 10;152(3):219-225
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Allergy or Tolerance, That's the Question.  
Jahn-Schmid B.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Feb 10;152(3):195-196

Variant Hypersensitivity Reaction (HSR) Presented with Persistent Dry Cough after Receiving Oxaliplatin in a Pancreatic Cancer Patient.  
Li J, Peccerillo J, Kaley K, Saif MW.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2009 Sep;8(3):165-168
Click to view abstract

Caterpillars and moths: Part I. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.  
Hossler EW.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Jan;62(1):1-10
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Case reports by Cochard and Eigenmann.  
Thompson JC, Morris MS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jan;125(1):277-278

Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.  
Sicherer SH, Leung DY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jan;125(1):85-97
Click to view abstract

Induction of anergic allergen-specific suppressor T cells using tolerogenic dendritic cells derived from children with allergies to house dust mites.  
Pacciani V, Gregori S, Chini L, Corrente S, Chianca M, Moschese V, Rossi P, Roncarolo MG, Angelini F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb 10;
Click to view abstract

Clavulanic acid can be the component in amoxicillin-clavulanic acid responsible for immediate hypersensitivity reactions.  
Torres MJ, Ariza A, Mayorga C, Dona I, Blanca-Lopez N, Rondon C, Blanca M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2):502-505

Cats and dogs: An attractive remedy versus atopy?  
Brenna OV.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb 4;

Naturally processed T-cell-activating peptides of the major birch pollen allergen.  
Mutschlechner S, Egger M, Briza P, Wallner M, Lackner P, Karle A, Vogt AB, Fischer GF, Bohle B, Ferreira F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb 2;
Click to view abstract

Are neighborhood-level characteristics associated with indoor allergens in the household?  
Rosenfeld L, Rudd R, Chew GL, Emmons K, cevedo-Garcia D.
J Asthma 2010 Feb;47(1):66-75
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Severe asthma with fungal sensitization: a case report and review of literature.  
Madani Y, Barlow A, Taher F.
J Asthma 2010 Feb;47(1):2-6
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New item on pediatric menu: food allergy.  
Voelker R.
JAMA 2010 Feb 10;303(6):497-498

Allergenicity of Hev b 13, a major esterase allergen in natural rubber latex (Hevea brasiliensis) allergy, does not only depend on its carbohydrate moiety.  
Rouge P, Culerrier R, Campistron M, Granier C, Bienvenu F, Bienvenu J, Didier A, Barre A.
Mol Immunol 2010 Jan;47(4):871-877
Click to view abstract

Dissecting cross-reactivity in hymenoptera venom allergy by circumvention of alpha-1,3-core fucosylation.  
Seismann H, Blank S, Braren I, Greunke K, Cifuentes L, Grunwald T, Bredehorst R, Ollert M, Spillner E.
Mol Immunol 2010 Jan;47(4):799-808
Click to view abstract


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