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 Allergy Advisor Digest - February 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media: prevalence, risk factors and the role of skin tests in diagnosis
Read High negative predictive value of allergological testing in allergic rhinitis.
Read Prevalence of possible occupational asthma in hairdressers working in hair salons for women.
Read Profilins: mimickers of allergy or relevant allergens?
Read Sensitization with 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy or pea induces IgE with different biological activities which are modified by soy tolerance.
Read Human insulin allergy: four case reports.
Read Co-recognition of lipid trasfer protein in pollen and foods in northern Italy: clinician's view.
Read Acute allergic reaction by occupational exposure to a proteolytic enzyme preparation with high peptidase and proteinase activity
Read The importance of Panallergens tropomyosin in the measurement of serum specific IgE to a variety of crustaceans and Intervertebraten sensitized patients
Read Rare and new occupational inhalation allergens
Read Extrinsic allergic alveolitis to Bacillus subtilis
Read The current catalog of the antigens, disease patterns and risk of extrinsic allergic alveolitis
Read Pru p 3, the nonspecific lipid transfer protein from peach, dominates the immune response to its homolog in hazelnut.
Read Influence of total and specific IgE, serum tryptase, and age on severity of allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.
Read Olive tree pollen counts and aeroallergen levels predict clinical symptoms in patients allergic to olive pollen.
Read Risk factors for systemic reactions to bee venom in British beekeepers.
Read Geography of house dust mite allergens.
Read Unusual delayed reaction after H1N1 vaccine.
Read IgE cross-reactivity between Pas n 1 of Bahia grass pollen and other group 1 grass pollen allergens.
Read Ingested allergens must be absorbed systemically to induce systemic anaphylaxis.
Read Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy.
Read Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) PNA lectin allergen cross-reacting with other structurally related legume lectins.
Read Real-life epidemiology of food allergy testing in Finnish children.
Read Sensitization profiles to purified plant food allergens among pediatric patients with allergy to banana.
Read Season of birth and childhood food allergy
Read Age-related sensitization profiles for hazelnut in a birch-endemic region.
Read Allergy to cow's milk proteins: what contribution does hypersensitivity in skin tests have to this diagnosis?

Abstracts shared in February 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Sensitization to horse allergens in Italy
Read Occurrence of nonceliac gluten sensitivity in patients with allergic disease.
Read Release of mast cell tryptase into saliva: a tool to diagnose food allergy by a mucosal challenge test?
Read Type IV allergic dermatitis from playing a wooden flute.
Read Storage mites - most important inhalant allergens in agriculture in Germany
Read Kiwifruit Act d 11 is the first member of the ripening-related protein family identified as an allergen.
Read Clinical manifestations, co-sensitizations, and immunoblotting profiles of buckwheat-allergic patients.
Read Frozen fruit skin prick test for the diagnosis of fruit allergy.
Read Enzymatic treatment of peanut kernels to reduce allergen levels.
Read Green bean (String bean): a new source of IgE-binding lipid transfer protein.
Read Wheat allergy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in adults.
Read The dominant 55kDa allergen of the subtropical Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum) pollen is a group 13 pollen allergen

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media: prevalence, risk factors and the role of skin tests in diagnosis
Background: Hypersensitivity to contrast media (CMs) may be common and serious. This study evaluated the prevalence of CM hypersensitivity, risk factors associated with it and the role of skin testing in its diagnosis. A total of 1,131 patients, mean age 55 +/- 14.2 years, were enrolled. The prevalence of historical and current CM reactors was 33/1,131 (2.92%) and 8/1,105 (0.72%), respectively. The skin was the most affected site. Female gender, a history of doctor-diagnosed asthma, drug allergy, food allergy and psychiatric diseases were significant risk factors. The sensitivities of SPTs and early readings of IDTs in the diagnosis of immediate reactions were 0 and 20%, respectively, and the specificities were 94.6 and 91.4%, respectively. For early readings of IDTs, the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 40 and 80%, respectively. For nonimmediate reactions, the sensitivities of delayed readings of IDTs and PTs were 14.3 and 25%, respectively; specificity was 100% for both tests. The PPV was 100% for both of these tests, and the NPVs were 85.4 and 82.4%, respectively.

Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media: prevalence, risk factors and the role of skin tests in diagnosis - a cross-sectional survey.  
Goksel O, Aydin O, Atasoy C, Akyar S, Demirel YS, Misirligil Z, Bavbek S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 3;155(3):297-305

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High negative predictive value of allergological testing in allergic rhinitis.
The authors point out that asymptomatic aeroallergen sensitisation affects approximately 10% of Western adolescents and is an established risk factor for the development of respiratory allergy. The reported incidence is 2-20% annually. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of onset of symptoms among clinically well-characterised asymptomatic, sensitised subjects compared with controls, and to evaluate the predictive values of common allergological tests, and concludes that in a well-characterised young population, asymptomatic aeroallergen sensitisation conferred a low risk for onset of symptoms during the 2-year follow-up. Persistent asymptomatic phenotype could be accurately predicted by negative results from simple allergological testing

A prospective, clinical study on asymptomatic sensitisation and development of allergic rhinitis: high negative predictive value of allergological testing.  
Bodtger U, Assing K, Poulsen LK.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 3;155(3):289-296

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of possible occupational asthma in hairdressers working in hair salons for women.
A telephone questionnaire (Q1) was administered to 1,334 individuals from a total of 1,875 hairdressers working in hair salons for women in Barcelona (response rate 71%) to identify those with respiratory symptoms. Multiple correspondence analysis showed 5 specific questions for assessing symptoms of asthma. Individuals who gave a positive response to 1 of these questions (n = 251) were given a second validated questionnaire (Q2) to identify those with suspected OA. OA was defined according to a classification tree based on the response to queries on nasal itching, daily symptoms throughout the week at work, nasal secretions, voice loss, wheezing, and sputum production as reported previously. Moreover, we calculated the prevalence of OA according to the conventional criteria of improvement and/or worsening of symptoms in relation to exposure at work and during off-work time on weekends and during vacations.

Results: Asthma was present in 9.5% of hairdressers. From Q2 data, 72 were classified as having possible OA, yielding a prevalence of OA from 5.4 (72/1,334) to 7.8% according to the classification tree previously described. A prevalence from 4.6 (62/1,334) to 6.7% was obtained using conventional criteria. Rhinitis or dermatitis (OR 7.80), as well as exacerbation of symptoms at work and persistence of symptoms on weekends (OR 2.99) were associated with the development of OA.

Conclusions: Hairdressing employment can induce asthma. Episodes of rhinitis or dermatitis seem to be risk factors for the development of OA in this population

Prevalence of possible occupational asthma in hairdressers working in hair salons for women.  
Espuga M, Munoz X, Plana E, Ramon MA, Morell F, Sunyer J, Cruz MJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):379-388

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Profilins: mimickers of allergy or relevant allergens?
"Profilins are ubiquitous proteins, present in all eukaryotic cells and identified as allergens in pollen, latex and plant foods. The highly conserved structure justifies the cross-reactive nature of IgE antibodies against plant profilins and their designation as pan-allergens. Primary sensitization to profilin seems to arise from pollen sensitization with later development of cross-reactive IgE antibodies against plant food (and possibly latex) profilins. The role of profilin in inducing allergic symptoms needs to be evaluated and raises important issues in allergy diagnosis due to cross-reactivity. IgE cross-reactivity among profilins is associated with multiple pollen sensitization and with various pollen-food syndromes. In respiratory allergy, sensitization to pollen to which the patient has virtually no environmental exposure has been identified as a manifestation of profilin sensitization. As a food allergen, profilin usually elicits mild reactions, such as oral allergy syndrome, is not modified by processing and is especially important in allergy to some fruits, such as melon, watermelon, banana, tomato, citrus fruit and persimmon. Purified natural and recombinant profilins for in vitro and in vivo allergy tests are helpful in the diagnostic work-up. Herein we review the current state of knowledge about the allergen profilin and its implications in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases. We conclude that, although its role in triggering allergic symptoms is still controversial, profilin is undoubtedly a relevant allergen. As a pan-allergen, profilin is associated with multiple pollen sensitization and pollen-food-latex syndromes that the allergist has to be aware of in order to accomplish an accurate diagnosis and successful treatment of allergic diseases"

Profilins: mimickers of allergy or relevant allergens?  
Santos A, Van Ree RR.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 2;155(3):191-204

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization with 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy or pea induces IgE with different biological activities which are modified by soy tolerance.
7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy, and pea were studied to determine whether related proteins would induce a similar sensitization when removed from their 'normal' matrix. Brown Norway rats (soy tolerant or nontolerant) were immunized i.p. 3 times with 100 mug purified peanut, hazelnut, soy, or pea 7S without adjuvant. Sera were analyzed for specific antibodies by different ELISAs (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgE), inhibition ELISA, and rat basophilic leukemia cell assay.

The 4 related 7S globulins induced a response with an almost identical level of specific antibodies, but peanut 7S induced IgE of higher avidity than hazelnut and pea 7S which, again, had a higher avidity than IgE induced by soy 7S. Soy tolerance reduced the functionality of IgE without influencing antibody titers. Therefore, although the 4 7S globulins are structurally related allergens, they induce antibodies with different antigen-binding characteristics. Peanut 7S induces IgE of a higher avidity than hazelnut and pea 7S which, again, has a higher avidity than IgE induced by soy 7S. The authors also show that soy tolerance influences the function of antibodies to peanut 7S. These findings may help explain how antibodies of different clinical significances can develop in different individuals sensitized to the same allergen.

Sensitization with 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy or pea induces IgE with different biological activities which are modified by soy tolerance.  
Kroghsbo S, Bogh KL, Rigby NM, Mills EN, Rogers A, Madsen CB.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 1;155(3):212-224

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Human insulin allergy: four case reports.
Insulin allergy was not uncommon in the past, but has lowered with the introduction of human recombinant insulin. Human recombinant insulin allergy is a rare condition, now reported in less than 1% of treated patients. However, it is a serious condition that requires an immediate allergological work-up. Four cases of IgE-mediated reaction to human recombinant insulin are described, emphasizing some practical aspects in diagnosis and treatment.

Human insulin allergy: four case reports.  
Teixeira RA, Ensina LF, Sabino GL, Kase TL, Giavina-Bianchi P, Motta AA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;42(6):221-223

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Co-recognition of lipid trasfer protein in pollen and foods in northern Italy: clinician's view.
This study looked at the prevalence of hypersensitivity to different lipid transfer protein- (LTP)-containing pollen sources among peach-allergic subjects sensitized to LTP. Sixty-six adults, mean age 33.7 yrs, with allergy to peach LTP living in the area of Milan underwent SPT with mugwort, plane and olive pollen extracts. Skin tests with Artemisia, Platanus, and Olea pollen extracts scored positive in 16 (24%), 10 (15%), and 10 (15%) patients, respectively. Peach-specific IgE were detected in 16/16 patients, whereas IgE to Artemisia, Platanus, and Olea pollen were found in 7 (44%), 10 (62%), and 8 (50%) cases. In all cases peach-specific IgE levels were higher than levels of IgE to the three pollens, and a strong correlation between peach-specific IgE levels and the levels of IgE specific for mugwort and plane pollen was recorded. Therefore in northern Italy olive, plane, and mugwort pollen seem an unlikely source of LTP sensitisation and the most likely primary sensitizer to this protein remains the peach.

Co-recognition of lipid trasfer protein in pollen and foods in northern Italy: clinician's view.  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;42(6):205-208

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Acute allergic reaction by occupational exposure to a proteolytic enzyme preparation with high peptidase and proteinase activity
A worker in the flavor and fragrance industry with no previous history of allergic disease, who after first exposure to a powdered enzyme preparation with high peptidase and proteinase activity (Umamizyme), developed acute asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and a swollen tongue. The skin prick test and IgE-CAP were positive for the enzyme preparation. Studies on specific IgE to enzymes that are used in the detergent industry (Maxatase, Alcalase, Savinase), or to proteases of plant origin (bromelain, papain) were negative. To the authors knowledge, this is the first instance of serum IgE against this proteolytic enzyme with high peptidase activity and no cross-reactivity against other proteases.

Kasuistik Akute allergische Reaktion durch berufliche Exposition gegenüber einem proteolytischen Enzympräparat mit hoher Peptidase- und Proteinase-Aktivität / Acute allergic reaction by occupational exposure to a proteolytic enzyme preparation  
Wüthrich B, Schaffner R.
Allergologie 2010;33(8):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The importance of Panallergens tropomyosin in the measurement of serum specific IgE to a variety of crustaceans and Intervertebraten sensitized patients
A patient with clinical history of adverse reactions, confirmed by raised specific IgE, to prawns, shrimp and crab, but also with to house fly, mosquito, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae and bee and wasp venom . The panallergen involved appeared to be tropomyosin.

Der Stellenwert des Panallergens Tropomyosin bei der spezifischen IgE-Messung des Serums eines auf diverse Krustazeen und Intervertebraten sensibilisierten Patienten  
Wahl R, Feil D, Varelmann H, Wegner M, Krause R, Suck R.
Allergologie 2010;33(9):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Rare and new occupational inhalation allergens
Google translation (extract):

n this review, rather rare and exotic occupational inhalation allergens according to their occurrence in the various professional fields and application areas (including the preparation of dough and baked goods, handling of ornamental and agricultural crops, wood processing, processing of fish, crustaceans and shellfish and in fish farming) shown.

Seltene und neue Allergene Seltene und neue berufliche Inhalationsallergene / Rare and new occupational inhalation allergens  
Raulf-Heimsoth M, Sander I, Kespohl S, van Kampen V, Brüning T.
Allergologie 2011;34(1):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Extrinsic allergic alveolitis to Bacillus subtilis
This article describes the diagnosis and the disease course of patients with confirmed extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) to Bacillus subtilis. The exposure was work related.

Allergische Alveolitis durch Bacillus subtilis in einem biologischen Reinigungsmittel – Diagnostik und Krankheitsverlauf  
Schulte W, Sennekamp J.
Allergologie 2010;33(12):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The current catalog of the antigens, disease patterns and risk of extrinsic allergic alveolitis
Google translation:

"In this paper, the updated list of antigens and disease patterns of extrinsic allergic alveolitis is listed. Added are risk occupations for allergic alveolitis. This list makes it easier to search for the causative antigen of allergic alveolitis in the growing number of newly discovered antigens. One can see what conditions are considered and in which occupation is possible to come into contact with these antigens."

Der aktuelle Katalog der Antigene, Krankheitsbilder und Risikoberufe der exogen-allergischen Alveolitis / The current catalog of the antigens, disease patterns and risk of extrinsic allergic alveolitis  
J. Sennekamp
Allergologie 2010;33(12):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pru p 3, the nonspecific lipid transfer protein from peach, dominates the immune response to its homolog in hazelnut.
This study analysed the T-cell response to Cor a 8, the nsLTP in hazelnut and its immunological cross-reactivity with the nsLTP in peach, Pru p 3. No major T-cell-activating region was found among 26 T-cell-reactive peptides identified in Cor a 8. Although generated with Cor a 8, 62% of the TCL responded more strongly to Pru p 3. This cross-reactivity was mediated by T cells specific for the immunodominant region Pru p 3(61-75) . Cor a 8 was more rapidly degraded by lysosomal proteases than Pru p 3. Pre-incubation of sera with Pru p 3 completely abolished IgE binding to Cor a 8, which was not the case vice versa. Therefore T-cell reactivity to Cor a 8 is predominantly based on cross-reactivity with Pru p 3, indicating that the latter initiates sensitisation to its homolog in hazelnut. The limited allergenic potential of Cor a 8 seems to be associated with rapid lysosomal degradation during allergen processing and the lack of major T-cell-activating regions.

Pru p 3, the nonspecific lipid transfer protein from peach, dominates the immune response to its homolog in hazelnut.  
Schulten V, Nagl B, Scala E, Bernardi ML, Mari A, Ciardiello MA, Lauer I, Scheurer S, Briza P, Jurets A, Ferreira F, Jahn-Schmid B, Fischer GF, Bohle B.
Allergy 2011 Feb 26;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Influence of total and specific IgE, serum tryptase, and age on severity of allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.
The data of this study shows that the connection of high severity sting reactions with lower IgE is mainly because of older age, which is associated with lower total IgE, and moreover with cardiovascular disease and elevated baseline serum tryptase, which are both risk factors for severe reactions.

Influence of total and specific IgE, serum tryptase, and age on severity of allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.  
Blum S, Gunzinger A, Muller UR, Helbling A.
Allergy 2011 Feb;66(2):222-228

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Olive tree pollen counts and aeroallergen levels predict clinical symptoms in patients allergic to olive pollen.
This study determined the correlation between olive pollen counts, aeroallergen levels, and clinical symptoms in patients with allergic asthma or rhinitis in Ciudad Real (Spain). Using a Poisson regression model, relative changes in aeroallergen concentrations and pollen counts were found to be similar and significant. Threshold levels for the induction of symptoms were 162 olive pollen grains/m(3) and 22.7 ng of olive pollen allergen/m(3) (equivalent to 0.9 ng/m(3) of Ole e 1). Olive aeroallergen concentrations and pollen counts are positively associated with symptoms of rhinitis and asthma in olive-allergic patients.

Olea europaea pollen counts and aeroallergen levels predict clinical symptoms in patients allergic to olive pollen.  
Brito FF, Gimeno PM, Carnes J, Martin R, Fernandez-Caldas E, Lara P, Lopez-Fidalgo J, Guerra F.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):146-152

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Risk factors for systemic reactions to bee venom in British beekeepers.
This study attempted to identify factors that predispose British beekeepers to systemic reactions (SRs) and to investigate how beekeepers access specialist services after SRs to bee venom. In an online survey, there were 852 responses to the questionnaire. Twenty-eight percent of all responders had experienced a large local reaction and 21% had experienced a SR. Factors that predisposed beekeepers to SRs included female sex, having a family member with bee venom allergy, more than 2 years of beekeeping before a SR, and premedication with an antihistamine before attending the hives. A total of 44% of beekeepers with SRs attended the emergency department because of their symptoms, 16.6% were reviewed by an allergy specialist, and only 18% carried an adrenaline autoinjector.

Risk factors for systemic reactions to bee venom in British beekeepers.  
Richter AG, Nightingale P, Huissoon AP, Krishna MT.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):159-163

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Geography of house dust mite allergens.
This article concludes "that while there is a broad knowledge of the distribution of different species of house dust mites, regions that require further examination have been identified and there are examples of incorrect use of allergens for different regions. The extension of allergy research and practice into new regions will benefit from allergen formulations designed for regional use. Specific knowledge of the allergens in the environments will be required to optimally implement some of the new molecularly-defined medicaments currently being developed for effective allergy vaccination and immunotherapy".

Geography of house dust mite allergens.  
Thomas WR.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;28(4):211-224

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Unusual delayed reaction after H1N1 vaccine.
A case of allergic contact dermatitis three weeks after the H1N1 vaccine, probably involving thimerosal additive. Patients should be aware of this possible unusual delayed reaction.

Unusual delayed reaction after H1N1 vaccine.  
Descatha A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;28(4):302-303

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE cross-reactivity between Pas n 1 of Bahia grass pollen and other group 1 grass pollen allergens.
This study's objective was an attempt to resolve the immunological relationships between pollen allergens of the Bahia grass and temperate grasses by evaluating serum IgE cross-reactivity between Bahia grass and temperate Lolium perenne (Ryegrass) pollen allergens. Serum IgE of grass pollen-allergic patients with P. notatum, L. perenne and Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) pollen extracts and their respective purified group 1 allergens, Pas n 1, Lol p 1 and Cyn d 1, were evaluated in 51 patients from a temperate region. A high frequency of IgE reactivity with each grass pollen was detected, but reactivity with L. perenne pollen was substantially greater than with P. notatum and C. dactylon pollen. Similarly, serum IgE reactivity with Lol p 1 was greater than with Pas n 1 or Cyn d 1. For seven of eight sera studied in detail, asymmetric serum IgE cross-reactivity was observed; L. perenne pollen inhibited IgE reactivity with P. notatum pollen but not the converse, and IgE reactivity with Pas n 1 was inhibited by Lol p 1 but IgE reactivity with Lol p 1 was not inhibited by Pas n 1 or Cyn d 1. Importantly, P. notatum pollen and Pas n 1 activated basophils in grass pollen-allergic patients from a temperate region, although stimulation was greater by pollen of L. perenne than P. notatum or C. dactylon, and by Lol p 1 than Pas n 1 or Cyn d 1. In contrast, a cohort of 47 patients from a subtropical region showed similar IgE reactivity with P. notatum and L. perenne pollen, and reciprocal cross-inhibition of IgE reactivity between L. perenne and P. notatum. Therefore pollen allergens of the subtropical P. notatum, including Pas n 1, show clinically relevant IgE cross-reactivity with pollen allergens of L. perenne but also species-specific IgE reactivity.

Functional immunoglobulin E cross-reactivity between Pas n 1 of Bahia grass pollen and other group 1 grass pollen allergens.  
Davies JM, Dang TD, Voskamp A, Drew AC, Biondo M, Phung M, Upham JW, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Feb;41(2):281-291

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ingested allergens must be absorbed systemically to induce systemic anaphylaxis.
Data from this study implies that ingested antigens must be absorbed systemically to induce anaphylaxis and suggests that immunization protocols that increase serum levels of antigen-specific, non-IgE antibodies should protect against severe food allergy

Ingested allergens must be absorbed systemically to induce systemic anaphylaxis.  
Strait RT, Mahler A, Hogan S, Khodoun M, Shibuya A, Finkelman FD.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb 26;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy.
Allergies to certain fruits such as banana, avocado, chestnut and kiwi are described in 30-70% of latex-allergic patients. This association is attributed to the cross-reactivity between the major latex allergen hevein and hevein-like domains (HLDs) from fruit class I chitinases. This study assessed the extent of cross-reactivity between hevein and HLDs using sera from latex-allergic patients with and without plant food allergy. Hevein and HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were expressed as fusion proteins. IgE binding to these proteins was studied in sera from 59 latex-allergic patients and 20 banana-allergic patients without latex allergy. Additionally, 16,408 allergic patients' sera were tested for IgE binding to hevein, latex chitinase, and wheat germ agglutinin. Hevein-specific IgE was detected in 34/59 (58%) latex-allergic patients' sera. HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were recognized by 21 (36%), 20 (34%), and 9 (15%) sera, respectively. In contrast, only one of 20 banana-allergic patients without latex allergy was sensitized to chitinase HLDs. In most tested latex-allergic patients' sera, IgE binding to hevein was only partially reduced by preincubation with HLDs. Among hevein-sensitized, latex-allergic patients, the percentage of plant food allergy (15/34 = 44%) was equal to latex-allergic patients without hevein sensitization (11/25 = 44%). In the general allergic population, 230 of 16,408 sera (1.4%) reacted to hevein and/or a hevein-like allergen. Of these, 128 sera showed an isolated sensitization to hevein, whereas only 17 bound to latex chitinase or wheat germ agglutinin without hevein sensitization. In conclusion, the IgE response to HLDs is elicited by hevein as sensitizing allergen in most cases. Despite considerable cross-reactivity between these allergens, no correlation between latex-associated plant food allergy and sensitization to hevein or HLDs was found.

Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy.  
Radauer C, Adhami F, Furtler I, Wagner S, Allwardt D, Scala E, Ebner C, Hafner C, Hemmer W, Mari A, Breiteneder H.
Mol Immunol 2011 Jan;48(4):600-609

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) PNA lectin allergen cross-reacting with other structurally related legume lectins.
Peanut lectin PNA and other legume lectins have been characterized as potential allergens for patients allergic to edible legume seeds. However, the clinical significance of the lectin-IgE interaction has to be addressed.

Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) PNA lectin allergen cross-reacting with other structurally related legume lectins.  
Rouge P, Culerrier R, Granier C, Rance F, Barre A.
Mol Immunol 2010 Aug;47(14):2359-2366

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Real-life epidemiology of food allergy testing in Finnish children.
The study population comprised all 5920 children aged 0-4 yr in the province of South Karelia, Finland, identified from the nationwide population register. The study included a questionnaire survey and a retrospective collection of FA test results (skin prick tests, IgE antibodies, or open food challenges) from the patient records of the entire study population. A total of 5849 FA tests had been performed on 961 children. By the age of 4 yr, the cumulative incidence of FA testing was 18% for any food item; 17% for essential items (milk, egg, cereals) and 9% for other food items. Essential food items had been tested in 90% of children who reportedly had a physician-diagnosed FA for these. The incidence of testing was 30% higher in boys than in girls and twofold higher among the offspring whose either or both parents reportedly had some allergic manifestation. This result shows the need to evaluate the financial burden of FA testing and to improve current testing practices

Real-life epidemiology of food allergy testing in Finnish children.  
Pyrhonen K, Hiltunen L, Nayha S, Laara E, Kaila M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 1;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization profiles to purified plant food allergens among pediatric patients with allergy to banana.
Banana fruit allergy is well known, but neither immunoglobulin E recognition patterns to purified plant food allergens nor true prevalences of putative banana allergens have been established. This study aimed to characterize beta-1,3-glucanase and thaumatin-like protein (TLP) as banana allergens, testing them, together with other plant food allergens, in 51 children with allergic reactions after banana ingestion and both positive specific IgE and skin prick test (SPT) to banana. Banana beta-1,3-glucanase and TLP were isolated and characterized. Both banana allergens, together with kiwifruit TLP Act d 2, avocado class I chitinase Pers a 1, palm pollen profilin Pho d 2 and peach fruit lipid transfer protein (LTP) Pru p 3, were tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. Banana beta-1,3-glucanase (Mus a 5) was glycosylated, whereas banana TLP (Mus a 4) was not, in contrast with its homologous kiwi allergen Act d 2. Specific IgE to both banana allergens, as well as to peach Pru p 3, was found in over 70% of sera from banana-allergic children, and Mus a 4 and Pru p 3 provoked positive SPT responses in 6 of the 12 tested patients, whereas Mus a 5 in only one of them. Both peptidic epitopes and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants were involved in the IgE-binding to Mus a 5, whereas cross-reactivity between Mus a 4 and Act d 2 was only based on common IgE protein epitopes. Profilin Pho d 2 elicited a relevant proportion of positive responses on in vitro (41%) and in vivo (58%) tests. Therefore, Mus a 4 and LTP behave as major banana allergens in the study population, and profilin seems to be also a relevant allergen. Mus a 5 is an equivocal allergenic protein, showing high IgE-binding to its attached complex glycan, and low in vivo potency.

Sensitization profiles to purified plant food allergens among pediatric patients with allergy to banana.  
Palacin A, Quirce S, Sanchez-Monge R, Bobolea I, az-Perales A, Martin-Munoz F, Pascual C, Salcedo G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Mar;22(2):186-195

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Season of birth and childhood food allergy
Recent studies suggest a possible role for low ultraviolet radiation exposure and low vitamin D status as a risk factor for food allergy. The authors hypothesized that children born in autumn/winter months (less sun exposure) might have higher food allergy rates than those born in spring/summer.

The study reports that in Australia, that significantly higher rates of food allergy exist in children born autumn/winter (compared to spring/summer), the relationship between relative food allergy rates and monthly UVR, combined with national adrenaline autoinjector and infant hypoallergenic formula prescription data, suggesting that ultraviolet light exposure/vitamin D status may be one of many potential factors contributing to childhood food allergy pathogenesis.

Season of birth and childhood food allergy in Australia.  
Mullins RJ, Clark S, Katelaris C, Smith V, Solley G, Camargo Jr CA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Age-related sensitization profiles for hazelnut in a birch-endemic region.
The objective of this study was to investigate sensitization profiles of hazelnut allergy in different age groups in a birch-endemic region using component resolved diagnosis (CRD) by microarray. Sixty-five patients with hazelnut allergy, 27 healthy control individuals tolerant to hazelnut, and 34 birch pollen allergic but hazelnut tolerant individuals were included.

Twenty-nine patients with hazelnut allergy suffered from a systemic reaction (17 preschool children, six school children, and six adults), whereas 36 patients reported an oral allergy syndrome (OAS; three preschool and nine school children and 24 adults). In the hazelnut allergic preschool children with systemic reactions, 65% were sensitized to Cor a 9, 12% to Cor a 8, 18% to Cor a 1.04, 6% to Cor a 1.0101, and 29% to Bet v 1. Of the school-aged systemic reactors, 50% were sensitized to Cor a 9, 17% to Cor a 8, 50% to Cor a 1.04 and Cor a 1.0101, and 67% to Bet v 1. In adults with hazelnut allergy, 3.3% were sensitized to Cor a 9, 6.7% to Cor a 8, 90% to Cor a 1.04 and Bet v 1, and 87% to Cor a 1.0101. In regard to systemic reactors in this group, 17% were sensitized to Cor a 9, 33% to Cor a 8 and Cor a 1.0101, and 50% to Cor a 1.04 and Bet v 1. In the patients with OAS, irrespective the age group, all were sensitized to Bet v 1 and over 97% to Cor a 1.04 and Cor a 1.0101. No sensitization to Cor a 9 or Cor a 8 was found in patients with only an OAS. Of the patients with birch pollen allergy, tolerant to hazelnut, none were sensitized to Cor a 9 or Cor a 8, 56% to Cor a 1.0101, 82% to Cor a 1.04, and 92% to Bet v 1. In healthy controls, no sensitization to components of hazelnut, hazel pollen or birch pollen was demonstrable.

Therefore hazelnut allergy in a birch-endemic region exhibits age-related sensitization profiles with distinct clinical outcomes that can be identified using CRD. The majority of hazelnut allergic preschool and school children in a birch-endemic region show systemic reactions on consumption of processed hazelnut, mostly being sensitized to the hazelnut legumin-like allergen Cor a 9 but unrelated to birch pollen allergy. In contrast, adults generally suffer from an OAS apparently as a result of cross-reactivity between Cor a 1.04 from hazelnut and Bet v 1 from birch pollen.

Age-related sensitization profiles for hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in a birch-endemic region.  
De Knop KJ, Verweij MM, Grimmelikhuijsen M, Philipse E, Hagendorens MM, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Stevens WJ, Ebo DG.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb;22(1 Pt 2):e139-e149

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to cow's milk proteins: what contribution does hypersensitivity in skin tests have to this diagnosis?
This study had the objective of analyzing the accuracy of hypersensitivity and specific IgE skin tests among children with Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) and predominantly gastrointestinal clinical manifestations. Of 192 children aged 1 and 5, 122 underwent open oral challenge to the suspected food. Presence of food allergy was confirmed for 50 children (40.9%). Of these, 44/50 (88%) were allergic to cow's milk protein. Twenty-two of the 44 cases (50.0%) presented symptoms within the first 4 h after the challenge. The SPT had a 31.8% sensitivity, 90.3% specificity, 66.7% PPV and 68.4% NPV. The APT showed a 25.0% sensitivity, 81.9% specificity, 45.8% PPV and 64.1% NPV. Specific IgE was raised 20.5%, 88.9%, 52.9% and 64.6% respectively. The authors conclude that despite the operational difficulty and the possible exposure risk, oral challenge is the best method for diagnosing CMPA, because of the low sensitivity and PPV of skin and specific IgE tests.

Allergy to cow's milk proteins: what contribution does hypersensitivity in skin tests have to this diagnosis?  
Costa AJ, Sarinho ES, Motta ME, Gomes PN, de Oliveira de Melo SM, da Silva GA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb;22(1 Pt 2):e133-e138

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Management of patients with known drug hypersensitivity in an emergency department in Israel.  
Reisfeld S, Goldberg A, Confino-Cohen R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):361-366
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Clinical allergy to hazelnut and peanut: identification of T cell cross-reactive allergens.  
Glaspole IN, de Leon MP, Prickett SR, O'Hehir RE, Rolland JM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):345-354
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Sensitization to airborne Ascospores, Basidiospores, and fungal fragments in allergic rhinitis and asthmatic subjects in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
Rivera-Mariani FE, Nazario-Jimenez S, Lopez-Malpica F, Bolanos-Rosero B.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):322-334
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Sensitization to horse allergens in Italy: a multicentre study in urban atopic subjects without occupational exposure.  
Liccardi G, D'Amato G, Antonicelli L, Berra A, Billeri L, Canonica GW, Casino G, Cecchi L, Folletti I, Gani F, Lombardi C, Lo SM, Meriggi A, Milanese M, Passalacqua G, Pio R, Rolla G, Russo M, .
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):412-417
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Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media: prevalence, risk factors and the role of skin tests in diagnosis - a cross-sectional survey.  
Goksel O, Aydin O, Atasoy C, Akyar S, Demirel YS, Misirligil Z, Bavbek S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 3;155(3):297-305
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They tell me i'm allergic to ragweed.  
Barnes CS, Amado M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 2;155(3):189-190
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Allergen-Induced Accumulation of CD68,CD123(+) Dendritic Cells in the Nasal Mucosa.  
Ekman AK, Erjefalt JS, Jansson L, Cardell LO.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 1;155(3):234-242
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Development of a Sandwich ELISA to measure exposure to occupational cow hair allergens.  
Zahradnik E, Sander I, Bruckmaier L, Flagge A, Fleischer C, Schierl R, Nowak D, Sultz J, Spickenheuer A, Noss I, Bruning T, Raulf-Heimsoth M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 1;155(3):225-233
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Characterization of the T-cell epitopes of the major peach allergen Pru p 3.  
Pastorello EA, Monza M, Pravettoni V, Longhi R, Bonara P, Scibilia J, Primavesi L, Scorza R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;153(1):1-12

The Russian Thistle (Salsola kali) pollen major allergen, Sal k 1, can be quantified in allergenic extracts and airborne pollen.  
Arilla MC, Ibarrola I, Brena S, Martinez A, Colas C, Asturias JA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;152(4):319-326

Penicillin allergy: value of including amoxicillin as a determinant in penicillin skin testing.  
Lin E, Saxon A, Riedl M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;152(4):313-318

Lateral flow tests for allergy diagnosis: point-of-care or point of contention?  
Chapman MD.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;152(4):301-302

Occurrence of nonceliac gluten sensitivity in patients with allergic disease.  
Massari S, Liso M, De SL, Mazzei F, Carlone A, Mauro S, Musca F, Bozzetti MP, Minelli M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):389-394
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Prevalence of possible occupational asthma in hairdressers working in hair salons for women.  
Espuga M, Munoz X, Plana E, Ramon MA, Morell F, Sunyer J, Cruz MJ.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;155(4):379-388
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Full-course drug challenge test in the diagnosis of delayed allergic reactions to penicillin.  
Borch JE, Bindslev-Jensen C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 3;155(3):271-274
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Basophil responsiveness and clinical picture of acetylsalicylic acid intolerance.  
Korosec P, Mavsar N, Bajrovic N, Silar M, Mrhar A, Kosnik M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 2;155(3):257-262
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Profilins: mimickers of allergy or relevant allergens?  
Santos A, Van Ree RR.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 2;155(3):191-204
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Sensitization with 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy or pea induces IgE with different biological activities which are modified by soy tolerance.  
Kroghsbo S, Bogh KL, Rigby NM, Mills EN, Rogers A, Madsen CB.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 1;155(3):212-224
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The role of Omega-5 Gliadin-specific ige test in diagnosing exercise-induced wheat allergy.  
Gordins P, Lean-Tooke A, Spickett GP.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Nov 26;155(1):93-94

Evaluation of a novel rapid test system for the detection of allergic sensitization to Tmothy grass pollen against established laboratory methods and skin prick test  
R. Lucassen, J. Schulte-Pelkum, C. Csuvarszki, J. Kleine-Tebbe, M. Fooke, and M. Mahler
J Allergy 2010 (2010), Article ID 524084, 4 pages
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In vitro determination of the allergenic potential of egg white in processed meat.  
Hildebrandt S, Schütte L, Stoyanov S, Hammer G, Steinhart H, Paschke A.
J Allergy 2010, Article ID 238573, 5 pages
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An Atypical Cutaneous Reaction to Rivastigmine Transdermal Patch  
T. Grieco, M. Rossi, V. Faina, I. De Marco, P. Pigatto, and S. Calvieri
J Allergy 2011 (2011), Article ID 752098, 2 pages
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Human insulin allergy: four case reports.  
Teixeira RA, Ensina LF, Sabino GL, Kase TL, Giavina-Bianchi P, Motta AA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;42(6):221-223
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Long-term tolerability of etoricoxib in different types of NSAID-intolerant subjects.  
Pagani M, Bonadonna P, Dama A, Senna GE, Vescovi PP, Antico A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;42(6):216-220
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Ragweed pollen in France: origin, diffusion, exposure.  
Thibaudon M, Hamberger C, Guilloux L, Massot R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;42(6):209-215
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Co-recognition of lipid trasfer protein in pollen and foods in northern Italy: clinician's view.  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Dec;42(6):205-208
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agung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Exogen-allergische Alveolitis der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin (DGP) Amiodaron-induzierte pulmonale Toxizität / Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity  

Allergologie 2010;33(12):
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Bedeutung spezifischer Glykostrukturen für die IgG-Bindung an Schimmelpilzantigen von Aspergillus versicolor / Importance of specific glyco-IgG binding to the antigen of mold Aspergillus versicolor  
S. Kespohl, S. Maryska, J. Sennekamp, I. Sander, T. Brüning und M. Raulf-Heimsoth
Allergologie 2010;33(12):
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Ethylenoxid als berufliches Kontaktallergen – ein unterschätztes Problem?  
K. Breuer, M. Worm, C. Skudlik und S.M. John
Allergologie 2010;33(8):
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Leitlinie Therapiemöglichkeiten bei der IgE-vermittelten Nahrungsmittelallergie  
U. Lepp, B. Ballmer-Weber, K. Beyer et al.
Allergologie 2010;33(8):
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Kasuistik Akute allergische Reaktion durch berufliche Exposition gegenüber einem proteolytischen Enzympräparat mit hoher Peptidase- und Proteinase-Aktivität / Acute allergic reaction by occupational exposure to a proteolytic enzyme preparation  
Wüthrich B, Schaffner R.
Allergologie 2010;33(8):
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Der Stellenwert des Panallergens Tropomyosin bei der spezifischen IgE-Messung des Serums eines auf diverse Krustazeen und Intervertebraten sensibilisierten Patienten  
Wahl R, Feil D, Varelmann H, Wegner M, Krause R, Suck R.
Allergologie 2010;33(9):
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Allergologie in der DDR Die wissenschaftliche Tätigkeit und Forschung auf dem Gebiet der Allergologie in der DDR  
D. Stiller, K.-C. Bergmann, W. Leupold, G. Metzner, W.D. Schneider und H.-J. Schubert
Allergologie 2010;33(11):
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Tagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Exogen-allergische Alveolitis der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin (DGP) Vorwort und Einführung  
D. Koschel, J. Schreiber und J. Sennekamp
Allergologie 2010;33(12):
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Seltene und neue Allergene Seltene und neue berufliche Inhalationsallergene / Rare and new occupational inhalation allergens  
Raulf-Heimsoth M, Sander I, Kespohl S, van Kampen V, Brüning T.
Allergologie 2011;34(1):
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Seltene und neue Allergene Materialunverträglichkeiten beim Zahnersatz unter besonderer Berücksichtigung allergischer Reaktionen / Material intolerance for dentures with special reference allergic reactions  
Hopp M, Biffar R.
Allergologie 2011;34(1):
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Vergleichende Untersuchungen zur Bestimmung von spezifischem IgE gegen Inhalations- und Nahrungsmittelallergene mit Einzel- und Sammelallergenträgern / Comparative studies on the determination of specific IgE against inhalant and food allergens  
R. Wahl, D. Feil und R. Krause
Allergologie 2011;34(1):
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Der aktuelle Katalog der Antigene, Krankheitsbilder und Risikoberufe der exogen-allergischen Alveolitis / The current catalog of the antigens, disease patterns and risk of extrinsic allergic alveolitis  
J. Sennekamp
Allergologie 2010;33(12):
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Seltene und neue Allergene Allergien durch Schimmelpilze: Ergebnisse aus epidemiologischen, umweltmedizinischen und interventionellen Studien / Allergies caused by mold: Results from epidemiological, environmental medicine and interventional studies  
O. Herbarth und A. Müller
Allergologie 2011;34(1):
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Seltene und neue Allergene Sind Schimmelpilze im Outdoor-Bereich relevante Inhalationsallergene?  
U. Rabe
Allergologie 2011;34(1):
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Seltene und neue Allergene Vorratsmilben – wichtigste Inhalationsallergene der Landwirtschaft in Deutschland / Storage mites - most important inhalant allergens in agriculture in Germany  
H. Müsken und J.-Th. FranZ
Allergologie 2011;34(1):
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Kiwifruit Act d 11 is the first member of the ripening-related protein family identified as an allergen.  
D'Avino R, Bernardi ML, Wallner M, Palazzo P, Camardella L, Tuppo L, Alessandri C, Breiteneder H, Ferreira F, Ciardiello MA, Mari A.
Allergy 2011 Feb 11;
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A case of severe anaphylaxis to kidney bean: phaseolin (vicilin) and PHA (lectin) identified as putative allergens.  
Rouge P, Culerrier R, Thibau F, Didier A, Barre A.
Allergy 2011 Feb;66(2):301-302

How do peanut and nut-allergic consumers use information on the packaging to avoid allergens?  
Barnett J, Leftwich J, Muncer K, Grimshaw K, Shepherd R, Raats MM, Gowland MH, Lucas JS.
Allergy 2011 Feb 14;
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Occupational rhinitis in bell pepper greenhouse workers: determinants of leaving work and the effects of subsequent allergen avoidance on health-related quality of life.  
Gerth van WR, Patiwael JA, de Jong NW, de GH, Burdorf A.
Allergy 2011 Feb 9;
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Pru p 3, the nonspecific lipid transfer protein from peach, dominates the immune response to its homolog in hazelnut.  
Schulten V, Nagl B, Scala E, Bernardi ML, Mari A, Ciardiello MA, Lauer I, Scheurer S, Briza P, Jurets A, Ferreira F, Jahn-Schmid B, Fischer GF, Bohle B.
Allergy 2011 Feb 26;
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Influence of total and specific IgE, serum tryptase, and age on severity of allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.  
Blum S, Gunzinger A, Muller UR, Helbling A.
Allergy 2011 Feb;66(2):222-228
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Clinical manifestations, co-sensitizations, and immunoblotting profiles of buckwheat-allergic patients.  
Heffler E, Nebiolo F, Asero R, Guida G, Badiu I, Pizzimenti S, Marchese C, Amato S, Mistrello G, Canaletti F, Rolla G.
Allergy 2011 Feb;66(2):264-270
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Clinical monosensitivity to salmonid fish linked to specific IgE-epitopes on salmon and trout beta-parvalbumins.  
Kuehn A, Hutt-Kempf E, Hilger C, Hentges F.
Allergy 2011 Feb;66(2):299-301

Indoor allergen levels in Guangzhou city, southern China.  
Zhang C, Gjesing B, Lai X, Li J, Spangfort MD, Zhong N.
Allergy 2011 Feb;66(2):186-191
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Analysis of allergen specific IgE cut points to cat and dog in the Childhood Allergy Study.  
Linden CC, Misiak RT, Wegienka G, Havstad S, Ownby DR, Johnson CC, Zoratti EM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):153-158
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Olea europaea pollen counts and aeroallergen levels predict clinical symptoms in patients allergic to olive pollen.  
Brito FF, Gimeno PM, Carnes J, Martin R, Fernandez-Caldas E, Lara P, Lopez-Fidalgo J, Guerra F.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):146-152
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Cockroach exposure independent of sensitization status and association with hospitalizations for asthma in inner-city children.  
Rabito FA, Carlson J, Holt EW, Iqbal S, James MA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):103-109

Systemic contact allergy to penicillin after prick and intradermal tests.  
Andre MC, Silva R, Filipe PL, Lopes A, Soares de Almeida LM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):174-175

Association of genetic variants of CD14 with peanut allergy and elevated IgE levels in peanut allergic individuals.  
Dreskin SC, Ayars A, Jin Y, Atkins D, Leo HL, Song B.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):170-172

Generalized urticaria after ingestion of Raphanus sativus.  
Damiani E, Aloia AM, Priore MG, Nardulli S, Ferrannini A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):168

Risk factors for systemic reactions to bee venom in British beekeepers.  
Richter AG, Nightingale P, Huissoon AP, Krishna MT.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Feb;106(2):159-163
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Establishment of ragweed pollen-specific experimental allergic conjunctivitis mouse model: role of il-33 in allergic conjunctivitis. [Japanese]  
Yoshimoto T.
Arerugi 2011 Jan 30;60(1):16-25

Geography of house dust mite allergens.  
Thomas WR.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;28(4):211-224
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Unusual delayed reaction after H1N1 vaccine.  
Descatha A.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;28(4):302-303
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Frozen fruit skin prick test for the diagnosis of fruit allergy.  
Garriga T, Guilarte M, Luengo O, Guillen M, Labrador-Horrillo M, Fadeeva T, Sala A, Cardona V.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;28(4):275-278
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Factors for high-risk asthma in Taiwanese children.  
Cheng CH, Shyur SD, Huang LH, Kao YH, Lei WT, Lo CY, Kuo-Hsi L, Chen CK, Liu LC.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec;28(4):250-255
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CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells do not transfer oral tolerance to peanut allergens in a mouse model of peanut allergy.  
Rezende MM, Hassing I, Bol-Schoenmakers M, Bleumink R, Boon L, van BJ, Pieters R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Feb 21;
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Re: allergy to rodents: an update.  
Folletti I, Siracusa A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Feb;41(2):292

Functional immunoglobulin E cross-reactivity between Pas n 1 of Bahia grass pollen and other group 1 grass pollen allergens.  
Davies JM, Dang TD, Voskamp A, Drew AC, Biondo M, Phung M, Upham JW, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Feb;41(2):281-291
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Occupational lower airway disease in relation to World Trade Center inhalation exposure.  
de la Hoz RE.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb 15;
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Reduction of exposure in the management of occupational asthma.  
Vandenplas O.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb 15;
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Allergen interactions with epithelium.  
Toppila-Salmi S, Renkonen J, Joenvaara S, Mattila P, Renkonen R.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb;11(1):29-32
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Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a new source of IgE-binding lipid transfer protein.  
Pastorello EA, Pravettoni V, Farioli L, Primavesi L, Scibilia J, Piantanida M, Mascheri A, Conti A.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Apr 14;58(7):4513-6.
Abstract

Ingested allergens must be absorbed systemically to induce systemic anaphylaxis.  
Strait RT, Mahler A, Hogan S, Khodoun M, Shibuya A, Finkelman FD.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb 26;
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Wheat allergy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in adults.  
Scibilia J, Pastorello EA, Zisa G, Ottolenghi A, Bindslev-Jensen C, Pravettoni V, Scovena E, Robino A, Ortolani C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2006 Feb;117(2):433-9.
Abstract

Improvement of mustard allergy (Sinapis alba) diagnosis and management by linking clinical features and component-resolved approaches.  
Vereda A, Sirvent S, Villalba M, Rodriguez R, Cuesta-Herranz J, Palomares O.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb 23;

The dominant 55kDa allergen of the subtropical Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum) pollen is a group 13 pollen allergen, Pas n 13.  
Davies JM, Voskamp A, Dang TD, Pettit B, Loo D, et al.
Mol Immunol 2011 [in press]
Abstract

Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy.  
Radauer C, Adhami F, Furtler I, Wagner S, Allwardt D, Scala E, Ebner C, Hafner C, Hemmer W, Mari A, Breiteneder H.
Mol Immunol 2011 Jan;48(4):600-609

Altered IgE epitope presentation: A model for hypoallergenic activity revealed for Bet v 1 trimer.  
Campana R, Vrtala S, Maderegger B, Dall'Antonia Y, Zafred D, Blatt K, Herrmann H, Focke-Tejkl M, Swoboda I, Scheiblhofer S, Gieras A, Neubauer A, Keller W, Valent P, Thalhamer J, Spitzauer S.
Mol Immunol 2011 Jan;48(4):431-441

Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) PNA lectin allergen cross-reacting with other structurally related legume lectins.  
Rouge P, Culerrier R, Granier C, Rance F, Barre A.
Mol Immunol 2010 Aug;47(14):2359-2366

Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.  
Robotham JM, Xia L, Willison LN, Teuber SS, Sathe SK, Roux KH.
Mol Immunol 2010 May;47(9):1830-1838

Diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity in children and adolescents: Discrepancy between physician-based assessment and results of testing.  
Seitz CS, Brocker EB, Trautmann A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 10;
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Real-life epidemiology of food allergy testing in Finnish children.  
Pyrhonen K, Hiltunen L, Nayha S, Laara E, Kaila M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 1;
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Sensitization profiles to purified plant food allergens among pediatric patients with allergy to banana.  
Palacin A, Quirce S, Sanchez-Monge R, Bobolea I, az-Perales A, Martin-Munoz F, Pascual C, Salcedo G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Mar;22(2):186-195
Click to view abstract

Season of birth and childhood food allergy in Australia.  
Mullins RJ, Clark S, Katelaris C, Smith V, Solley G, Camargo Jr CA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 22;
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Allergy to seeds.  
Dalal I.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb;22(1 Pt 2):e150-e154

Age-related sensitization profiles for hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in a birch-endemic region.  
De Knop KJ, Verweij MM, Grimmelikhuijsen M, Philipse E, Hagendorens MM, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Stevens WJ, Ebo DG.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb;22(1 Pt 2):e139-e149
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Allergy to cow's milk proteins: what contribution does hypersensitivity in skin tests have to this diagnosis?  
Costa AJ, Sarinho ES, Motta ME, Gomes PN, de Oliveira de Melo SM, da Silva GA.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb;22(1 Pt 2):e133-e138
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Effect of freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil on house dust mites in soft toys.  
Chang CF, Wu FF, Chen CY, Crane J, Siebers R.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Feb 21;
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Assessing Peanut Consumption in a Population of Mothers and Their Children in the UK: Validation Study of a Food Frequency Questionnaire  
Sofianou-Katsoulis, Aikaterini; Mesher, David; Sasieni, Peter; Du Toit, George; Fox, Adam T.; Lack, Gideon
WAO Journal 2011;4(2):38-44
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