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 Allergy Advisor Digest - February 2013
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Inability to detect significant absorption of immunoreactive soya protein in healthy adults may be relevant to its weak allergenicity.
Read The skin prick test - European standards.
Read Being overweight increases susceptibility to indoor pollutants among urban children with asthma.
Read Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).
Read Prevalence of confirmed immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions among school children.
Read Positive nickel patch tests in infants are of low clinical relevance and rarely reproducible.
Read Peanut allergy in France: first results of the pilot program MIRABEL
Read Specific IgG levels to wheat in wheat tolerant professional cyclists may depend on a homeostatic immune response to a high consumption of wheat.
Read Different fish-eating habits and cytokine production in chronic urticaria with and without sensitization against the fish-parasite Anisakis simplex.
Read Evaluation of commercial skin prick test solutions for selected occupational allergens.
Read Identification of galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose in the gastrointestinal tract of the tick Ixodes ricinus; possible relationship with red meat allergy.
Read EAACI position paper: skin prick testing in the diagnosis of occupational type I allergies.
Read The influence of the time and temperature of heat treatment on the allergenicity of egg white proteins.
Read Anaphylaxis to topically applied sodium fusidate.
Read Persistence of peanut allergen on a table surface.
Read Characterization of aspirin allergies in patients with coronary artery disease.
Read Identification of the major allergens of Charybdis feriatus (red crab) and its cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus (blue crab).

Abstracts shared in February 2013 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Component-resolved diagnosis of wasp (yellow jacket) venom allergy.
Read Hypersensitivity reactions to the Sabin vaccine in children with cow's milk allergy.
Read Fish Allergy: In Review.
Read Anaphylaxis to plant-foods and pollen allergens in patients with lipid transfer protein syndrome.
Read Citrus allergy from pollen to clinical symptoms.
Read Hypersensitivity reactions allergic and non-allergic vaccines
Read Diagnosis of food allergy to hazelnut in children - must be careful!
Read Food allergy to chicken eggs. Current data and perspectives
Read Prevalence of sensitisation to oilseed rape and maize pollens in France.
Read Anaphylactic reactions to olive - caused by oil body fraction lipoproteins.
Read Simultaneous intradermal testing with hymenoptera venoms is safe and more efficient than sequential testing.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Inability to detect significant absorption of immunoreactive soya protein in healthy adults may be relevant to its weak allergenicity.
Soya and peanut are botanically closely related and share cross-reacting antigens, but compared to soya, peanut allergy has a higher prevalence with more severe allergic reactions. Furthermore, the threshold dose for eliciting reactions is higher for soya. A difference in undigested protein absorption between the two foods, might explain this diversity. In the current study the amount of soya protein absorbed after soya bean ingestion in healthy adults was estimated. Ten subjects ingested 100 grams of soya beans (40 grams of soya protein) and blood was drawn before and 1, 3 and 24 hours after administration. Serum was analysed by ELISA and histamine release (HR). In all serum samples the soya protein concentration was below quantification limit (1.6 ng/ml which corresponds to 4.8 mug or 0.12 parts per million absorbed soya protein. No significant absorption of soya protein could be detected. The authors conclude that while they could not totally exlude technical reasons, it may also reflect a true poor absorption in healthy adult volunteers. This could, in turn, be relevant to the apparently weak allergenicity of soy protein by comparison with peanut protein in allergic subjects.

Inability to detect significant absorption of immunoreactive soya protein in healthy adults may be relevant to its weak allergenicity.  
Lund CM, Dirks CG, Pedersen MH, Jensen BM, Poulsen LK.
Clin Transl Allergy 2013 Feb 4;3(1):6

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The skin prick test - European standards.
Skin prick testing is an essential test procedure to confirm sensitization in IgE-mediated allergic disease in subjects with rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria, anapylaxis, atopic eczema and food and drug allergy. This manuscript reviews the available evidence including Medline and Embase searches, abstracts of international allergy meetings and position papers from the world allergy literature. The recommended method of prick testing includes the appropriate use of specific allergen extracts, positive and negative controls, interpretation of the tests after 15 - 20 minutes of application, with a positive result defined as a wheal >/=3 mm diameter. A standard prick test panel for Europe for inhalants is proposed and includes hazel (Corylus avellana), alder (Alnus incana), birch (Betula alba), plane (Platanus vulgaris), cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), grass mix (Poa pratensis, Dactilis glomerata, Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, Festuca pratensis, Helictotrichon pretense), Olive (Olea europaea), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), Alternaria alternata (tenuis), Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Parietaria, cat, dog, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and cockroach (Blatella germanica). Standardization of the skin test procedures and standard panels for different geographic locations are encouraged worldwide to permit better comparisons for diagnostic, clinical and research purposes.

The skin prick test - European standards.  
Heinzerling L, Mari A, Bergmann KC, Bresciani M, Burbach G, Darsow U, Durham S, Fokkens W, Gjomarkaj M, Haahtela T, Bom AT, Wohrl S, Maibach H, Lockey R.
Clin Transl Allergy 2013;3(1):3

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Being overweight increases susceptibility to indoor pollutants among urban children with asthma.
Being overweight or obese can increase susceptibility to indoor PM(2.5) and NO(2) in urban children with asthma. Interventions aimed at weight loss might reduce asthma symptom responses to PM(2.5) and NO(2), and interventions aimed at reducing indoor pollutant levels might be particularly beneficial in overweight children.

Being overweight increases susceptibility to indoor pollutants among urban children with asthma.  
Lu KD, Breysse PN, Diette GB, Curtin-Brosnan J, Aloe C, Williams DL, Peng RD, McCormack MC, Matsui EC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Feb 9;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).
This study aimed to identify the major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab) using the allergenomics approach. Raw and cooked extracts of the crab were prepared from the crab meat. Immunoblotting using sera from 30 patients with crab allergy was utilised. The SDS-PAGE of raw extract revealed approximately 20 protein fractions over a wide molecular weight range, while cooked extract demonstrated fewer protein bands. The raw extract also demonstrated a higher number of IgE reactive bands than the cooked extract. A heat-resistant protein of 36 kDa has been identified as the major allergen in both raw and cooked extracts. In addition, a heat-sensitive protein of 41 kDa was also recognized as a major allergen in raw crab. The 2-DE gel profile of the raw extract demonstrated about >100 distinct proteins spots and immunoblotting of the 2-DE profile demonstrated at least 12 different major IgE reactive spots with molecular masses between 13 to 250 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) values ranging from 4.0 to 7.0. The 36 and 41 kDa proteins were identified as the crab tropomyosin and arginine kinase, respectively by mass spectrometry.

Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).  
Rosmilah M, Shahnaz M, Zailatul H MY, Noormalin A, Normilah I.
Miscellaneous Trop Biomed 2012 Sep;29(3):467-78.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of confirmed immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions among school children.
The aim of this study was to determine the actual frequency of immediate type drug hypersensitivity using diagnostic tests in school children with parent-reported drug allergies. Overall, 11,233 questionnaires were distributed, 10,096 of which were retrieved after completion by parents. The rate of parent-reported immediate type drug hypersensitivity was 7.87% (792 children). However, phone survey revealed a clinical history suggestive of drug allergy in only 117 children (1.16%). After further diagnostic work-up, the true frequency of immediate type drug hypersensitivity was 0.11%.

Prevalence of confirmed immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions among school children.  
Erkocoglu M, Kaya A, Civelek E, Ozcan C, Cakir B, Akan A, Toyran M, Ginis T, Kocabas CN.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Feb 3;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Positive nickel patch tests in infants are of low clinical relevance and rarely reproducible.
Nickel test reactions in infancy are probably of irritant or non-specific nature. Hence, nickel patch tests should only be performed in small children if there is a clinical suspicion of nickel-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

Positive nickel patch tests in infants are of low clinical relevance and rarely reproducible.  
Mortz CG, Kjaer HF, Eller E, Osterballe M, Norberg LA, Host A, Bindslev-Jensen C, Andersen KE.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Feb;24(1):84-87

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut allergy in France: first results of the pilot program MIRABEL
The MIRABEL project deals with peanut allergy in order to make the connection between medical data including the reactive dose and the food consumptions of the patients. The two aims of the pilot study are to characterize the profile of peanut allergy in France and the feasibility of the study. Sixty-one paediatric cases have been collected from June to September 2011. The age ranges from 1 and 11 years. The median of sensitization is 1.5 year and for the first clinical symptoms: 3 years. Atopy is detected in 95.1% of cases. Tree nut allergy is associated in 47.5% of cases, legume allergy in 36.4% of cases. The route is ingestion (84.6%), contact with the skin (28.8%), and inhalation (5.8%). The median of the amount of peanut eliciting reactions is 102 mg. The median of the cumulative reactive dose (CRD) determined by oral challenges is 109 mg. A strict avoidance, needing to read the labels, is prescribed in 32.2% of cases. It is based on a low CRD (median: 24 mg, range: 4.7–109 mg). Half of the patients sent back the questionnaire for their consumptions. The feasibility of the study is confirmed.

Peanut allergy in France: first results of the pilot program MIRABEL: An integrated approach to risk assessment and cost / benefits associated with food allergens [French]  
Guenard-Bilbault L, Moneret-Vautrin D-A, Papadopoulos A, Beaumont P, Menetrey C, Beaudouin E, Gayraud J, Drouet M, Sansas B, Crepet A.
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(8):509-514

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Specific IgG levels to wheat in wheat tolerant professional cyclists may depend on a homeostatic immune response to a high consumption of wheat.
Implication of IgG antibodies to wheat has been alleged in gastrointestinal symptoms. Precise data on the specific IgG levels in healthy subjects are lacking. The objectives of this study was to compare levels of IgG antibodies to wheat protein fractions in healthy non atopic or atopic subjects, and in healthy professional cyclist subjects, taking into account the quantitative consumption of wheat. 24 control subjects and 26 professional cyclist subjects were selected. ELISA was performed to 2 wheat commercial solutions and to 3 wheat protein fractions. No significant difference was observed between non atopic and atopic subjects. Therefore atopic and non atopic healthy adults have a similar level of sIgG to wheat. Increased levels of sIgG are observed correlatively with an excessive consumption, and could contribute to homeostasis of tolerance. Studies searching for a pathogenic role of sIgG in certain pathologies should take into account the quantitative consumption.

Specific IgG levels to wheat in wheat tolerant professional cyclists may depend on a homeostatic immune response to a high consumption of wheat.  
Richard C, Peres G, Guillaume G, Leduc V, ery-Papini S, Battais F, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;44(6):243-250

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Different fish-eating habits and cytokine production in chronic urticaria with and without sensitization against the fish-parasite Anisakis simplex.
Anisakis simplex sensitization has been associated with acute, but also with chronic urticaria. The objective of this study was to characterize chronic urticaria with (CU+) and without sensitization (CU-) against the ubiquitous fish parasite A. simplex in a transversal and longitudinal evaluation. 16 CU+ and 22 CU- patients were included. Patients were randomly put on a fish-free diet for three months. There was no difference in Urticaria activity score (UAS) in both groups. Anisakis induced IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma production was higher in CU+. Con A induced IL-6 and IL-10 production was higher in CU+. CU+ was associated with higher total fish intake, whereas CU- was associated with oily fish intake. The correlation of UAS was positive with oily fish, but negative with total fish intake. There was a better UAS-based prognosis in CU+ without diet. Improvement was associated with higher Con A induced IL-10/IFN-gamma as well as IL-10/IL-6 ratios. Further, previous higher oily fish intake was associated with improvement. This data confirms the different clinical and immunological phenotype of CU+. Our results show a complex relationship between fish-eating habits, cytokine production and prognosis, which could have important consequences in dietary advice in patients with CU. When encountering A. simplex sensitization, patients should not be automatically put on a diet without fish in order to reduce contact with A. simplex products.

Different fish-eating habits and cytokine production in chronic urticaria with and without sensitization against the fish-parasite Anisakis simplex.  
Daschner A, Fernandez-Figares V, Valls A, de FC, Rodero M, Ubeira FM, Cuellar C.
Allergol Int 2013 Feb 25;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evaluation of commercial skin prick test solutions for selected occupational allergens.
The aim of the study was to assess different commercially available SPT solutions for selected occupational allergens. SPT was performed in 116 bakers, 47 farmers and 33 subjects exposed to natural rubber latex (NRL), all with work-related allergic symptoms. The SPT solutions from different manufacturers (n = 3-5) for wheat flour, rye flour, soy, cow hair/dander, storage mites (Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Acarus siro) and NRL were analysed with respect to their protein and antigen contents. SPT was carried out in 16 allergy centres in six European countries using standardized procedures. Specific IgE values were used as the gold standard to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of SPT solutions. The optimal cut-point for each SPT solution was determined by Youden Index. Protein and antigen contents and patterns of the SPT solutions varied remarkably depending on the manufacturer. While SPT solutions for wheat flour and soy reached overall low sensitivities, sensitivities of other tested SPT solutions depended on the manufacturer. As a rule, solutions with higher protein and antigen content showed higher sensitivities and test efficiencies.

Evaluation of commercial skin prick test solutions for selected occupational allergens.  
van Kampen V, de Blay F, Folletti I, Kobierski P, Moscato G, Olivieri M, Quirce S, Sastre J, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Kotschy-Lang N, Müsken H, Mahler V, Schliemann S, Ochmann U, Sültz J, Worm M, et al.
Allergy 2013 Feb 20;

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose in the gastrointestinal tract of the tick Ixodes ricinus; possible relationship with red meat allergy.
Patients with IgE antibodies against the carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-Gal) have reported severe allergic reactions after consumption of red meat. Investigations have revealed associations between IgE to alpha-Gal and tick bites. This study provides the first direct evidence that alpha-Gal is present within ticks thus potentially explaining the relationship between tick exposure and sensitization to alpha-Gal, with development of red meat allergy as a secondary phenomena. Serum from Swedish patients with delayed severe reactions to red meat was included in the study. A dose-dependent inhibition of IgE responses to alpha-Gal by the tick Ixodes ricinus is demonstrated. Furthermore, using cryostat-cut sections of I. ricinus, both a monoclonal and a polyclonal antibody against alpha-Gal stains the gastrointestinal tract of the tick. The same pattern is seen when staining with patient sera IgE positive to alpha-Gal. These results confirm that the alpha-Gal epitope is present in I. ricinus and imply host exposure to alpha-Gal during a tick bite. This provides further evidence that tick bites are associated with IgE responses to alpha-Gal and red meat allergy.

Identification of galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose in the gastrointestinal tract of the tick Ixodes ricinus; possible relationship with red meat allergy.  
Hamsten C, Starkhammar M, Tran TA, Johansson M, Bengtsson U, Ahlen G, Sallberg M, Gronlund H, van HM.
Allergy 2013 Feb 18;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
EAACI position paper: skin prick testing in the diagnosis of occupational type I allergies.
Skin prick testing (SPT) in combination with the clinical history of the patient is one important step in the diagnosis of IgE-mediated occupational allergies. However, skin test performance is related to the quality of allergen extracts. The present consensus document was prepared by an EAACI Task Force consisting of an expert panel of allergologists and occupational physicians from Germany, Italy, Spain, France, Austria, and Poland. All members of the panel were also involved in the data collection within the European multicentre study STADOCA (Standard diagnosis for occupational allergy). The aim of this Task Force was the assessment of the quality of commercially available SPT solutions for selected occupational allergens under standardized procedure conditions in different European centres and institutes of Occupational Medicine. The data evaluation shows a wide variability among SPT solutions and also indicates that the sensitivity of several SPT solutions is low. Therefore, improvement and standardization of SPT solutions for occupational allergens is highly recommended. Clinical practitioners should also not presume that their SPT solutions are fully reliable. The main objective of the document is to issue consensus suggestions for the use of SPT with occupational allergens based on the European multicentre study STADOCA, on existing scientific evidence and the expertise of a panel of allergologists.

EAACI position paper: skin prick testing in the diagnosis of occupational type I allergies.  
van Kampen V, de Blay F, Folletti I, Kobierski P, Moscato G, Olivieri M, Quirce S, Sastre J, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Raulf-Heimsoth M.
Allergy 2013 Feb 15;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The influence of the time and temperature of heat treatment on the allergenicity of egg white proteins.
Raw egg white (EW) and 4 kinds of heated EW (fried EW, boiled EW for 10 minutes, boiled EW for 30 minutes, and baked EW for 20 minutes at 170) were prepared, and protein extraction was carried out. IgE immunoblots were performed with the sera of 7 egg-allergic patients. The results revealed that the duration of heat treatment had more influence on the composition and allergenicity of EW proteins than the temperature. (Shin 2013 ref.28782 0)

The influence of the time and temperature of heat treatment on the allergenicity of egg white proteins.  
Shin M, Han Y, Ahn K.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Mar;5(2):96-101

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to topically applied sodium fusidate.
Fusidic acid is a bacteriostatic antibiotic that is effective primarily on gram-positive bacteria. It is often topically applied to the skin, but is also given systemically as a tablet or injection. Allergic contact dermatitis, or urticaria, has been reported as a side effect of fusidic acid treatment, whereas anaphylaxis to topically administered fusidic acid has not been reported previously. A 16-year-old boy suffered abrasions on his arms during exercise, which were treated with a topical ointment containing sodium fusidate. Within 30 minutes, he developed urticaria and eyelid swelling, followed by a cough and respiratory difficulty. Oral provocation with fusidate was performed. After 125 mg (1/2 tablet) of sodium fusidate was administered, he developed a cough and itching of the throat within 30 minutes, which was followed by chest discomfort and urticaria. FEV1 dropped from 4.09 L at baseline to 3.50 L after challenge.

Anaphylaxis to topically applied sodium fusidate.  
Park MR, Kim DS, Kim J, Ahn K.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Mar;5(2):110-112

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Persistence of peanut allergen on a table surface.
The purpose of this study was to determine the persistence of peanut allergen on a typical table surface over time. 5 mL of peanut butter was evenly smeared on a 12 inch by 12 inch (30.5 by 30.5 cm) square on a nonporous (laminated plastic) table surface. The table was kept in a regular hospital office at room temperature and ambient lighting. No cleaning occurred for 110 days. Samples were taken at regular intervals from different areas each time. At baseline, there was no detectable Ara h 1 allergen. Immediately post application and for 110 days of collecting, detectable Ara h 1 was found each time a sample was taken. There was no obvious allergen degradation over time. Active cleaning of the contaminated surface with a commercial cleaning wipe resulted in no detectable Ara h 1 allergen.

Persistence of peanut allergen on a table surface.  
Watson WT, Woodrow A, Stadnyk AW.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2013 Feb 18;9(1):7

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization of aspirin allergies in patients with coronary artery disease.
Histories of aspirin reactions in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) are uncommon, occurring in only 1.5% of this study population. The 21% of patients with histories compatible with aspirin hypersensitivities can be challenged and, if the results are positive, successfully desensitized. Moreover, almost all patients with gastric intolerance to aspirin can be treated with aspirin and a proton pump inhibitor. However, both approaches, which result in restoration of cardiovascular prophylaxis, were seriously underused in this study population

Characterization of aspirin allergies in patients with coronary artery disease.  
Feng CH, White AA, Stevenson DD.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Feb;110(2):92-95

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of the major allergens of Charybdis feriatus (red crab) and its cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus (blue crab).
Tropomyosin and arginine kinase have been identified as the major allergens in multiple species of crab. Charybdis feriatus (Crucifix crab) is an important commercial crab in Malaysia. This study characterized the major allergens of C. feriatus using a proteomics approach and subsequently to identify the allergens involved in cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus (Blue crab). Raw and boiled extracts of the crabs were prepared from crab meat. Major allergens were identified by the immunoblotting test using sera from 50 patients with crab allergy. At least 20 protein bands between 13 to 250 kDa were detected in the SDS-PAGE gel of raw extract, while boiled extract procuced fewer protein bands. Proteins of 36 kDa and 41 kDa were recognized as the major allergens of the crab. The major allergenic spot sequences of the 36 and 41 kDa proteins were identified as crab tropomyosin and arginine kinase, respectively. All IgE-binding proteins, including both major allergens, were found to be cross-creative with P. pelagicus allergens.

Identification of the major allergens of Charybdis feriatus (red crab) and its cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus (blue crab).  
Misnan R, Murad S, Yadzir ZH, Abdullah N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):285-293

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Component-resolved diagnosis of wasp (yellow jacket) venom allergy.  
Ebo DG, Faber M, Sabato V, Leysen J, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 Feb;43(2):255-261
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to the Sabin vaccine in children with cow's milk allergy.  
Parisi CA, Smaldini PL, Gervasoni ME, Maspero JF, Docena GH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 Feb;43(2):249-254
Click to view abstract

Segmental allergen challenge enhances chitinase activity and levels of CCL18 in mild atopic asthma.  
Gavala ML, Kelly EA, Esnault S, Kukreja S, Evans MD, Bertics PJ, Chupp GL, Jarjour NN.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 Feb;43(2):187-197
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Innate affairs of allergens.  
Thomas WR.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 Feb;43(2):152-163
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Allergen bronchoprovocation and chitinases in allergic asthma.  
Gauvreau GM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2013 Feb;43(2):149-151

Inability to detect significant absorption of immunoreactive soya protein in healthy adults may be relevant to its weak allergenicity.  
Lund CM, Dirks CG, Pedersen MH, Jensen BM, Poulsen LK.
Clin Transl Allergy 2013 Feb 4;3(1):6
Click to view abstract

The skin prick test - European standards.  
Heinzerling L, Mari A, Bergmann KC, Bresciani M, Burbach G, Darsow U, Durham S, Fokkens W, Gjomarkaj M, Haahtela T, Bom AT, Wohrl S, Maibach H, Lockey R.
Clin Transl Allergy 2013;3(1):3
Click to view abstract

Fish Allergy: In Review.  
Sharp MF, Lopata AL.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 Feb 27;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to plant-foods and pollen allergens in patients with lipid transfer protein syndrome.  
Asero R, Pravettoni V.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Feb 18;
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House dust mite models: Will they translate clinically as a superior model of asthma?  
Phillips JE, Peng R, Harris P, Burns L, Renteria L, Lundblad LK, Fine JS, Bauer CM, Stevenson CS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Feb 9;

Early-life cockroach allergen and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposures predict cockroach sensitization among inner-city children.  
Perzanowski MS, Chew GL, Divjan A, Jung KH, Ridder R, Tang D, Diaz D, Goldstein IF, Kinney PL, Rundle AG, Camann DE, Perera FP, Miller RL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Mar;131(3):886-893
Click to view abstract

Occupational Asthma Incidence: Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Asthma Call-Back Survey-United States, 2006-2009.  
Mazurek JM, Knoeller GE, Moorman JE, Storey E.
J Asthma 2013 Feb 22;
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Citrus allergy from pollen to clinical symptoms.  
Iorio RA, Del Duca S, Calamelli E, Pula C, Lodolini M, Scamardella F, Pession A, Ricci G.
Miscellaneous PLoS One 2013;8(1):e53680.
Abstract

Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).  
Rosmilah M, Shahnaz M, Zailatul H MY, Noormalin A, Normilah I.
Miscellaneous Trop Biomed 2012 Sep;29(3):467-78.
Abstract

Bronchial allergen challenges in children - safety and predictors.  
Schulze J, Reinmuller W, Herrmann E, Rosewich M, Rose MA, Zielen S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Feb;24(1):19-27
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Prevalence of confirmed immediate type drug hypersensitivity reactions among school children.  
Erkocoglu M, Kaya A, Civelek E, Ozcan C, Cakir B, Akan A, Toyran M, Ginis T, Kocabas CN.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Feb 3;
Click to view abstract

Positive nickel patch tests in infants are of low clinical relevance and rarely reproducible.  
Mortz CG, Kjaer HF, Eller E, Osterballe M, Norberg LA, Host A, Bindslev-Jensen C, Andersen KE.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Feb;24(1):84-87
Click to view abstract

L’enfant allergique à l’arachide : une approche thérapeutique personnalisée / The child with peanut allergy: a personalized therapeutic approach  
C. Iliescu, C. Sauvage, A. Decoster, C. Preda, M.-C. Castelain
Rev Fr Allergol 2013;53(1):5-10
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Les réactions d’hypersensibilité allergiques et non allergiques aux vaccins / Hypersensitivity reactions allergic and non-allergic vaccines  
C. Ponvert, É. Bloch-Morot
Rev Fr Allergol 2013;53(1):11-19
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Allergie aux teintures capillaires : les aspects cliniques et les tests cutanés / Hair dye allergy: clinical features and skin testing  
M.-B. Cleenewerck
Rev Fr Allergol 2013;53(1):32-37
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Actualités dans les toxidermies immunoallergiques et hypersensibilité médicamenteuse / News in toxidermia immunoallergic and drug hypersensitivity  
A. Barbaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2013;53(1):43-49
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Le syndrome d’envenimation massive à propos d’un cas clinique de piqûres multiples discuté par le groupe « insectes » de la SFA / Massive envenomation syndrome about a clinical case of multiple stings discussed by the group "insects" of the SFA  
I. Sullerot, J. Birnbaum, E. Girodet
Rev Fr Allergol 2013;53(1):50-52
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Diagnostic de l’allergie alimentaire à la noisette chez l’enfant : il faut rester prudent ! / Diagnosis of food allergy to hazelnut in children must be careful!  
B. Evrard, E. Michaud, B. Rondet, A. Tridon, J.-L. Fauquert
Rev Fr Allergol 2013;53(1):53-55
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les réactions d’hypersensibilité aux produits de contraste iodés. Résultats d’une enquête à l’hôpital Ibn Sina de Rabat / Hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media. Results of a survey to Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat  

Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(8):505-508
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Peanut allergy in France: first results of the pilot program MIRABEL: An integrated approach to risk assessment and cost / benefits associated with food allergens [French]  
Guenard-Bilbault L, Moneret-Vautrin D-A, Papadopoulos A, Beaumont P, Menetrey C, Beaudouin E, Gayraud J, Drouet M, Sansas B, Crepet A.
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(8):509-514
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Allergie alimentaire à l’œuf de poule. Données actuelles et perspectives / Food allergy to chicken eggs. Current data and perspectives  
G. Dutau, É. Bidat, F. Lavaud
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(8):515-520
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Analyses d’articles : épidémiologie générale, diagnostic (précoce) et traitement, aliments, médicaments et substances biologiques, et insectes / Analysis of items: epidemiology, diagnosis (early) and treatment, food, drugs and biologicals, and insects  

Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(8):524-552
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Intraoperative anaphylaxis: a case report of allergy to ranitidine.  
Antonicelli L, Stagnozzi G, Massaccesi C, Manfredi M, Valentini M, Campi P.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;44(6):253-255
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IgE to staphylococcal enterotoxins are undetectable in sera from patients with nasal polyposis.  
Schiappoli M, Lombardo C, Bortolami O, Caruso B, Senna G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;44(6):251-252
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Specific IgG levels to wheat in wheat tolerant professional cyclists may depend on a homeostatic immune response to a high consumption of wheat.  
Richard C, Peres G, Guillaume G, Leduc V, ery-Papini S, Battais F, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;44(6):243-250

Prevalence of sensitisation to oilseed rape and maize pollens in France: a multi-center study carried out by the Allergo-Vigilance Network.  
Moneret-Vautrin DA, Peltre G, Gayraud J, Morisset M, Renaudin JM, Martin A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Dec;44(6):225-235
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Different fish-eating habits and cytokine production in chronic urticaria with and without sensitization against the fish-parasite Anisakis simplex.  
Daschner A, Fernandez-Figares V, Valls A, de FC, Rodero M, Ubeira FM, Cuellar C.
Allergol Int 2013 Feb 25;
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Severity assessment of Japanese cedar pollinosis using the practical guideline for the management of allergic rhinitis in Japan and the allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma guideline.  
Gotoh M, Yuta A, Okano M, Ohta N, Matsubara A, Okubo K.
Allergol Int 2013 Feb 25;
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A Case of Streptomycin-Induced Pneumonitis.  
Machida H, Shinohara T, Okano Y, Ogushi F.
Allergol Int 2013 Feb 25;

Anaphylactic reactions caused by oil body fraction lipoproteins.  
Pineda F, Palacios R, Vilella R, Pascal M, Bartra J.
Allergy 2011 May;66(5):701-702

Evaluation of commercial skin prick test solutions for selected occupational allergens.  
van Kampen V, de Blay F, Folletti I, Kobierski P, Moscato G, Olivieri M, Quirce S, Sastre J, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Kotschy-Lang N, Müsken H, Mahler V, Schliemann S, Ochmann U, Sültz J, Worm M, et al.
Allergy 2013 Feb 20;
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Identification of galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose in the gastrointestinal tract of the tick Ixodes ricinus; possible relationship with red meat allergy.  
Hamsten C, Starkhammar M, Tran TA, Johansson M, Bengtsson U, Ahlen G, Sallberg M, Gronlund H, van HM.
Allergy 2013 Feb 18;
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EAACI position paper: skin prick testing in the diagnosis of occupational type I allergies.  
van Kampen V, de Blay F, Folletti I, Kobierski P, Moscato G, Olivieri M, Quirce S, Sastre J, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Raulf-Heimsoth M.
Allergy 2013 Feb 15;
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Simultaneous intradermal testing with hymenoptera venoms is safe and more efficient than sequential testing.  
Strohmeier B, Aberer W, Bokanovic D, Komericki P, Sturm GJ.
Allergy 2013 Feb 14;
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The influence of the time and temperature of heat treatment on the allergenicity of egg white proteins.  
Shin M, Han Y, Ahn K.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Mar;5(2):96-101
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Seasonal specificity of seasonal allergens and validation of the ARIA classification in Korea.  
Chung YJ, Cho IK, Lee KI, Bae SH, Lee JW, Chung PS, Mo JH.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Mar;5(2):75-80
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Anaphylaxis to topically applied sodium fusidate.  
Park MR, Kim DS, Kim J, Ahn K.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Mar;5(2):110-112
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Preparation and characterization of an extract of German cockroach from a Korean source.  
Jeong KY, Choi SY, Lee JH, Lee JS, Yong TS, Hong CS, Park JW.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2013 Mar;5(2):102-105
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Persistence of peanut allergen on a table surface.  
Watson WT, Woodrow A, Stadnyk AW.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2013 Feb 18;9(1):7

Allergen of the month-European beech.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Feb;110(2):A15

Anaphylaxis in the community setting: determining risk factors for admission-the role of asthma.  
Mulla ZD, Simon MR.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Feb;110(2):128

Characterization of aspirin allergies in patients with coronary artery disease.  
Feng CH, White AA, Stevenson DD.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Feb;110(2):92-95
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Mosquito allergy.  
Crisp HC, Johnson KS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Feb;110(2):65-69

Hand contact dermatitis in hairdressers: clinical and causative allergens, experience in Bangkok.  
Tresukosol P, Swasdivanich C.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):306-312
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Comparison of skin test reactivity to histamine on back and forearm in young children.  
Yuenyongviwat A, Koonrangsesomboon D, Sangsupawanich P.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):301-305
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House dust mite and storage mite IgE reactivity in allergic patients from Guangzhou, China.  
Zhang C, Li J, Lai X, Zheng Y, Gjesing B, Spangfort MD, Zhong N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):294-300
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Identification of the major allergens of Charybdis feriatus (red crab) and its cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus (blue crab).  
Misnan R, Murad S, Yadzir ZH, Abdullah N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):285-293
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Prevalence of self-reported food allergy in Hong Kong children and teens--a population survey.  
Ho MH, Lee SL, Wong WH, Ip P, Lau YL.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):275-284
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High prevalence of shellfish and house dust mite allergies in Asia-Pacific: probably not just a coincidence.  
Klaewsongkram J.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Dec;30(4):247-248


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