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 Allergy Advisor Digest - February 2017
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the February 2017 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Baked milk tolerant patient: Is there any special feature?
Read Allergic respiratory disease: different allergens, different symptoms.
Read Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.
Read LEAPing Through the looking glass: secondary analysis of the effect of skin test size and age of introduction on peanut tolerance after early peanut Introduction.
Read A Korean multicenter study on anaphylaxis caused by peanut, tree nuts, and seeds in children and adolescents.
Read Prediction of clinical peanut allergy status among children in Hamilton, Ontario
Read The impact of age on Pru p 3 IgE production in Italy.
Read Hypothesis: may e-cigarette smoking boost the allergic epidemic?
Read Galactose-alpha-1,3-Galactose: Atypical Food Allergen or Model IgE Hypersensitivity?
Read An overview of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug reactions.
Read The Role of Fungi in Atopic Dermatitis.
Read Cutaneous manifestation of food allergy.
Read Bariatric Surgery: A Novel Risk Factor for Food Allergy?
Read A case of anaphylaxis to patent blue
Read Where there's smoke, there's fire: cannabis allergy through passive exposure.
Read Prediction of peanut allergy in adolescence by early childhood storage protein-specific IgE signatures
Read Evolution and predictive value of IgE responses toward a comprehensive panel of house dust mite allergens during the first 2 decades of life.
Read Peanut Allergen Threshold Study (PATS): Novel single-dose oral food challenge study to validate eliciting doses in peanut allergic children.
Read Validation of recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled challenges with milk, egg white, and hazelnut.
Read Key issues in Hymenoptera venom allergy: an update.
Read Phenotypical characterization of peanut allergic children with differences in cross-allergy to tree nuts and other legumes.
Read Negative Act d 8 indicates systemic kiwifruit allergy among kiwifruit-sensitized children.
Read Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies in children.
Read Systemic reaction after performing a food prick-to-prick test
Read Cow's milk allergy: towards an update of DRACMA guidelines.

Snippets posted in the February 2017 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Contact urticaria caused by alcohol: Clinical characteristics and cross-reactions.
Read Development of sesame tolerance and cosensitization of sesame allergy with peanut and tree nut allergy in children.
Read Anaphylaxis caused by honey: a case report.
Read Conjunctival provocation test in diagnosis of peanut allergy in children.
Read New insights into wheat toxicity: Breeding did not seem to contribute to a prevalence of potential celiac disease’s immunostimulatory epitopes.
Read The false alarm hypothesis: Food allergy is associated with high dietary advanced glycation end-products and proglycating dietary sugars that mimic alarmins.
Read Reliable mite-specific IgE testing in nasal secretions by means of allergen microarray.
Read Asthma due to swiss chard: identification of a new allergen.
Read Association of acute toxic encephalopathy with litchi consumption in an outbreak in Muzaffarpur, India
Read Safety and feasibility of heated egg yolk challenge for children with egg allergies.
Read An unusual cause of food-induced anaphylaxis in mothers: prebiotic Galacto-oligosaccharides.
Read Anaphylaxis in a 4-year-old male caused by contact with grasses: a case report.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Baked milk tolerant patient: Is there any special feature?
Determining whether patients with cow's milk allergy (CMA) can tolerate foods produced with baked milk could provide a better quality of life, a better prognosis, and an option for desensitization. The aim of this study was to identify which patients over four years of age with persistent CMA could tolerate baked milk, to compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics of reactive and non-reactive groups and to describe their clinical evolution. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Patients underwent an oral food challenge (OFC) with a muffin (2.8g of cow's milk protein). To exclude cow's milk (CM) tolerance, the patients were subsequently challenged with unheated CM. Thirty patients met all the inclusion criteria. Fourteen patients (46.7%) were considered non-reactive to baked milk and reactive to unheated CM. When the groups that were reactive and non-reactive to baked milk were compared, no statistically significant differences in clinical features were found. The prick test for alpha-lactalbumin (p=0.01) and casein (p=0.004) and the serum specific IgE for casein (p=0.05) presented statistical differences. After one year, none of the patients who were reactive to baked milk were ingesting CM, while 28% of the tolerant patients were consuming fresh CM. Therefore baked milk can be tolerated by patients with CMA, especially those with lower levels of casein and alpha-lactalbumin.

Baked milk tolerant patient: Is there any special feature?  
Barbosa CP, Castro AP, Yonamine GH, Gushken AK, Beck CM, Macedo PR, Dorna MB, Santos CJ, Pastorino AC, Jacob CM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Feb 1;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic respiratory disease: different allergens, different symptoms.
Different types of aeroallergens and specific sensitization profiles are associated with different allergic clinical pictures (rhinitis with/without asthma), different clinical symptoms and severity. This could have implications to predict later clinical course and to select appropriate management approaches.

Allergic respiratory disease: different allergens, different symptoms.  
Valero A, Quirce S, Davila I, Delgado J, Dominguez-Ortega J.
Allergy 2017 Feb 16;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.
Dau c 1 displays several characteristics of sensitizing allergens, namely a major T-cell-activating region, low susceptibility to endolysosomal degradation, and induction of a Bet v 1-independent T-cell response. These cellular insights confirm that the major carrot allergen has a special status among Bet v 1-related food allergens.

Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.  
Zulehner N, Nagl B, Briza P, Roulias A, Ballmer-Weber B, Zlabinger GJ, Ferreira F, Bohle B.
Allergy 2017 Feb;72(2):244-251

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
LEAPing Through the looking glass: secondary analysis of the effect of skin test size and age of introduction on peanut tolerance after early peanut Introduction.
In the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study, early peanut introduction in high-risk 4-11 month olds was associated with a significantly decreased risk of developing peanut allergy. However, the influence. Secondary analysis was conducted on the publically available LEAP dataset, exploring relationships between peanut tolerance, baseline peanut/egg sensitization, eczema severity/duration, age of introduction, gender, and race. Increasing peanut wheal size predicted peanut tolerance only in the avoidance arm. Peanut introduction between 6-11 months of age was associated with the highest rates of peanut tolerance, questioning the 'urgency' of introduction before 6 months.

LEAPing Through the looking glass: secondary analysis of the effect of skin test size and age of introduction on peanut tolerance after early peanut Introduction.  
Greenhawt M, Fleischer D, Chan ES, Venter C, Stukus D, Gupta R, Spergel J.
Allergy 2016 Nov 29;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A Korean multicenter study on anaphylaxis caused by peanut, tree nuts, and seeds in children and adolescents.
Peanut (PN) and tree nuts (TNs) are common causes of anaphylaxis in Western countries, but no information is available in Korea. To feature clinical characteristics of anaphylaxis caused by PN, TNs, and seeds, a retrospective medical record review was performed in 14 university hospitals in Korea (2009-2013). One hundred and twenty-six cases were identified, with the mean age of 4.9 years. PN, walnut (WN), and pine nut accounted for 32.5%, 41.3%, and 7.1%, respectively. The median values of specific IgE (sIgE) to PN, WN, and pine nut were 10.50, 8.74, and 4.61 kUA /l, respectively. Among 50 cases managed in the emergency department, 52.0% were treated with epinephrine, 66.0% with steroid, 94.0% with antihistamines, 36.0% with oxygen, and 48.0% with bronchodilator. In conclusion, WN, PN, and pine nut were the three most common triggers of anaphylaxis in Korean children, and anaphylaxis could occur at remarkably low levels of sIgE.

A multicenter study on anaphylaxis caused by peanut, tree nuts, and seeds in children and adolescents.  
Jeong K, Lee SY, Ahn K, Kim J, Lee HR, Suh DI, Pyun BY, Min TK, Kwon JW, Kim KE, Kim KW, Sohn MH, Kim YH, Song TW, Kwon JH, Jeon YH, Kim HY, Kim JH, Ahn YM, Lee S.
Allergy 2017 Mar;72(3):507-510

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prediction of clinical peanut allergy status among children in Hamilton, Ontario
The gold standard for diagnosing clinical peanut allergy is the oral food challenge, but this method is time-consuming and can cause severe allergic reactions. It would therefore be beneficial to develop a tool for predicting clinical peanut allergy in peanut-sensitized individuals whose peanut allergy status is unknown so as to better determine who requires an oral food challenge for diagnosis. Two separate studies were conducted. Peanut skin prick test wheal size was the best predictor of clinical peanut allergy in both study cohorts. For every 1 mm increase in wheal size, the odds ratio of an individual having clinical peanut allergy was 2.36 in our first cohort and 4.85 in our second cohort. No other variable approached the predictive power of wheal size.

Prediction of clinical peanut allergy status among children in Hamilton, Ontario using chart review data collected during 2012-2015.  
Simms E, Foster G, Arias K, Larche M, Freitag T, Walker T, Goncharova S, Marrin A, Freitag A, Jordana M, Waserman S.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2017;1310

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The impact of age on Pru p 3 IgE production in Italy.
This study aimed to to test the hypothesis about the differences of Pru p 3 sensitization across Italy, mainly concerning the impact of age. The current study was retrospective and multicentre, involving 2 labs in Northern Italy (709 subjects), 1 in Genoa (1,040 subjects), and 1 in Southern Italy (2,188 subjects). All of them referred to labs for IgE testing because of suspected food allergy. Serum IgE to Pru p 3 was assessed in all subjects. The study concludes that Pru p 3 sensitization and production are closely age-dependent phenomena.

The impact of age on Pru p 3 IgE production in Italy.  
Ciprandi G, De AM, Di Martino ML, Barocci F, Comite P.
Asia Pac Allergy 2017 Jan;7(1):42-47

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hypothesis: may e-cigarette smoking boost the allergic epidemic?
The hypothesis that e-cigarette increases S. aureus colonisation and then induces sensitization is important to consider since S. aureus colonisation is needed for the development of an IgE immune response that is often associated with a polyclonal IgE response, allergic symptoms of the upper and lower airways including allergic rhinitis, severe asthma and/or chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis. Although currently there is no confirmation that e-cigarette smoking may induce allergic diseases, there is sufficient background to seriously consider this hypothesis and to test it in appropriate cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiologic studies.

Hypothesis: may e-cigarette smoking boost the allergic epidemic?  
Bousquet J, Bachert C, Alexander LC, Leone FT.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;640

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Galactose-alpha-1,3-Galactose: Atypical Food Allergen or Model IgE Hypersensitivity?
First described as the target of IgE in individuals suffering immediate hypersensitivity reactions to the novel anti-EGF monoclonal antibody cetuximab, it is now clear that alpha-gal sensitization is associated with mammalian meat allergy as well as reactions to other mammalian products. Unlike traditional IgE-mediated food allergies, reactions to alpha-gal often do not manifest until several hours following an exposure, although co-factors can influence the presentation. Multiple pieces of evidence, including recent work with a mouse model, point to the fact that sensitization is mediated by exposure to certain hard ticks and increasingly we are aware of its globally widespread impact. The oligosaccharide alpha-gal represents a novel allergen with several unusual clinical features. It has been recognized now on multiple continents and its clinical presentation can be quite variable. Moreover, efforts to delineate the mechanisms leading to alpha-gal sensitization may have ramifications for our broader understanding of type 2 immunity.

Galactose-alpha-1,3-Galactose: Atypical Food Allergen or Model IgE Hypersensitivity?  
Wilson JM, Schuyler AJ, Schroeder N, Platts-Mills TA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Jan;17(1):8

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
An overview of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug reactions.
Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, are among the most commonly used drugs worldwide. They account for a large number of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The prevalence of NSAID-induced reactions is increasing. Distinguishing between a predicted side effect of a drug and a potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction is essential to manage the affected patient. However, most clinicians find it difficult to diagnose these types of reactions despite published classification schemes. In this overview, we provide an in-depth review of NSAID classification, types of NSAID reactions, diagnostic tactics, and management strategies to provide the reader with a greater understanding of NSAID-induced reactions

An overview of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug reactions.  
Walters KM, Woessner KM.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2016 Nov;36(4):625-641

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The Role of Fungi in Atopic Dermatitis.
There is little doubt that Malassezia spp plays a role in atopic dermatitis because it may interact with the local skin immune responses and barrier function, and sensitization against this skin-colonizing yeast can correlate with disease activity. Also, antifungal therapy shows beneficial effects in some patients. However, the pathogenetic mechanism and mutual interaction between Malassezia spp and atopic dermatitis still remain partly unclear and need further investigation.

The Role of Fungi in Atopic Dermatitis.  
Glatz M, Bosshard P, Schmid-Grendelmeier P.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 Feb;37(1):63-74

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cutaneous manifestation of food allergy.
Hypersensitivity reactions to foods can have diverse and highly variable manifestations. Cutaneous reactions, such as acute urticaria and angioedema, are among the most common manifestations of food allergy. However, cutaneous manifestations of food allergy encompass more than just IgE-mediated processes and include atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and even dermatitis herpetiformis. These cutaneous manifestations provide an opportunity to better understand the diversity of adverse immunologic responses to food and the interconnected pathways that produce them

Cutaneous manifestation of food allergy.  
Tam JS.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 Feb;37(1):217-231

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Bariatric Surgery: A Novel Risk Factor for Food Allergy?
In this case report, we describe a birch pollen-allergic patient in whom a Fobi pouch gastric bypass was associated with the transition from a mild, localized, birch pollen-related oral allergy syndrome to more severe, generalized allergic reactions to peach.

Bariatric Surgery: A Novel Risk Factor for Food Allergy?  
Blockhuys M, Faber MA, Sabato V, Hubens G, Ebo DG.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb 23;172(1):64-66

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of anaphylaxis to patent blue
In medicine, patent blue violet (PBV) is utilized for staining lymphatic vessels in sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery. Moreover, PBV (also called E131 ) is used as food additive. We report on a 51-year-old non-atopic female with early breast cancer, who was scheduled for SLN excision and experienced an intra-operative anaphylactic reaction. In diagnostics the skin prick test (SPT) was positive to PBV. Hypersensitivity reactions to PBV can arise after the first exposure in surgery as sensitization may arise from either PBV (E131) in foods (i.e. in sweets or blue curacao) or from other structurally closely related triarylmethane dyes in objects of everyday life like textiles, detergents, paints, cold remedies and cosmetics. This article supports the necessity of an increased awareness of the possibility of anaphylactic reactions to PBV during SLN surgery, even if the patient never had contact to PBV before.

A case of anaphylaxis to patent blue in a patient with sentinel lymph node excision.  
Aurich S, Seitz AT, Tomm J, Simon JC, Treudler R.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;15(6):547-550

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Where there's smoke, there's fire: cannabis allergy through passive exposure.
We observed a 5-year-old boy who suffered from cannabis-related allergies in whom sensitization probably occurred via passive exposure to airborne cannabis allergen. Here, we report 2 additional cases in whom cannabis sensitization and allergy seem to result from passive exposure to cannabis smoke and/or indirect cutaneous transmission. Furthermore, both patients suffered from an oral allergy syndrome (OAS) and more generalized allergic reactions on ingestion and/or consumption of various plant-derived foods. Importantly, patient 2 reported that cannabis-related symptoms clearly preceded the onset of allergic symptoms to plant foods. Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed with an ns-LTP-rich extract from Can s. Total IgE and specific IgE (sIgE) to industrial hemp, rCan s 3 (C. sativa), rPru p 3 (Prunus persica), and bromelain (biomarker for sensitization to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants [CCD]) were measured. Recombinant Can s 3 was cloned. ns-LTP sensitization was confirmed.

Where there's smoke, there's fire: cannabis allergy through passive exposure.  
Decuyper II, Faber MA, Sabato V, Bridts CH, Hagendorens MM, Rihs HP, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 22;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prediction of peanut allergy in adolescence by early childhood storage protein-specific IgE signatures
IgE signatures to peanut allergen measured in early childhood allow predicting the likelihood of peanut allergy in adolescence. Peanut symptoms and Ara h 2 IgE >2.0 ISU-E at 4 years predict peanut allergy in adolescence

Prediction of peanut allergy in adolescence by early childhood storage protein-specific IgE signatures: the BAMSE population-based birth cohort.  
Asarnoj A, Hamsten C, Lupinek C, Melen E, Andersson N, Anto JM, Bousquet J, Valenta R, van HM, Wickman M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evolution and predictive value of IgE responses toward a comprehensive panel of house dust mite allergens during the first 2 decades of life.
The evolution of the IgE response to the numerous allergen molecules of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus is still unknown. We sought to characterize the evolutionary patterns of the IgE response to 12 molecules of D pteronyssinus from birth to adulthood and to investigate their determinants and clinical relevance. We investigated the clinical data and sera of 722 participants in the German Multicenter Allergy Study, a birth cohort started in 1990. One hundred ninety-one (26.5%) of 722 participants ever had IgE to D pteronyssinus extract (>/=0.35 kUA/L). At age 20 years, their IgE recognized most frequently Der p 2, Der p 1, and Der p 23 (group A molecules; prevalence, >40%), followed by Der p 5, Der p 7, Der p 4, and Der p 21 (group B molecules; prevalence, 15% to 30%) and Der p 11, Der p 18, clone 16, Der p 14, and Der p 15 (group C molecules; prevalence, <10%). IgE sensitization started almost invariably with group A molecules and expanded sequentially first to group B and finally to group C molecules. Early IgE sensitization onset, parental hay fever, and higher exposure to mites were associated with a broader polymolecular IgE sensitization pattern. Participants reaching the broadest IgE sensitization stage (ie, ABC) had significantly higher risk of mite-related AR and asthma than unsensitized participants. IgE to Der p 1 or Der p 23 at age 5 years or less predicted asthma at school age. Parental hay fever and early exposure to D pteronyssinus allergens promote IgE polysensitization to several D pteronyssinus molecules, which in turn predicts current mite-related AR and current/future asthma. These results might inspire predictive algorithms and prevention strategies against the progression of IgE sensitization to mites toward AR and asthma

Evolution and predictive value of IgE responses toward a comprehensive panel of house dust mite allergens during the first 2 decades of life.  
Posa D, Perna S, Resch Y, Lupinek C, Panetta V, Hofmaier S, Rohrbach A, Hatzler L, Grabenhenrich L, Tsilochristou O, Chen KW, Bauer CP, Hoffman U, Forster J, Zepp F, Schuster A, Wahn U, Kei.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):541-549

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut Allergen Threshold Study (PATS): Novel single-dose oral food challenge study to validate eliciting doses in peanut allergic children.
Eliciting doses (ED) of allergenic foods can be defined by the distribution of threshold doses for individuals within a specific population. ED05 is the dose that elicits a reaction in 5% of allergic subjects. The predicted ED05 for peanut (PN) is 1.5 mg of peanut protein (6 mg whole peanut). This study sought to validate the predicted peanut ED05 (1.5 mg) with a novel single dose challenge. Consecutive eligible peanut allergic children in 3 centres were prospectively invited to participate, irrespective of previous reaction severity. Predetermined criteria for objective reactions were used to identify ED05 single dose reactors. 518 children (mean age 6.8 years) were eligible. 378 children (206 male) completed the study. Almost half the group reported ignoring precautionary allergen labelling. 245 (65%) experienced no reaction to the single dose of peanut. 67 (18%) reported a subjective reaction without objective findings. 58 (15%) experienced signs of a mild and transient nature that did not meet the pre-determined criteria. Only 8 subjects (2.1%, 95% CI 0.6%-3.4%) met the pre-determined criteria for an objective and likely related event. No child experienced more than a mild reaction, 4 of the 8 received oral antihistamines only and none received epinephrine. Food allergy related quality of life improved from baseline to 1 month post challenge regardless of outcome. Peanut SPT, peanut and Ara h 2 spIgE levels were not associated with objective reactivity to PN ED05.

Peanut Allergen Threshold Study (PATS): Novel single-dose oral food challenge study to validate eliciting doses in peanut allergic children.  
Hourihane JO, Allen KJ, Shreffler WG, Dunngalvin G, Nordlee JA, Zurzolo GA, DunnGalvin A, Gurrin LC, Baumert JL, Taylor SL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 24;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Validation of recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled challenges with milk, egg white, and hazelnut.
We developed 3 recipes for use in DBPCFC with milk, egg white, and hazelnut and used the triangle test to validate them in a 2-phase study in which 197 volunteers participated. We used sensory testing to validate milk, egg white, and hazelnut recipes for use in DBPCFC. The validated recipes are easy to prepare in a clinical setting, provide the equivalent of 1 serving dose, and were liked by most participants.

Validation of recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled challenges with milk, egg white, and hazelnut.  
Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Alonso Diaz de Durana MD, Garcia EY, Melendez BA, Rodriguez-Alvarez M, de la Hoz CB, Del PN, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):40-45

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Key issues in Hymenoptera venom allergy: an update.
In this review, the Hymenoptera Allergy Committee of the SEAIC analyzes the most recent scientific literature addressing problems related to the diagnosis of hymenoptera allergy and to management of venom immunotherapy. Molecular diagnosis and molecular risk profiles are the key areas addressed. The appearance of new species of hymenoptera that are potentially allergenic in Spain and the associated diagnostic and therapeutic problems are also described. Finally, we analyze the issue of mast cell activation syndrome closely related to hymenoptera allergy, which has become a new diagnostic challenge for allergists given its high prevalence in patients with venom anaphylaxis

Key issues in Hymenoptera venom allergy: an update.  
Alfaya AT, Soriano G, Soto MT, Vega CA, Vega Gutierrez JM, Alonso LA, Antolin AD, Carballada Gonzalez FJ, Dominguez NC, Gutierrez FD, Marques AL, Martinez AA, Martinez S, Moreno AA, Puen.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):19-31

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Phenotypical characterization of peanut allergic children with differences in cross-allergy to tree nuts and other legumes.
The three phenotypes highlighted by the present study could be useful to identify children with high risk of cross-allergic reaction to TNs and legumes early after PA diagnosis.

Phenotypical characterization of peanut allergic children with differences in cross-allergy to tree nuts and other legumes.  
Cousin M, Verdun S, Seynave M, Vilain AC, Lansiaux A, Decoster A, Sauvage C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Jan 31;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Negative Act d 8 indicates systemic kiwifruit allergy among kiwifruit-sensitized children.
Commercially available in vitro tests for specific IgE antibodies to crude kiwifruit extracts cannot predict severe kiwifruit allergy. Although the prick by prick test has high sensitivity, it has low specificity and cannot predict severe symptoms. This study concludes that negative Act d 8 indicates systemic kiwifruit allergy among kiwifruit-sensitized children.

Negative Act d 8 indicates systemic kiwifruit allergy among kiwifruit-sensitized children.  
Asaumi T, Yanagida N, Sato S, Takahashi K, Ebisawa M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Jan 31;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies in children.
Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergic disorders (non-IgE-GI-FA) including food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES), food protein-induced enteropathy (FPE), and food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP) are relatively uncommon in infants and young children, but are likely under-diagnosed. Non-IgE-GI-FA have a favorable prognosis, with majority resolving by age 3-5 years. Diagnosis relies on the recognition of symptoms pattern in FPIAP and FPIES and biopsy in FPE. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the pathomechanism, which will lead eventually to the development of diagnostic tests and treatments. Limited evidence supports the role of food allergens in subsets of constipation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and colic. The immunologic pathomechanism is not fully understood and empiric prolonged avoidance of food allergens should be limited to minimize nutrient deficiency and feeding disorders/food aversions in infants.

Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies in children.  
Caubet JC, Szajewska H, Shamir R, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb;28(1):6-17

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Systemic reaction after performing a food prick-to-prick test
A 47-year old woman with a history of persistent allergic rhinitis, sensitized to the pollen of grasses, olive and salsola; was assessed for anaphylaxis triggered by the consumption of avocado, cantaloupe, carrots and watermelon. Minutes after skin prick test with standardized extract and skin prick with fresh foods, she developed dyspnea, pruritus, erythema, dizziness and sibilance. Although skin tests are safe, the risk of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions should not be ruled out, especially in susceptible patients.

Systemic reaction after performing a food prick-to-prick test. A case report. [Spanish]  
Hernandez-Moreno KE, Diez LS.
Rev Alerg Mex 2017 Jan;64(1):126-129

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cow's milk allergy: towards an update of DRACMA guidelines.
In 2010, the diagnosis and treatment of IgE-mediated CMA were systematized in a GRADE guideline. After 6 years, the state of the knowledge in diagnosis and treatment of CMA has largely evolved. We summarize here the main advances, and exemplify indicating some specific points: studies aimed at better knowledge of the effects of breastfeeding and the production of new special formulae intended for the treatment of CMA. The literature was searched. The authors drew on their collective clinical experience to restrict retrieved studies to those of relevance to a pediatric allergy practice.

Conclusions: Evidence-based diagnostic criteria should be identified for non-IgE-mediated CMA. Debate is ongoing about the best substitute for infants with CMA. In particular, Hydrolyzed Rice Formulae have been widely assessed in the last six years. In the substitute choice, clinicians should be aware of recent studies that can modify the interpretation of the current recommendations. New systematic reviews and metanalyses are needed to confirm or modify the current DRACMA recommendations

Cow's milk allergy: towards an update of DRACMA guidelines.  
Fiocchi A, Dahda L, Dupont C, Campoy C, Fierro V, Nieto A.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;9(1):35

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Baked milk tolerant patient: Is there any special feature?  
Barbosa CP, Castro AP, Yonamine GH, Gushken AK, Beck CM, Macedo PR, Dorna MB, Santos CJ, Pastorino AC, Jacob CM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Feb 1;
Click to view abstract

Diagnostic values for egg white specific IgE levels with the skin prick test in Turkish children with egg white allergy.  
Nacaroglu HT, Erdem SB, Karaman S, Dogan D, CS UK, Kanik T, Can D.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Feb 22;
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The impact of age on serum allergen-specific IgE to inhaled molecular components.  
Tosca MA, Silvestri M, Olcese R, Pistorio A, Rossi GA, Ciprandi G.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2017 Jan 30;
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Japanese guidelines for occupational allergic diseases 2017.  
Dobashi K, Akiyama K, Usami A, Yokozeki H, Ikezawa Z, Tsurikisawa N, Nakamura Y, Sato K, Okumura J, Takayama K.
Allergol Int 2017 Feb 14;
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Allergic respiratory disease: different allergens, different symptoms.  
Valero A, Quirce S, Davila I, Delgado J, Dominguez-Ortega J.
Allergy 2017 Feb 16;
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Allergenome characterization of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.  
Cantillo JF, Puerta L, Puchalska P, Lafosse-Marin S, Subiza JL, Fernandez-Caldas E.
Allergy 2017 Feb 24;
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Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.  
Zulehner N, Nagl B, Briza P, Roulias A, Ballmer-Weber B, Zlabinger GJ, Ferreira F, Bohle B.
Allergy 2017 Feb;72(2):244-251
Click to view abstract

Skin prick tests and specific IgE in 10 year old children: agreement and association with allergic diseases.  
Chauveau A, Dalphin ML, Mauny F, Kaulek V, Schmausser-Hechfellner E, Renz H, Riedler J, Pekkanen J, Karvonen AM, Lauener R, Roduit C, Vuitton DA, von ME, Dalphin JC.
Allergy 2017 Feb 24;
Click to view abstract

LEAPing Through the looking glass: secondary analysis of the effect of skin test size and age of introduction on peanut tolerance after early peanut Introduction.  
Greenhawt M, Fleischer D, Chan ES, Venter C, Stukus D, Gupta R, Spergel J.
Allergy 2016 Nov 29;
Click to view abstract

A multicenter study on anaphylaxis caused by peanut, tree nuts, and seeds in children and adolescents.  
Jeong K, Lee SY, Ahn K, Kim J, Lee HR, Suh DI, Pyun BY, Min TK, Kwon JW, Kim KE, Kim KW, Sohn MH, Kim YH, Song TW, Kwon JH, Jeon YH, Kim HY, Kim JH, Ahn YM, Lee S.
Allergy 2017 Mar;72(3):507-510
Click to view abstract

Prediction of clinical peanut allergy status among children in Hamilton, Ontario using chart review data collected during 2012-2015.  
Simms E, Foster G, Arias K, Larche M, Freitag T, Walker T, Goncharova S, Marrin A, Freitag A, Jordana M, Waserman S.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2017;1310
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of allergen sensitization in 1000 adults in Saskatchewan.  
Lok SD, Davis BE, Cockcroft DW.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2017;139
Click to view abstract

Primum non nocere-first do no harm. And then feed peanut.  
Hildebrand KJ, Abrams EM, Vander Leek TK, Upton JE, Mack DP, Kirste L, McCusker C, Kapur S.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2017;137
Click to view abstract

Specific nasal provocation test with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, monitored by acoustic rhinometry, in children with rhinitis.  
Matsumoto FY, Goncalves TR, Sole D, Wandalsen GF.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2017 Jan 1;31(1):7-11
Click to view abstract

Guidelines for the prevention of peanut allergy in the United States: From development to prospective outcomes.  
Assa'ad A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Feb;118(2):125-126

IgE-mediated anaphylactic shock caused by pumpkin seed in an adult.  
Doll R, Johnson J, Peppers BP, Tcheurekdjian H, Hostoffer R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2017 Jan 23;

Contact urticaria caused by alcohol: Clinical characteristics and cross-reactions.  
Chularojanamontri L, Tuchinda P, Pongparit K, Pinkaew S, Nuchkull P, Kulthanan K.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):721-723

Raltegravir-induced drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome in a child.  
Scaggs FA, Aziz MS, Palmisano EL, Mahdavinia M, Raikar SS, Logan LK.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):719-721

Development of sesame tolerance and cosensitization of sesame allergy with peanut and tree nut allergy in children.  
Tuano KT, Dillard KH, Guffey D, Davis CM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;117(6):708-710

Hypersensitivity to ticagrelor and low response to clopidogrel: a case report.  
Dai J, Lyu S, Ge C.
Asia Pac Allergy 2017 Jan;7(1):51-53
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis caused by honey: a case report.  
Aguiar R, Duarte FC, Mendes A, Bartolome B, Barbosa MP.
Asia Pac Allergy 2017 Jan;7(1):48-50
Click to view abstract

The impact of age on Pru p 3 IgE production in Italy.  
Ciprandi G, De AM, Di Martino ML, Barocci F, Comite P.
Asia Pac Allergy 2017 Jan;7(1):42-47
Click to view abstract

Involvement of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants-specific IgE in pollen allergy testing.  
Yokoi H, Yoshitake H, Matsumoto Y, Kawada M, Takato Y, Shinagawa K, Sakurai H, Saito K.
Asia Pac Allergy 2017 Jan;7(1):29-36
Click to view abstract

Conjunctival provocation test in diagnosis of peanut allergy in children.  
Lindvik H, Lodrup Carlsen KC, Mowinckel P, Navaratnam J, Borres MP, Carlsen KH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2017 Feb 4;
Click to view abstract

Hypothesis: may e-cigarette smoking boost the allergic epidemic?  
Bousquet J, Bachert C, Alexander LC, Leone FT.
Clin Transl Allergy 2016;640

Is fruit and vegetable intake associated with asthma or chronic rhino-sinusitis in European adults? Results from the Global Allergy and Asthma Network of Excellence (GA2LEN) Survey.  
Garcia-Larsen V, Arthur R, Potts JF, Howarth PH, Ahlstrom M, Haahtela T, Loureiro C, Bom AT, Brozek G, Makowska J, Kowalski ML, Thilsing T, Keil T, Matricardi PM, Toren K, van ZT, Bachert .
Clin Transl Allergy 2017;73
Click to view abstract

Fungal Exposure and Asthma: IgE and Non-IgE-Mediated Mechanisms.  
Zhang Z, Reponen T, Hershey GK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2016 Nov;16(12):86
Click to view abstract

Galactose-alpha-1,3-Galactose: Atypical Food Allergen or Model IgE Hypersensitivity?  
Wilson JM, Schuyler AJ, Schroeder N, Platts-Mills TA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Jan;17(1):8
Click to view abstract

The Skin as a Route of Allergen Exposure: Part II. Allergens and Role of the Microbiome and Environmental Exposures.  
Knaysi G, Smith AR, Wilson JM, Wisniewski JA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2017 Jan;17(1):7
Click to view abstract

Mite allergens.  
Caraballo L.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 6;

New insights into wheat toxicity: Breeding did not seem to contribute to a prevalence of potential celiac disease’s immunostimulatory epitopes.  
Miguel Ribeiroa, Marta Rodriguez-Quijano, Fernando M. Nunes, Jose Maria Carrillo, Gérard Branlard, Gilberto Igrejas.
Food Chemistry 2016;213:8-18.
Abstract

An overview of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug reactions.  
Walters KM, Woessner KM.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2016 Nov;36(4):625-641
Click to view abstract

The Role of Fungi in Atopic Dermatitis.  
Glatz M, Bosshard P, Schmid-Grendelmeier P.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 Feb;37(1):63-74
Click to view abstract

Cutaneous manifestation of food allergy.  
Tam JS.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 Feb;37(1):217-231
Click to view abstract

Cutaneous Manifestation of Drug Allergy and Hypersensitivity.  
Zalewska-Janowska A, Spiewak R, Kowalski ML.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2017 Feb;37(1):165-181
Click to view abstract

Inhalant Allergens in Portugal.  
Gomes CC.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb 23;172(2):67-88
Click to view abstract

Bariatric Surgery: A Novel Risk Factor for Food Allergy?  
Blockhuys M, Faber MA, Sabato V, Hubens G, Ebo DG.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb 23;172(1):64-66
Click to view abstract

A case of anaphylaxis to patent blue in a patient with sentinel lymph node excision.  
Aurich S, Seitz AT, Tomm J, Simon JC, Treudler R.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2016 Dec;15(6):547-550
Click to view abstract

Characterization of Vancomycin Reactions and Linezolid Utilization in the Pediatric Population.  
Lin SK, Mulieri KM, Ishmael FT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Feb 8;
Click to view abstract

Food allergy-related risk-taking and management behaviors among adolescents and young adults.  
Warren CM, Dyer AA, Otto AK, Smith BM, Kauke K, Dinakar C, Gupta RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 26;
Click to view abstract

The prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in pediatric patients with IgE-Mediated Food Allergy.  
Hill DA, Dudley JW, Spergel JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 30;
Click to view abstract

Chlorhexidine-induced IgE-mediated allergy in a 6-year-old child.  
Cogne Y, Mouton-Faivre C, Cavasino T, Teychene AM, de PL, Dewachter P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 29;

Where there's smoke, there's fire: cannabis allergy through passive exposure.  
Decuyper II, Faber MA, Sabato V, Bridts CH, Hagendorens MM, Rihs HP, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2016 Dec 22;

A delayed reaction to the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadobutrol.  
Nagai H, Nishigori C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2017 Jan 30;

No evidence of intrauterine sensitization against inhalant allergens.  
Wolsk HM, Andersen MR, Bisgaard H, Bonnelykke K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 28;

Maternal house dust mite exposure during pregnancy enhances severity of HDM-induced asthma in murine offspring.  
Richgels PK, Yamani A, Chougnet CA, Lewkowich IP.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 9;
Click to view abstract

Prediction of peanut allergy in adolescence by early childhood storage protein-specific IgE signatures: the BAMSE population-based birth cohort.  
Asarnoj A, Hamsten C, Lupinek C, Melen E, Andersson N, Anto JM, Bousquet J, Valenta R, van HM, Wickman M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 9;
Click to view abstract

Epicutaneous sensitization to house dust mite allergen requires IRF4-dependent dermal dendritic cells.  
Deckers J, Sichien D, Plantinga M, Van MJ, Vanheerswynghels M, Hoste E, Malissen B, Dombrowicz D, Guilliams M, De BK, Lambrecht BN, Hammad H.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 9;
Click to view abstract

Dose-time-response relationship in peanut allergy using a human model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis.  
Mose AP, Mortz CG, Eller E, Sprogoe U, Barington T, Bindslev-Jensen C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 8;

International Consensus Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome: Workgroup Report of the Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.  
Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Chehade M, Groetch M, Spergel JM, Wood RA, Allen K, Atkins D, Bahna S, Barad A, Berin C, Brown WT, Burks AW, Caubet JC, Cianferoni A, Conte M, Davis C, Fiocchi A, Grimshaw .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 3;

Early or delayed introduction of food? Misunderstanding is in the air.  
Di MS, Basevi V, Panza C, Conti NS, Cattaneo A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan 27;

Calpain-14 and its association with eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Litosh VA, Rochman M, Rymer JK, Porollo A, Kottyan LC, Rothenberg ME.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Jan 25;
Click to view abstract

Extensively hydrolyzed casein formula containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG reduces the occurrence of other allergic manifestations in children with cow's milk allergy: 3-year randomized controlled trial.  
Berni CR, Di CM, Bedogni G, Amoroso A, Cosenza L, Di SC, Granata V, Nocerino R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2016 Dec 30;
Click to view abstract

Evolution and predictive value of IgE responses toward a comprehensive panel of house dust mite allergens during the first 2 decades of life.  
Posa D, Perna S, Resch Y, Lupinek C, Panetta V, Hofmaier S, Rohrbach A, Hatzler L, Grabenhenrich L, Tsilochristou O, Chen KW, Bauer CP, Hoffman U, Forster J, Zepp F, Schuster A, Wahn U, Kei.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):541-549

Humoral and cellular responses to casein in patients with food protein-induced enterocolitis to cow's milk.  
Caubet JC, Bencharitiwong R, Ross A, Sampson HA, Berin MC, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):572-583

The false alarm hypothesis: Food allergy is associated with high dietary advanced glycation end-products and proglycating dietary sugars that mimic alarmins.  
Smith PK, Masilamani M, Li XM, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):429-437

IgE-reactivity profiles to nonspecific lipid transfer proteins in a northwestern European country.  
Faber MA, Van Gasse AL, Decuyper II, Uyttebroek A, Sabato V, Hagendorens MM, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Fernandez-Rivas M, Pascal M, az-Perales A, Ebo DG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):679-682

Half-life of IgE in serum and skin: Consequences for anti-IgE therapy in patients with allergic disease.  
Lawrence MG, Woodfolk JA, Schuyler AJ, Stillman LC, Chapman MD, Platts-Mills TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):422-428

Specific IgE and IgG measured by the MeDALL allergen-chip depend on allergen and route of exposure: The EGEA study.  
Siroux V, Lupinek C, Resch Y, Curin M, Just J, Keil T, Kiss R, Lodrup CK, Melen E, Nadif R, Pin I, Skrindo I, Vrtala S, Wickman M, Anto JM, Valenta R, Bousquet J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb;139(2):643-654

Peanut Allergen Threshold Study (PATS): Novel single-dose oral food challenge study to validate eliciting doses in peanut allergic children.  
Hourihane JO, Allen KJ, Shreffler WG, Dunngalvin G, Nordlee JA, Zurzolo GA, DunnGalvin A, Gurrin LC, Baumert JL, Taylor SL.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 24;
Click to view abstract

Clinical Validation of a house dust mite environmental challenge chamber model.  
Zieglmayer P, Lemell P, Chen KW, Schmutz R, Zieglmayer R, Pfaar O, Horak F, Vrtala S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 23;
Click to view abstract

Reliable mite-specific IgE testing in nasal secretions by means of allergen microarray.  
Berings M, Arasi S, De RN, Perna S, Resch Y, Lupinek C, Chen KW, Vrtala S, Pajno GB, Bachert C, Lambrecht BN, Dullaers M, Valenta R, Matricardi PM, Gevaert P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 18;

The association between paracetamol and asthma is still under debate.  
Lourido-Cebreiro T, Salgado FJ, Valdes L, Gonzalez-Barcala FJ.
J Asthma 2017 Jan 2;54(1):32-38
Click to view abstract

Clinical profile of patients with severe anaphylaxis hospitalized in the spanish hospital system: 1997-2011.  
Nieto-Nieto A, Tejedor-Alonso MA, Farias-Aquino E, Moro-Moro M, Rosado-Ingelmo A, Gonzalez-Moreno A, Gil de MA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017 Feb 2;0

Kounis Syndrome After Intake of Levofloxacin: Increasing Incidence of Hypersensitivity to Fluoroquinolones.  
Kounis NG, Koniari I, Soufras G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):76-77

Asthma due to swiss chard: identification of a new allergen.  
Jara-Gutierrez P, Zafra MP, Sanz V, Del P, Fernandez-Nieto M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):67-68

The effects of prolonged infusion on reducing oxaliplatin hypersensitivity reactions.  
Zhang X, Zhao Y, Zheng Y, Dong Y.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):65-66

Psoriatic Erythroderma Caused by Terbinafine: A Possible Pathogenetic Role for IL-23.  
Oda T, Sawada Y, Yamaguchi T, Ohmori S, Omoto D, Haruyama S, Yoshioka M, Okada E, Nakamura M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):63-64

Validation of recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled challenges with milk, egg white, and hazelnut.  
Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Alonso Diaz de Durana MD, Garcia EY, Melendez BA, Rodriguez-Alvarez M, de la Hoz CB, Del PN, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):40-45
Click to view abstract

Immediate Reactions to More Than 1 NSAID Must Not Be Considered Cross-Hypersensitivity Unless Tolerance to ASA Is Verified.  
Perez-Alzate D, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Perez-Sanchez N, Andreu I, Garcia-Moral A, Agundez JA, Bartra J, Dona I, Torres MJ, Blanca M, Blanca-Lopez N, Canto G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):32-39
Click to view abstract

Key issues in Hymenoptera venom allergy: an update.  
Alfaya AT, Soriano G, Soto MT, Vega CA, Vega Gutierrez JM, Alonso LA, Antolin AD, Carballada Gonzalez FJ, Dominguez NC, Gutierrez FD, Marques AL, Martinez AA, Martinez S, Moreno AA, Puen.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):19-31
Click to view abstract

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome.  
Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Jarocka-Cyrta E, Moschione CA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2017;27(1):1-18
Click to view abstract

Association of acute toxic encephalopathy with litchi consumption in an outbreak in Muzaffarpur, India, 2014: a case-control study.  
Shrivastava A, Kumar A, Thomas JD, Laserson KF, Bhushan G, Carter MD, Chhabra M, Mittal V, Khare S, Sejvar JJ, Dwivedi M, Isenberg SL7, Johnson R, et al.
Miscellaneous 592 2017 Jan 30. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Serum biomarkers for allergy in children.  
Knipping K, Knippels LM, Dupont C, Garssen J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Mar;28(2):114-123
Click to view abstract

Early introduction of food reduces food allergy - Pro.  
Palmer DJ, Prescott SL.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Dec 31;
Click to view abstract

Allergen sensitization affected the change trend of prevalence of symptoms of rhinitis co-existing with wheeze among adolescents in Guangzhou city from 1994 to 2009.  
Chen Y, Wang H, Wong GW, Zhong N, Li J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb 24;
Click to view abstract

Safety and feasibility of heated egg yolk challenge for children with egg allergies.  
Yanagida N, Sato S, Asaumi T, Ogura K, Borres MP, Ebisawa M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb 16;
Click to view abstract

Indoor fungal diversity in primary schools may differently influence allergic sensitization and asthma in children.  
Cavaleiro RJ, Madureira J, Paciencia I, Aguiar L, Pereira C, Silva D, Padrao P, Moreira P, Delgado L, nnesi-Maesano I, Oliveira FE, Teixeira JP, Moreira A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb 16;
Click to view abstract

Phenotypical characterization of peanut allergic children with differences in cross-allergy to tree nuts and other legumes.  
Cousin M, Verdun S, Seynave M, Vilain AC, Lansiaux A, Decoster A, Sauvage C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Jan 31;
Click to view abstract

Non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies in children.  
Caubet JC, Szajewska H, Shamir R, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Feb;28(1):6-17

Systemic reaction after performing a food prick-to-prick test. A case report. [Spanish]  
Hernandez-Moreno KE, Diez LS.
Rev Alerg Mex 2017 Jan;64(1):126-129
Click to view abstract

High prevalence of food sensitization among adults with allergic diseases who live in the Guadalajara metropolitan area. [Spanish]  
Bedolla-Barajas M, Torres-Alvarez NE, Contreras-Gonzalez U, Hernandez-Colin D, Bedolla-Pulido TI, Robles-Figueroa M, Morales-Romero J.
Rev Alerg Mex 2017 Jan;64(1):66-75
Click to view abstract

Skin reactivity frequency to aeroallergens in patients with clinical symptoms of allergic disease. [Spanish]  
Rojas-Mendez IC, rana-Munoz O, Lopez-Garcia AI, Rivero-Yeverino D, Caballero-Lopez CG, Papaqui-Tapia S, Camero-Martinez H, Vazquez-Rojas E.
Rev Alerg Mex 2017 Jan;64(1):7-12
Click to view abstract

Viable allergenic fungi in a documentary deposit of the National Archive of Cuba. [Spanish]  
Molina-Veloso A, Borrego-Alonso SF.
Rev Alerg Mex 2017 Jan;64(1):40-51
Click to view abstract

Prevalence of sensitization to inhalant allergens in the immunology department from Hospital de Especialidades Pediatricas Maria, Honduras, 2016. [Spanish]  
Gonzales-Gonzalez VA, az-Flores AM, Fernandez-Zelaya KZ, Rivera-Reyes MF.
Rev Alerg Mex 2017 Jan;64(1):24-33
Click to view abstract

Cow's milk allergy: towards an update of DRACMA guidelines.  
Fiocchi A, Dahda L, Dupont C, Campoy C, Fierro V, Nieto A.
World Allergy Organ J 2016;9(1):35
Click to view abstract

An unusual cause of food-induced anaphylaxis in mothers.  
Soh JY, Chiang WC, Huang CH, Woo CK, Ibrahim I, Heng K, Pramanick A, Lee BW.
World Allergy Organ J 2017;10(1):3
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis in a 4-year-old male caused by contact with grasses: a case report.  
Ramon GD, Croce VH, Cherrez O.
World Allergy Organ J 2017;10(1):5
Click to view abstract


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