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 Allergy Advisor Digest - January 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome induced by ingestion of short-neck clam.
Read Sensitization profiles of a case of pollen-food allergy syndrome.
Read Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults.
Read Ara h 2: crystal structure and IgE binding distinguish two subpopulations of peanut allergic patients by epitope diversity.
Read The nature of melon allergy in ragweed-allergic subjects.
Read Diagnostic value of Alt a 1, fungal enolase and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase in the component-resolved diagnosis of allergy to pleosporaceae.
Read Non-proteolytic aeroallergens from mites, cat and dog exert adjuvant-like activation of bronchial epithelial cells.
Read Birch pollen honey for birch pollen allergy
Read Allergens isolated from the freshwater fish blunt snout bream
Read Mite allergen is a danger signal for the skin
Read Incidence, prevalence, and trends of general practitioner-recorded diagnosis of peanut allergy in England
Read The advent of recombinant allergens and allergen cloning.
Read Birch pollen-related food allergy: Clinical aspects and the role of allergen-specific IgE and IgG(4) antibodies.
Read Chenopodium album pollen profilin (Che a 2)
Read The prevalence of food allergy in infants in Chongqing, China.
Read IgE-mediated cross-reactivity among leguminous seed proteins in peanut allergic children.
Read Adverse reactions to mosquito bites in scholars from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Read Food allergy to hen's egg at the University Hospital of Montpellier
Read The Cupin protein motif: major allergen of seeds
Read Plant food allergens identified (apart from peanuts)
Read Repeated exposure to hair dye induces regulatory T cells in mice.
Read Erythema multiforme-like reaction to para-phenylenediamine in henna tattoo.

Abstracts shared in January 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis diagnosed by the provocation test with cuttlefish after the pretreatment with 1.5 g of aspirin.
Read Food protein-induced gastrointestinal syndromes in identical and fraternal twins.
Read Aspergillus sensitization is associated with airflow limitation and bronchiectasis in severe asthma.
Read Histamine intolerance mimics anorexia nervosa.
Read Fungi-specific immunoglobulin E in patients with atopic dermatitis.
Read Arginine kinase from the cellar spider (Holocnemus pluchei): a new asthma-causing allergen.
Read Are IgE levels to foods other than Rosaceae predictive of allergy in lipid transfer protein-hypersensitive patients?
Read Semen allergy suspected in rare post-orgasm illness
Read Clinical significance of allergen cross-reactivity of cashew nuts
Read Food allergy in Lebanon: Is sesame seed the “Middle Eastern” peanut?

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome induced by ingestion of short-neck clam.
A 6-year-old boy had several vomiting episodes following ingestion of short-neck clam, since the age of 2 years. He was not allergic to other foods or shellfish. Short-neck clam-specific IgE was (1.04 UA/ml). Skin prick test was positive for short-neck clam. The lymphocyte stimulation test was positive. The patch test was positive. An oral challenge test with boiled short-neck clam induced abdominal pain and vomiting 2 h after ingestion, and the patient presented with increased peripheral leukocytes after 6 h.

A case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome induced by short-neck clam ingestion. [Japanese]  
Hayashi D, Aoki T, Shibata R, Ichikawa K.
Arerugi 2010 Dec 30;59(12):1628-1633

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization profiles of a case of pollen-food allergy syndrome.
A 13-year-old girl who had had pollinosis since the age of eight began to experience itching of the ears and vomiting after eating fresh fruits such as peach, apple and watermelon. This occurred at 10 years of age. The girl displayed positive reactions to six kinds of pollens, eleven kinds of fruits, numerous vegetables and to recombinant: rBet v2 present in specific IgE antibodies. She also reacted positively to several pollens, fruits and rBet v2 in the skin prick test. Microarray tested positive for profilin. From these results, the authors concluded that the allergic reactions to multiple kinds of foodstuff and pollens observed in this subject were due to cross-reactivity induced by profilin and that microarray assessment is a reliable test in the diagnosis of PFAS.

Sensitization profiles of a case of pollen-food allergy syndrome.  
Sano A, Yagami A, Inaba Y, Yamakita T, Suzuki K, Matsunaga K.
Allergol Int 2011 Jan 25;60(1):

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults.
"Background: In double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs), the use of challenge materials in which blinding is validated is a prerequisite for obtaining true blinded conditions during the test procedure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to enlarge the available range of validated recipes for DBPCFCs to facilitate oral challenge tests in all age groups, including young children, while maximizing the top dose in an acceptable volume."

"Methods: Recipes were developed and subsequently validated by a panel recruited by a matching sensory test. The best 30% of candidates were selected to participate in sensory testing using the paired comparison test."

"Results: For young children, three recipes with cow's milk and one recipe with peanut could be validated which may be utilized in DBPCFCs. For children older than 4 years and adults, one recipe with egg, two with peanut, one with hazelnut, and one with cashew nut were validated for use in DBPCFCs."

"Conclusions: All recipes contained larger amounts of allergenic foods than previously validated. These recipes increase the range of validated recipes for use in DBPCFCs in adults and children."

Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults.  
Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Herpertz I, Pasker L, van der HS, Kukler J, Jansink C, Vaessen W, Beusekamp BJ, Dubois AE.
Allergy 2011 Jan 24;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ara h 2: crystal structure and IgE binding distinguish two subpopulations of peanut allergic patients by epitope diversity.
The protein Ara h 2 is the most potent peanut allergen recognized by 80-90% of peanut allergic patients. This study describes the crystal structure of Ara h 2. The MBP-Ara h 2 fusion construct was positively recognized by IgE from 76% of allergic patients (25/33). Interestingly, 2 populations of patients could be identified. Subpopulation 1 (n = 14) showed an excellent correlation of IgE antibody binding to natural vs recombinant Ara h 2. Subpopulation 2 (n = 15) showed significantly reduced IgE binding to the MBP fusion protein. Interestingly, about 20% of the IgE binding in subpopulation 2 could be recovered by increasing the distance between MBP and Ara h 2 in a second construct. The reduced IgE binding to the MBP-Ara h 2 of subpopulation 2 indicates that the MBP molecule protects an immunodominant epitope region near the first helix of Ara h 2.

Ara h 2: crystal structure and IgE binding distinguish two subpopulations of peanut allergic patients by epitope diversity.  
Mueller GA, Gosavi RA, Pomes A, Wunschmann S, Moon AF, London RE, Pedersen LC.
Allergy 2011 Jan 21;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The nature of melon allergy in ragweed-allergic subjects.
Previous studies suggest cross-reactivity between specific ragweed pollen and melon allergens. This study was designed to clarify the origin of the cross-reactivity between ragweed pollen and the gourd family by assessing 1,000 ragweed-allergic subjects. Six hundred forty-six and 354 subjects reacted to 3 seasonal allergens, respectively; 4/646 (1%) and 81/354 (23%) reported a history of melon/watermelon-induced OAS. Forty-three of 46 (93%) melon reactors scored positive on SPT with the profilin-enriched extract, which was positive in 0/2 (0%) versus 43/44 (98%) reactive to 3 seasonal allergen sources, respectively (p < 0.0001). In vitro, serum from melon-allergic subjects showed a strong IgE reactivity to the profilin-enriched date palm pollen extract, which was abolished by preabsorption with both grass pollen extract and date palm pollen extract, but not by BSA. In ragweed pollen-allergic subjects, melon allergy is most likely associated with cross-sensitization to the plant pan-allergen profilin and not to specific ragweed pollen allergens. This study confirms the association between profilin sensitization and melon allergy.

The nature of melon allergy in ragweed-allergic subjects: A study of 1000 patients.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2011 Jan;32(1):64-67

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnostic value of Alt a 1, fungal enolase and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase in the component-resolved diagnosis of allergy to pleosporaceae.
Recent investigations have demonstrated that Alt a 1 should be considered as a relevant allergen of the Pleosporaceae group and that enolase is the main allergen involved in the cross-reactivity to fungi. This study aimed to demonstrate the current value of the available fungal allergen panel and the need to build an accurate mould allergen array for the diagnosis of allergy to Pleosporaceae. Specific IgEs to individual mould allergens and allergenic mould extracts were evaluated using the ImmunoCAP() system in 30 patients allergic to Alternaria and in 100 blood donors. All allergic patients had positive specific IgE responses to several moulds from different taxonomical families. Classic and molecular diagnosis demonstrated that 23% of patients had multi-sensitization. The current commercially available fungal allergen array was not sufficient to establish an accurate diagnosis. Unexpected correlations between Alternaria or Alt a 1 and Curvularia or Cladosporium stimulated the investigation of a more accurate allergen panel. A manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) homologous to Asp f 6 was identified as a new IgE-binding molecule from Alternaria alternata. Therefore, Alt a 1 is the marker for allergy to Pleosporaceae, not including Curvularia. MnSOD can explain 6.6% of allergy to Alternaria without Alt a 1 sensitization and should be included together with Alt a 1 and fungal enolase in the molecular array for the diagnosis of allergy to Pleosporaceae.

Diagnostic value of Alt a 1, fungal enolase and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase in the component-resolved diagnosis of allergy to pleosporaceae.  
Postigo I, Gutierrez-Rodriguez A, Fernandez J, Guisantes JA, Sunen E, Martinez J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jan 24;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Non-proteolytic aeroallergens from mites, cat and dog exert adjuvant-like activation of bronchial epithelial cells.
This study aimed to determine if other clinically relevant non-proteolytic aeroallergens originating from house dust mites (HDMs), storage mites, cat, dog, birch and timothy also activate respiratory epithelial cells. Cultures of human bronchial epithelial cell line, normal human bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cell line were exposed to recombinant (r)Der p 2, natural (n)Der f 2, rEur m 2, rLep d 2, rFel d 1, nFel d 1, rCan f 2, rBet v 1 or rPhl p 5a. A panel of secreted mediators and expression of cell adhesion receptors involved in recruitment, survival and adhesion of inflammatory cells in asthmatic airways was assessed. The mite allergens rDer p 2, nDer f 2, rEur m 2 and rLep d 2 as well as the cat and dog allergens rFel d 1, nFel d 1 and rCan f 2 induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte-chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-3alpha secretion from bronchial epithelial cells as well as surface expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1. The pollen allergens rBet v 1 and rPhl p 5a from birch and timothy did not activate the cells. These results show that both mite and structurally unrelated cat and dog allergens can activate respiratory epithelial cells by adjuvant-like protease-independent mechanisms

Non-proteolytic aeroallergens from mites, cat and dog exert adjuvant-like activation of bronchial epithelial cells.  
Osterlund C, Gronlund H, Gafvelin G, Bucht A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 22;155(2):111-118

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Birch pollen honey for birch pollen allergy
This study assessed the effects of the preseasonal use of birch pollen honey (BPH; birch pollen added to honey) or regular honey (RH) on symptoms and medication during birch pollen season. Forty-four patients with birch pollen allergy consumed either BPH or RH daily in incremental amounts from November 2008 to March 2009. During birch pollen season in 2009, BPH patients reported a 60% lower total symptom score (p < 0.01), twice as many asymptomatic days (p < 0.01), and 70% fewer days with severe symptoms (p < 0.001), and they used 50% less antihistamines (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. The differences between the BPH and RH groups were not significant. However, the BPH patients used less antihistamines than did the RH patients (p < 0.05). The results should be regarded as preliminary, but they indicate that BPH could serve as a complementary therapy for birch pollen allergy.

Birch pollen honey for birch pollen allergy - a randomized controlled pilot study.  
Saarinen K, Jantunen J, Haahtela T.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 23;155(2):160-166

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens isolated from the freshwater fish blunt snout bream
Sera from 11 patients with convincing clinical history of blunt snout bream allergy were utilized in IgE immunoblot analysis to identify prominent allergens. Several blunt snout bream proteins revealed specific binding to serum IgE, with the 47 and 41 kDa proteins being the most immunodominant among them. IgE immunoblot analysis confirmed the strong reactivity of these protein spots with the pooled sera from blunt snout bream-sensitive patients. These spots were isoforms of enolase and muscle creatine kinase, respectively. The potential allergenicity of these proteins was further verified by an bioinformatics approach using the full-length and 80 amino acid sliding window FASTA searches, which revealed a significant amino acid sequence homology between blunt snout bream allergens and several known inhaled and crustacean allergens. (Liu 2010 ref.25645 7)

Characterization of Allergens Isolated from the Freshwater Fish Blunt Snout Bream ( Megalobrama amblycephala ).  
Liu R, Krishnan HB, Xue W, Liu C.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Dec 13. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mite allergen is a danger signal for the skin
House dust mite (HDM) allergens are important in the development of atopic dermatitis. In airway allergy, HDM allergens activate innate immunity. However, information regarding the activation of innate immunity by HDM allergens in the skin is limited. This study investigated whether HDM allergens activate the inflammasome in epidermal keratinocytes - the inflammasome is a key regulator of pathogen recognition and inflammation. The study found that D pteronyssinus activated caspase-1 and induced caspase-1-dependent release of IL-1beta and IL-18 from keratinocytes. Moreover, D pteronyssinus stimulated assembly of the inflammasome by recruiting apoptosis-associated specklike protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC), caspase-1, and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin-domain containing 3 (NLRP3) to the perinuclear region.

Mite allergen is a danger signal for the skin via activation of inflammasome in keratinocytes.  
Dai X, Sayama K, Tohyama M, Shirakata Y, Hanakawa Y, Tokumaru S, Yang L, Hirakawa S, Hashimoto K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 25;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Incidence, prevalence, and trends of general practitioner-recorded diagnosis of peanut allergy in England
This UK study reports that data on GP-recorded diagnosis of peanut allergy from a large general practice database suggest a much lower prevalence in peanut allergy than has hitherto been found. This difference may in part be explained by underrecording of peanut allergy in general practice. Further research is needed to assess the true frequency of peanut allergy in the population and whether there has been a true increase in recent years.

Incidence, prevalence, and trends of general practitioner-recorded diagnosis of peanut allergy in England, 2001 to 2005.  
Kotz D, Simpson CR, Sheikh A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 12;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The advent of recombinant allergens and allergen cloning.
"When the allergen nomenclature system was adopted in 1986, allergens were identified by their behavior on electrophoresis and chromatography and by reactivity to shared antisera. Not only was this unsatisfactory for standardization, but the processes of allergic sensitization and immunotherapy could not be studied in the framework of antigen processing and B- and T-cell epitopes. Recombinant technologies developed in the 1980s for cloning cDNA from low-abundance mRNA permitted the cloning of allergens, beginning with the major house dust mite allergen Der p 1 and hornet allergen Dol m 5. After this, a wave of cloning with IgE immunoscreening resulted in the cloning of Der p 2, Der p 5, Bet v 1, Bet v 2, and Dac g 2 along with Fel d 1 cloned after amino acid sequencing. Recombinant allergens have now been used to define the important allergens for a wide range of allergies and to develop new types of immunotherapy, some of which have shown efficacy in human trials. The clonally pure allergens have been used to solve the tertiary structures of allergens and from this how allergens might activate innate immunity. Proprietary recombinant allergens are now being used in improved diagnostic tests."

The advent of recombinant allergens and allergen cloning.  
Thomas WR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 19;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Birch pollen-related food allergy: Clinical aspects and the role of allergen-specific IgE and IgG(4) antibodies.
This study evaluated the prevalence, main symptoms, and triggers of birch pollen-related food allergy and the role of food-specific IgG(4) antibodies in food tolerance in 225 individuals with birch pollen allergy. A total of 73% of the study population experienced food allergy, which was perennial in 86% of the affected individuals. The oral allergy syndrome was the main clinical manifestation. However, more than 58% of the patients also experienced food-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Apples and hazelnuts were identified as the most frequent triggers. Food allergy correlated with IgE reactivity to Bet v 1 but not to Bet v 2. Mal d 1-specific and Cor a 1-specific IgG(4)/IgE ratios were significantly higher in food-tolerant individuals than individuals with food allergy. Sera from IgG(4)-positive food-tolerant patients possessed IgG-dependent IgE-inhibitory activity. The authors conclude that high food allergen-specific IgG(4)/IgE ratios seem associated with food tolerance, potentially because specific IgG(4) blocks IgE binding to food allergens. Thus, the presence of food allergen-specific IgG(4) antibodies is no diagnostic marker for birch pollen-related food allergy.

Birch pollen-related food allergy: Clinical aspects and the role of allergen-specific IgE and IgG(4) antibodies.  
Geroldinger-Simic M, Zelniker T, Aberer W, Ebner C, Egger C, Greiderer A, Prem MN, Lidholm J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Vieths S, Bohle B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 19;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Chenopodium album pollen profilin (Che a 2)
Using sixteen individual sera from C. album (Careless weed) allergic patients demonstrated that purified recombinant Che a 2 could be the same as that in the crude extract. Amino acid sequence homology analysis showed that a high degree of IgE cross-reactivity among plant-derived profilins may depend on predicted potential IgE epitopes. (Amini 2010 ref.25650 7)

Chenopodium album pollen profilin (Che a 2): homology modeling and evaluation of cross-reactivity with allergenic profilins based on predicted potential IgE epitopes and IgE reactivity analysis.  
Amini A, Sankian M, Assarehzadegan MA, Vahedi F, Varasteh A.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 Nov 18. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The prevalence of food allergy in infants in Chongqing, China.
This Chinese study aimed to estimate the prevalence and the clinical features of food allergy (FA) in infants attending a routine well-baby clinic. Consecutive infants and young children aged 0-12 months attending routine well-baby checks were invited to participate in the study. Parents completed questionnaires, and children were skin prick tested (SPT) to a panel of 10 foods (egg white, egg yolk, cow's milk, soybean, peanut, wheat, fish, shrimp, orange, and carrot) Of 497 children, 477 (96%) participated. Of these, 56 subjects had a positive SPT (11.3%), with 45 positive to egg, 13 to cow's milk, 2 to peanut, 1 to fish, shrimp, and orange respectively. Eighty subjects (16.1%, 80/497) participated in food challenges. The overall prevalence of challenge-proven FA in 0- to 1-yr-old children in Chongqing, China, was 3.8% with 2.5% (12/477) egg allergic and 1.3% (6/477) cow's milk allergic.

The prevalence of food allergy in infants in Chongqing, China.  
Chen J, Hu Y, Allen KJ, Ho MH, Li H.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 25;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE-mediated cross-reactivity among leguminous seed proteins in peanut allergic children.
The immunological cross-reactivity among major protein- and oil-crops, including lupin, lentil, pea, peanut, kidney bean and soybean, was studied in vitro and in vivo: SDS-PAGE separations of legume protein extracts and immuno-blot revelations with 12 peanut-sensitive subjects' sera, Immuno-CAP and Skin Prick tests on the same subjects. The immuno-blotting data showed a wide range of IgE-binding responses both displayed by one subject towards different plant extracts and among subjects. Differences were both quantitative and qualitative. The prevalent responses of most subjects' sera were seen with peanut polypeptides, as expected, as well as with various polypeptides of the other legumes, the most recurrent of which were the basic subunits of the 11S globulins. (Ballabio 2010 ref.25652 5)

IgE-mediated cross-reactivity among leguminous seed proteins in peanut allergic children.  
Ballabio C, Magni C, Restani P, Mottini M, Fiocchi A, Tedeschi G, Duranti M.
Plant Foods Hum Nutr 2010 Dec;65(4):396-402.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Adverse reactions to mosquito bites in scholars from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
A cross-sectional descriptive study was made to children from public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon. A total of 11 public schools randomly selected using 1,000 were submitted, of which 506 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seventy-six percent referred adverse reactions to mosquito bites, itching (75%) and rash (72%) being the most frequent ones, in the last 12 months.

Adverse reactions to mosquito bites in scholars from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. [Spanish]  
Manrique Lopez MA, Gonzalez Diaz SN, Arias CA, Sedo Mejia GA, Canseco Villarreal JI, Gomez Retamoza EA, Padron Lopez OM, Cruz Moreno MA, Cisneros Salazar GD.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 May;57(3):79-84

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy to hen's egg at the University Hospital of Montpellier
A retrospective study in patients who underwent an oral food challenge to egg at the Allergy Department of Montpellier University Hospital since 2004, reports on 79 patients (mean 6,6 years). 48.1% started egg avoidance because of the reaction secondary to egg ingestion, 31.6% after positive skin or biological test. The most common clinical symptoms were angiœdema (26.6%), urticaria (24%) and vomiting (11.4%). Skin prick-tests to commercial extract were positive in 83.3% to 88.8% depending of the extract, and in 42% to 87% for egg challenge. Egg white specific IgE were positive in 95.4%, 65% to egg yolk and 77.7% to ovalbumin. Eighteen patients (23.4%) were positive to oral food challenge with principally urticaria (72.2%) and conjunctivitis (55.5%). Only skin prick-test to heated egg white and yolk, as well as egg white and yolk specific IgE were statistically different between positive and negative oral food challenges groups.

L’allergie alimentaire à l’œuf de poule au CHU de Montpellier / Food allergy to hen's egg at the University Hospital of Montpellier  
A. Siret-Alatrista, L. Pur Ozyigit, M. Rubio, M. Demoly, H. Alatrista-Salas, P.-J. Bousquet, P. Demoly
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):22-30

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The Cupin protein motif: major allergen of seeds
"Major allergens of peanut, tree nuts and other edible seeds, essentially consist of seed storage proteins that are deposited into the protein bodies during the seed ripening process. Globulins with cupin motifs are the most abundant seed storage protein allergens. They are classically subdivided in two groups of 7S and 11S globulins, which correspond to vicilins and legumins, respectively. Vicilins result from the non-covalent association of three single-chain monomers in flattened triangular-shaped homotrimers. Legumins definitely differ from vicilins by homotrimers built up from two-chain monomers, subsequently associated face to face in a homohexameric structure. In addition, vicilins are usually N-glycosylated whereas legumins are essentially non-glycosylated. Both vicilin and legumin proteins are widely distributed as major allergens, e.g. Ara h 1 (vicilin) and Ara h 3 (legumin) of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), or as putative allergens, e.g. germin (legumin) of chestnut (Castanea sativa), in edible seeds of different plant families. According to their high degree of both sequential and structural conservation, they often trigger IgE-binding cross-reactions in sensitized individuals. In most cases, however, the clinical significance of these IgE-binding cross-reactivities still remains to be assessed."

Les protéines à motif cupine : allergènes majeurs des graines / The Cupin protein motif: major allergen of seeds  
P. Rougé, E. Brunet, J.-P. Borges, A. Jauneau, B. Saggio, T. Bourrier, F. Rancé, A. Didier, A. Barre
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):36-40

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Plant food allergens identified (apart from peanuts)
"Knowledge of allergenic molecules in edible vegetables has progressed enormously in recent years. The authors draw attention to the importance of identifying allergenic molecules in several circumstances: for links with the clinical severity of allergic diseases, for epidemiological studies of allergic sensitization, and for interpretation of polysensitization. Allergenic molecules of different edible vegetables are presented in two distinct families: (1) families associated with a high prevalence of sensitizations, which includes prolamines, 2S-albumins, LTP, alpha-amylase inhibitors, 7S and 11S globulins, profilins, and Bet v 1-like proteins, and (2) families associated with a lower prevalence of sensitizations, including 1-3ß-glucanases, 1-endochitinases, isoflavone reductases, etc. For the allergenic molecules that have been identified, the authors indicate which are currently available for in vitro tests. They also provide examples of compound-resolved diagnosis performed with groups of food allergen molecules which show increased diagnostic efficacy in certain specific cases."

Allergènes végétaux alimentaires identifiés (en dehors de l’arachide) / Plant food allergens identified (apart from peanuts)  
G. Pauli
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):56-62

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Repeated exposure to hair dye induces regulatory T cells in mice.
This study shows that p-phenylenediamine (PPD)-containing hair dyes strongly affect the immune system. In addition to being potent skin sensitizers that activate inflammatory T cells, hair dyes also induce anti-inflammatory mechanisms. This might explain why many consumers can use hair dyes repeatedly without developing noticeable allergies, but it also raises the question whether the immune modulatory effects of hair dyes might influence the development of autoimmune diseases and cancers

Repeated exposure to hair dye induces regulatory T cells in mice.  
Rubin IM, Dabelsteen S, Nielsen MM, White IR, Johansen JD, Geisler C, Bonefeld CM.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Nov;163(5):992-998

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Erythema multiforme-like reaction to para-phenylenediamine in henna tattoo.
A case of a 15 year-old girl who developed an erythema multiforme-like reaction to para-phenylenediamine (PPD) after Henna tattoos is described. The patient was treated successfully with oral prednisolone and highly potent topical corticosteroids. The patient developed a long-lasting post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Potential hyperreactive response was prevented by applying the PPD patch for only 30 minutes, but still there was a significantly positive reaction.

Erythema multiforme-like reaction to para-phenylenediamine. [Danish]  
Mikkelsen CS, Liljefred F, Mikkelsen DB.
Ugeskr Laeger 2011 Jan 3;173(1):51-52

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis diagnosed by the provocation test with cuttlefish after the pretreatment with 1.5 g of aspirin. [Japanese]  
Nakamura K, Inomata N, Okawa T, Maeda N, Kirino M, Shiomi K, Ikezawa Z.
Arerugi 2010 Dec 30;59(12):1634-1641

A case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome induced by short-neck clam ingestion. [Japanese]  
Hayashi D, Aoki T, Shibata R, Ichikawa K.
Arerugi 2010 Dec 30;59(12):1628-1633

IgG-mediated systemic anaphylaxis to protein antigen can be induced even under conditions of limited amounts of antibody and antigen.  
Ishikawa R, Tsujimura Y, Obata K, Kawano Y, Minegishi Y, Karasuyama H.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2010 Nov 26;402(4):742-746
Click to view abstract

Proteose peptone fraction of bovine milk depressed IgE production in vitro and in vivo.  
Ohno F, Sugahara T, Kanda K, Nishimoto S.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2010;74(7):1332-1337
Click to view abstract

Occupational trichloroethylene hypersensitivity syndrome with human herpesvirus-6 and cytomegalovirus reactivation.  
Watanabe H, Tohyama M, Kamijima M, Nakajima T, Yoshida T, Hashimoto K, Iijima M.
Dermatology 2010 Aug;221(1):17-22
Click to view abstract

Allergy and sensitization during childhood associated with prenatal and lactational exposure to marine pollutants.  
Grandjean P, Poulsen LK, Heilmann C, Steuerwald U, Weihe P.
Environ Health Perspect 2010 Oct;118(10):1429-1433
Click to view abstract

Food protein-induced gastrointestinal syndromes in identical and fraternal twins.  
Shoda T, Isozaki A, Kawano Y.
Allergol Int 2011 Jan 25;60(1):

Sensitization profiles of a case of pollen-food allergy syndrome.  
Sano A, Yagami A, Inaba Y, Yamakita T, Suzuki K, Matsunaga K.
Allergol Int 2011 Jan 25;60(1):

Aspergillus sensitization is associated with airflow limitation and bronchiectasis in severe asthma.  
Menzies D, Holmes L, McCumesky G, Prys-Picard C, Niven R.
Allergy 2011 Jan 25;

Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults.  
Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Herpertz I, Pasker L, van der HS, Kukler J, Jansink C, Vaessen W, Beusekamp BJ, Dubois AE.
Allergy 2011 Jan 24;

Allergy gap between Finnish and Russian Karelia on increase.  
Laatikainen T, von HL, Koskinen JP, Makela MJ, Jousilahti P, Kosunen TU, Vlasoff T, Ahlstrom M, Vartiainen E, Haahtela T.
Allergy 2011 Jan 21;

Ara h 2: crystal structure and IgE binding distinguish two subpopulations of peanut allergic patients by epitope diversity.  
Mueller GA, Gosavi RA, Pomes A, Wunschmann S, Moon AF, London RE, Pedersen LC.
Allergy 2011 Jan 21;

IgE-sensitization to the cough suppressant pholcodine and the effects of its withdrawal from the Norwegian market.  
Florvaag E, Johansson SG, Irgens A, de Pater GH.
Allergy 2011 Jan 17;

Fatty acids in breast milk and development of atopic eczema and allergic sensitisation in infancy.  
Thijs C, Muller A, Rist L, Kummeling I, Snijders BE, Huber M, van RR, Simoes-Wust AP, Dagnelie PC, van den Brandt PA.
Allergy 2011 Jan;66(1):58-67

The nature of melon allergy in ragweed-allergic subjects: A study of 1000 patients.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2011 Jan;32(1):64-67

A sixty-five-year-old man with rash, fever, and generalized weakness.  
Bajaj P, Prematta MJ, Ghaffari G.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2011 Jan;32(1):1-3

Assessing potential determinants of positive provocation tests in subjects with NSAID hypersensitivity.  
Viola M, Rumi G, Valluzzi RL, Gaeta F, Caruso C, Romano A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jan;41(1):96-103

Characteristics of subjects experiencing hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: patterns of response.  
Dona I, Blanca-Lopez N, Cornejo-Garcia JA, Torres MJ, Laguna JJ, Fernandez J, Rosado A, Rondon C, Campo P, Agundez JA, Blanca M, Canto G.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jan;41(1):86-95

Coxibs strike back.  
Sanak M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Jan;41(1):2-5

The clinical significance of 25OH-Vitamin D status in celiac disease.  
Lerner A, Shapira Y, gmon-Levin N, Pacht A, Ben-Ami SD, Lopez HM, Sanchez-Castanon M, Shoenfeld Y.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 7;

Cutting edge issues in Goodpasture's disease.  
Chan AL, Louie S, Leslie KO, Juarez MM, Albertson TE.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 5;

Tobacco and skin. [French]  
Biver-Dalle C, Humbert P.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 Aug;137(8-9):568-572

Eosinophilic esophagitis after specific oral tolerance induction for egg protein.  
Ridolo E, De Angelis GL, Dall'aglio P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jan;106(1):73-74

Penicillin skin testing in the evaluation and management of penicillin allergy.  
Fox S, Park MA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jan;106(1):1-7

On the cover.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jan;106(1):A6

Cold-induced urticaria and angioedema. Classification, diagnosis and therapy. [German]  
Krause K, Degener F, Altrichter S, Ardelean E, Kalogeromitros D, Magerl M, Metz M, Siebenhaar F, Weller K, Maurer M.
Hautarzt 2010 Sep;61(9):743-749
Click to view abstract

Histamine intolerance mimics anorexia nervosa. [German]  
Stolze I, Peters KP, Herbst RA.
Hautarzt 2010 Sep;61(9):776-778
Click to view abstract

Non-proteolytic aeroallergens from mites, cat and dog exert adjuvant-like activation of bronchial epithelial cells.  
Osterlund C, Gronlund H, Gafvelin G, Bucht A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 22;155(2):111-118

The effects of antidepressants on the results of skin prick tests used in the diagnosis of allergic diseases.  
Isik SR, Celikel S, Karakaya G, Ulug B, Kalyoncu AF.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):63-68

Collaboration between allergists and pharmacists increases beta-lactam antibiotic prescriptions in patients with a history of penicillin allergy.  
Park MA, McClimon BJ, Ferguson B, Markus PJ, Odell L, Swanson A, Kloos-Olson KE, Bjerke PF, Li JT.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):57-62

Analysis of the serum levels of fungi-specific immunoglobulin E in patients with allergic diseases.  
Chang FY, Lee JH, Yang YH, Yu HH, Wang LC, Lin YT, Chiang BL.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):49-56

Affinity purification of egg-white allergens for improved component-resolved diagnostics.  
Everberg H, Brostedt P, Oman H, Bohman S, Moverare R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):33-41

Does sensitization to foods in adults occur always in the gut?  
Asero R, Antonicelli L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):6-14

Missions of protease allergens in the epithelium.  
Takai T.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):3-5

You can't unscramble an egg. Or can you?  
Zuidmeer L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011;154(1):1-2

Penicillin determinants in the diagnosis of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactams.  
Blanca M, Torres MJ, Blanca-Lopez N, Canto MG.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 23;155(2):187-188

Arginine kinase from the cellar spider (Holocnemus pluchei): a new asthma-causing allergen.  
Bobolea I, Barranco P, Pastor-Vargas C, Iraola V, Vivanco F, Quirce S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 23;155(2):180-186

Birch pollen honey for birch pollen allergy - a randomized controlled pilot study.  
Saarinen K, Jantunen J, Haahtela T.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 23;155(2):160-166

Are IgE levels to foods other than Rosaceae predictive of allergy in lipid transfer protein-hypersensitive patients?  
Asero R, Arena A, Cecchi L, Conte ME, Crivellaro M, Emiliani F, Lodi RF, Longo R, Minale P, Murzilli F, Musarra A, Nebiolo F, Quercia O, Ridolo E, Savi E, Senna GE, Villalta D.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 22;155(2):149-154

The efficacy and safety of a chinese herbal product (Xiao-Feng-San) for the treatment of refractory atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.  
Cheng HM, Chiang LC, Jan YM, Chen GW, Li TC.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Dec 22;155(2):141-148

Photosensitivity testing in children.  
ten BO, Sigurdsson V, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, van WH, Pasmans SG.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Dec;63(6):1019-1025
Click to view abstract

Characterization of Allergens Isolated from the Freshwater Fish Blunt Snout Bream ( Megalobrama amblycephala ).  
Liu R, Krishnan HB, Xue W, Liu C.
J Agric Food Chem 2010 Dec 13. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Quantification of specific IgE to whole peanut extract and peanut components in prediction of peanut allergy.  
Nicolaou N, Murray C, Belgrave D, Poorafshar M, Simpson A, Custovic A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 25;

Mite allergen is a danger signal for the skin via activation of inflammasome in keratinocytes.  
Dai X, Sayama K, Tohyama M, Shirakata Y, Hanakawa Y, Tokumaru S, Yang L, Hirakawa S, Hashimoto K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 25;

Bet v 1-specific T-cell receptor/forkhead box protein 3 transgenic T cells suppress Bet v 1-specific T-cell effector function in an activation-dependent manner.  
Schmetterer KG, Haiderer D, Leb-Reichl VM, Neunkirchner A, Jahn-Schmid B, Kung HJ, Schuch K, Steinberger P, Bohle B, Pickl WF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan;127(1):238-45, 245

A striking local esophageal cytokine expression profile in eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Blanchard C, Stucke EM, Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Burwinkel K, Collins MH, Ahrens A, Alexander ES, Butz BK, Jameson SC, Kaul A, Franciosi JP, Kushner JP, Putnam PE, Abonia JP, Rothenberg ME.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan;127(1):208-17, 217

The role of penicillin in benign skin rashes in childhood: a prospective study based on drug rechallenge.  
Caubet JC, Kaiser L, Lemaitre B, Fellay B, Gervaix A, Eigenmann PA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan;127(1):218-222

Epidemiology of food allergy.  
Sicherer SH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 12;

Long-term follow-up of patients with hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reveals shortcomings in compliance and care.  
Buhl T, Meynberg HC, Kaune KM, Hunecke P, Schon MP, Fuchs T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan;127(1):284-285

Incidence, prevalence, and trends of general practitioner-recorded diagnosis of peanut allergy in England, 2001 to 2005.  
Kotz D, Simpson CR, Sheikh A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 12;

The advent of recombinant allergens and allergen cloning.  
Thomas WR.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 19;

Birch pollen-related food allergy: Clinical aspects and the role of allergen-specific IgE and IgG(4) antibodies.  
Geroldinger-Simic M, Zelniker T, Aberer W, Ebner C, Egger C, Greiderer A, Prem MN, Lidholm J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Vieths S, Bohle B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Jan 19;

Drug antigenicity, immunogenicity, and costimulatory signaling: evidence for formation of a functional antigen through immune cell metabolism.  
Elsheikh A, Lavergne SN, Castrejon JL, Farrell J, Wang H, Sathish J, Pichler WJ, Park BK, Naisbitt DJ.
J Immunol 2010 Dec 1;185(11):6448-6460
Click to view abstract

Chenopodium album pollen profilin (Che a 2): homology modeling and evaluation of cross-reactivity with allergenic profilins based on predicted potential IgE epitopes and IgE reactivity analysis.  
Amini A, Sankian M, Assarehzadegan MA, Vahedi F, Varasteh A.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 Nov 18. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Postorgasmic Illness Syndrome (POIS) in 45 Dutch Caucasian Males: Clinical Characteristics and Evidence for an Immunogenic Pathogenesis (Part 1).  
Waldinger MD, Meinardi MM, Zwinderman AH, Schweitzer DH.
Miscellaneous J Sex Med. 2011 Jan 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal diet during lactation and allergic sensitization in the offspring at age of 5.  
Nwaru BI, Erkkola M, Ahonen S, Kaila M, Lumia M, Prasad M, Haapala AM, Kronberg-Kippila C, Veijola R, Ilonen J, Simell O, Knip M, Virtanen SM.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 12;

The prevalence of food allergy in infants in Chongqing, China.  
Chen J, Hu Y, Allen KJ, Ho MH, Li H.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 25;

Association of Blattella germanica sensitization with atopic diseases in pediatric allergic patients.  
La GS, Cibella F, Passalacqua G, Cuttitta G, Liotta G, Ferlisi A, Viegi G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 24;

A case of atrial fibrillation induced by inhaled fluticasone propionate.  
Oteri A, Bussolini A, Sacchi M, Clementi E, Zuccotti GV, Radice S.
Pediatrics 2010 Nov;126(5):e1237-e1241
Click to view abstract

IgE-mediated cross-reactivity among leguminous seed proteins in peanut allergic children.  
Ballabio C, Magni C, Restani P, Mottini M, Fiocchi A, Tedeschi G, Duranti M.
Plant Foods Hum Nutr 2010 Dec;65(4):396-402.
Abstract

Atopic dermatitis in scholar children from Ciudad Guzman, Mexico. Prevalence and related factors. [Spanish]  
Bedolla BM, Barrera Zepeda AT, Morales RJ.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 May;57(3):71-78

Hypersensitivity to metals in patients with orthopedic implants. [Spanish]  
Sanchez Olivas MA, Valencia Zavala MP, Sanchez Olivas JA, Sepulveda VG.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jul;57(4):127-130

Adverse reactions to mosquito bites in scholars from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. [Spanish]  
Manrique Lopez MA, Gonzalez Diaz SN, Arias CA, Sedo Mejia GA, Canseco Villarreal JI, Gomez Retamoza EA, Padron Lopez OM, Cruz Moreno MA, Cisneros Salazar GD.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 May;57(3):79-84

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: new therapeutic options. [French]  
Germaud P, Pipet A.
Rev Mal Respir 2010 Sep;27(7):784-785

Hypersensitivity reactions to antituberculous therapy. [French]  
Fekih L, Fenniche S, Boussoffara L, Hassene H, Abdelghaffar H, Belhabib D, Megdiche ML.
Rev Mal Respir 2010 Sep;27(7):673-678
Click to view abstract

Prévalence des manifestations cliniques, des troubles fonctionnelles respiratoires et de la sensibilisation cutanée chez les artisans boulangers-pâtissiers à Casablanca  
O. Laraqui, S. Laraqui, G. Kanny, C. Verger, A. Caubet, B. Rkiek, K. Harourate, Y. El Aoudi, N. Bentayeb, C.H. Laraqui
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):10-21
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’allergie alimentaire à l’œuf de poule au CHU de Montpellier / Food allergy to hen's egg at the University Hospital of Montpellier  
A. Siret-Alatrista, L. Pur Ozyigit, M. Rubio, M. Demoly, H. Alatrista-Salas, P.-J. Bousquet, P. Demoly
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):22-30
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Signification clinique des allergènes croisants de la noix de Cajou (Anacardium occidentale) / Clinical significance of allergen cross-reactivity of cashew nuts  
P. Rougé, F. Thibau, T. Bourrier, B. Saggio, R. Culerrier, F. Rancé, A. Barre
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):31-35
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Les protéines à motif cupine : allergènes majeurs des graines / The Cupin protein motif: major allergen of seeds  
P. Rougé, E. Brunet, J.-P. Borges, A. Jauneau, B. Saggio, T. Bourrier, F. Rancé, A. Didier, A. Barre
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):36-40
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Pollution atmosphérique, facteur de risque des BPCO ? / Air pollution risk factor for COPD?  
Y.-M. Allain, N. Roche, G. Huchon
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):41-55
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergènes végétaux alimentaires identifiés (en dehors de l’arachide) / Plant food allergens identified (apart from peanuts)  
G. Pauli
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(1):56-62
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis as a manifestation of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome.  
Ben SC, Fathallah N, Saidi W, Jeddi C, Ghariani N, Hmouda H, Bouraoui K.
Ann Pharmacother 2010 Oct;44(10):1681-1682

Repeated exposure to hair dye induces regulatory T cells in mice.  
Rubin IM, Dabelsteen S, Nielsen MM, White IR, Johansen JD, Geisler C, Bonefeld CM.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Nov;163(5):992-998
Click to view abstract

Erythema multiforme-like reaction to para-phenylenediamine. [Danish]  
Mikkelsen CS, Liljefred F, Mikkelsen DB.
Ugeskr Laeger 2011 Jan 3;173(1):51-52
Click to view abstract

Food allergy in Lebanon: Is sesame seed the “Middle Eastern” peanut?  
Irani, Carla; Maalouly, George; Germanos, Mirna; Kazma, Hassan
WAO Journal 2011;1(1):1-2 January
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Key role of water-insoluble allergens of pollen cytoplasmic granules in biased allergic response in a rat model.  
Abou Chakra, Oussama R.; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Poncet, Pascal; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Sénéchal, Hélène
WAO Journal 2011;1(1):1-2 January
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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