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 Allergy Advisor Digest - January 2014
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read The influence of chitin on the immune response to the house dust mite allergen Blo t 12.
Read Sal k 5, a member of the widespread Ole e 1-like protein family, is a new allergen of Russian Thistle (Salsola kali) pollen.
Read Occupational allergic respiratory diseases in garbage workers.
Read Skin prick test and basophil reactivity to cetuximab in patients with IgE to alpha-gal and allergy to red meat.
Read The prevalence and distribution of food sensitization in European adults.
Read A case of codeine induced anaphylaxis via oral route.
Read Can fecal calprotectin level be used as a markers of inflammation in the diagnosis and follow-up of cow's milk protein allergy?
Read Delayed anaphylaxis secondary to allergy skin testing.
Read Indoor, long-term persistence of cypress pollen allergenic potency: a 10-month study.
Read Occupational rhinitis, asthma, and contact urticaria caused by hydrolyzed wheat protein in hairdressers.
Read Identification of 70 kDa shrimp protein as a possible new allergen for shrimp allergy
Read Wind-pollination and the roles of pollen allergenic proteins.
Read Positive reactions to placebo in children undergoing double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge.
Read Ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG4 ratio might improve the prediction of cooked and uncooked egg tolerance development in egg allergic children.
Read A comprehensive review of sensitization and allergy to soy-based products.
Read New UK nickel-plated steel coins constitute an increased allergy and eczema risk.
Read Finding the optimal patch test material and test concentration to detect contact allergy to geraniol.
Read An international multicentre study on the allergenic activity of air-oxidized R-limonene.
Read Quinoline Yellow dye-induced fixed food-and-drug eruption.
Read Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves
Read Higher allergenicity of high molecular weight hydrolysed wheat protein in cosmetics for percutaneous sensitization.
Read Identification of Der p 23, a peritrophin-like protein, as a new major Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen
Read Arginine kinase from Scylla paramamosain.
Read Identification of thaumatin-like protein and aspartyl protease as new major allergens in lettuce.
Read Allergenic relevance of nonspecific lipid transfer proteins 2: Identification and characterization of Api g 6 from celery tuber
Read Boiling peanut Ara h 1 results in the formation of aggregates with reduced allergenicity.
Read Effect of heat processing on antibody reactivity to allergen variants and fragments of black tiger prawn
Read In vitro digestion of soluble cashew proteins and characterization of surviving IgE-reactive peptides.
Read Taumatin-like protein (TLP 2), an allergen in sapodilla plum (Manilkara zapota).
Read Vig r 6, the cytokinin-specific binding protein from mung bean (Vigna radiata) sprouts, cross-reacts with Bet v 1-related allergens and binds IgE from birch pollen allergic patients' sera.
Read Severe childhood asthma and allergy to furry animals: Refined assessment using molecular-based allergy diagnostics.
Read Occupational allergies against pepsin, chymosin and microbial rennet.
Read Anaphylaxis and delayed hymenoptera in a child with fire ant envenomation.
Read A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children

Abstracts shared in January 2014 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Sensitization to beer ingredients in Chinese individuals with beer allergy
Read Anaphylaxis/angioedema caused by honey ingestion.
Read A case of anaphylaxis to peppermint.
Read In vivo and in vitro techniques in the diagnosis of lipid transfer protein sensitization.
Read Special consideration is required for the component-resolved diagnosis of egg allergy in infants.
Read Mislabelled cow's milk allergy in infants: a prospective cohort study.
Read Serum albumins-unusual allergens.
Read Walnut allergens: molecular characterisation, detection and clinical relevance.
Read Component resolution reveals additional major allergens in patients with honeybee venom allergy.
Read Pine nut allergy: clinical features and major allergens characterization.
Read Barley's lipid transfer protein: a new emerging allergen in pediatric anaphylaxis.
Read Serum diamine oxidase activity as a diagnostic test for histamine intolerance.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The influence of chitin on the immune response to the house dust mite allergen Blo t 12.
It is predicted that Blo t 12, an allergen with two described isoforms, contains a chitin-binding domain, similar to that found in peritrophins. This study aimed to evaluate the chitin-binding activity of Blo t 12 isoallergens and its effect on airway inflammation and antibody responses in a murine model of allergen sensitization. The study concludes that Blo t 12 isoforms are chitin-binding proteins that induce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity. However, for Blo t 12.0101, chitin reinforces its effects on total IgE production.

The influence of chitin on the immune response to the house dust mite allergen Blo t 12.  
Zakzuk J, Benedetti I, Fernandez-Caldas E, Caraballo L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 5;163(2):119-129

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sal k 5, a member of the widespread Ole e 1-like protein family, is a new allergen of Russian Thistle (Salsola kali) pollen.
This study characterized and produced Sal k 5 as recombinant allergen S. kali Ole e 1-like protein, and assessed using sera from 57 allergic patients recruited from two Spanish regions where this pollinosis is frequent. The purified allergen, Sal k 5, is an acidic glycoprotein of 17,628 Da. Its amino acid sequence exhibits 68 and 32% identity with the allergens of Che a 1 and Ole e 1, respectively. A sensitization frequency between 30 and 40% was observed in pollinic patients from the center and east coast of Spain.

Sal k 5, a member of the widespread Ole e 1-like protein family, is a new allergen of Russian Thistle (Salsola kali) pollen.  
Castro L, Mas S, Barderas R, Colas C, Garcia-Selles J, Barber D, Rodriguez R, Villalba M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 17;163(2):142-153

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergic respiratory diseases in garbage workers.
Exposures to molds and bacteria (especially actinomycetes) at workplaces are common in garbage workers, but allergic respiratory diseases due to these microorganisms have been described rarely. The aim of this study was a detailed analysis of mold or bacteria-associated occupational respiratory diseases in garbage workers. From 2002 to 2011 four cases of occupational respiratory diseases related to garbage handling were identified. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) was diagnosed in three subjects (cases 1-3, one smoker, two non-smokers), occupational asthma (OA) was diagnosed in one subject (case 4, smoker), but could not be excluded completely in case 2. Cases 1 and 2 worked in composting sites, while cases 3 and 4 worked in packaging recycling plants. Exposure periods were 2-4 years. Molds and actinomycetes were identified as allergens in all cases. Specific IgE antibodies to Aspergillus fumigatus were detected exclusively in case 4. Diagnoses of HP were essentially based on symptoms and the detection of specific IgG serum antibodies to molds and actinomycetes. OA was confirmed by bronchial provocation test with Aspergillus fumigatus in case 4. In conclusion, occupational HP and OA due to molds occur rarely in garbage workers. Technical prevention measures are insufficient and the diagnosis of HP is often inconclusive. Therefore, it is recommended to implement the full repertoire of diagnostic tools including bronchoalveolar lavage and high resolution computed tomography in the baseline examination

Occupational allergic respiratory diseases in garbage workers: relevance of molds and actinomycetes.  
Hagemeyer O, Bunger J, van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Drath C, Merget R, Bruning T, Broding HC.
Adv Exp Med Biol 2013;788313-320

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin prick test and basophil reactivity to cetuximab in patients with IgE to alpha-gal and allergy to red meat.
Severe hypersensitivity reactions to red meat with delay of several hours in patients with IgE to alpha-gal (galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose) have been reported. The diagnosis of meat allergy is difficult, because of the limited sensitivity of skin prick tests and specific IgE tests to meat extracts. These circumstances have been explained by the delayed expression of alpha-gal due to digestive processes. Because of the low sensitivity of skin prick tests to meat, the authors studied the possibility to perform skin prick tests with cetuximab, which carries the alpha-gal epitope. Skin prick and intradermal tests with cetuximab were clearly positive in 2 of 2 patients. As a further diagnostic step, basophil activation tests were performedwith cetuximab. Skin prick tests and basophil activation test using cetuximab may be a more sensitive alternative in patients with an assumed allergy to meat.

Skin prick test and basophil reactivity to cetuximab in patients with IgE to alpha-gal and allergy to red meat.  
Michel S, Scherer K, Heijnen IA, Bircher AJ.
Allergy 2013 Dec 26;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The prevalence and distribution of food sensitization in European adults.
This study assessed IgE sensitization to food-associated allergens in different regions of Europe using a common protocol. Participants from general populations aged 20-54 years in eight European centres (Zurich, Madrid, Utrecht, Lodz, Sophia, Athens, Reykjavik and Vilnius) were assessed. Serum for IgE analysis by ImmunoCAP for 24 foods, 6 aeroallergens and, by allergen microarray, for 48 individual food proteins. The prevalence of IgE sensitization to foods ranged from 23.6% to 6.6%. The least common IgE sensitizations were to fish (0.2%), milk (0.8%) and egg (0.9%), and the most common were to hazelnut (9.3%), peach (7.9%) and apple (6.5%). The order of prevalence of IgE sensitization against different foods was similar in each centre and correlated with the prevalence of the pollen-associated allergens Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 (r = 0.86). IgE sensitization to plant allergen components unrelated to pollen allergens was more evenly distributed and independent of pollen IgE sensitization (r = -0.10). The most common foods containing allergens not cross-reacting with pollens were sesame, shrimp and hazelnut.

The prevalence and distribution of food sensitization in European adults.  
Burney PG, Potts J, Kummeling I, EN CM, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Barreales L, Fernandez-Perez C, Fernandez-Rivas M, Le TM, Knulst AC, Kowalski ML, Lidholm J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Braun-Fahlande.
Allergy 2013 Dec 26;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of codeine induced anaphylaxis via oral route.
Codeine is widely prescribed in clinical settings for the relief of pain and non-productive coughs. Common adverse drug reactions to codeine include constipation, euphoria, nausea, and drowsiness. However, there have been few reports of serious adverse reactions after codeine ingestion in adults. The authors present a case of severe anaphylaxis after oral ingestion of a therapeutic dose of codeine. A 30-year-old Korean woman complained of the sudden onset of dyspnea, urticaria, chest tightness, and dizziness 10 minutes after taking a 10-mg dose of codeine to treat a chronic cough following a viral infection. She had previously experienced episodes of asthma exacerbation following upper respiratory infections, and had non-atopic rhinitis and a food allergy to seafood. A skin prick test showed a positive response to 1-10 mg/mL of codeine extract, with a mean wheal size of 3.5 mm, while negative results were obtained in 3 healthy adult controls. A basophil histamine release test showed a notable dose-dependent increase in histamine following serial incubations with codeine phosphate, while there were minimal changes in the healthy controls. Following a CYP2D6 genotype analysis, the patient was found to have the CYP2D6*1/*10 allele, indicating she was an intermediate metabolizer. An open label oral challenge test was positive.

A case of codeine induced anaphylaxis via oral route.  
Yoo HS, Yang EM, Kim MA, Hwang SH, Shin YS, Ye YM, Nahm DH, Park HS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Jan;6(1):95-97

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Can fecal calprotectin level be used as a markers of inflammation in the diagnosis and follow-up of cow's milk protein allergy?
Calprotectin is a cytosolic protein with immunomodulatory, antimicrobial, and antiproliferative actions. The concentration of calprotectin increases in infection, inflammation, and malignancy. We determined if calprotectin can be used as a marker for the diagnosis and follow-up of bowel inflammation in cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA). The study concludes that FC levels may be a useful marker for follow-up treatment and recurrence determination in CMPA.

Can fecal calprotectin level be used as a markers of inflammation in the diagnosis and follow-up of cow's milk protein allergy?  
Beser OF, Sancak S, Erkan T, Kutlu T, Cokugras H, Cokugras FC.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Jan;6(1):33-38

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Delayed anaphylaxis secondary to allergy skin testing.
A patient underwent allergy skin prick testing with commercial allergenic extracts and was noted to have 4-plus wheal-and-flare reactions to grass pollens and 3-plus wheal-and-flare reactions to tree pollens and dust mites. Approximately 30 minutes after arriving home (2 hours after skin prick tests), the patient developed burning and itching of the palms, nasal congestion, itchy eyes, bilateral orbital edema, and erythema of the face. He also experienced wheezing and a throat closing sensation.

Delayed anaphylaxis secondary to allergy skin testing.  
Ricketti PA, Unkle DW, Cleri DJ, Ricketti AJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Nov;111(5):420-421

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Indoor, long-term persistence of cypress pollen allergenic potency: a 10-month study.
This study shows that in some regions cypress pollen grains could be detected in house dust sedimentations practically year-round. The present findings demonstrate that there is no change in the in vitro allergenic potency of C sempervirens pollen grains left for 10 months in an indoor environment representative of a home site. During this period, approximately from one pollinating season to another, the pollenwas submitted to temperature, light, and humidity variations

found in a dwelling house (ie, in uncontrolled conditions of storage).

Indoor, long-term persistence of cypress pollen allergenic potency: a 10-month study.  
Shahali Y, Brazdova A, Calleja M, Charpin D, Senechal H, Poncet P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Nov;111(5):428-430

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational rhinitis, asthma, and contact urticaria caused by hydrolyzed wheat protein in hairdressers.
Hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP) is a common ingredient in food and cosmetic products. Immediate hypersensitivity to HWP has been reported, and HWP present in foods may cause severe allergic reactions. HWP in cosmetic products has been reported to cause allergic contact urticaria (CU) and even to induce heat dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) in consumers. This study describes 2 hairdressers in whom the use of HWP-containing hairdressing products at work led to the development of HWP hypersensitivity, occupational rhinitis (OR), and occupational CU. One of them also developed occupational asthma (OA). In addition, both hairdressers developed symptoms consistent with WDEIA.

Occupational rhinitis, asthma, and contact urticaria caused by hydrolyzed wheat protein in hairdressers.  
Airaksinen L, Pallasaho P, Voutilainen R, Pesonen M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Dec;111(6):577-579

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of 70 kDa shrimp protein as a possible new allergen for shrimp allergy
A large-scale study of causative allergen components of shrimp allergies has never been conducted in Japan. A total of 31 referred patients with shrimp allergy were enrolled in the study. Shrimp allergy was diagnosed according to the clinical symptoms, and positive prick testing using black tiger shrimp. In 31 cases of shrimp allergy, detection rate (more than class 1) of allergen-specific IgE to conventional shrimp was 58.1%, to "new" shrimp was 66.7%, and to tropomyosin was 29.0%. Positive rate (more than class 2) of allergen-specific IgE to conventional shrimp was 54.8%, to new shrimp was 55.0%, and to tropomyosin was 19.4%. In the 5 cases of FDEIA, detection rate of allergen-specific IgE to conventional shrimp was 20%, to new shrimp was 40%, and to tropomyosin was 0%. In the 19 cases of immediate-type allergy, detection rate of allergen-specific IgE to conventional shrimp was 68.4%, to new shrimp was 66.7%, and to tropomyosin was 36.8%. In the 7 cases of OAS, detection rate of allergen-specific IgE to shrimp was 57.1%, to new shrimp was 85.7%, and to tropomyosin was 28.5%. Western blot analysis of the 31 cases showed that several cases showed a band with a molecular weight of 35-38 kDa, which corresponds to tropomyosin. However, a 70-kDa band was detected in 30 of 31 cases. The 70-kDa protein may be a new major allergen component of shrimp allergy.

Identification of 70 kDa shrimp protein as a possible new allergen for shrimp allergy. [Japanese]  
Adachi A, Tanaka A, Chinuki Y, Morita E.
Arerugi 2013 Aug;62(8):960-967

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Wind-pollination and the roles of pollen allergenic proteins.
Even with large amounts of available information about allergenic proteins from pollens, the incidence of pollen allergy continuously increases worldwide. The reason for this increase is unclear and is most likely due to a combination of factors. One important culprit might be a change in the pollen itself. Knowledge about pollen biology and how pollen is changing as a result of more extreme environmental conditions might improve our understanding of the disease. This review focuses on the characteristics of plants producing allergenic pollens that are relevant to pollen allergy, including the phylogenetic relationships, pollen dispersal distances, amounts of pollen produced, amounts of protein in each type of pollen, and how allergenic proteins are released from pollens. In addition, the physiological roles of major allergenic protein families will be discussed to help us understand why some of these proteins become allergens and why GMO plants with hypoallergenic pollens may not be successful

Wind-pollination and the roles of pollen allergenic proteins.  
Songnuan W.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;31(4):261-270

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Positive reactions to placebo in children undergoing double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge.
The aim of this study was to analyze incidence and characteristics of positive placebo reactions during DBPCFCs. 2.8% (21 out of 740) of all placebo challenges were assessed as positive. Young children (age <= 1.5 yrs) had more positive placebo challenges (4.0%) compared to older children (age > 1.5 yrs; 1.5%). Children with positive placebo challenges had higher levels of total IgE (median 201 kU/l) compared to negatively classified children (median 110 kU/l). In children with positive placebo reactions, skin symptoms were observed significantly more often, with a worsening of atopic eczema (AE) as the most reported symptom.

Positive reactions to placebo in children undergoing double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge.  
Ahrens B, Niggemann B, Wahn U, Beyer K.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Jan 31;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG4 ratio might improve the prediction of cooked and uncooked egg tolerance development in egg allergic children.
Accurate predictors of natural tolerance development to cooked and uncooked egg are needed in egg-allergic patients. This study compared the diagnostic performance of different immunological tests in relation to egg allergy versus tolerance. Children aged 5-18 years diagnosed with IgE-mediated egg allergy were prospectively recruited. All followed an egg-free diet. Prick test and specific IgE (sIgE) to ovalbumin, ovomucoid and egg white, ovalbumin-sIgG4 and ovomucoid-sIgG4 were determined. By boiled and raw egg challenges, children were classified as cooked egg allergic (CEA, n=50) or tolerant (CET, n=35), and uncooked egg allergic (UEA, n=64) or tolerant (UET, n=21).

Ovalbumin-sIgG4 resulted an independent protective factor for uncooked egg allergy. To identify patients with high probability of egg tolerance, ovalbumin-sIgE/sIgG4 tended to perform better than sIgE and prick, specifically in children with ovalbumin-sIgE <1.9kU/L (for UEA) and ovomucoid-sIgE <2.12kU/L (for CEA). The most accurate cut-offs to recommend challenges were ovalbumin-sIgE/sIgG4 below 2.49 for cooked egg and 1.45 for uncooked egg, which associated 89.5% and 80% probability of tolerance, respectively. These cut-offs identified correctly as tolerant an additional 23% and 14% of children with negative challenges to cooked and uncooked egg, respectively, in comparison to sIgE negative decision points. Additionally, prick test tended to perform better than sIgE alone in predicting cooked and uncooked egg tolerance for ovomucoid-sIgE <0.92kU/L and ovalbumin-sIgE <1.37kU/L, respectively.

Ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG4 ratio might improve the prediction of cooked and uncooked egg tolerance development in egg allergic children.  
Vazquez-Ortiz M, Pascal M, Jimenez-Feijoo R, Lozano J, Giner M, Alsina L, Martin-Mateos M, Plaza A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Jan 7;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A comprehensive review of sensitization and allergy to soy-based products.
Since 1943, cases of sensitization or allergy to soy-based formulas (SBFs) have been described without any consensus on their real prevalence. This study identified the adjusted prevalence of IgE-mediated soy allergies in children and performed a secondary analysis of the impact of age (less than and more than 6 months). A systematic review with meta-analysis of studies published from 1909 to 2013 in PubMed, Embase, LILACS, ARTEMISA, Cochrane, Bandolier, DARE and the GRADE system for grading quality was performed. The 40 studies identified established weighted prevalence of soy allergies of 0 to 0.5 % (0.27) for the general population, 0.4 to 3.1 % (1.9) for the referred population, and 0 to 12.9 % (2.7) for allergic children. Prevalence of sensitization after the use of SBFs is 8.7 and 8.8 %, depending on the method used. The prevalence of allergies to soy and IgE sensitization to the use of SBFs is less than reported. Not enough evidence exists to show a higher risk of allergy in infants younger than 6 months. The concern about soy allergy is no reason to postpone the use of SBFs in IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy infants until the age of 6 months.

A comprehensive review of sensitization and allergy to soy-based products.  
Katz Y, Gutierrez-Castrellon P, Gonzalez MG, Rivas R, Lee BW, Alarcon P.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2014 Jan 15;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
New UK nickel-plated steel coins constitute an increased allergy and eczema risk.
Nickel-plated steel coins have recently been introduced in the United Kingdom. This study compared the performance and allergy risk of the new nickel-plated coins (five and ten pence) with those of the cupro-nickel coins being replaced. Nickel-plated coins deposit higher levels of nickel onto skin than cupro-nickel coins, and hence pose an increased allergy risk. One-week release in artificial sweat is not suitable for determining the risk of handling items with high nickel release that come into short, repeated contact with the skin. UK citizens are now, because of this change in coinage, unnecessarily exposed to higher levels of nickel on the skin. This is of public health concern.

New UK nickel-plated steel coins constitute an increased allergy and eczema risk.  
Julander A, Midander K, Herting G, Thyssen JP, White IR, Odnevall W, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):323-330

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Finding the optimal patch test material and test concentration to detect contact allergy to geraniol.
Increasing the test concentrations of pure and oxidized geraniol enables the detection of more cases of contact allergy. Oxidized geraniol detects more patients than pure geraniol, but patch testing with only oxidized geraniol does not detect all cases of contact allergy to geraniol

Finding the optimal patch test material and test concentration to detect contact allergy to geraniol.  
Hagvall L, Karlberg AT, Christensson JB.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):224-231

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
An international multicentre study on the allergenic activity of air-oxidized R-limonene.
Limonene is a common fragrance terpene that, in its pure form, is not allergenic or is a very weak allergen. However, limonene autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. Oxidized R-limonene has previously been patch tested in multicentre studies, giving 2-3% positive patch test reactions in consecutive patients. Oxidized R-limonene 3.0% (Lim-OOHs 0.33%) pet. Was tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Denmark, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Australia. Results: Overall, 5.2% (range 2.3-12.1%) of the patients showed a positive patch test reaction to oxidized R-limonene. Doubtful reactions were found in 7.0% of the patients (range 0-24%). Few irritant reactions were seen.

An international multicentre study on the allergenic activity of air-oxidized R-limonene.  
Brared CJ, Andersen KE, Bruze M, Johansen JD, Garcia-Bravo B, Gimenez-Arnau A, Goh CL, Nixon R, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):214-223

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Quinoline Yellow dye-induced fixed food-and-drug eruption.
Quinoline Yellow dye-induced fixed food-and-drug eruption in a 23-year-old woman who had an 18-month history of recurrent, well-defined raised reddish plaques on her trunk and upper limbs. This rash always occurred at the same sites, and healed within a few days, leaving a brownish residual pigmentation. The patient regularly ingested lemon flavour candies and sodas, usually yellow in colour. One recurrence had occurred after intake of cough syrup (pholcodine), which contains Quinoline Yellow. Patch tests were positive for Quinoline Yellow.

Quinoline Yellow dye-induced fixed food-and-drug eruption.  
Leleu C, Boulitrop C, Bel B, Jeudy G, Vabres P, Collet E.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):187-188

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves
An increased frequency of occupational contact hand dermatitis among surgical operating theatre personnel has been noticed. This study evaluated patients with occupational contact dermatitis caused by their rubber gloves. Patch tests were performed with the baseline series, a rubber chemical series, and the patients' own gloves. A method for analysing 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG) and cetylpyridinium chloride in the gloves was developed. Contact allergy to thiuram mix was found in 8 of 16 patients, whereas 12 of 16 patients reacted to DPG. In 7 of 8 patients, contact allergy to cetylpyridinium chloride was found. In the patients' gloves, cetylpyridinium chloride and DPG were detected at higher concentrations on the inside of the gloves than on the outside. Most patients had worked for decades in their present occupations, but their hand dermatitis had only been present for months. The authors point out that contact allergy to DPG in gloves has been disputed, but, in this study, they we were able to confirm the presence of DPG and cetylpyridinium chloride in the causative gloves by using a modified method for the analysis. The presence of these chemicals in gloves caused an increase in occupational contact dermatitis in surgical operating theatre personnel.

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves: clinical investigation and chemical analyses.  
Ponten A, Hamnerius N, Bruze M, Hansson C, Persson C, Svedman C, Thorneby AK, Bergendorff O.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):103-110

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Higher allergenicity of high molecular weight hydrolysed wheat protein in cosmetics for percutaneous sensitization.
Wheat protein derivatives are used in a variety of products worldwide. Gluten is commercially used 'as is' or with modifications such as hydrolysis, which is carried out to overcome its insolubility. Several cases of contact urticaria following exposure to hydrolysed wheat protein (HWP) in cosmetics or of anaphylaxis caused by deamidated gluten in food or non-food products have been described. Seven patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis who had been sensitized to HWP primarily through the percutaneous and/or the rhinoconjunctival route by using facial soap containing HWP were evaluated. The IgE of all the patients reacted to HWPs composed of large polypeptide aggregates. High molecular weight (MW) HWPs were also found to induce significant enhancement of basophil CD203c expression. HWPs composed of large polypeptide aggregates possibly induce sensitization to a greater degree than lower-MW HWPs.

Higher allergenicity of high molecular weight hydrolysed wheat protein in cosmetics for percutaneous sensitization.  
Chinuki Y, Takahashi H, Dekio I, Kaneko S, Tokuda R, Nagao M, Fujisawa T, Morita E.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):86-93

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of Der p 23, a peritrophin-like protein, as a new major Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen
The authors screened a D. pteronyssinus expression cDNA library with IgE Abs from HDM allergic patients. A cDNA coding for a new major allergen was isolated, which showed sequence homology to peritrophins, which contain chitin-binding domains and are part of the peritrophic matrix lining the gut of arthropods. The mature Der p 23 allergen was expressed in Escherichia coli as an 8-kDa protein. It reacted with IgE Abs from 74% of D. pteronyssinus allergic patients (n = 347) at levels comparable to the two major HDM allergens, Der p 1 and Der p 2. Thus, Der p 23 represents a new major D. pteronyssinus allergen. Immunogold electron microscopy localized the allergen in the peritrophic matrix lining the midgut of D. pteronyssinus as well as on the surface of the fecal pellets.

Identification of Der p 23, a peritrophin-like protein, as a new major Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen associated with the peritrophic matrix of mite fecal pellets.  
Weghofer M, Grote M, Resch Y, Casset A, Kneidinger M, Kopec J, Thomas WR, Fernandez-Caldas E, Kabesch M, Ferrara R, Mari A, Purohit A, Pauli G, Horak F, Keller W, Valent P, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
J Immunol 2013 Apr 1;190(7):3059-3067

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Arginine kinase from Scylla paramamosain.
Arginine kinase (AK) is reported to be the pan-allergen of shellfish. However, there is limited information on its IgE epitopes and structural characteristics. In this study, AK from Scylla paramamosain was purified and characterized. The purified AK has a molecular weight of 40 kDa and it demonstrates cross-reactivity with the related allergens present in other shellfish. Recombinant AK (rAK) and three partial recombinant AKs (rAK1, rAK2, and rAK3) were successfully expressed. The proteins of rAK1, rAK2 and rAK have strong IgE reactivity with the pooled sera from crab allergic patients, while rAK3 has significantly weaker IgE reactivity, which indicates that the IgE epitopes of AK are mainly distributed in the regions of rAK1 and rAK2. In the IgE-binding assays of the sera from nine crab allergic patients, only three sera reacted with the denatured, linear AK as shown by Western-blotting, eight sera reacted with the native, folded AK by both dot-blotting and ELISA, which indicates that the conformational IgE epitopes of S. paramamosain AK may be more predominant.

Structural characterization and IgE epitope analysis of arginine kinase from Scylla paramamosain.  
Mao HY, Cao MJ, Maleki SJ, Cai QF, Su WJ, Yang Y, Liu GM.
Mol Immunol 2013 Dec;56(4):463-470

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of thaumatin-like protein and aspartyl protease as new major allergens in lettuce.
Consumed worldwide, lettuce is a Compositae family vegetable that can elicit allergic reactions. To date, however, only one lipid transfer protein has been described in allergic reaction to lettuce. The aim of this study was to identify potential new allergens involved in lettuce allergy. Sera from 42 Spanish lettuce-allergic patients were obtained from patients. The IgE-binding bands recognized in the sera of more than 50% of patients were identified as lipid transfer protein (9 kDa), a thaumatin-like protein (26 kDa), and an aspartyl protease (35 and 45 kDa).

Identification of thaumatin-like protein and aspartyl protease as new major allergens in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).  
Muñoz-García E, Luengo-Sánchez O, Haroun-Díaz E, Maroto AS, Palacín A, Díaz-Perales A, de las Heras Gozalo M, Labrador-Horrillo M, Vivanco F, Cuesta-Herranz J, Pastor-Vargas C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Dec;57(12):2245-52.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergenic relevance of nonspecific lipid transfer proteins 2: Identification and characterization of Api g 6 from celery tuber
This study sought to identify an IgE-binding nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) in celery tuber. A low molecular weight protein exclusively present in celery tuber was purified and designated Api g 6 and classified as member of the nsLTP2 family. Api g 6 has a molecular mass of 6936 Da. The alpha-helical disulfide bond-stabilized structure confers tremendous thermal stability (Tm > 90°C) and high resistance to gastrointestinal digestion. Thirty-eight percent of A. graveolens allergic patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to purified natural Api g 6 in ELISA and heat treatment did only partially reduce its allergenic activity. No correlation in IgE binding and limited cross-reactivity was observed with Api g 2 and Art v 3, nsLTP1 from celery stalks and mugwort pollen. Api g 6, a novel nsLTP2 from celery tuber represents the first well-characterized allergen in this protein family. Despite similar structural and physicochemical features as nsLTP1, immunological properties of Api g 6 are distinct which warrants its inclusion in molecule-based diagnosis of A. graveolens allergy. (Vejvar 2013 ref.29421 7)

Allergenic relevance of nonspecific lipid transfer proteins 2: Identification and characterization of Api g 6 from celery tuber as representative of a novel IgE-binding protein family.  
Vejvar E, Himly M, Briza P, Eichhorn S, Ebner C, Hemmer W, Ferreira F, Gadermaier G.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Nov;57(11):2061-70.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Boiling peanut Ara h 1 results in the formation of aggregates with reduced allergenicity.
Ara h 1 aggregates formed by boiling were morphologically distinct from those formed by roasting and had lower allergenic activity. Glycation had no additional effect on Ara h 1 allergenicity compared with heating alone. Taken together with published data on the loss of Ara h 2/6 from boiled peanuts, this supports the hypothesis that boiling reduces the allergenicity of peanuts

Boiling peanut Ara h 1 results in the formation of aggregates with reduced allergenicity.  
Blanc F, Vissers YM, del-Patient K, Rigby NM, Mackie AR, Gunning AP, Wellner NK, Skov PS, Przybylski-Nicaise L, Ballmer-Weber B, Zuidmeer-Jongejan L, Szepfalusi Z, Ruinemans-Koerts J, Jans.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Dec;55(12):1887-1894

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of heat processing on antibody reactivity to allergen variants and fragments of black tiger prawn
The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of heating on black tiger prawn allergens using a comprehensive allergenomic approach. Heat processing enhanced the overall patient IgE binding to prawn extracts and increased recognition of a number of allergen variants and fragments of prawn allergens. Allergens identified were tropomyosin, myosin light chain, sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein, and putative novel allergens including triose phosphate isomerase, aldolase, and titin. Thermal treatment enhanced antibody reactivity to prawn allergens as well as fragments and should be considered in the diagnosis of prawn allergy and detection of crustacean allergens in processed food.

Effect of heat processing on antibody reactivity to allergen variants and fragments of black tiger prawn: A comprehensive allergenomic approach.  
Kamath SD, Rahman AM, Voskamp A, Komoda T, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE, Lopata AL.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2014 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print]

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
In vitro digestion of soluble cashew proteins and characterization of surviving IgE-reactive peptides.
The ability of pepsin and trypsin to digest cashew allergens was assessed with an in vitro digestion model. Increasing amount of protease resulted in greater degradation of higher molecular weight cashew proteins. Among cashew proteins, the 2S albumin, Ana o 3, was most resistant to digestion by both pepsin and trypsin. MS identified digestion resistant Ana o 3 protein fragments that retained reported IgE-binding epitopes. Ana o 3 reduction followed by protease digestion decreased binding of serum IgE from cashew allergic patients. These results indicate that the Ana o 3 disulfide bond dependent structure protects the protein from proteolysis.

In vitro digestion of soluble cashew proteins and characterization of surviving IgE-reactive peptides.  
Mattison CP, Grimm CC, Wasserman RL.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Dec 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Taumatin-like protein (TLP 2), an allergen in sapodilla plum (Manilkara zapota).
Cases of oral allergy syndrome following the ingestion of sapodilla plum (Manilkara zapota) have been reported rarely. The main objective of this study was to identify and characterize the important allergens in sapodilla. Several cases of allergy to sapodilla fruit were identified; majority of the sapodilla-allergic subjects (6/7) experienced typical oral allergy syndrome symptoms, and allergen-specific IgE to the purified protein was positive. The allergen (21 578 Da) was identified as a thaumatin-like protein by homology, belonging to the pathogenesis-related protein (PR-5) family, which has been recognized as a new family of conserved, cross-reactive plant allergens.

Identification and characterization of a basic thaumatin-like protein (TLP 2) as an allergen in sapodilla plum (Manilkara zapota).  
Hegde VL, Ashok Kumar HG, Sreenath K, Hegde ML, Venkatesh YP.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Dec 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Vig r 6, the cytokinin-specific binding protein from mung bean (Vigna radiata) sprouts, cross-reacts with Bet v 1-related allergens and binds IgE from birch pollen allergic patients' sera.
Birch pollen associated allergy to mung bean sprouts is caused by cross-reactivity between the birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and the mung bean allergen Vig r 1. This study determined the allergenicity of the cytokinin-specific binding protein from mung bean (Vig r 6), another allergen related to Bet v 1 with only 31% sequence identity. Bet v 1, Gly m 4, Vig r 1, and Vig r 6 were produced in Escherichia coli. In an ELISA, 73 and 32% of Bet v 1-sensitized birch-allergic patients' sera (n = 60) showed IgE binding to Vig r 1 and Vig r 6, respectively. Of 19 patients who reported allergic reactions or had positive prick-to-prick tests to mung bean sprouts, 79% showed IgE binding to Vig r 1 and 63% showed IgE binding to Vig r 6. Bet v 1 completely inhibited IgE binding to both mung bean allergens. Vig r 6 showed partial cross-reactivity with Vig r 1 and activated basophils sensitized with mung bean allergic patients' sera. The study demonstrated IgE cross-reactivity despite low sequence identity between Vig r 6 and other Bet v 1-related allergens. Thus, IgE binding to Vig r 6 may contribute to birch pollinosis-associated mung bean sprout allergy.

Vig r 6, the cytokinin-specific binding protein from mung bean (Vigna radiata) sprouts, cross-reacts with Bet v 1-related allergens and binds IgE from birch pollen allergic patients' sera.  
Guhsl EE, Hofstetter G, Hemmer W, Ebner C, Vieths S, Vogel L, Breiteneder H, Radauer C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Sep 1. [Epub ahead of print]

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe childhood asthma and allergy to furry animals: Refined assessment using molecular-based allergy diagnostics.
Allergy to cats and dogs and polysensitization towards these animals are associated with severe childhood asthma. Molecular-based allergy diagnostics offers new opportunities for improved characterization and has been suggested to be particularly useful in patients with polysensitization and/or severe asthma. The aim was to use extract- and molecular-based allergy diagnostics to compare patterns of IgE sensitization towards aeroallergens in children with problematic severe and controlled asthma. Children with a positive ImmunoCAP towards any furry animal (cat, dog or horse) were recruited from a Nationwide Swedish study on severe childhood asthma. Severe (n = 37, age 13 years) and controlled (n = 28, age 14 years) asthmatics underwent assessment of allergic sensitization by ImmunoCap (kUA /l) and immunosolid-phase allergen chip (ISAC). Children with severe asthma had lower asthma control and FEV1 and more bronchial hyper-responsiveness in spite of high doses of inhaled steroids. Children with severe asthma displayed higher levels of IgE antibodies towards cat (17 vs. 3.9, p = 0.027), dog (3.8 vs. 1.2, p = 0.012) and horse (7.4 vs. 0.7, p = 0.014). Sensitization towards Can f 2 (22% vs. 0%, p = 0.009) and Equ c 1 (51% vs. 25%, p = 0.03) was more common in severe asthma. IgE levels towards Equ c 1 correlated with asthma control (r = -0.41, p = 0.04). The study concludes that children with severe allergic asthma had higher sIgE levels to cat, dog and horse. Molecular-based allergy diagnostics revealed a more complex molecular spreading of allergen components in children with the most severe disease.

Severe childhood asthma and allergy to furry animals: Refined assessment using molecular-based allergy diagnostics.  
Konradsen JR, Nordlund B, Onell A, Borres MP, Gronlund H, Hedlin G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Jan 27;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergies against pepsin, chymosin and microbial rennet.
Rennet is a mixture of the proteolytic enzymes pepsin and chymosin (rennin), which is usually obtained from the fourth stomach of young ruminants. While pepsin is also used in the pharmaceutical industry, both enzymes (pepsin and chymosin) are used for the coagulation of milk protein in the manufacture of cheese. Additionally, microbial rennet, which is naturally produced by certain microorganisms, has been used as a substitute for natural rennet in the cheese production for decades. Exposure to enzyme dusts has long been known to cause occupational immediate hypersensitivities. The present paper reviews the results of an evaluation of the literature data concerning occupational airway sensitisation due to natural and microbial rennet. Cases of specific airway sensitisation caused by rennet could be shown clearly by several studies. Positive skin prick and challenge tests as well as specific IgE antibodies have been described, thus suggesting an immunological mechanism

Occupational allergies against pepsin, chymosin and microbial rennet. [German]  
van K, Lessmann H, Bruning T, Merget R.
Pneumologie 2013 May;67(5):260-264

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis and delayed hymenoptera in a child with fire ant envenomation.
Hymenoptera envenomations can cause severe allergic reactions and anaphylaxis as well as severe toxin-mediated systemic reactions including rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, liver injury, and coagulopathy. However, red imported fire ant envenomations have rarely been reported to cause these systemic toxin-mediated effects. This report presents the first reported pediatric case of a 2-year-old male infant who presented with both anaphylaxis and evolving signs of systemic envenomation, including rhabdomyolysis and renal failure, as a result of multiple fire ant stings. The case illustrates the potential for a significant hymenoptera toxidrome in the setting of multiple stings and emphasizes the importance of close follow-up given the potential for slowly evolving findings.

Anaphylaxis and delayed hymenoptera in a child with fire ant envenomation.  
Cochran J, McSwain SD, Evans M, Webb S, Tecklenburg F.
Am J Emerg Med 2013 Mar;31(3):632-633

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children
While food allergies and eczema are among the most common chronic non-communicable diseases in children in many countries worldwide, quality data on the burden of these diseases is lacking, particularly in developing countries. This 2012 survey was performed to collect information on existing data on the global patterns and prevalence of food allergy by surveying all the national member societies of the World Allergy Organization, and some of their neighbouring countries. Data were collected from 89 countries, including published data, and changes in the health care burden of food allergy. More than half of the countries surveyed (52/89) did not have any data on food allergy prevalence. Only 10% (9/89) of countries had accurate food allergy prevalence data, based on oral food challenges (OFC). The remaining countries (23/89) had data largely based on parent-reporting of a food allergy diagnosis or symptoms, which is recognised to overestimate the prevalence of food allergy. Based on more accurate measures, the prevalence of clinical (OFC proven) food allergy in preschool children in developed countries is now as high as 10%. In large and rapidly emerging societies of Asia, such as China, where there are documented increases in food allergy, the prevalence of OFC-proven food allergy is now around 7% in pre-schoolers, comparable to the reported prevalence in European regions. While food allergy appears to be increasing in both developed and developing countries in the last 10–15 years, there is a lack of quality comparative data. This survey also highlights inequities in paediatric allergy services, availability of adrenaline auto-injectors and standardised National Anaphylaxis Action plans. In conclusion, there remains a need to gather more accurate data on the prevalence of food allergy in many developed and developing countries to better anticipate and address the rising community and health service burden of food allergy.

A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children  
Prescott SL, Pawankar R, Allen KJ, Campbell DE, Sinn JKH, Fiocchi A, Ebisawa M, Sampson HA, Beyer K, Lee BW United States of America
WAO Journal 2013;7:1

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Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Is specific IgE antibody analysis feasible for the diagnosis of methylenediphenyl diisocyanate-induced occupational asthma?  
Budnik LT, Preisser AM, Permentier H, Baur X.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2013 May;86(4):417-430
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The influence of chitin on the immune response to the house dust mite allergen Blo t 12.  
Zakzuk J, Benedetti I, Fernandez-Caldas E, Caraballo L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 5;163(2):119-129

Sal k 5, a member of the widespread Ole e 1-like protein family, is a new allergen of Russian Thistle (Salsola kali) pollen.  
Castro L, Mas S, Barderas R, Colas C, Garcia-Selles J, Barber D, Rodriguez R, Villalba M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 17;163(2):142-153

Sensitization to beer ingredients in Chinese individuals with beer allergy: a clinical study of 20 cases.  
Song Z, Chen W, Huang X, Zhou X, Luo J, Wang H, Darsow U, Becker T, Qian F, Hao F, Ring J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 14;163(2):135-141

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis with Mycobacterium avium complex among spa workers.  
Moraga-McHaley SA, Landen M, Krapfl H, Sewell CM.
Int J Occup Environ Health 2013 Jan;19(1):55-61
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Prevalence and risk factors for latex glove allergy among female clinical nurses: a multicenter questionnaire study in China.  
Liu QL, He XZ, Liang K, Xie R, Fang HP, Zhu KJ, Fan YM.
Int J Occup Environ Health 2013 Jan;19(1):29-34
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Allergic contact dermatitis caused by a blood pressure cuff.  
Milanesi N, Francalanci S, Gola M, Ieri F, Alessandri S, Romani A.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2013 Dec;69(6):e301-e302

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: an uncommon confounding oral mucosal overlap.  
Schwartz RA, Husain Z, Reddy BY.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2013 Dec;69(6):1057

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome: a picture is worth a thousand words.  
Rosenbach M, Fett N, Wanat KA, Rudolph RI.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2013 Dec;69(6):1056-1057

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to metalworking fluids: how to find the antigens.  
Merget R, Sander I, van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Rabente T, Kolk A, Bruning T.
Adv Exp Med Biol 2013;788335-340
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Occupational allergic respiratory diseases in garbage workers: relevance of molds and actinomycetes.  
Hagemeyer O, Bunger J, van K, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Drath C, Merget R, Bruning T, Broding HC.
Adv Exp Med Biol 2013;788313-320

Evaluation of a 4-steps-1-day whole body challenge protocol for the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to diisocyanates.  
Scheidler L, Sucker K, Taeger D, van K, Heinze E, Marczynski B, Monse C, Bruning T, Merget R.
Adv Exp Med Biol 2013;788301-311
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Implementation of non-invasive methods in the diagnosis of diisocyanate-induced asthma.  
Raulf-Heimsoth M, Liebig R, Marczynski B, Borowitzki G, Bernard S, Freundt S, Heinze E, Bruning T, Merget R.
Adv Exp Med Biol 2013;788293-300
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Detection of sugar alcohol-Specific IgE.  
Venkatesh YP.
Allergol Int 2014 Jan 25;

Over-reliance on assays for specific IgE in diagnostics of penicillin allergy?  
Kosnik M, Zidarn M, Korosec P, Hjortlund J, Mortz CG, Skov PS, Bindslev-Jensen C.
Allergy 2013 Dec;68(12):1626-1627

A majority of parents of children with peanut allergy fear using the epinephrine auto-injector.  
Chad L, Ben-Shoshan M, Asai Y, Cherkaoui S, Alizadehfar R, St-Pierre Y, Harada L, Allen M, Clarke A.
Allergy 2013 Dec;68(12):1605-1609

Aeroallergen and food IgE sensitization and local and systemic inflammation in asthma.  
Patelis A, Janson C, Borres MP, Nordvall L, Alving K, Malinovschi A.
Allergy 2014 Jan 7;

Skin prick test and basophil reactivity to cetuximab in patients with IgE to alpha-gal and allergy to red meat.  
Michel S, Scherer K, Heijnen IA, Bircher AJ.
Allergy 2013 Dec 26;

The prevalence and distribution of food sensitization in European adults.  
Burney PG, Potts J, Kummeling I, EN CM, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Barreales L, Fernandez-Perez C, Fernandez-Rivas M, Le TM, Knulst AC, Kowalski ML, Lidholm J, Ballmer-Weber BK, Braun-Fahlande.
Allergy 2013 Dec 26;

The diagnosis of food allergy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  
Soares-Weiser K, Takwoingi Y, Panesar SS, Muraro A, Werfel T, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Roberts G, Halken S, Poulsen L, Van RR, Vlieg-Boerstra BJ, Sheikh A.
Allergy 2013 Dec 14;

Respiratory allergen from house dust mite is present in human milk and primes for allergic sensitization in a mouse model of asthma.  
Macchiaverni P, Rekima A, Turfkruyer M, Mascarell L, Airouche S, Moingeon P, del-Patient K, Condino-Neto A, nnesi-Maesano I, Prescott SL, Tulic MK, Verhasselt V.
Allergy 2013 Dec 14;

Anaphylaxis/angioedema caused by honey ingestion.  
Vezir E, Kaya A, Toyran M, Azkur D, Dibek ME, Kocabas CN.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2014 Jan;35(1):71-74

Pain perception and performance of three devices for single-site allergen skin testing.  
Nelson HS, Lopez P, Curran-Everett D.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2014 Jan;35(1):63-65

A case of codeine induced anaphylaxis via oral route.  
Yoo HS, Yang EM, Kim MA, Hwang SH, Shin YS, Ye YM, Nahm DH, Park HS.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Jan;6(1):95-97

Can fecal calprotectin level be used as a markers of inflammation in the diagnosis and follow-up of cow's milk protein allergy?  
Beser OF, Sancak S, Erkan T, Kutlu T, Cokugras H, Cokugras FC.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2014 Jan;6(1):33-38

A case of anaphylaxis to peppermint.  
Bayat R, Borici-Mazi R.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 28;10(1):6

A dire reaction: rash after amiodarone administration.  
Chen A, Sauer W, Nguyen DT.
Am J Med 2013 Apr;126(4):301-303

Protein identification of two allergens of Boletus edulis causing occupational asthma.  
Castillo C, Lara B, Cruz MJ, Munoz X.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2013 May 15;187(10):1146-1148

Chronic respiratory symptoms of poultry farmers and model-based estimates of long-term dust exposure.  
Guillam MT, Pedrono G, Le BS, Huneau A, Gaudon J, Leborgne R, Dewitte JD, Segala C.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2013;20(2):307-311
Click to view abstract

Delayed anaphylaxis secondary to allergy skin testing.  
Ricketti PA, Unkle DW, Cleri DJ, Ricketti AJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Nov;111(5):420-421

Indoor, long-term persistence of cypress pollen allergenic potency: a 10-month study.  
Shahali Y, Brazdova A, Calleja M, Charpin D, Senechal H, Poncet P.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Nov;111(5):428-430

Occupational rhinitis, asthma, and contact urticaria caused by hydrolyzed wheat protein in hairdressers.  
Airaksinen L, Pallasaho P, Voutilainen R, Pesonen M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Dec;111(6):577-579

In vivo and in vitro techniques in the diagnosis of lipid transfer protein sensitization.  
Berroa F, Gastaminza G, Saiz N, Azofra J, Gamboa PM, Vela C, Garcia BE, Lizarza S, Echenagusia MA, Joral A, Aranzabal MA, Quinones MD, Jauregui I, Madera JF, Navarro JA, Lizaso MT, Goikoetxea MJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2013 Dec;111(6):571-573

Allergen of the month-melaleuca.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jan;112(1):A9

Anaphylaxis associated with streptomycin skin testing.  
Jung DM, Kim JH, Choi NY, Choi JH, Hwang YI, Jang SH, Jung KS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jan;112(1):81-82

Spice allergies in children.  
Fiocchi A, Dahdah L, Martelli A, Mazzina O, Manzotti G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jan;112(1):72-73

Special consideration is required for the component-resolved diagnosis of egg allergy in infants.  
Kim J, Lee J, Park MR, Han Y, Shin M, Ahn K.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jan;112(1):53-57

Occupational asthma, rhinitis, and contact urticaria caused by oxidative hair dyes in hairdressers.  
Helaskoski E, Suojalehto H, Virtanen H, Airaksinen L, Kuuliala O, alto-Korte K, Pesonen M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jan;112(1):46-52

Phleum pratense manganese superoxide dismutase identified by proteomic: a new candidate grass allergen.  
Conti A, Alessio M, Pesca M, Soldarini A, Breda D, Pigatto PD, Burastero SE.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jan 10;

Poison ivy dermatitis.  
Colbeck C, Clayton TH, Goenka A.
Arch Dis Child 2013 Dec;98(12):1022

Mislabelled cow's milk allergy in infants: a prospective cohort study.  
Elizur A, Cohen M, Goldberg MR, Rajuan N, Katz Y.
Arch Dis Child 2013 Jun;98(6):408-412
Click to view abstract

Establishment of 'Anaphylaxis Scoring Aichi (ASCA),' a new symptom scoring system to be used in an oral food challenge (OFC). [Japanese]  
Hino A, Maeda T, Haneda Y, Kobayashi T, Yasui M, Kando N, Ito K.
Arerugi 2013 Aug;62(8):968-979

Identification of 70 kDa shrimp protein as a possible new allergen for shrimp allergy. [Japanese]  
Adachi A, Tanaka A, Chinuki Y, Morita E.
Arerugi 2013 Aug;62(8):960-967

Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media: prevalence, risk factors and outcome-the results of a 3-year period.  
Pradubpongsa P, Dhana N, Jongjarearnprasert K, Janpanich S, Thongngarm T.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;31(4):299-306

Wind-pollination and the roles of pollen allergenic proteins.  
Songnuan W.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;31(4):261-270

Immunoglobulin values in healthy Thai children aged ? 24 months determined by nephelometry.  
Sitcharungsi R, Bunupuradah T, Pornvoranunt A, Apornpong T, Ananworanich J, Khupulsup K, Nouanthong P, Vilaiyuk S, Phasomsap C, Kamchaisatian W, Pancharoen C, Puthanakit T, Sirivichayakul.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;31(4):227-232

Molecular nature and the phylogenetic of allergic pollens play role in allergic diseases.  
Wongratanacheewin S.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;31(4):259

Serum albumins-unusual allergens.  
Chruszcz M, Mikolajczak K, Mank N, Majorek KA, Porebski PJ, Minor W.
Biochim Biophys Acta 2013 Dec;1830(12):5375-5381
Click to view abstract

When should specific occupational challenge tests be performed?  
Tarlo SM.
Chest 2013 May;143(5):1196-1198

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to metalworking fluid exposures.  
Barber CM, Burton CM, Robinson E, Crook B, Evans G, Fishwick D.
Chest 2013 Apr;143(4):1189

IgE-mediated immune responses and airway detection of Aspergillus and Candida in adult cystic fibrosis.  
Baxter CG, Moore CB, Jones AM, Webb AK, Denning DW.
Chest 2013 May;143(5):1351-1357
Click to view abstract

Incidence of severe asthmatic reactions after challenge exposure to occupational agents.  
Vandenplas O, D'Alpaos V, Evrard G, Jamart J.
Chest 2013 May;143(5):1261-1268
Click to view abstract

Positive reactions to placebo in children undergoing double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge.  
Ahrens B, Niggemann B, Wahn U, Beyer K.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Jan 31;

Ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG4 ratio might improve the prediction of cooked and uncooked egg tolerance development in egg allergic children.  
Vazquez-Ortiz M, Pascal M, Jimenez-Feijoo R, Lozano J, Giner M, Alsina L, Martin-Mateos M, Plaza A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Jan 7;

Walnut allergens: molecular characterisation, detection and clinical relevance.  
Costa J, Carrapatoso I, Oliveira MB, Mafra I.
Clin Exp Allergy 2014 Jan 2;

A comprehensive review of sensitization and allergy to soy-based products.  
Katz Y, Gutierrez-Castrellon P, Gonzalez MG, Rivas R, Lee BW, Alarcon P.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2014 Jan 15;

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by betulin-containing triterpene extract from the outer bark of birch (Betula alba).  
Meyer-Hoffert U, Brasch J.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):382-383

Exanthema caused by ingestion of potassium p-aminobenzoate (POTABA-Glenwood((R)) ).  
Meyer-Hoffert U, Jensen JM, Brasch J.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):381-382

Immediate contact urticaria caused by hydrolysed wheat proteins in a child via maternal skin contact sensitization.  
Leheron C, Bourrier T, Albertini M, Giovannini-Chami L.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):379-380

Severe occupational contact dermatitis caused by black rubber as a consequence of p-phenylenediamine allergy resulting from a temporary henna tattoo.  
Hald M, Menne T, Johansen JD, Zachariae C.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):377-379

Nickel allergy from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort.  
Mortz CG, Bindslev-Jensen C, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):348-356
Click to view abstract

New UK nickel-plated steel coins constitute an increased allergy and eczema risk.  
Julander A, Midander K, Herting G, Thyssen JP, White IR, Odnevall W, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Jun;68(6):323-330
Click to view abstract

Severe occupational protein contact dermatitis caused by fish in 2 patients with filaggrin mutations.  
Kaae J, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):319-320

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate.  
Sachse MM, Junghans T, Rose C, Wagner G.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):317-319

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by a nursing comfort balm: methyl glucose dioleate as the sensitizing ingredient.  
Deswysen AC, Dekeuleneer V, Goossens A, Baeck M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):315-316

Occupational contact allergy to the epoxy methacrylate 2,2-bis[4-(2-methacryloxyethoxy)phenyl] propane in an anaerobic glue.  
alto-Korte K, Pesonen M, Henriks-Eckerman ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):314-315

Results of patch testing with fragrance mix 1, fragrance mix 2, and their ingredients, and Myroxylon pereirae and colophonium, over a 21-year period.  
Nardelli A, Carbonez A, Drieghe J, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):307-313
Click to view abstract

Unexpected loss of contact allergy to aluminium induced by vaccine.  
Gente LA, Bergfors E, Inerot A, Blomgren U, Gillstedt M, Trollfors B.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):286-292
Click to view abstract

Sensitization patterns in Compositae-allergic patients with current or past atopic dermatitis.  
Paulsen E, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):277-285
Click to view abstract

One thousand cases of severe occupational contact dermatitis.  
Schwensen JF, Friis UF, Menne T, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):259-268
Click to view abstract

Whilst Rome burns: the epidemic of contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone.  
Goncalo M, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):257-258

Hairdressers presenting to an occupational dermatology clinic in Melbourne, Australia.  
Lyons G, Roberts H, Palmer A, Matheson M, Nixon R.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):300-306
Click to view abstract

Dimethylfumarate: potency prediction and clinical experience.  
Basketter DA, White IR, Burleson FG, Burleson GR, Kimber I.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 May;68(5):269-272
Click to view abstract

Nickel may be released from iPhone((R)) 5.  
Jensen P, Johansen UB, Johansen JD, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):255-256

Methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone contact allergy: a new 'epidemic'.  
Urwin R, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):253-255

Airborne exposure to methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone from a toilet cleaner.  
Lundov MD, Menne T.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):252-253

Airborne and systemic dermatitis, mimicking atopic dermatitis, caused by methylisothiazolinone in a young child.  
Aerts O, Cattaert N, Lambert J, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):250-251

Photopatch testing: recommendations for a European photopatch test baseline series.  
Goncalo M, Ferguson J, Bonevalle A, Bruynzeel DP, Gimenez-Arnau A, Goossens A, Kerr A, Lecha M, Neumann N, Niklasson B, Pigatto P, Rhodes LE, Rustemeyer T, Sarkany R, Thomas P, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):239-243
Click to view abstract

Finding the optimal patch test material and test concentration to detect contact allergy to geraniol.  
Hagvall L, Karlberg AT, Christensson JB.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):224-231
Click to view abstract

An international multicentre study on the allergenic activity of air-oxidized R-limonene.  
Brared CJ, Andersen KE, Bruze M, Johansen JD, Garcia-Bravo B, Gimenez-Arnau A, Goh CL, Nixon R, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):214-223
Click to view abstract

Chemical atopy.  
Puangpet P, Lai-Cheong J, McFadden JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):208-213
Click to view abstract

Penetration and haptenation of p-phenylenediamine.  
Pot LM, Scheitza SM, Coenraads PJ, Blomeke B.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):193-207
Click to view abstract

Chromate or titanium allergy -- the role of impurities?  
Bernard S, Baeck M, Tennstedt D, Haufroid V, Dekeuleneer V.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):191-192

Contact dermatitis caused by fatty alcohols: may polyethoxylation of the fatty alcohols influence their sensitizing potential?  
Corazza M, Zauli S, Bianchi A, Benetti S, Borghi A, Virgili A.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):189-190

Quinoline Yellow dye-induced fixed food-and-drug eruption.  
Leleu C, Boulitrop C, Bel B, Jeudy G, Vabres P, Collet E.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):187-188

Thiurams in shoe contact dermatitis -- a case series.  
Munk R, Sasseville D, Siegel PD, Law BF, Moreau L.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):185-187

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by weeds of the Compositae, Fabaceae and Rosaceae plant families.  
Andersen F, Paulsen E, Sommerlund M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):183-185

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by triphenyl phosphite in poly(vinyl chloride) gloves.  
Vandevenne A, Ghys K, Dahlin J, Ponten A, Kerre S.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):181-182

An update on airborne contact dermatitis: 2007-2011.  
Swinnen I, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Apr;68(4):232-238
Click to view abstract

Occupational contact allergy caused by pao ferro (Santos rosewood): a report of two cases.  
Bonny M, Aerts O, Lambert J, Lambert J, Lapeere H.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):126-128

Airborne allergic contact dermatitis caused by didecyldimethylammonium chloride in a geriatric nurse.  
Geier J, Lessmann H, Krautheim A, Fuchs T.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):123-125

An unusual case of triclosan-induced immunological contact urticaria.  
Ozkaya E, Kavlak BP.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):121-123

Contact dermatitis caused by dimethyl fumarate in wallets.  
Pastor-Nieto MA, Quintanilla-Lopez JE, Gomara B, Yanguas-Bayona I, Hervella M, Sanchez-Herreros C, Cuevas J.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):118-120

Education, communication, and nickel allergy-now is the time for stricter discipline.  
Jensen P, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):116

Outcome of a second patch test reading of TRUE Tests(R) on D6/7.  
Torp MJ, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):94-97
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy from disperse dyes in textiles: a review.  
Malinauskiene L, Bruze M, Ryberg K, Zimerson E, Isaksson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):65-75
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves: clinical investigation and chemical analyses.  
Ponten A, Hamnerius N, Bruze M, Hansson C, Persson C, Svedman C, Thorneby AK, Bergendorff O.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):103-110
Click to view abstract

Higher allergenicity of high molecular weight hydrolysed wheat protein in cosmetics for percutaneous sensitization.  
Chinuki Y, Takahashi H, Dekio I, Kaneko S, Tokuda R, Nagao M, Fujisawa T, Morita E.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Feb;68(2):86-93
Click to view abstract

Several cases of work-related allergic contact dermatitis caused by isocyanates at a company manufacturing heat exchangers.  
Engfeldt M, Isaksson M, Zimerson E, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):175-180
Click to view abstract

Occupational dermatitis in hairdressers: do they claim workers' compensation?  
Lyons G, Keegel T, Palmer A, Nixon R.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):163-168
Click to view abstract

Contact allergy to local anaesthetics-value of patch testing with a caine mix in the baseline series.  
Brinca A, Cabral R, Goncalo M.
Contact Dermatitis 2013 Mar;68(3):156-162
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergy: respiratory hazards in healthcare workers.  
Wiszniewska M, Walusiak-Skorupa J.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 21;

Insect repellents and contact urticaria: differential response to DEET and picaridin.  
Shutty B, Swender D, Chernin L, Tcheurekdjian H, Hostoffer R.
Cutis 2013 Jun;91(6):280-282
Click to view abstract

Orlistat-induced bullous leukocytoclastic vasculitis.  
Lazic T, Fonder M, Robinson-Bostom L, Wilkel CS, Della TL.
Cutis 2013 Mar;91(3):148-149
Click to view abstract

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema.  
Theyab AA, Lee DS, Khachemoune A.
Cutis 2013 Jan;91(1):30-35
Click to view abstract

Respiratory symptoms and sensitization to airborne pollen of ragweed and mugwort of adults in Southwest Germany. [German]  
Boehme MW, Kompauer I, Weidner U, Piechotowski I, Gabrio T, Behrendt H.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2013 Aug;138(33):1651-1658
Click to view abstract

Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. [German]  
Randerath WJ.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2013 Mar;138(11):541-547
Click to view abstract

Phthalates and Childhood Asthma, with Randi Bertelsen. Interviewed by Ashley Ahearn.  
Bertelsen R.
Environ Health Perspect 2013 Mar;121(3):A69

Proximity plus pollution: understanding factors in asthma among children living near major roadways.  
Barrett JR.
Environ Health Perspect 2012 Nov;120(11):A436

Differential immunogenicity and allergenicity of native and recombinant human lactoferrins: role of glycosylation.  
Almond RJ, Flanagan BF, Antonopoulos A, Haslam SM, Dell A, Kimber I, Dearman RJ.
Eur J Immunol 2013 Jan;43(1):170-181
Click to view abstract

Phototoxic and photoallergic reactions. [German]  
Neumann NJ, Schauder S.
Hautarzt 2013 May;64(5):354-362
Click to view abstract

Adverse reaction to fillers. Diagnosis and management. [German]  
Rzany B, Bachmann F, Nast A.
Hautarzt 2013 Mar;64(3):163-170
Click to view abstract

Injectable fillers: adverse reactions and their management. [German]  
Rzany B, Bachmann F, Nast A.
Hautarzt 2013 Feb;64(2):117-125
Click to view abstract

Exercise-induced anaphylaxis. [German]  
Wylon K, Hompes S, Worm M.
Hautarzt 2013 Feb;64(2):97-101
Click to view abstract

Value of in-vitro diagnostic tools after anaphylaxis. [German]  
Vanstreels L, Merk HF.
Hautarzt 2013 Feb;64(2):93-96
Click to view abstract

Epidemiology of anaphylaxis. [German]  
Worm M.
Hautarzt 2013 Feb;64(2):88-92
Click to view abstract

Component resolution reveals additional major allergens in patients with honeybee venom allergy.  
Kohler J, Blank S, Muller S, Bantleon F, Frick M, Huss-Marp J, Lidholm J, Spillner E, Jakob T.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 16;

Ash pollen immunoproteomics: Identification, immunologic characterization, and sequencing of 6 new allergens.  
Mas S, Torres M, Garrido-Arandia M, Salamanca G, Castro L, Barral P, Purohit A, Pauli G, Rodriguez R, Batanero E, Barderas R, Villalba M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 10;

Microarrayed dog, cat, and horse allergens show weak correlation between allergen-specific IgE and IgG responses.  
Curin M, Swoboda I, Wollmann E, Lupinek C, Spitzauer S, van HM, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan 7;

Major rabbit allergen Ory c 3: What could be its possible role as a sensitizing agent in real life?  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Russo M, Esposito G, Liccardi A, D'Amato G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Jan;133(1):283-284

Minimum prick test panel for adult patients with asthma and rhinitis in Ankara, Turkey.  
Comert S, Demir AU, Karakaya G, Kalyoncu AF.
J Asthma 2014 Jan 23;

IgG antibodies in food allergy influence allergen-antibody complex formation and binding to B cells: a role for complement receptors.  
Meulenbroek LA, de Jong RJ, den Hartog Jager CF, Monsuur HN, Wouters D, Nauta AJ, Knippels LM, van Neerven RJ, Ruiter B, Leusen JH, Hack CE, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CA, Knulst AC, Garssen J, van HE.
J Immunol 2013 Oct 1;191(7):3526-3533
Click to view abstract

Phl p 1-specific human monoclonal IgE and design of a hypoallergenic group 1 grass pollen allergen fragment.  
Levin M, Rydnert F, Kallstrom E, Tan LW, Wormald PJ, Lindstedt M, Greiff L, Ohlin M.
J Immunol 2013 Jul 15;191(2):551-560
Click to view abstract

Identification of Der p 23, a peritrophin-like protein, as a new major Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen associated with the peritrophic matrix of mite fecal pellets.  
Weghofer M, Grote M, Resch Y, Casset A, Kneidinger M, Kopec J, Thomas WR, Fernandez-Caldas E, Kabesch M, Ferrara R, Mari A, Purohit A, Pauli G, Horak F, Keller W, Valent P, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
J Immunol 2013 Apr 1;190(7):3059-3067
Click to view abstract

A case of hypersensitivity to mosquito bites without peripheral natural killer cell lymphocytosis in a 6-year-old Korean boy.  
Seon HS, Roh JH, Lee SH, Kang EK.
J Korean Med Sci 2013 Jan;28(1):164-166
Click to view abstract

Recurrent anaphylaxis caused by topical povidone-iodine (Betadine).  
Gray PE, Katelaris CH, Lipson D.
J Paediatr Child Health 2013 Jun;49(6):506-507

Patterns of sensitisation to common food and inhalant allergens and allergic symptoms in pre-school children.  
Kim HY, Shin YH, Yum HY, Jee HM, Jang SJ, Yoon JW, Han MY.
J Paediatr Child Health 2013 Apr;49(4):272-277
Click to view abstract

Precautionary allergen labelling following new labelling practice in Australia.  
Zurzolo GA, Mathai ML, Koplin JJ, Allen KJ.
J Paediatr Child Health 2013 Apr;49(4):E306-E310
Click to view abstract

Role of food allergy in childhood atopic dermatitis.  
Campbell DE.
J Paediatr Child Health 2012 Dec;48(12):1058-1064
Click to view abstract

Sensitization profile in differential diagnosis: allergic asthma vs. chronic (nonspecific) cough syndrome.  
Drkulec V, Nogalo B, Perica M, Plavec D, Pezer M, Turkalj M.
Med Sci Monit 2013;19409-415
Click to view abstract

Pollen aero allergens and the climate in Mediterranean region and allergen sensitivity in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma patients.  
Yalcin AD, Basaran S, Bisgin A, Polat HH, Gorczynski RM.
Med Sci Monit 2013;19102-110
Click to view abstract

Macrophages in food allergy: an enigma.  
Kumar S, Dwivedi PD, Das M, Tripathi A.
Mol Immunol 2013 Dec;56(4):612-618
Click to view abstract

Structural characterization and IgE epitope analysis of arginine kinase from Scylla paramamosain.  
Mao HY, Cao MJ, Maleki SJ, Cai QF, Su WJ, Yang Y, Liu GM.
Mol Immunol 2013 Dec;56(4):463-470
Click to view abstract

Molecular and immunological characterization of wheat Serpin (Tri a 33).  
Mameri H, ery-Papini S, Pietri M, Tranquet O, Larre C, Drouet M, Paty E, Jonathan AM, Beaudouin E, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Moreau T, Briozzo P, Gaudin JC.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2012 Dec;56(12):1874-1883

Pine nut allergy: clinical features and major allergens characterization.  
Cabanillas B, Cheng H, Grimm CC, Hurlburt BK, Rodriguez J, Crespo JF, Maleki SJ.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2012 Dec;56(12):1884-1893

Structural changes and allergenic properties of beta-lactoglobulin upon exposure to high-intensity ultrasound.  
Stanic-Vucinic D, Stojadinovic M, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Ognjenovic J, Gronlund H, van HM, Lantto R, Sancho AI, Velickovic TC.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2012 Dec;56(12):1894-1905

High fat food increases gastric residence and thus thresholds for objective symptoms in allergic patients.  
Mackie A, Knulst A, Le TM, Bures P, Salt L, Mills EN, Malcolm P, Andreou A, Ballmer-Weber BK.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2012 Nov;56(11):1708-1714

Identification of thaumatin-like protein and aspartyl protease as new major allergens in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).  
Muñoz-García E, Luengo-Sánchez O, Haroun-Díaz E, Maroto AS, Palacín A, Díaz-Perales A, de las Heras Gozalo M, Labrador-Horrillo M, Vivanco F, Cuesta-Herranz J, Pastor-Vargas C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Dec;57(12):2245-52.

Allergenic relevance of nonspecific lipid transfer proteins 2: Identification and characterization of Api g 6 from celery tuber as representative of a novel IgE-binding protein family.  
Vejvar E, Himly M, Briza P, Eichhorn S, Ebner C, Hemmer W, Ferreira F, Gadermaier G.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Nov;57(11):2061-70.
Abstract

Molecular and immunological characterization of Mus a 5 allergen from banana fruit.  
Aleksic I, Popovic M, Dimitrijevic R, Andjelkovic U, Vassilopoulou E, Sinaniotis A, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Lindner B, Petersen A, Papadopoulos NG, Gavrovic-Jankulovic M.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2012 Mar;56(3):446-453

Wheat gliadins modified by deamidation are more efficient than native gliadins in inducing a Th2 response in Balb/c mice experimentally sensitized to wheat allergens.  
Gourbeyre P, ery-Papini S, Larre C, Gaudin JC, Brossard C, Bodinier M.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2012 Feb;56(2):336-344

Boiling peanut Ara h 1 results in the formation of aggregates with reduced allergenicity.  
Blanc F, Vissers YM, del-Patient K, Rigby NM, Mackie AR, Gunning AP, Wellner NK, Skov PS, Przybylski-Nicaise L, Ballmer-Weber B, Zuidmeer-Jongejan L, Szepfalusi Z, Ruinemans-Koerts J, Jans.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Dec;55(12):1887-1894

Allergenic and immunogenic potential of cow's milk beta-lactoglobulin and caseins evidenced without adjuvant in germ-free mice.  
Morin S, Bernard H, Przybylski-Nicaise L, Corthier G, Rabot S, Wal JM, Hazebrouck S.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Nov;55(11):1700-1707

A food matrix reduces digestion and absorption of food allergens in vivo.  
Schulten V, Lauer I, Scheurer S, Thalhammer T, Bohle B.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Oct;55(10):1484-1491

Responsiveness of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 scaffold to the gastric environment: impact on structure and allergenic activity.  
Sancho AI, Wangorsch A, Jensen BM, Watson A, Alexeev Y, Johnson PE, Mackie AR, Neubauer A, Reese G, Ballmer-Weber B, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Skov PS, Vieths S, Mills EN.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Nov;55(11):1690-1699

Identification of hemocyanin as a novel non-cross-reactive allergen from the giant freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium rosenbergii.  
Piboonpocanun S, Jirapongsananuruk O, Tipayanon T, Boonchoo S, Goodman RE.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Oct;55(10):1492-1498

High-pressure treatment reduces the immunoreactivity of the major allergens in apple and celeriac.  
Husband FA, Aldick T, Van dP, Grauwet T, Hendrickx M, Skypala I, Mackie AR.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2011 Jul;55(7):1087-1095

Digestion of peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6: a comparative in vitro study and partial characterization of digestion-resistant peptides.  
Koppelman SJ, Hefle SL, Taylor SL, de Jong GA.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 Dec;54(12):1711-1721

Effect of heat processing on antibody reactivity to allergen variants and fragments of black tiger prawn: A comprehensive allergenomic approach.  
Kamath SD, Rahman AM, Voskamp A, Komoda T, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE, Lopata AL.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2014 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print]

In vitro digestion of soluble cashew proteins and characterization of surviving IgE-reactive peptides.  
Mattison CP, Grimm CC, Wasserman RL.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Dec 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Identification and characterization of a basic thaumatin-like protein (TLP 2) as an allergen in sapodilla plum (Manilkara zapota).  
Hegde VL, Ashok Kumar HG, Sreenath K, Hegde ML, Venkatesh YP.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Dec 5. [Epub ahead of print]

Vig r 6, the cytokinin-specific binding protein from mung bean (Vigna radiata) sprouts, cross-reacts with Bet v 1-related allergens and binds IgE from birch pollen allergic patients' sera.  
Guhsl EE, Hofstetter G, Hemmer W, Ebner C, Vieths S, Vogel L, Breiteneder H, Radauer C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2013 Sep 1. [Epub ahead of print]

Staphylococcus delta-toxin induces allergic skin disease by activating mast cells.  
Nakamura Y, Oscherwitz J, Cease KB, Chan SM, Munoz-Planillo R, Hasegawa M, Villaruz AE, Cheung GY, McGavin MJ, Travers JB, Otto M, Inohara N, Nunez G.
Nature 2013 Nov 21;503(7476):397-401
Click to view abstract

Archer dermatitis: a new case of allergic contact dermatitis.  
Tammaro A, Cortesi G, Abruzzese C, Narcisi A, Ermini G, Parisella FR, Persechino S.
Occup Environ Med 2013 Oct;70(10):750

Dampness and mould in schools and respiratory symptoms in children: the HITEA study.  
Borras-Santos A, Jacobs JH, Taubel M, Haverinen-Shaughnessy U, Krop EJ, Huttunen K, Hirvonen MR, Pekkanen J, Heederik DJ, Zock JP, Hyvarinen A.
Occup Environ Med 2013 Oct;70(10):681-687
Click to view abstract

Wheat IgE profiling and wheat IgE levels in bakers with allergic occupational phenotypes.  
Olivieri M, Biscardo CA, Palazzo P, Pahr S, Malerba G, Ferrara R, Zennaro D, Zanoni G, Xumerle L, Valenta R, Mari A.
Occup Environ Med 2013 Sep;70(9):617-622
Click to view abstract

Work-related allergic respiratory disease and asthma in spice mill workers is associated with inhalant chili pepper and garlic exposures.  
van der Walt A, Singh T, Baatjies R, Lopata AL, Jeebhay MF.
Occup Environ Med 2013 Jul;70(7):446-452
Click to view abstract

Sensitisation to cereal flour allergens is a major determinant of elevated exhaled nitric oxide in bakers.  
Baatjies R, Jeebhay MF.
Occup Environ Med 2013 May;70(5):310-316
Click to view abstract

Barley's lipid transfer protein: a new emerging allergen in pediatric anaphylaxis.  
Nemni A, Borges JP, Rouge P, Barre A, Just J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Apr 3;

Severe childhood asthma and allergy to furry animals: Refined assessment using molecular-based allergy diagnostics.  
Konradsen JR, Nordlund B, Onell A, Borres MP, Gronlund H, Hedlin G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2014 Jan 27;

Diagnostic evaluation of hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in a large population of children.  
Zambonino MA, Corzo JL, Munoz C, Requena G, Ariza A, Mayorga C, Urda A, Blanca M, Torres MJ.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 13;

Impact of suspected food allergy on emotional distress and family life of parents prior to allergy diagnosis.  
Knibb RC, Semper H.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;24(8):798-803

The role of hydrolysates for allergy prevention--pro.  
von Berg A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec;24(8):720-723

Advice recommended by health professionals regarding precautionary allergen labelling on pre-packed foods.  
Turner PJ, Skypala IJ, Fox AT.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 1;

Egg yolk: An unusual trigger of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.  
Arik YE, Cavkaytar O, Uysal SO, Sackesen C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2013 Dec 1;

Introduction of complementary foods and the relationship to food allergy.  
Grimshaw KE, Maskell J, Oliver EM, Morris RC, Foote KD, Mills EN, Roberts G, Margetts BM.
Pediatrics 2013 Dec;132(6):e1529-e1538
Click to view abstract

Occupational allergies against pepsin, chymosin and microbial rennet. [German]  
van K, Lessmann H, Bruning T, Merget R.
Pneumologie 2013 May;67(5):260-264
Click to view abstract

Exacerbations of asthma in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) and volcanic eruption in Montserrat (70 km from Guadeloupe). [French]  
Cadelis G, Tourres R, Molinie J, Petit RH.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Mar;30(3):203-214
Click to view abstract

Cross reactions between pollens and vegetable food allergens. [French]  
Pauli G, Metz-Favre C.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Apr;30(4):328-337
Click to view abstract

Ambrosia pollinosis. [French]  
Dechamp C.
Rev Mal Respir 2013 Apr;30(4):316-327
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis and delayed hymenoptera in a child with fire ant envenomation.  
Cochran J, McSwain SD, Evans M, Webb S, Tecklenburg F.
Am J Emerg Med 2013 Mar;31(3):632-633

Frequency of positive patch test reactions to preservatives: The Australian experience.  
Chow ET, Avolio AM, Lee A, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2013 Feb;54(1):31-35
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to methacrylates in ECG electrode dots.  
Lyons G, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2013 Feb;54(1):39-40
Click to view abstract

Patch testing is an effective method for the diagnosis of carbamazepine-induced drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome in an 8-year-old girl.  
Buyuktiryaki AB, Bezirganoglu H, Sahiner UM, Yavuz ST, Tuncer A, Kara A, Sackesen C.
Australas J Dermatol 2012 Nov;53(4):274-277
Click to view abstract

Serum diamine oxidase activity as a diagnostic test for histamine intolerance. [German]  
Music E, Korosec P, Silar M, Adamic K, Kosnik M, Rijavec M.
Wien Klin Wochenschr 2013 May;125(9-10):239-243

A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children  
Prescott SL, Pawankar R, Allen KJ, Campbell DE, Sinn JKH, Fiocchi A, Ebisawa M, Sampson HA, Beyer K, Lee BW United States of America
WAO Journal 2013;7:1
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