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 Allergy Advisor Digest - June 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Plant-expressed recombinant mountain cedar allergen Jun a 1 is allergenic and has limited pectate lyase activity.
Read Basophil activation marker CD203c is useful in the diagnosis of hen's egg and cow's milk allergies in children.
Read Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase and egg white cystatin react with IgE antibodies from children with egg allergy.
Read Allergen-specific IgE as a biomarker of exposure plus sensitization in inner-city adolescents with asthma.
Read Five cases of food allergy to vegetable worm (Cordyceps sinensis)
Read Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada.
Read A survey of serum specific-lgE to common allergens in primary school children of Taipei City.
Read Cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants strongly affect the results of the basophil activation test in hymenoptera-venom allergy.
Read Immunological characterization of Can f 4: a dog dander allergen cross-reactive with a 23 kDa odorant-binding protein in cow dander.
Read Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.
Read Anaphylaxis and insect allergy.
Read Food allergy and oral allergy or pollen-food syndrome.
Read Hyaluronidase allergy: a rare cause of periorbital inflammation.

Abstracts shared in June 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Comparison of IgE-binding capacity, cross-reactivity and biological potency of allergenic non-specific lipid transfer proteins from peach, cherry and hazelnut.
Read Important variations in parvalbumin content in common fish species: a factor possibly contributing to variable allergenicity.
Read Cloning, expression, characterization, cross-reactivity of manganese superoxide dismutase allergen from pistachio Nut.
Read Serum IgE measurement and detection of food allergy in pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.
Read Determination of storage conditions for shrimp extracts: analysis of specific IgE-allergen profiles.
Read Early exposure to cow's milk protein is protective against IgE-mediated cow's milk protein allergy.
Read Peanut allergy and allergic airways inflammation.
Read Anaphylaxis to Mango: ten cases reported in the Allergy Vigilance Networ
Read Assessment of the role of aeroallergens in patients with chronic urticaria
Read Nickel allergy presenting as mobile phone contact dermatitis.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Plant-expressed recombinant mountain cedar allergen Jun a 1 is allergenic and has limited pectate lyase activity.
Jun a 1 (from Mountain cedar) is the dominant allergenic protein of this tree, but biologically active recombinant Jun a 1 has not been successfully expressed, despite numerous attempts with several expression systems. In this study, recombinant Jun a 1 was expressed and recovered in good quantity (100 mug/g Tobacco leaf material), was confirmed as Jun a 1, bound IgE from sera from cedar hypersensitive patients and inhibited IgE binding to native Jun a 1. Jun a 1 pectate lyase activity was demonstrated, which may explain the necrosis seen on host plants, which was similar to that of control plants expressing banana pectate lyase.

Plant-expressed recombinant mountain cedar allergen jun a 1 is allergenic and has limited pectate lyase activity.  
Liu Z, Bhattacharyya S, Ning B, Midoro-Horiuti T, Czerwinski EW, Goldblum RM, Mort A, Kearney CM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 17;153(4):347-358

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Basophil activation marker CD203c is useful in the diagnosis of hen's egg and cow's milk allergies in children.
This study concludes that assessment of food antigen-induced CD203c expression on basophils is useful in the diagnosis of hen's egg and cow's milk allergies in children and to determine if children will outgrow FA as well as in decision making regarding whether or not to perform OFCs

Basophil activation marker CD203c is useful in the diagnosis of hen's egg and cow's milk allergies in children.  
Sato S, Tachimoto H, Shukuya A, Kurosaka N, Yanagida N, Utsunomiya T, Iguchi M, Komata T, Imai T, Tomikawa M, Ebisawa M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;152 Suppl 154-61

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase and egg white cystatin react with IgE antibodies from children with egg allergy.
Egg white protein is composed of over 30 proteins; many of which have neither been identified nor their allergenicities characterized. Ovalbumin, ovomucoid, ovotransferrin, lysozyme, and ovomucin are known to be major allergens found in egg white. This study set out to analyze whether unknown proteins that bind to IgE antibodies in serum from patients with egg allergy exist in egg white. Diluted egg white proteins were separated and immunolabeling was performed on individual patient sera from 19 child patients with egg white allergy and 11 negative control subjects. Egg white proteins were separated into 63 spots. Twenty-five of the 63 reacted with egg allergy patients' sera, and 10 of the 25 reactive spots showed IgE-reactivity to controls as well. Specific bindings to the IgE from egg allergy patients were found in 15 spots; one of which was confirmed as ovotransferrin. Among the other 14 protein spots, egg white cystatin and lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) were newly identified proteins that reacted with IgE in patients with egg allergy.

Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase and egg white cystatin react with IgE antibodies from children with egg allergy.  
Suzuki M, Fujii H, Fujigaki H, Shinoda S, Takahashi K, Saito K, Wada H, Kimoto M, Kondo N, Seishima M.
Allergol Int 2010 Jun;59(2):175-183

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen-specific IgE as a biomarker of exposure plus sensitization in inner-city adolescents with asthma.
Five hundred and forty-six inner-city adolescents enrolled in the Asthma Control Evaluation study underwent exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) measurement, lung function testing, and completion of a questionnaire. Among sensitized participants, allergen-specific IgE levels were correlated with the corresponding settled dust allergen levels for cockroach, dust mite, and mouse (r = 0.38, 0.34, 0.19, respectively; P < 0.0001 for cockroach and dust mite and P = 0.03 for mouse), but not cat (r = -0.02, P = 0.71). Higher cockroach-, mite-, mouse-, and cat-specific IgE levels were associated with higher FE(NO) concentrations, poorer lung function, and higher blood eosinophils. Higher cat, dust mite, and mouse allergen-specific IgE levels were also associated with an increasing risk of exacerbations or hospitalization.

Allergen-specific IgE as a biomarker of exposure plus sensitization in inner-city adolescents with asthma.  
Matsui EC, Sampson HA, Bahnson HT, Gruchalla RS, Pongracic JA, Teach SJ, Gergen PJ, Bloomberg GR, Chmiel JF, Liu AH, Kattan M, Sorkness CA, Steinbach SF, Story RE, Visness CM.
Allergy 2010 Jun 17;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Five cases of food allergy to vegetable worm (Cordyceps sinensis)
Cordyceps sinensis is a highly valued medicinal fungi of traditional Chinese medicine. Cordyceps sinensis is believed to have many beneficial properties. Cordyceps is a genus of ascomycete fungi (sac fungi) that includes about 400 described species. All Cordyceps species are endoparasitoids, mainly on insects and other arthropods (they are thus entomopathogenic fungi); a few are parasitic on other fungi. Cordyceps sinensis, known in English commonly as caterpillar fungus is considered a medicinal mushroom in oriental medicines, such as Traditional Chinese Medicines and Traditional Tibetan medicine.

This article describes 5 cases of food allergy to vegetable worm showing cross-reactivity with silkworm pupae.

Five cases of food allergy to vegetable worm (Cordyceps sinensis) showing cross-reactivity with silkworm pupae.  
Choi GS, Shin YS, Kim JE, Ye YM, Park HS.
Allergy 2010 Jun 14;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada.
Adults aged 20-44 years in six study sites across Canada underwent allergy skin testing using 14 allergens (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae) cat, cockroach, grasses (Timothy grass, Kentucky grass), molds (Cladosporium herbarium, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium), trees (tree mix, birch, Olea europea), and common ragweed. The overall prevalence of atopy was 62.7%. There was significant geographical variation in the prevalence of atopy in the six study sites (lowest 55.6% in Prince Edward Island, highest 66.0 in Montreal) and of sensitization to each of the allergens tested even after adjustment for confounders. When the first eight of the nine allergens in the ECRHS were used to estimate the prevalence of atopic sensitization, the prevalence of atopy in Canada was 57% compared with 35.2% overall for centers in the ECRHS.

Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada.  
Chan-Yeung M, Anthonisen NR, Becklake MR, Bowie D, Sonia BA, mich-Ward H, Ernst P, Sears MR, Siersted HC, Sweet L, Van TL, Manfreda J.
Allergy 2010 Jun 14;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A survey of serum specific-lgE to common allergens in primary school children of Taipei City.
This Taiwanese study investigated changes in common allergen sensitivities among children in Taipei City. A total of 142 primary schools in Taipei City, which included 25,094 students aged 7-8 years, were surveyed using an ISAAC questionnaire to screen for allergies. For positive responders, serum allergen-specific IgE was confirmed using the Pharmacia CAP system. A total of 1,500 students (5.98%) had confirmed sensitivities to allergens. Dust mite sensitivity among these children was nearly 90%. The prevalences of sensitivities to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae and Blomia tropicalis were 90.79%, 88.24%, and 84.63%, respectively. Dog dander (29.95%) was the second most common aeroallergen to induce sensitivity. Allergies to cat dander (8.69%) and to cockroach (15.48%) had decreased dramatically compared with previous analyses. Among the food allergens studied, the most common allergens that induced sensitization were (in order of prevalence) crab, milk, egg white, and shrimp (88.08%, 22.45%, 24.23%, and 21.44%, respectively). Mold and pollen sensitization was identified in fewer than 2% of the schoolchildren. Dust mites remain the most common allergen to induce allergic sensitization among children in Taipei City, while cockroach and mold sensitivities have dramatically declined. Food allergens should also be considered as a trigger of respiratory allergy. Except for dust mites, American cockroach and crab, allergens commonly reported to induce sensitization in other Asian counties are not common in Taiwan.

A survey of serum specific-lgE to common allergens in primary school children of Taipei City.  
Wan KS, Yang W, Wu WF.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar;28(1):1-6

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants strongly affect the results of the basophil activation test in hymenoptera-venom allergy.
The aim of this study was to investigate the biological activity of CCD-sIgE and the suitability of the basophil activation test (BAT) in hymenoptera venom-allergic patients (honeybee venom (HBV) and yellow jacket venom (YJV) having CCD-sIgE. The study concludes that in vitro basophil activation test (BAT) clearly demonstrates biological activity of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants-sIgE (CCD-sIgE). However, because most of the patients showed a mono-positive intracutaneous skin tests (IC) and activation of basophils with the IC-negative venom was significantly lower compared with the IC-positive one, the present data suggest that CCD-sIgE is clinically irrelevant in these patients.

Cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants strongly affect the results of the basophil activation test in hymenoptera-venom allergy.  
Mertens M, Amler S, Moerschbacher BM, Brehler R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jun 7;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunological characterization of Can f 4: a dog dander allergen cross-reactive with a 23 kDa odorant-binding protein in cow dander.
The object of this study was to purify, clone and characterize dog dander allergen Can f 4. Can f 4 was cloned and used to produce recombinant Can f 4 in Escherichia coli. A 23 kDa protein from cow dander, displaying cross-reactivity with Can f 4, was purified. Recombinant Can f 4 displayed close immunological and biochemical similarity to purified natural Can f 4 and bound IgE antibodies from 13/37 (35%) sera of dog allergic subjects. Can f 4 reactive sera showed IgE binding to a 23 kDa protein present in cow dander extract, related to a family of odorant-binding proteins. The dog and cow proteins shared 37% sequence identity and their cross-reactivity was demonstrated by IgE inhibition experiments.

Molecular and immunological characterization of Can f 4: a dog dander allergen cross-reactive with a 23 kDa odorant-binding protein in cow dander.  
Mattsson L, Lundgren T, Olsson P, Sundberg M, Lidholm J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jun 7;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.
"Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) are unpredictable and are a concern for radiologists and cardiologists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions manifest as anaphylaxis, and an allergic IgE-mediated mechanism has been continuously discussed for decades. Non-immediate reactions clinically are exanthemas resembling other drug-induced non-immediate hypersensitivities. During the past years, evidence is increasing that some of these reactions may be immunological. Repeated reactions after re-exposure, positive skin tests, and presence of specific IgE antibodies as well as positive basophil activation tests in some cases, and positive lymphocyte transformation or lymphocyte activation tests in others, indicate that a subgroup of both immediate and non-immediate reactions are of an allergic origin, although many questions remain unanswered. Recently reported cases highlight that pharmacological premedication is not safe to prevent RCM hypersensitivity in patients with previous severe reactions. These insights may have important consequences. A large multicenter study on the value of skin tests in RCM hypersensitivity concluded that skin testing is a useful tool for diagnosis of RCM allergy. It may have a role for the selection of a safe product in previous reactors, although confirmatory validation data is still scarce. In vitro tests to search for RCM-specific cell activation still are in development. In conclusion, recent data indicate that RCM hypersensitivity may have an allergic mechanism and that allergological testing is useful and may indicate tolerability."

Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.  
Brockow K, Ring J.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95157-169

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis and insect allergy.
"PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Anaphylaxis is an acute-onset and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that can be caused by numerous allergic triggers including stinging insects. This review focuses on recent advances, natural history, risk factors and therapeutic considerations.

RECENT FINDINGS: Recent work suggests that concerns over insect allergy diagnosis continue to exist. This is especially true with individuals who have a convincing history of a serious life-threatening anaphylactic event, but lack the necessary diagnostic criteria of venom-specific IgE by skin test or in-vitro diagnostic methods to confirm the diagnosis. The role of occult mastocytosis or increased basophile reactivity may play a role in this subset population. Additionally, epinephrine continues to be underutilized as the primary acute intervention for an anaphylactic reaction in the emergent setting.

SUMMARY: The incidence of anaphylaxis continues to rise across all demographic groups, especially those less than 20 years of age. Fortunately, the fatalities related to anaphylaxis appear to have decreased over the past decades. Our understanding of various triggers, associated risk factors, as well as an improved understanding and utilization of biological markers such as serum tryptase have improved. Our ability to treat insect anaphylaxis by venom immunotherapy is highly effective. Unfortunately, anaphylaxis continues to be underappreciated and undertreated especially in regard to insect sting anaphylaxis. This includes the appropriate use of injectable epinephrine as the primary acute management tool. These findings suggest that continued education of the general population, primary care healthcare providers and emergency departments is required."

Anaphylaxis and insect allergy.  
Demain JG, Minaei AA, Tracy JM.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun 10;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy and oral allergy or pollen-food syndrome.
"This paper reviews current concepts in our understanding of oral allergy or pollen-food syndrome. As technology has improved, much more accurate profiling of food allergic individuals is now possible, resulting in more precise diagnosis, elucidation of cross reactivity patterns and more helpful prediction of risk of anaphylaxis. "

"In-vitro screening of food allergic patients with large panels of allergens will change the accuracy of diagnosis resulting in better management. Allergens are now available for use in the allergist's office to improve diagnostic accuracy of skin tests in patients presenting with plant-food allergy. Knowledge of the specific sensitization of individual patients has consequences for both risk assessment and dietary management."

Food allergy and oral allergy or pollen-food syndrome.  
Katelaris CH.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun;10(3):246-251

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hyaluronidase allergy: a rare cause of periorbital inflammation.
"Hyaluronidase is a bovine or ovine testicular protein that is used as an adjunct to co-administered medicaments and fluids to enhance their dispersion and absorption through the degradation of hyaluronan. While it is a known potential allergen, there are few reports of hyaluronidase hypersensitivity. A 56-year-old lady presented 8 hours post glaucoma surgery with ipsilateral lacriminorrhoea, periorbital erythema, oedema, proptosis, pruritus and conjunctival chemosis. Right ocular motility was restricted and visual acuity was reduced. The reaction settled with oral corticosteroids and antihistamines. Hyaluronidase allergy was confirmed on skin prick testing. Hyaluronidase allergy is rare. In the few cases reported, reactions occurred at various doses and were acute (intraoperative), early (within hours), intermediate (within days) or delayed (within weeks). Anaphylaxis has also been described. Primary sensitization appears to be a prerequisite for most reactions. The variability in onset of symptoms and the response to skin testing would suggest that type I and type IV hypersensitivity may both contribute to this response. In this case, the timing fitted with a late phase type 1 reaction. This case shows that despite being less common than haemorrhage for acute reactions and infection for delayed reactions, allergy can account for orbital inflammation following ophthalmic surgery."

Hyaluronidase allergy: a rare cause of periorbital inflammation.  
Borchard K, Puy R, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2010 Feb;51(1):49-51

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Plant-expressed recombinant mountain cedar allergen jun a 1 is allergenic and has limited pectate lyase activity.  
Liu Z, Bhattacharyya S, Ning B, Midoro-Horiuti T, Czerwinski EW, Goldblum RM, Mort A, Kearney CM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 17;153(4):347-358

Comparison of IgE-binding capacity, cross-reactivity and biological potency of allergenic non-specific lipid transfer proteins from peach, cherry and hazelnut.  
Hartz C, Lauer I, Del Mar San Miguel Moncin, Cistero-Bahima A, Foetisch K, Lidholm J, Vieths S, Scheurer S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 17;153(4):335-346

Pen ch 13 major fungal allergen decreases CD44 expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.  
Tai HY, Tam MF, Chou H, Perng DW, Shen HD.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 17;153(4):367-371
Click to view abstract

Important variations in parvalbumin content in common fish species: a factor possibly contributing to variable allergenicity.  
Kuehn A, Scheuermann T, Hilger C, Hentges F.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 17;153(4):359-366

Basophil activation marker CD203c is useful in the diagnosis of hen's egg and cow's milk allergies in children.  
Sato S, Tachimoto H, Shukuya A, Kurosaka N, Yanagida N, Utsunomiya T, Iguchi M, Komata T, Imai T, Tomikawa M, Ebisawa M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010;152 Suppl 154-61

Guidelines Treatment options in IgEmediated food allergy  

Allergo J 2010;3:187-195
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Nahrungsmittelallergie à la carte.  
M. Worm
Allergo J 2010;4:207-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Journal Club Auf Nummer sicher bei Garnelenallergie Beikost: lieber früh als spät Aluminium-Kontaktallergie infolge SCIT? Cluster-SCIT: verträglicher durch Anti-IgE  

Allergo J 2010;4:214-217
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Original Article Food anaphylaxis: data from the anaphylaxis register  

Allergo J 2010;4:234
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

CME Nahrungsmittelallergie - M. Worm  

Allergo J 2010;4:234
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Review Articles Increasing popularity of soy: which advice can we give to patients with birch pollinosis? Allergen families and molecular dia gnostics of IgE-mediated food-allergic reactions: from theory to practice  

Allergo J 2010;4:243-263
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Review Articles Haematogenous contact eczema induced by foods  

Allergo J 2010;4:264-274
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase and egg white cystatin react with IgE antibodies from children with egg allergy.  
Suzuki M, Fujii H, Fujigaki H, Shinoda S, Takahashi K, Saito K, Wada H, Kimoto M, Kondo N, Seishima M.
Allergol Int 2010 Jun;59(2):175-183

Cloning, Expression, Characterization, and Computational Approach for Cross-Reactivity Prediction of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Allergen from Pistachio Nut.  
Noorbakhsh R, Mortazavi SA, Sankian M, Shahidi F, Assarehzadegan MA, Varasteh A.
Allergol Int 2010 Jun 25;59(3):

Pathological Mechanisms and Clinical Features of Eosinophilic Chronic Rhinosinusitis in the Japanese Population.  
Takeno S, Hirakawa K, Ishino T.
Allergol Int 2010 Jun 25;59(3):
Click to view abstract

Allergen-specific IgE as a biomarker of exposure plus sensitization in inner-city adolescents with asthma.  
Matsui EC, Sampson HA, Bahnson HT, Gruchalla RS, Pongracic JA, Teach SJ, Gergen PJ, Bloomberg GR, Chmiel JF, Liu AH, Kattan M, Sorkness CA, Steinbach SF, Story RE, Visness CM.
Allergy 2010 Jun 17;

Anaphylaxis to camel milk in an atopic child.  
Al-Hammadi S, El-Hassan T, Al-Reyami L.
Allergy 2010 Jun 17;

Projections of the effects of climate change on allergic asthma: the contribution of aerobiology.  
Cecchi L, D'Amato G, Ayres JG, Galan C, Forastiere F, Forsberg B, Gerritsen J, Nunes C, Behrendt H, Akdis C, Dahl R, nnesi-Maesano I.
Allergy 2010 Jun 17;
Click to view abstract

Five cases of food allergy to vegetable worm (Cordyceps sinensis) showing cross-reactivity with silkworm pupae.  
Choi GS, Shin YS, Kim JE, Ye YM, Park HS.
Allergy 2010 Jun 14;

Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada.  
Chan-Yeung M, Anthonisen NR, Becklake MR, Bowie D, Sonia BA, mich-Ward H, Ernst P, Sears MR, Siersted HC, Sweet L, Van TL, Manfreda J.
Allergy 2010 Jun 14;

Possible in-cabin exposure to cat allergen: a 2010 airline survey on live animal transport and a review of literature.  
Mohrenschlager M, Ring J, Lauener R.
Allergy 2010 Jun 14;

Bet v 1 and its homologous food allergen Api g 1 stimulate dendritic cells from birch pollen-allergic individuals to induce different Th-cell polarization.  
Smole U, Wagner S, Balazs N, Radauer C, Bublin M, Allmaier G, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Breiteneder H.
Allergy 2010 Jun 14;
Click to view abstract

Comparison of the skin-prick test and Phadia ImmunoCAP as tools to diagnose house-dust mite allergy.  
Jung YG, Cho HJ, Park GY, Min JY, Kim HY, Dhong HJ, Chung SK, Kim SW.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 May;24(3):226-229
Click to view abstract

Serum IgE measurement and detection of food allergy in pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Erwin EA, James HR, Gutekunst HM, Russo JM, Kelleher KJ, Platts-Mills TA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;104(6):496-502

On the cover. Eucalyptus globulus.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;104(6):A3

The role of component-resolved testing in food allergy and oral allergy syndrome.  
Thompson JC, Kroker GF.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;104(6):543-544

Occupational asthma caused by gerbil: purification and partial characterization of a new gerbil allergen.  
de las HM, Cuesta-Herranz J, Cases B, de MJ, Fernandez-Nieto M, Sastre J, Vivanco F, Pastor-Vargas C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;104(6):540-542

A case of generalized urticaria caused by arrowroot ingestion.  
Kim JH, Kim JE, Choi GS, Ye YM, Park HS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jun;104(6):539-540

Determination of storage conditions for shrimp extracts: analysis of specific IgE-allergen profiles.  
Piboonpocanun S, Boonchoo S, Pariyaprasert W, Visitsunthorn N, Jirapongsananuruk O.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar;28(1):47-52

Comparison between Siriraj mite allergen vaccine and standardized commercial mite vaccine by skin prick testing in normal Thai adults.  
Visitsunthorn N, Pacharn P, Jirapongsananuruk O, Weeravejsukit S, Sripramong C, Sookrung N, Bunnag C.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar;28(1):41-45
Click to view abstract

A survey of serum specific-lgE to common allergens in primary school children of Taipei City.  
Wan KS, Yang W, Wu WF.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar;28(1):1-6

Occupational asthma due to colistin in a pharmaceutical worker.  
Gomez-Olles S, Madrid-San MF, Cruz MJ, Munoz X.
Chest 2010 May;137(5):1200-1202
Click to view abstract

Component-resolved diagnosis of allergy: more is better?  
Salcedo G, az-Perales A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jun;40(6):836-838

Cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants strongly affect the results of the basophil activation test in hymenoptera-venom allergy.  
Mertens M, Amler S, Moerschbacher BM, Brehler R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jun 7;

Molecular and immunological characterization of Can f 4: a dog dander allergen cross-reactive with a 23 kDa odorant-binding protein in cow dander.  
Mattsson L, Lundgren T, Olsson P, Sundberg M, Lidholm J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jun 7;

Allergen challenge of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis increases IL-17RB, which regulates basophil apoptosis and degranulation.  
Wang H, Mobini R, Fang Y, Barrenas F, Zhang H, Xiang Z, Benson M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jun 7;
Click to view abstract

Insect venoms.  
Muller UR.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95141-156
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In vitro diagnosis of anaphylaxis.  
Sanz ML, Gamboa PM, Garcia-Figueroa BE, Ferrer M.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95125-140
Click to view abstract

T-cell response to allergens.  
Ozdemir C, Akdis M, Akdis CA.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;9522-44
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History and classification of anaphylaxis.  
Ring J, Behrendt H, de WA.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;951-11
Click to view abstract

Anaphylactic reactions to local anesthetics.  
Ring J, Franz R, Brockow K.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95190-200
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to general anesthetics.  
Moneret-Vautrin DA, Mertes PM.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95180-189
Click to view abstract

Analgesics.  
Szczeklik A.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95170-179
Click to view abstract

Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.  
Brockow K, Ring J.
Chem Immunol Allergy 2010;95157-169

Update on epidemiology of pollinosis in Japan: changes over the last 10 years  
Nakae, K.; Baba, K.
Clin Exp Allergy Rev 2010;10 (1):2-7
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Prevalence of Japanese cedar pollinosis in Tokyo: a survey conducted by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government.  
Nishihata, S.; Murata, T.; Inoue, S.; Okubo, K.; Sahashi, N.; Takahashi, H.; Hirooka, J.; Hoshiyama, Y.; Murayama, K.; Mezawa, A.; Yokoyama, T.; Endo, T.; Saiga, T.; Saito, Y.
Clin Exp Allergy Rev 2010;10 (1):8-11
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Japanese cedarJapanese cypress pollen-dispersion information and the initial therapy.  
Endo T.
Clin Exp Allergy Rev 2010;10 (1):39-43
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis and insect allergy.  
Demain JG, Minaei AA, Tracy JM.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun 10;

Diagnosis and treatment of allergy to hymenoptera venoms.  
Hamilton RG.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun 10;
Click to view abstract

Avoidance or exposure to foods in prevention and treatment of food allergy?  
Prescott SL, Bouygue GR, Videky D, Fiocchi A.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun;10(3):258-266

Food allergy and oral allergy or pollen-food syndrome.  
Katelaris CH.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun;10(3):246-251

Food allergy and eosinophilic gastroenteritis and colitis.  
Bischoff SC.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun;10(3):238-245
Click to view abstract

The role of the gut mucosal immunity in the development of tolerance against allergy to food.  
Chahine BG, Bahna SL.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun;10(3):220-225
Click to view abstract

Botanical briefs: poisonwood (Metopium toxiferum).  
Hossler EW.
Cutis 2010 Apr;85(4):178-179

Implant allergies. [German]  
Thomas P, Thomsen M.
Hautarzt 2010 Mar;61(3):255-262
Click to view abstract

Early exposure to cow's milk protein is protective against IgE-mediated cow's milk protein allergy.  
Katz Y, Rajuan N, Goldberg MR, Eisenberg E, Heyman E, Cohen A, Leshno M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun 9;
Click to view abstract

Targeting Toll-like receptors on dendritic cells modifies the T(H)2 response to peanut allergens in vitro.  
Pochard P, Vickery B, Berin MC, Grishin A, Sampson HA, Caplan M, Bottomly K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun 8;
Click to view abstract

Contribution of IgE and immunoglobulin free light chain in the allergic reaction to cow's milk proteins.  
Schouten B, van Esch BC, van Thuijl AO, Blokhuis BR, Groot KT, Hofman GA, Moro GE, Boehm G, Arslanoglu S, Sprikkelman AB, Willemsen LE, Knippels LM, Redegeld FA, Garssen J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jun;125(6):1308-1314
Click to view abstract

Occupational asthma caused by the predatory beneficial mites Amblyseius californicus and Amblyseius cucumeris.  
Skousgaard SG, Thisling T, Bindslev-Jensen C, Baelum J.
Occup Environ Med 2010 Apr;67(4):287

Peanut allergy and allergic airways inflammation.  
Hughes JL, Brown T, Edgar JD, Shields MD.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 20;

Diet and nutritional status of children with food allergies.  
Flammarion S, Santos C, Guimber D, Jouannic L, Thumerelle C, Gottrand F, Deschildre A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 14;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis in Israel: Experience with 92 hospitalized children.  
Hoffer V, Scheuerman O, Marcus N, Levy Y, Segal N, Lagovsky I, Monselise Y, Garty BZ.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun 7;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxie à la mangue : dix cas rapportés au Réseau allergovigilance aspects cliniques et fréquence actuelle / Anaphylaxis Mango: ten cases reported in the Allergy Vigilance Network - clinical and current frequency  
M. Morisset, D.-A. Moneret-Vautrin, P. Beaumont, B. Bonnefoy-Guionnet, M.-P. Chataignaullt, A. Cheynel, J.-P. Sacre, I. Sullerot, L. Parisot
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(4):406-409
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Thrombopénie induite par la rifampicine de découverte fortuite et sans sensibilisation préalable  
N. Chaouch, M. Mjid, M. Zarrouk, S. Cheikh Rouhou, F. Ben Hassen, S. Yaalaoui, H. Racil, A. Chabbou
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(4):410-412
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Première introduction d’aliments à la maison, proposition d’un schéma de progression accompagné de photos / First introduction of food at home, proposed a scheme of progress with photos  
C. Feuillet Dassonval, E. Bidat
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(4):413-414
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Assessment of the role of aeroallergens in patients with chronic urticaria  
M.M. Refaat, E.N. Ossman, M.N. Farres, M.M. El-Khodeery, N.A. Arafa, M.Y. Attia
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(4):394-397
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie aux céphalosporines : intérêt des tests cutanés / Allergy to cephalosporins: value of skin tests  
C. Galera, D. Kacimi, A. Jolivet, P.J. Bousquet, P. Demoly
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(4):398-405
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Mite and cockroach sensitisation in patients with allergic rhinitis in the Free State.  
Seedat RY, Claassen J, Claassen AJ, Joubert G.
S Afr Med J 2010 Mar;100(3):160-163
Click to view abstract

Indoor and outdoor allergens in Bloemfontein.  
Potter PC.
S Afr Med J 2010 Mar;100(3):155

Hyaluronidase allergy: a rare cause of periorbital inflammation.  
Borchard K, Puy R, Nixon R.
Australas J Dermatol 2010 Feb;51(1):49-51

Nickel allergy presenting as mobile phone contact dermatitis.  
Roberts H, Tate B.
Australas J Dermatol 2010 Feb;51(1):23-25

True blue football fan: tattoo reaction confined to blue pigment.  
Yoong C, Vun YY, Spelman L, Muir J.
Australas J Dermatol 2010 Feb;51(1):21-22
Click to view abstract


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