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 Allergy Advisor Digest - June 2012
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Varying allergen composition and content affects the in vivo allergenic activity of commercial Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts.
Read IgE to recombinant allergens Api m 1, Ves v 1, and Ves v 5 distinguish double sensitization from crossreaction in venom allergy.
Read Allergy to deamidated gluten in patients tolerant to wheat: specific epitopes linked to deamidation.
Read Predictive value of IgE/IgG4 antibody ratio in children with egg allergy.
Read Korean squirrel: a new pet as a cause of asthma.
Read Allergen stabilities and compatibilities in mixtures of high-protease fungal and insect extracts.
Read Contact allergy to sodium sulfite and its relationship to sodium metabisulfite.
Read Sodium metabisulfite as a contact allergen--an example of a rare chemical mechanism for protein modification.
Read Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis.
Read Exposure to dog allergens and subsequent allergic sensitization: an updated review.
Read Update on food allergy in adults.
Read Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake?
Read Identification of causative foods in children with eosinophilic esophagitis treated with an elimination diet.
Read Esophageal eosinophilia caused by milk proteins: From suspicion to evidence based on 2 case reports.
Read Allergens in urban schools and homes of children with asthma.

Abstracts shared in June 2012 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Cof a 1: identification, expression and immunoreactivity of the first coffee allergen.
Read Anaphylaxis to peanut in a patient predominantly sensitized to Ara h 6.
Read Hypersensitivity reactions to marijuana.
Read ABIDEC drops and peanut allergy.
Read Direct and indirect exposure to horse
Read Insect anaphylaxis: where are we?
Read Peanut component Ara h 8 sensitization and tolerance to peanut.
Read Specific IgE against Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins: An independent risk factor for asthma.
Read Can f 1 levels in hair and homes of different dog breeds: Lack of evidence to describe any dog breed as hypoallergenic.
Read Outcomes of 100 consecutive open, baked-egg oral food challenges in the allergy office.
Read Anaphylaxis due to chicken meat.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Varying allergen composition and content affects the in vivo allergenic activity of commercial Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts.
The aim of this study was to analyze commercially available Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts from different manufacturers regarding allergen composition and content and whether variations may affect their allergenic activity. Only Der p 1 and Der p 2 were detected in all extracts but their concentrations and ratios showed high variability (Der p 1: 6.0-40.8 microg ml(-1); Der p 2: 1.7-45.0 microg ml(-1)). At least 1 out of 4 allergens (i.e. Der p 5, 7, 10 and 21) was not detected in 8 of the studied extracts. Mite-allergic subjects showed different IgE reactivity profiles to the individual mite allergens, the extracts showed different allergenic activity in skin-prick tests and false-negative results. Commercially available D. pteronyssinus extracts lack important allergens, show great variability regarding allergen composition and content and some gave false-negative diagnostic test results in certain patients.

Varying allergen composition and content affects the in vivo allergenic activity of commercial Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts.  
Casset A, Mari A, Purohit A, Resch Y, Weghofer M, Ferrara R, Thomas WR, Alessandri C, Chen KW, de BF, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 21;159(3):253-262

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE to recombinant allergens Api m 1, Ves v 1, and Ves v 5 distinguish double sensitization from crossreaction in venom allergy.
Patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy are frequently positive to venoms of both honey bee and wasp (Vespula). Component-resolved analysis with recombinant species-specific major allergens (rSSMA) may help to distinguish true double sensitization from crossreactivity. 121 patients with systemic allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings, 76 with double positivity of serum-specific IgE (sIgE) to both venoms, 45 with single positivity to bee or wasp venom, and 32 controls without history of systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings and no sIgE to whole venoms were assessed.

Only 47% of 76 patients with double positivity to whole venoms reacted also to rSSMA of both species. Specificity of sIgE to the 3 rSSMA was very high, with no sIgE to rSSMA of the other species in single-positive venom-allergic patients and only one control with low sIgE to Ves v 1. All wasp-allergic single-positive patients had sIgE to Ves v 5 and/or Ves v 1, and 78.3% of single-positive bee venom-allergic patients had sIgE to Api m 1.

Specificity of sIgE to rSSMA of both species is excellent. Sensitivity of sIgE to rSSMA was optimal for wasp venom. Sensitivity of bee venom Api m 1 could be increased by adding rSSMA of other important bee venom allergens

IgE to recombinant allergens Api m 1, Ves v 1, and Ves v 5 distinguish double sensitization from crossreaction in venom allergy.  
Muller U, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Hausmann O, Helbling A.
Allergy 2012 Jun 8;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to deamidated gluten in patients tolerant to wheat: specific epitopes linked to deamidation.
Gluten proteins can be modified by deamidation to enhance their solubility and technological applications. However, severe allergic reactions have been reported after the consumption of food products containing deamidated gluten (DG) in subjects tolerant to wheat. This investigation aimed to characterize allergen profiles for these patients in comparison with those of patients allergic to wheat and to identify IgE-binding epitopes. Sera were obtained from 15 patients allergic to DG and from nine patients allergic to wheat proteins (WP). Compared to the heterogeneous pattern of allergens detected by IgE from patients allergic to WP, responses of patients allergic to DG were homogeneous. In ELISA, all the sera displayed IgE binding to deamidated gamma- and omega2-gliadins and deamidated total gliadins frequently with high concentrations. These modified proteins induced RBL degranulation with most of the sera from DG-allergic patients. A consensus epitope was found on native gamma- and omega2-gliadins (QPQQPFPQ); it was repeated several times in their sequences. The substitution of two or three glutamines of this epitope into glutamic acid at positions Q3 or Q4 and Q8 (QPEEPFPE) increased its recognition the best. Therefore allergy to deamidated gluten is a separate entity from wheat allergy. It can be evidenced by strong IgE binding to deamidated gliadins or peptides of the type QPEEPFPE.

Allergy to deamidated gluten in patients tolerant to wheat: specific epitopes linked to deamidation.  
Denery-Papini S, Bodinier M, Larré C, Brossard C, Pineau F, Triballeau S, Pietri M, Battais F, Mothes T, Paty E, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Allergy 2012 Jun 28;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Predictive value of IgE/IgG4 antibody ratio in children with egg allergy.
The aim of this study was to investigate the role of specific IgG4 antibodies to hen's egg white and determine their utility as a marker for the outcome of oral challenge test in children sensitized to hen's egg. Hen's egg oral food challenge test was performed in 105 sensitized children, and the titers of egg white-specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies were measured. Sixty-four of 105 oral challenges with whole eggs were assessed as positive. The AUC for IgE, IgG4, and IgE/IgG4 for the prediction of positive results were 0.609, 0.724, and 0.847, respectively. Thus, the IgE/IgG4 ratio generated significantly higher specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value (%), and negative predictive value (%) than the individual IgE and IgG4. Egg white-specific serum IgG4/IgE ratio is important for predicting reactivity to egg during food challenges.

Predictive value of IgE/IgG4 antibody ratio in children with egg allergy.  
Okamoto S, Taniuchi S, Sudo K, Hatano Y, Nakano K, Shimo T, Kaneko K.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 7;8(1):9

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Korean squirrel: a new pet as a cause of asthma.
A 47-year-old woman with latex allergy presented with persistent rhinoconjunctivitis and daily asthma-like symptoms, shortness of breath, and wheezes. During the last year she had had a Korean squirrel in her house. Prick by prick skin test with Korean squirrel dander was performed, being positive with a wheal of 8 mm. Speci?c bronchial challenge with Korean chipmunk dander extract resulted in an immediate asthmatic reaction, dyspnea, and oral pruritus; no late asthmatic reaction was observed.

Eutamias sibiricus: a new pet as a cause of asthma.  
Arochena L, ndregnette-Roscigno V, Gamez C, Del P, Fernandez-Nieto M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):461-462

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen stabilities and compatibilities in mixtures of high-protease fungal and insect extracts.
Current practice guidelines state that protease-rich fungal and insect extracts can be combined when preparing immunotherapy vaccines, but data supporting the stability of allergens in these mixtures have not been reported. Mixtures containing Alternaria, German cockroach, and other fungal and insect extracts frequently included in immunotherapy vaccines were analyzed by a combination of quantitative analyses (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for multiallergen immunoglobulin E [IgE]-binding potency, major Alternaria allergen Alt a 1, and major German cockroach allergens Bla g 1 and Bla g 2) and qualitative methods (immunoblotting). Mixtures and analogous single-extract controls containing 10 to 50% glycerin were evaluated after storage for up to 12 months at 2 degrees C to 8 degrees C. Mixtures of extracts within the same phylogenetic groups (fungal-fungal, insect-insect) retained favorable Alternaria and German cockroach allergen levels and activities under most conditions examined. For several cross-taxonomic (fungal-insect) extract combinations at 10 to 25% glycerin concentrations, different immunochemical test methods measuring single (major) or multiple allergens yielded threefold to 10-fold variations in allergen recoveries.

Allergen stabilities and compatibilities in mixtures of high-protease fungal and insect extracts.  
Grier TJ, Lefevre DM, Duncan EA, Esch RE, Coyne TC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):439-447

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to sodium sulfite and its relationship to sodium metabisulfite.
There is increasing recognition of allergic contact dermatitis caused by sodium metabisulfite; however, contact allergy to sodium sulfite is less well recognized. This study sought to establish the prevalence of positive patch test reactions to sodium sulfite in a patient population and investigate its relationship with sodium metabisulfite. Over a 4-month period, 183 patients referred for patch testing were tested with sodium sulfite 1% pet. in addition to sodium metabisulfite 1% pet.

Positive allergic reactions occurred to sodium metabisulfite in 5.5% of the tested patients and to sodium sulfite in 3.8% of the tested patients. Sixty per cent of patients with a positive reaction to sodium metabisulfite were positive to sodium sulfite. Only 1 patient (0.6%) with a negative reaction to sodium metabisulfite showed a positive reaction to sodium sulfite.

This study shows that the majority of patients with positive reactions to sodium metabisulfite are also positive to sodium sulphite. Routinely patch testing with sodium sulfite is probably unnecessary, as most patients with positive reactions will also react to sodium metabisulfite. Clinicians should consider advising patients to avoid sodium sulfite and other sulfites when a positive allergic reaction to sodium metabisulfite occurs.

Contact allergy to sodium sulfite and its relationship to sodium metabisulfite.  
Oliphant T, Mitra A, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):128-130

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sodium metabisulfite as a contact allergen--an example of a rare chemical mechanism for protein modification.
Skin-sensitizing chemicals that cause allergic contact dermatitis do so by reacting with self-proteins such that the modified structure becomes antigenic. The reaction chemistry involved is well characterized, but there are exceptions, such as the occasional allergen sodium metabisulfite. This study sought to identify the potential in cutaneo reaction chemistry of sodium metabisulfite. A probable mechanism for the in cutaneo modification of proteins by sodium metabisulfite involves the sulfite di-anion, acting as a nucleophile towards electrophilic centres in proteins, which is a rare mechanism, as most known skin-sensitizing chemicals behave as electrophiles. Sodium metabisulfite is an unusual but not infrequent contact allergen whose chemistry suggests a previously unrecognized protein modification mechanism involving nucleophilic attack by sulfite di-anions on target electrophilic centres in skin proteins. The chemical properties required for sensitization by nucleophilic attack on skin proteins are quite restrictive, so the domain of nucleophilic sensitizers is expected to be small. Thiourea derivatives are among the sensitizers likely to act by this mechanism

Sodium metabisulfite as a contact allergen--an example of a rare chemical mechanism for protein modification.  
Roberts DW, Basketter D, Kimber I, White J, McFadden J, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):123-127

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis.
Cobalt allergy is prevalent in dermatitis patients. This study investigated sources of cobalt exposure and to presents selected epidemiological data on cobalt allergy from patch-tested dermatitis patients. 19,780 dermatitis patients aged 4-99 years were patch tested with nickel, chromium or cobalt between 1985 and 2010. The cobalt spot test was used to test for cobalt ion release from mobile phones as well as cobalt-containing dental alloys and revised hip implant components. Six of eight dental alloys and 10 of 98 revised hip implant components released cobalt in the cobalt spot test, whereas none of 50 mobile phones gave positive reactions. The clinical relevance of positive cobalt test reactions was difficult to determine in the majority of patients. Isolated patch test reactivity to cobalt was less associated with occupational dermatitis and hand eczema than patch test reactivity to cobalt in combination with other contact allergies.

Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis.  
Thyssen JP, Menne T, Liden C, Julander A, Jensen P, Jakobsen SS, Soballe K, Gotfredsen K, Jellesen MS, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):113-122

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Exposure to dog allergens and subsequent allergic sensitization: an updated review.
This review provides an update on the research into dog exposure and the development and exacerbation of allergic sensitization, disease, and asthma. The various dog allergens and how they relate to the burden of illness associated with environmental allergens is discussed. The relationships of family demographics to dog ownership and allergic sensitization is discussed, and recent research into childhood exposure to dogs and the protective role it may play in later development of allergic symptoms is reviewed. Newly proposed treatments being evaluated to reduce or eliminate the symptoms of allergy stemming from sensitization to dog allergen are reviewed.

Exposure to dog allergens and subsequent allergic sensitization: an updated review.  
Smallwood J, Ownby D.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 9;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Update on food allergy in adults.
"Though much has been studied and written about food allergy, the majority of the available literature focuses on food allergies in the pediatric population. Unfortunately, it is likely that in regard to food allergies, adults are not just big children, and extrapolating findings from pediatric to adult patient populations might lead to erroneous assumptions. Thus, it is important to validate the correlation between pediatric and adult data, gather data regarding adult food allergy and understand the specific nuances of subsets of adults to better treat their food allergy. This review was conducted by identifying potentially relevant studies regarding food allergies in adults through electronic databases, including PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar. The search terms included 'allergy', 'food' and 'adults'. Parameters of 19+ years of age were added to search terms and all journals were written in or translated to English. From these search results, focus was placed on studies from 2010 to 2012. This systematic update on food allergy in adults found that the evidence regarding prevalence, diagnosis and management of food allergies is very limited, with the majority of data derived from children and young adults"

Update on Food Allergy in Adults.  
Chaudhry RQ, Oppenheimer JJ.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 3;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake?
This stuy used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort to examine associations between maternal peanut and tree nut intake during pregnancy and allergic outcomes in children at 18 months and 7 years of age. The authors found that maternal intake of peanuts and tree nuts was inversely associated with asthma in children at 18 months of age. Compared with mothers consuming no peanuts, children whose mothers reported eating peanuts 1 or more times per week were 0.66 and 0.83 times as likely to have a registry-based and medication-related asthma diagnosis, respectively. Higher tree nut intake was inversely associated with a medication-related asthma diagnosis and self-reported allergic rhinitis. The study concludes that these results do not suggest that women should decrease peanut and tree nut intake during pregnancy; instead, consumption of peanuts and tree nuts during pregnancy might even decrease the risk of allergic disease development in children.

Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake? Longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort.  
Maslova E, Granstrom C, Hansen S, Petersen SB, Strom M, Willett WC, Olsen SF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 26;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of causative foods in children with eosinophilic esophagitis treated with an elimination diet.
This study concludes that an elimination diet based on SPT/APT results leads to resolution of esophageal eosinophilia in a similar proportion of patients as empiric removal of foods but required that fewer foods be removed. These observations suggest that both methods are acceptable options.

Identification of causative foods in children with eosinophilic esophagitis treated with an elimination diet.  
Spergel JM, Brown-Whitehorn TF, Cianferoni A, Shuker M, Wang ML, Verma R, Liacouras CA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 26;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Esophageal eosinophilia caused by milk proteins: From suspicion to evidence based on 2 case reports.
Case 1, a 31-year-old woman , when 10 years of age, she started to have dysphagia 5 to 10 minutes after dairy product ingestion. Skin prick tests was negative to cow’s milk, a-lactal- bumin, and b-lactoglobulin and positive results to casein (4 mm). Total IgE was 290 IU/mL. Specific IgE was 0.10 kU/L to cow’s milk, 0.0 kU/L to a-lactalbumin, 0.0 kU/L to b-lactoglobulin, 0.12 kU/L to casein, 0.09 kU/L to goat’s milk, and 0.0 kU/L to sheep’s milk. Food patch testing was negative for all the foods tested. A double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge to cow’s milk was conducted. The patient reported pharyngeal pruritus and chest tightness, as well as dysphagia 15 to 20 minutes after milk ingestion. An esophagogastroendoscopy within 48 hours after milk intake revealed normal mucosa. A mean of 26 to 37 eosinophils per hpf was found.

Case 2: a 36-year-old woman with a knot-in-the-throat sensation and salivation immediately after consuming milk beginning at 14 years of age. SPT was positive for, among other, cow’s milk (6 mm), a-lactalbumin (9 mm), b-lactoglobulin (4 mm), and casein (4 mm). Total IgE was 22 IU/mL. Specific IgE was less than 0.05 kU/L to cow’s milk, a-lactalbumin, b-lactoglobulin, casein, and serum albumin. An esophagogastroendoscopy revealed normal esophageal mucosa. 7 to 8 eosinophils per hpf was shown. A double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge to milk resulted in dysphagia and a burning chest 10 minutes after milk ingestion. And immediate laryngoscopy after the oral challenge was normal. A mean of 22 to 25 eosinophils per hpf was now seen.

Esophageal eosinophilia caused by milk proteins: From suspicion to evidence based on 2 case reports.  
Terrados CS, ntolin-Amerigo D, Foruny JR, Gonzalez AS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 May;129(5):1416-1419

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens in urban schools and homes of children with asthma.
Settled dust and airborne samples from 12 inner-city schools were analyzed for indoor allergens using multiplex array technology (MARIA). School samples were linked to students with asthma enrolled in the School Inner-City Asthma Study (SICAS). Settled dust samples from students' bedrooms were analyzed similarly. Mouse allergen levels in schools were substantial. In general, cat and dog allergen levels were low, but detectable, and were higher in schools. Aerosolization of mouse allergen in classrooms may be a significant exposure for students. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of indoor allergen exposure in schools on asthma morbidity in students with asthma.

Allergens in urban schools and homes of children with asthma.  
Permaul P, Hoffman E, Fu C, Sheehan W, Baxi S, Gaffin J, Lane J, Bailey A, King E, Chapman M, Gold D, Phipatanakul W.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 6;

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Varying allergen composition and content affects the in vivo allergenic activity of commercial Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts.  
Casset A, Mari A, Purohit A, Resch Y, Weghofer M, Ferrara R, Thomas WR, Alessandri C, Chen KW, de BF, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 21;159(3):253-262
Click to view abstract

Cof a 1: identification, expression and immunoreactivity of the first coffee allergen.  
Manavski N, Peters U, Brettschneider R, Oldenburg M, Baur X, Bittner C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 20;159(3):235-242
Click to view abstract

Diet influences growth rates and allergen and endotoxin contents of cultured Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus house dust mites.  
Avula-Poola S, Morgan MS, Arlian LG.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 20;159(3):226-234
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to peanut in a patient predominantly sensitized to Ara h 6.  
Asarnoj A, Glaumann S, Elfstrom L, Lilja G, Lidholm J, Nilsson C, Wickman M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 1;159(2):209-212
Click to view abstract

How can we better classify nsaid hypersensitivity reactions? - validation from a large database.  
Caimmi S, Caimmi D, Bousquet PJ, Demoly P.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 22;159(3):306-312
Click to view abstract

A high serum concentration of chemerin in pustular dermatitis paradoxically induced by etanercept.  
Sawada Y, Nakamura M, Hama K, Hino R, Tokura Y.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2012 May;66(5):e182-e184

Immediate reaction to articaine.  
Aksu K, Kurt E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2012 Jun 8;

Non occupational chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to Aspergillus fumigatus on leaky walls.  
Mitsui C, Taniguchi M, Fukutomi Y, Saito A, Kawakami Y, Mori A, Akiyama K.
Allergol Int 2012 Jun 25;0(0):

Food allergy after cord blood stem cell transplantation with tacrolimus therapy in two patients who developed veno-occlusive disease.  
Inoue Y, Ochiai H, Hishiki T, Shimojo N, Yoshida H, Kohno Y.
Allergol Int 2012 Jun 25;0(0):

IgE to recombinant allergens Api m 1, Ves v 1, and Ves v 5 distinguish double sensitization from crossreaction in venom allergy.  
Muller U, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Hausmann O, Helbling A.
Allergy 2012 Jun 8;
Click to view abstract

Allergy to deamidated gluten in patients tolerant to wheat: specific epitopes linked to deamidation.  
Denery-Papini S, Bodinier M, Larré C, Brossard C, Pineau F, Triballeau S, Pietri M, Battais F, Mothes T, Paty E, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Allergy 2012 Jun 28;
Click to view abstract

Predictive value of IgE/IgG4 antibody ratio in children with egg allergy.  
Okamoto S, Taniuchi S, Sudo K, Hatano Y, Nakano K, Shimo T, Kaneko K.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 7;8(1):9

Breast eczema: mobile phones must not be overlooked. [French]  
Dannepond C, Armingaud P.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2012 Feb;139(2):142-143

Hypersensitivity reactions to marijuana.  
Tessmer A, Berlin N, Sussman G, Leader N, Chung EC, Beezhold D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Apr;108(4):282-284

Allergen of the Month-Stachybotrys chartarum.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):A9

Eutamias sibiricus: a new pet as a cause of asthma.  
Arochena L, ndregnette-Roscigno V, Gamez C, Del P, Fernandez-Nieto M.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):461-462

Allergen stabilities and compatibilities in mixtures of high-protease fungal and insect extracts.  
Grier TJ, Lefevre DM, Duncan EA, Esch RE, Coyne TC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):439-447
Click to view abstract

Relationships between total and allergen-specific serum IgE concentrations and lung function in young adults.  
Rajendra C, Zoratti E, Havstad S, Nicholas C, Wegienka G, Cross MT, Johnson CC, Ownby D.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):429-434
Click to view abstract

Endotoxin exposure in inner-city schools and homes of children with asthma.  
Sheehan WJ, Hoffman EB, Fu C, Baxi SN, Bailey A, King EM, Chapman MD, Lane JP, Gaffin JM, Permaul P, Gold DR, Phipatanakul W.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):418-422
Click to view abstract

Molecular allergy diagnosis: we need to become more knowledgeable.  
Melioli G, Canonica GW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Jun;108(6):387

In vitro gastric and intestinal digestions of pulsed light-treated shrimp extracts.  
Yang WW, Shriver SK, Chung SY, Percival S, Correll MJ, Rababah TM.
Appl Biochem Biotechnol 2012 Mar;166(6):1409-1422

ABIDEC drops and peanut allergy.  
Subramanian G, Santhanam G, Chandran D.
Arch Dis Child 2012 Mar;97(3):298

Progress in food allergy diagnosis by antigen-specific ige antibody measurement (application of probability curve and allergen component). [Japanese]  
Komata T, Ebisawa M.
Arerugi 2012 May;61(5):599-606

The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part III.  
Thyssen JP, Gimenez-Arnau E, Lepoittevin JP, Menne T, Boman A, Schnuch A.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Apr;66 Suppl 153-70

The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part II.  
Thyssen JP, Gimenez-Arnau E, Lepoittevin JP, Menne T, Boman A, Schnuch A.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Apr;66 Suppl 125-52

The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part I.  
Thyssen JP, Gimenez-Arnau E, Lepoittevin JP, Menne T, Boman A, Schnuch A.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Apr;66 Suppl 111-24

The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Miscellaneous.  

Contact Dermatitis 2012 Apr;66 Suppl 11-9

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by dexpanthenol: report of two cases.  
Fernandes S, Macias V, Cravo M, Amaro C, Santos R, Cardoso J.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):160-161

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the emulsifier triceteareth-4-phosphate.  
Madsen JT, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):159-160

The detection of clinically relevant contact allergens with a standard screening tray of 28 allergens.  
Patel D, Belsito DV.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):154-158

A pilot study aimed at finding a suitable eugenol concentration for a leave-on product for use in a repeated open application test.  
Svedman C, Engfeldt M, Api AM, Politano VT, Belsito DV, Isaksson M, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):137-139

Patch test concentrations (doses in mg/cm2 ) for the 12 non-mix fragrance substances regulated by European legislation.  
Bruze M, Svedman C, Andersen KE, Bruynzeel D, Goossens A, Johansen JD, Matura M, Orton D, Vigan M.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):131-136

Contact allergy to sodium sulfite and its relationship to sodium metabisulfite.  
Oliphant T, Mitra A, Wilkinson M.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):128-130

Sodium metabisulfite as a contact allergen--an example of a rare chemical mechanism for protein modification.  
Roberts DW, Basketter D, Kimber I, White J, McFadden J, White IR.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):123-127

Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis.  
Thyssen JP, Menne T, Liden C, Julander A, Jensen P, Jakobsen SS, Soballe K, Gotfredsen K, Jellesen MS, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):113-122

Non-occupational contact sensitization to epoxy resin of bisphenol A among general dermatology patients.  
Majasuo S, Liippo J, Lammintausta K.
Contact Dermatitis 2012 Mar;66(3):148-153

Direct and indirect exposure to horse: risk for sensitization and asthma.  
Liccardi G, Emenius G, Merritt AS, Salzillo A, D'Amato M, D'Amato G.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 21;
Click to view abstract

Exposure to dog allergens and subsequent allergic sensitization: an updated review.  
Smallwood J, Ownby D.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 9;
Click to view abstract

Update on Food Allergy in Adults.  
Chaudhry RQ, Oppenheimer JJ.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 3;
Click to view abstract

Molecular approaches to allergen standardization.  
Chapman MD, Briza P.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 29;
Click to view abstract

Food Allergy: Temporal Trends and Determinants.  
Ben-Shoshan M, Turnbull E, Clarke A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 22;
Click to view abstract

Physical Urticaria.  
Abajian M, Mlynek A, Maurer M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun 1;
Click to view abstract

Diagnosis of occupational asthma: an update.  
Jares EJ, Baena-Cagnani CE, Gomez RM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Jun;12(3):221-231
Click to view abstract

Hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors.  
Chang YS.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 28;
Click to view abstract

Insect anaphylaxis: where are we? The stinging facts 2012.  
Tracy JM, Khan FS, Demain JG.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 22;
Click to view abstract

Drug hypersensitivity reactions presenting as a morbilliform eruption with islands of sparing.  
Colaco SM, Bakr FS, Silvers DN, Grossman ME.
Cutis 2012 Apr;89(4):173-174

Peanut and tree nut consumption during pregnancy and allergic disease in children-should mothers decrease their intake? Longitudinal evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort.  
Maslova E, Granstrom C, Hansen S, Petersen SB, Strom M, Willett WC, Olsen SF.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 26;
Click to view abstract

Identification of causative foods in children with eosinophilic esophagitis treated with an elimination diet.  
Spergel JM, Brown-Whitehorn TF, Cianferoni A, Shuker M, Wang ML, Verma R, Liacouras CA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 26;
Click to view abstract

Alternaria alternata allergen Alt a 1: A unique beta-barrel protein dimer found exclusively in fungi.  
Chruszcz M, Chapman MD, Osinski T, Solberg R, Demas M, Porebski PJ, Majorek KA, Pomes A, Minor W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jul;130(1):241-247
Click to view abstract

Methylene blue-treated plasma: An increased allergy risk?  
Mertes PM, Demoly P, Alperovitch A, Bazin A, Bienvenu J, Caldani C, Lamy B, Laroche D, Leconte des Floris MF, Py JY, Rebibo D, Willaert B, Drouet C, Carlier M, Lienhart A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 2;

Esophageal eosinophilia caused by milk proteins: From suspicion to evidence based on 2 case reports.  
Terrados CS, ntolin-Amerigo D, Foruny JR, Gonzalez AS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 May;129(5):1416-1419

Peanut component Ara h 8 sensitization and tolerance to peanut.  
Asarnoj A, Nilsson C, Lidholm J, Glaumann S, Ostblom E, Hedlin G, van HM, Lilja G, Wickman M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 26;
Click to view abstract

Specific IgE against Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins: An independent risk factor for asthma.  
Bachert C, van SK, Zhang N, Holtappels G, Cattaert T, Maus B, Buhl R, Taube C, Korn S, Kowalski M, Bousquet J, Howarth P.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 26;
Click to view abstract

Selection of contrast media in patients with delayed reactions should be based on challenge test results.  
Gracia Bara MT, Moreno E, Laffond E, Munoz FJ, Macias E, Davila I.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 22;

Hypersensitivity to proton pump inhibitors: Diagnostic accuracy of skin tests compared to oral provocation test.  
Bonadonna P, Lombardo C, Bortolami O, Bircher A, Scherer K, Barbaud A, Passalacqua G, Pagani M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 22;

Mast cell anaphylatoxin receptor expression can enhance IgE-dependent skin inflammation in mice.  
Schafer B, Piliponsky AM, Oka T, Song CH, Gerard NP, Gerard C, Tsai M, Kalesnikoff J, Galli SJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 22;
Click to view abstract

Can f 1 levels in hair and homes of different dog breeds: Lack of evidence to describe any dog breed as hypoallergenic.  
Vredegoor DW, Willemse T, Chapman MD, Heederik DJ, Krop EJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun 22;
Click to view abstract

Outcomes of 100 consecutive open, baked-egg oral food challenges in the allergy office.  
Lieberman JA, Huang FR, Sampson HA, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun;129(6):1682-1684

Ovomucoids IgE is a better marker than egg white-specific IgE to diagnose boiled egg allergy.  
Haneda Y, Kando N, Yasui M, Kobayashi T, Maeda T, Hino A, Hasegawa S, Ichiyama T, Ito K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun;129(6):1681-1682

Effect of secondhand smoke on asthma control among black and Latino children.  
Oh SS, Tcheurekdjian H, Roth LA, Nguyen EA, Sen S, Galanter JM, Davis A, Farber HJ, Gilliland FD, Kumar R, Avila PC, Brigino-Buenaventura E, Chapela R, Ford JG, Lenoir MA, Lurmann F, Meade K, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Jun;129(6):1478-1483
Click to view abstract

Associations between quantitative measures of fungi in home floor dust and lung function among older adults with chronic respiratory disease: a pilot study.  
Shendell DG, Mizan SS, Yamamoto N, Peccia J.
J Asthma 2012 Jun;49(5):502-509
Click to view abstract

Cockroach allergens induce biphasic asthma-like pulmonary inflammation in outbred mice.  
Vaickus LJ, Bouchard J, Kim J, Natarajan S, Remick DG.
J Asthma 2012 Jun;49(5):510-521
Click to view abstract

Prescription of a specific bronchial provocation test for the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to platinum salt. [Italian]  
Porro S, Cerri S, Bernabeo F, Pisati G.
Med Lav 2012 Mar;103(2):123-129

Allergens in urban schools and homes of children with asthma.  
Permaul P, Hoffman E, Fu C, Sheehan W, Baxi S, Gaffin J, Lane J, Bailey A, King E, Chapman M, Gold D, Phipatanakul W.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Jun 6;
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis due to chicken meat. [French]  
Cheikh RS, Bachouch I, Racil H, Chaouch N, Zarrouk M, Salmi L, Chabbou A.
Rev Mal Respir 2012 Jan;29(1):98-100


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