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 Allergy Advisor Digest - March 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Identification of a new allergen from Amaranthus retroflexus pollen, Ama r 2.
Read Cloning and expression of Cucumisin (Cuc m 1), a Subtilisin-like Protease of Cucumis melo
Read An explorative study of low levels of allergen-specific IgE and clinical allergy symptoms during early childhood.
Read IgE sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with reduced lung function in asthma.
Read Asthma caused by occupational exposure to Trichophyton.
Read Skin prick testing and peanut-specific IgE can predict peanut challenge outcomes in preschoolchildren with peanut sensitization.
Read Contact allergy to aliphatic polyisocyanates based on hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate (HDI).
Read Contact allergy to essential oils
Read Permanent make-up colorants may cause severe skin reactions.
Read Contact allergy to fragrances: current patch test results
Read Ethosome formulation of contact allergens may enhance patch test reactions in patients.
Read Occupational methacrylate and acrylate allergy--cross-reactions and possible screening allergens.
Read IgG food allergies - a subject of controversy
Read A new tomato allergen - Acidic ribosomal protein 60S
Read Inappropriate test methods in allergy.
Read Allergy to car seat.
Read Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy.
Read Mechanisms underlying differential food allergy response to heated egg.
Read Highly accurate prediction of food challenge outcome using routinely available clinical data.
Read Impaired allergy diagnostics among parasite-infected patients caused by IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha1,3-galactose.
Read Type IV reaction due to phenylephrine administered nasally with cross-reactivity with ethylephrine.
Read Oleaceae-induced pollinosis in an area with exposure to olive and ash trees.
Read Occupational allergic 'march'. Rapid evolution of contact dermatitis to ammonium persulfate into airborne contact dermatitis with rhinitis and asthma in a hairdresser.
Read Mite component-specific IgE repertoire and phenotypes of allergic disease in childhood: Tropical Singapore
Read Psychotropic drug-related eosinophilia with systemic symptoms after acute caffeine ingestion.
Read Selectively high level of serum interleukin 5 in a newborn infant with cow's milk allergy.
Read Adverse respiratory outcomes associated with occupational exposures at a soy processing plant.

Abstracts shared in March 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Hypersensitivity to lipid transfer protein is frequently associated with chronic urticaria.
Read Cedar pollen aggravates atopic dermatitis in patients with allergic rhino conjunctivitis.
Read Late-onset anaphylaxis due to Chinese noodles in a patient with allergy to fermented soybeans (natto).
Read Tomato allergens of six different varieties.
Read Seafood hypersensitivity in mite sensitized individuals: is tropomyosin the only responsible allergen?
Read Recombinant allergens. For routine use or still only science?
Read Standards and pitfalls of in-vitro diagnostics of Hymenoptera venom allergy.
Read Prevalence of challenge-proven IgE-mediated food allergy in infants.
Read Urticaria due to antihistamines.
Read Effects of a restricted elimination diet on the behaviour of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Read Human seminal plasma hypersensitivity: an under-recognized women's health issue.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of a new allergen from Amaranthus retroflexus pollen, Ama r 2.
Pollinosis from Amaranthus retroflexus pollen is a common cause of respiratory allergy in Iran with a high positive rate (68.8%) among Iranian allergic patients. Using sera from twelve patients allergic to A. retroflexus pollen, a cDNA of A. retroflexus pollen profilin was cloned. The 14.6kDa protein had an IgE-reactivity of 33% (4/12) among A. retroflexus pollen-allergic patients, and belonged to the profilin family and was designated as Ama r 2. A recombinant Ama r 2 (rAma r 2) was then produced which showed a strong IgE-reactivity via ELISA confirmed by the SPT. Inhibition experiments revealed high IgE cross-reactivities with the profilins from other plants.

Identification of a new allergen from Amaranthus retroflexus pollen, Ama r 2.  
Tehrani M, Sankian M, Assarehzadegan MA, Falak R, Noorbakhsh R, Moghadam M, Jabbari F, Varasteh A.
Allergol Int 2011 Mar 25;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cloning and expression of Cucumisin (Cuc m 1), a Subtilisin-like Protease of Cucumis melo
Allergy to melon (cucumis melo) is one of the most frequent fruit allergies in Iran. Cuc m 1 (cucumisin) has been identified as the major allergen of melon. Cucumisin is an alkaline serine protease that it is found as a 78kDa protein in precursor form. This study produced recombinant Cuc m 1 in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Immunoblotting with sera of patients allergic to melon showed strong reactivity with purified protein band. Inhibition assays demonstrated that purified rCuc m 1 could be the same with natural form of Cuc m 1 in total extract. The recombinant cucumisin allergen, rCuc m 1, is a 86kDa protein.

Molecular cloning and expression of Cucumisin (Cuc m 1), a Subtilisin-like Protease of Cucumis melo in Escherichia coli.  
Sankian M, Talebi F, Moghadam M, Vahedi F, Azad FJ, Varasteh AR.
Allergol Int 2011 Mar;60(1):61-67

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
An explorative study of low levels of allergen-specific IgE and clinical allergy symptoms during early childhood.
Early identification of children at risk for later development of allergic disease is essential for early intervention and initiation of proper treatment and management. This study investigated the relationship between low levels (0.1-0.7 kU(A) /l) of IgE sensitization to food and inhalant allergens and symptoms of eczema, rhinitis, and asthma from birth to 5 years of age. Two hundred and sixty eight children were followed prospectively from birth to 5 years of age with physical examinations and measurements of s-IgE at 6, 12, 24, and 60 months of age. Seventy-four percent of the children with low levels of s-IgE to egg and/or milk at the age of 6 months were still sensitized to one or more allergens at age 2 years. Eighty-four percent of the children with low levels of s-IgE to any of the studied allergens at 12 months of age were still sensitized at age 5. The low levels of egg and milk s-IgE also significantly increased the risk for eczema at the same age and also increased the risk for eczema at 2 years of age. The study concludes that low levels of s-IgE can be detected from the age of 6 months and are related to further IgE sensitization. The low levels seem to be of importance for both the association to present symptoms and for prediction of future allergic symptoms, especially eczema during early infancy. A detectable s-IgE level, albeit low, could be a clear signal that the immune system is alerted and should be followed.

An explorative study of low levels of allergen-specific IgE and clinical allergy symptoms during early childhood.  
Soderstrom L, Lilja G, Borres MP, Nilsson C.
Allergy 2011 Mar 11;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgE sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with reduced lung function in asthma.
This study attempted to define the relationship between the clinical and laboratory features of Aspergillus fumigatus-associated asthma by studing 79 patients with asthma (89% classed as GINA 4 or 5) classified into 3 groups according to A. fumigatus sensitization: (1) IgE-sensitized (immediate cutaneous reactivity > 3 mm and/or IgE > 0.35 kU/L); (2) IgG-only-sensitized (IgG > 40 mg/L); and (3) nonsensitized. A. fumigatus was cultured from 63% of IgE-sensitized patients with asthma (n = 40), 39% of IgG-only-sensitized patients with asthma (n = 13), 31% of nonsensitized patients with asthma (n = 26) and 7% of healthy control subjects (n = 14). Patients sensitized to A. fumigatus compared with nonsensitized patients with asthma had lower lung function, more bronchiectasis, and more sputum neutrophils. In a multilinear regression model, A. fumigatus-IgE sensitization and sputum neutrophil differential cell count were important predictors of lung function, supported by culture of A. fumigatus and eosinophil differential cell count.

IgE sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with reduced lung function in asthma.  
Fairs A, Agbetile J, Hargadon B, Bourne M, Monteiro WR, Brightling CE, Bradding P, Green RH, Mutalithas K, Desai D, Pavord ID, Wardlaw AJ, Pashley CH.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Dec 1;182(11):1362-1368

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Asthma caused by occupational exposure to Trichophyton.
A 39-year-old female nurse presented with poorly controlled asthma. Although she did not have tinea, she had opportunities for contact with patients who did. A relationship was suggested between asthma exacerbation and workplace. Specific IgE antibody to Trichophyton was positive. As occupational exposure to Trichophyton was considered as a cause of asthma exacerbations, avoidance of Trichophyton as well as anti-asthma treatment was conducted and symptoms improved. That occupational exposure to trichophyton could exacerbate asthma symptoms needs to be kept in mind, particularly in the case of nurses who may be in contact with elderly individuals with tinea.

A case of bronchial asthma caused by occupational exposure to Trichophyton. [Japanese]  
Hoshi R, Nakagome K, Aoki H, Takaku Y, Yamaguchi T, Soma T, Nishihara F, Komiyama K, Hagiwara K, Kanazawa M, Nagata M.
Arerugi 2011 Feb;60(2):207-213

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin prick testing and peanut-specific IgE can predict peanut challenge outcomes in preschoolchildren with peanut sensitization.
The objective of this study was to determine the utility of skin prick tests (SPT) and fluorescent-enzyme immunoassays (FEIA) for identifying either peanut allergy or tolerance in preschoolchildren with peanut sensitization.

Forty-nine preschoolchildren (<5 years of age) with peanut sensitization (SPT 2 mm or peanut-specific IgE 0.35 kU/L) but unknown clinical reactivity had graded open peanut challenges reaching a total of 11 g. A positive challenge was defined as an objective IgE-mediated reaction during challenge or the 2-h observation. Forty-nine percent (24/49) had positive challenges. An SPT of >7 mm on the day of challenge predicted a positive challenge with a sensitivity of 83% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 84%. An FEIA of >2.0 kU/L showed a sensitivity of 79% and an NPV of 80%. Predicting challenge outcome from a combination of SPT and FEIA (SPT >7 and/or FEIA >2 is positive) increased sensitivity to 96% and NPV to 95%.

Therefore, at least half of preschoolchildren with peanut sensitization and no antecedent history of peanut ingestion can tolerate peanuts. A SPT<7 mm and FEIA<2 kU/L identify children most likely to tolerate peanut, with only a 5% likelihood of failing an oral challenge. T

Skin prick testing and peanut-specific IgE can predict peanut challenge outcomes in preschoolchildren with peanut sensitization.  
Johannsen H, Nolan R, Pascoe EM, Cuthbert P, Noble V, Corderoy T, Franzmann A, Loh R, Prescott SL.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Mar 24;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to aliphatic polyisocyanates based on hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate (HDI).
A report on 4 patients with allergic contact dermatitis/contact allergy resulting from HDI-based polyisocyanates (aliphatic polyisocyanates based on hexamethylene 1,6-diisocyanate) in polyurethane paints. HDI trimers are novel contact allergens in workers who handle polyurethane paints. The allergic reactions cannot be explained by sensitization to HDI monomer.

Contact allergy to aliphatic polyisocyanates based on hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate (HDI).  
alto-Korte K, Pesonen M, Kuuliala O, Alanko K, Jolanki R.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):357-363

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to essential oils
Essential oils are used in perfumery and in products for aromatherapy or balneotherapy. Data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology on all patients patch tested between January 2000 and December 2008 with essential oils were retrospectively analysed. 15 682 patients of 84 716 consulting in the period had been tested with at least one essential oil, and 637 reacted positively to at least one of the essential oils, most commonly to ylang-ylang oil (I and II), lemongrass oil (1.8%), jasmine absolute (1.6%), sandalwood oil and clove oil (1.5% each). Cross-reactivity between distillate and main allergen, if available, was marked.

Contact allergy to essential oils: current patch test results (2000-2008) from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK).  
Uter W, Schmidt E, Geier J, Lessmann H, Schnuch A, Frosch P.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):277-283

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Permanent make-up colorants may cause severe skin reactions.
Cosmetic tattoos [permanent make-up (PMU)] on eyelids, eyebrows and lips have become increasingly popular. However, most colorants are manufactured for non-medical purposes, without any established history of safe use in humans. This study investigated severe adverse reactions, such as swelling, burning, and the development of papules, of the lips and the surrounding area in 4 patients who had had at least two PMU procedures on their lips. Beauticians tended to use various PMU products, but all contained Pigment Red 181 (CI 73360). All patients tested showed a clear delayed reaction to Pigment Red 181 or the tattoo ink, or both, after prick testing. Histology indicated an allergic reaction. Each lip lesion slowly abated after several months of topical or systemic therapy, but none has yet completely resolved.

Permanent make-up colorants may cause severe skin reactions.  
Wenzel SM, Welzel J, Hafner C, Landthaler M, Baumler W.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):223-227

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy to fragrances: current patch test results
Of all patients tested with the German baseline series, 15.1% reacted positively to fragrance mix (FM) I (6.6% positive), FM II (4.6% positive) or Myroxylon pereirae resin (balsam of Peru, 6.8% positive). Among the single constituents of FM I, Evernia prunastri [oak moss absolute (abs.)] was the leading allergen, and amyl cinnamal the least frequent allergen. Among fragrances not included in FM I or FM II, Evernia furfuracea (tree moss abs.) was the most common allergen.

For diagnostic purposes, it is necessary to combine several screening agents. The frequency of contact sensitization differs greatly between single fragrances.

Contact allergy to fragrances: current patch test results (2005-2008) from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology.  
Uter W, Geier J, Frosch P, Schnuch A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):254-261

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ethosome formulation of contact allergens may enhance patch test reactions in patients.
Ethosomes and liposomes are ultra-small vesicles capable of encapsulating drugs and cosmetic ingredients for topical use, thereby potentially increasing bioavailability and clinical efficacy. So far, few reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase the allergenicity potential. This study investigated the effect of ethosome formulation of isoeugenol and methyldibromo glutaronitrile on the elicitation response under patch test conditions and by repeated open applications, and concludes that encapsulating potential contact allergens in ethosomes may increase the challenge response as compared with the same concentrations in an ethanol/water base without ethosomes.

Ethosome formulation of contact allergens may enhance patch test reactions in patients.  
Madsen JT, Vogel S, Karlberg AT, Simonsson C, Johansen JD, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):209-214

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational methacrylate and acrylate allergy--cross-reactions and possible screening allergens.
Acrylic resin monomers, especially acrylates and methacrylates, are important occupational allergens. This study analysed patterns of concomitant patch test reactions to acrylic monomers in relation to exposure. Patch test files at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health for allergic reactions to acrylic monomers, and analysed the clinical records of sensitized patients were reviewed. In a group of 66 patients allergic to an acrylic monomer, the most commonly positive allergens were three methacrylates, namely ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (2-HPMA), and an acrylate, namely diethyleneglycol diacrylate (DEGDA). The patterns of concomitant reactions imply that exposure to methacrylates may induce cross-reactivity to acrylates, whereas exposure to acrylates usually does not lead to cross-allergy to methacrylates. Screening for triethyleneglycol diacrylate (TREGDA) in the baseline series was found to be useful, as 3 of 8 patients with diagnosed occupational acrylate allergy might have been missed without the screening.

Occupational methacrylate and acrylate allergy--cross-reactions and possible screening allergens.  
alto-Korte K, Henriks-Eckerman ML, Kuuliala O, Jolanki R.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):301-312

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
IgG food allergies - a subject of controversy
Google translation:

Food allergies have increased in recent years, but the diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Many people with vague or nonspecific symptoms, despite negative findings convinced allergic response to foods. They cling increasingly to methods that are scientifically indefensible, or at least highly controversial.

IgG food allergies - a subject of controversy. [German]  
Weiss J.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2011 Jan;136(4):3

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A new tomato allergen - Acidic ribosomal protein 60S
Three tomato allergens (Lyc e 1, Lyc e 2 and Lyc e 3) have been characterised until now. Previous studies have demonstrated the existence of other proteins with capacity to bind IgE.

A tomato peel cDNA library was screened using a specific pool of sera from sensitised individuals. A clone was obtained and its sequence indicated the protein to be an acidic ribosomal protein 60S (ARP60S). This protein showed more than 85% of homology with fungal allergens and 93.8% of homology with the almond allergen Pru du 5. The IgE detection with a pool of sera was positive which confirms that is a new tomato allergen. (López-Matas 2011 ref.25867 7)

Acidic ribosomal protein 60S: A new tomato allergen.  
López-Matas MA, Ferrer A, Larramendi CH, Huertas AJ, Pagán JA, García-Abujeta JL, Bartra J, Andreu C, Lavín JR, Carnés J.
Food Chemistry 2011;127(2):638-640

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Inappropriate test methods in allergy.
"Inappropriate test methods are increasingly utilized to diagnose allergy. They fall into two categories: I. Tests with obscure theoretical basis, missing validity and lacking reproducibility, such as bioresonance, electroacupuncture, applied kinesiology and the ALCAT-test. These methods lack both the technical and clinical validation needed to justify their use. II. Tests with real data, but misleading interpretation: Detection of IgG or IgG4-antibodies or lymphocyte proliferation tests to foods do not allow to separate healthy from diseased subjects, neither in case of food intolerance, allergy or other diagnoses. The absence of diagnostic specificity induces many false positive findings in healthy subjects. As a result unjustified diets might limit quality of life and lead to malnutrition. Proliferation of lymphocytes in response to foods can show elevated rates in patients with allergies. These values do not allow individual diagnosis of hypersensitivity due to their broad variation. Successful internet marketing, infiltration of academic programs and superficial reporting by the media promote the popularity of unqualified diagnostic tests; also in allergy. Therefore, critical observation and quick analysis of and clear comments to unqualified methods by the scientific medical societies are more important than ever."

Inappropriate test methods in allergy. [German]  
Kleine-Tebbe J, Herold DA.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):961-966

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to car seat.
This is a case report of a female patient showing a delayed allergic reaction to epoxy resin. The allergic contact dermatitis occurred after sitting in her new car equipped with artificial leather seats.

Allergy to car seat. [German]  
Wurpts G, Merk HF.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):933-934

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy.
Loss-of-function mutations within the filaggrin gene are associated with atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases; therefore, filaggrin is a candidate gene in the etiology of peanut allergy: therefore this study investigated the association between filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and peanut allergy using a case-control study of 71 English, Dutch, and Irish oral food challenge-positive patients with peanut allergy and 1000 non peanut-sensitized English population controls. The study concludes that filaggrin mutations represent a significant risk factor for IgE-mediated peanut allergy, indicating a role for epithelial barrier dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease.

Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy.  
Brown SJ, Asai Y, Cordell HJ, Campbell LE, Zhao Y, Liao H, Northstone K, Henderson J, Alizadehfar R, Ben-Shoshan M, Morgan K, Roberts G, Masthoff LJ, Pasmans SG, van den Akker PC, Wijmenga C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):661-667

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mechanisms underlying differential food allergy response to heated egg.
Egg white proteins are usually subjected to heating, making them edible for the majority of children with egg allergy. This study sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the reduced allergenicity displayed by heat-treated egg white allergens, and concludes from an animal model that heat treatment reduces allergenicity of OVA and ovomucoid. This is partially a result of the enhanced gastrointestinal digestibility of heated OVA and the inability of heated OVA or ovomucoid to be absorbed in a form capable of triggering basophils.

Mechanisms underlying differential food allergy response to heated egg.  
Martos G, Lopez-Exposito I, Bencharitiwong R, Cecilia BM, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 4;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Highly accurate prediction of food challenge outcome using routinely available clinical data.
This study sought to develop and validate a model to predict food challenge outcome by using routinely collected data in a diverse sample of children considered suitable for food challenge. The proto-algorithm was generated by using a limited data set from 1 service (phase 1). The authors then retrospectively applied, evaluated, and modified the initial model by using an extended data set in another center (phase 2). Finally, they prospectively validated the model in a blind study in a further group of children undergoing food challenge for peanut, milk, or egg in the second center (phase 3). Allergen-specific models were developed for peanut, egg, and milk.

Phase 1 (N = 429) identified 5 clinical factors associated with diagnosis of food allergy by food challenge. In phase 2 (N = 289), the authors examined the predictive ability of 6 clinical factors: skin prick test, serum specific IgE, total IgE minus serum specific IgE, symptoms, sex, and age. In phase 3 (N = 70), 97% of cases were accurately predicted as positive and 94% as negative. The model showed an advantage in clinical prediction compared with serum specific IgE only, skin prick test only, and serum specific IgE and skin prick test (92% accuracy vs 57%, and 81%, respectively).

Highly accurate prediction of food challenge outcome using routinely available clinical data.  
Dunngalvin A, Daly D, Cullinane C, Stenke E, Keeton D, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, Roberts GC, Lucas J, Hourihane JO.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):633-639

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Impaired allergy diagnostics among parasite-infected patients caused by IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha1,3-galactose.
The carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (alpha-Gal) is abundantly expressed on nonprimate mammalian proteins. Alpha-Gal is responsible for the IgE binding to cat IgA, a newly identified cat allergen (Fel d 5). This study investigated the diagnostic relevance of IgE antibodies to Fel d 5 and alpha-Gal among parasite-infected patients from central Africa without cat allergy compared with patients with cat allergy from the same region using sera from 47 parasite-infected patients and 31 patients with cat allergy. Total IgE and serum IgE antibodies against cat dander extract (CDE) was measured, as well as inhibition assays. Among the 47 parasite-infected patients, 85% had IgE antibodies against alpha-Gal and 66% against Fel d 5. Twenty-four of the parasite-infected patients were sensitized to CDE, and 21 of them had IgE antibodies to Fel d 5 and alpha-Gal. There was no correlation between IgE levels to CDE and rFel d 1 among the parasite-infected patients but a strong correlation between CDE and Fel d 5 and alpha-Gal. Among the group with cat allergy, only 5 patients had IgE to alpha-Gal, and nearly 75% (n = 23) had IgE to rFel d 1. In contrast, among the patients with cat allergy, there was a correlation between IgE levels to CDE and rFel d 1 (P < .05) but no correlation between CDE and Fel d 5 and alpha-Gal.

Therefore IgE to alpha-Gal causes impaired allergy diagnostics in parasite-infected patients. Screening for IgE to rFel d 1 and other allergens without carbohydrates might identify patients with true cat sensitization/allergy in parasite-infested areas.

Impaired allergy diagnostics among parasite-infected patients caused by IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha1,3-galactose.  
Arkestal K, Sibanda E, Thors C, Troye-Blomberg M, Mduluza T, Valenta R, Gronlund H, van HM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 2;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Type IV reaction due to phenylephrine administered nasally with cross-reactivity with ethylephrine.
Type IV hypersensitivity eye reactions have been described after the administration of the sympathomimetic agent phenylephrine. A case of an atopic woman who developed nasal congestion and discharge, dysphagia, and dyspnea 1 hour after the administration of Stopcold pills and Disneumon Pernasal nasal spray for otitis. The same symptoms reappeared after the accidental administration of Rinobanedif ointment in the nasal mucosa. Skin patch tests were performed with a standard True Test panel, preservatives, Disneumon Pernasal, pseudoephedrine, eyedrops (tropicamide, cyclopentolate, and phenylephrine), and other sympathomimetic agents. The patient also underwent oral, ocular, and nasal controlled challenges with the same drugs. Finally, patch tests were performed in 11 controls with phenylephrine and ethylephrine. The patient had a positive outcome in patch testing with nickel sulphate, fragrance mix, phenylephrine, and ethylephrine. This is the first report of a type IV reaction to nasally administered phenylephrine with cross-reactivity with ethylephrine detected by patch testing.

Type IV reaction due to phenylephrine administered nasally with cross-reactivity with ethylephrine.  
Bobadilla-Gonzalez P, Perez-Rangel I, Garcia-Menaya JM, Sanchez-Vega S, Cordobes-Duran C, Zambonino-Carreiras MA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(1):69-72

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Oleaceae-induced pollinosis in an area with exposure to olive and ash trees.
This study assessed the relevance of ash as a cause of pollinosis in Navarre, in Northern Spain, an area with moderate exposure to olive and ash tree pollen. 85 patients from Navarre with clinical symptoms of pollinosis were assessed. Specific IgE was determined for Fra e 1, Ole e 1, and a mixture of amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of Ole e 9 (Ole e 9 NC). Prick tests were performed with ash pollen (n=33) and olive pollen (n=85) and the symptomatic period was recorded (n=85). Sensitization to Oleaceae was detected in 24/85 patients (28.2%). The mean (SD) level of IgE to Fra e 1 was 8.5 (10) kU(A)/L and to Ole e 16.07 (7.88) kU(A)/L. In the control group, these figures were 103.64 (132.19) kU(A)/L and 86.43 (118.5) kU(A)/L, respectively. In all patients with positive sIgE to Fra e 1, IgE to Ole e 1 was also detected, both in the study group and in the control group. Patients who were sensitized to Fra e 1 did not present a longer symptomatic period and their symptoms did not have an earlier onset. No evidence was found of clinically relevant sensitization to ash in Navarre.

Oleaceae-induced pollinosis in an area with exposure to olive and ash trees.  
Garcia BE, Lizaso MT, Moreno C, Rodriguez R, Villalba MT, Ledesma A, Tabar A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(1):34-37

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational allergic 'march'. Rapid evolution of contact dermatitis to ammonium persulfate into airborne contact dermatitis with rhinitis and asthma in a hairdresser.
A female, age 33 years, developed contact dermatitis after 10 years of exposure to ammonium persulfate. After 7 months of progressively extensive and persistent skin lesions, respiratory symptoms appeared that were related to the occupational exposure. The patch test was positive to ammonium persulfate (++), and bronchial challenge for ammonium persulfate showed a significant late response (FEV1 decrease--33%).

Occupational allergic 'march'. Rapid evolution of contact dermatitis to ammonium persulfate into airborne contact dermatitis with rhinitis and asthma in a hairdresser. [Italian]  
Poltronieri A, Patrini L, Pigatto P, Riboldi L, Marsili C, Previdi M, Margonari M, Marraccini P.
Med Lav 2010 Nov;101(6):403-408

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mite component-specific IgE repertoire and phenotypes of allergic disease in childhood: Tropical Singapore
In tropical Singapore, multiple codominant species of mites abound in the indoor environment, and preferential species-specific sensitization has been associated with different phenotypes of allergic disease. This study investigated the pattern of mite component-specific IgE (mcsIgE) in children with different phenotypes of clinical allergic disease in an environment with multiple mite species exposure. Sera were tested for specific IgE against an extensive panel of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Blomia tropicalis allergens. A total of 253 children were included, mean age 7.3 yr. Sensitization to one or both mites was observed in 91% of children, 89% were sensitized to D. pteronyssinus, and 70% to B. tropicalis. The most common mite allergens recognized by these atopic children were Der p 1 (64%), Der p 2 (71%), Blo t 5 (45%), Blo t 7 (44%), and Blo t 21 (56%). Specific IgE responses to an increased number of distinct mite allergens correlated with the complexity of the allergic phenotype. An increased risk for the multi-systemic phenotype (AR + AS + AD) was associated with sensitization to an increased repertoire of mite components (three or more) and a positive parental history of AS. A highly pleiomorphic IgE response to the prevalent indoor mites is associated with the presence of a multi-systemic allergic phenotype in childhood in a tropical environment.

Mite component-specific IgE repertoire and phenotypes of allergic disease in childhood: the tropical perspective.  
Kidon MI, Chin CW, Kang LW, Ching OT, Seng TY, Ning WK, Angus AC, Theng OS, Feng GY, Reginald K, Zhi BX, Shen SH, Tim CF.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Mar;22(2):202-210

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Psychotropic drug-related eosinophilia with systemic symptoms after acute caffeine ingestion.
Drug-related eosinophilia with systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a potentially life-threatening, multiorgan condition that can result from drug treatment. A 16-year-old boy with long-standing bipolar disorder who was chronically treated with aripiprazole and fluoxetine developed DRESS syndrome after ingestion of high doses of caffeine. His classic presentation with fever, morbilliform rash, lymphadenopathy, and visceral involvement, including leukocytosis, eosinophilia, and hepatitis, was consistent with this diagnosis. The authors propose that the development of DRESS syndrome was a net result of inconsistent medication adherence coupled with the ingestion of near-toxic doses of caffeine, which can lead to rhabdomyolysis and, through renal impairment, lead to the accumulation of toxic oxidative metabolites of either or both psychotropic medications.

Psychotropic drug-related eosinophilia with systemic symptoms after acute caffeine ingestion.  
Mahapatra S, Belgrad JL, Adeoye MA.
Pediatrics 2011 Jan;127(1):e235-e238

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Selectively high level of serum interleukin 5 in a newborn infant with cow's milk allergy.
We report here the case of a term newborn infant who showed hematochezia 36 hours after the first feeding with cow's milk formula. His serum immunoglobulin E levels were not elevated, although eosinophils were detected in the stool. Elimination of cow's milk formula resolved the symptoms, and from the clinical course and laboratory data the infant was diagnosed with CMA. The serum interleukin 5 (IL-5) (125 pg/mL) level in this patient was selectively elevated. However, serum levels of other T-helper 2 (Th2) cytokines (including IL-4 and IL-13), Th1 cytokines (including interferon gamma), and proinflammatory cytokines (including tumor necrosis factor alpha) were not elevated. These findings suggest that, for this patient, IL-5 and eosinophils might have played a role in the development of neonatal CMA.

Selectively high level of serum interleukin 5 in a newborn infant with cow's milk allergy.  
Koike Y, Takahashi N, Yada Y, Kawamata R, Sato Y, Momoi MY.
Pediatrics 2011 Jan;127(1):e231-e234

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Adverse respiratory outcomes associated with occupational exposures at a soy processing plant.
This study aimed to characterise the relationship between adverse health outcomes and occupational risk factors among workers at a soy processing plant. 147 (52%) out of 281 employees, including 66 (70%) out of 94 production workers, participated. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were significantly elevated for wheeze, sinusitis, ever-asthma and current asthma. Participants had significantly higher mean concentrations of soy-specific IgG (97.9 mg.L(-1) versus 1.5 mg.L(-1)) and prevalence of soy-specific IgE (21% versus 4%) than controls. Participants with soy-specific IgE had three-fold greater odds of current asthma or asthma-like symptoms, and six-fold greater odds of work-related asthma-like symptoms; the latter additionally was associated with production work and higher peak dust exposures. Airways obstruction was associated with higher peak dust. Work-related sinusitis, nasal allergies and rash were associated with reported workplace mould exposure. Asthma and symptoms of asthma, but not other respiratory problems, were associated with immune reactivity to soy.

Adverse respiratory outcomes associated with occupational exposures at a soy processing plant.  
Cummings KJ, Gaughan DM, Kullman GJ, Beezhold DH, Green BJ, Blachere FM, Bledsoe T, Kreiss K, Cox-Ganser J.
Eur Respir J 2010 Nov;36(5):1007-1015

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

The German experience 10 years after the latex allergy epidemic: need for further preventive measures in healthcare employees with latex allergy.  
Merget R, van K, Sucker K, Heinze E, Taeger D, Goldscheid N, Haufs MG, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Kromark K, Nienhaus A, Bruening T.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2010 Dec;83(8):895-903

Latex allergy symptoms among health care workers: results from a university health and safety surveillance system.  
Epling C, Duncan J, Archibong E, Ostbye T, Pompeii LA, Dement J.
Int J Occup Environ Health 2011 Jan;17(1):17-23

Systemic nickel allergy presenting as papuloerythroderma-like eruptions.  
Kato K, Satoh T, Tanaka T, Ueda N, Yokozeki H.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 Nov;90(6):655-656

Urticarial vasculitis secondary to H1N1 vaccination.  
Hughes R, Lacour JP, Baldin B, Reverte M, Ortonne JP, Passeron T.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 Nov;90(6):651-652

Severe pneumonia caused by combined infection with Pneumocystis jiroveci, parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus, and Aspergillus fumigatus in a patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.  
Lee T, Bae YJ, Park SK, Park HJ, Kim SH, Cho YS, Moon HB, Lee SO, Kim TB.
Acta Derm Venereol 2010 Nov;90(6):625-629

Cedar pollen aggravates atopic dermatitis in childhood monozygotic twin patients with allergic rhino conjunctivitis.  
Murakami Y, Matsui S, Kijima A, Kitaba S, Murota H, Katayama I.
Allergol Int 2011 Mar 25;

Late-onset anaphylaxis due to poly (gamma-glutamic acid) in the soup of commercial cold Chinese noodles in a patient with allergy to fermented soybeans (natto).  
Inomata N, Chin K, Nagashima M, Ikezawa Z.
Allergol Int 2011 Mar 25;

Identification of a new allergen from Amaranthus retroflexus pollen, Ama r 2.  
Tehrani M, Sankian M, Assarehzadegan MA, Falak R, Noorbakhsh R, Moghadam M, Jabbari F, Varasteh A.
Allergol Int 2011 Mar 25;

Correlation between Asian Dust Storms and Worsening Asthma in Western Japan.  
Watanabe M, Yamasaki A, Burioka N, Kurai J, Yoneda K, Yoshida A, Igishi T, Fukuoka Y, Nakamoto M, Takeuchi H, Suyama H, Tatsukawa T, Chikumi H, Matsumoto S, Sako T, Hasegawa Y, Okazaki R, Hora.
Allergol Int 2011 Feb 25;
Click to view abstract

Allergy to rocuronium: from clinical suspicion to correct diagnosis.  
Leysen J, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Vercauteren M, Lambert J, Weyler JJ, Stevens WJ, Ebo DG.
Allergy 2011 Mar 6;

IgE component-resolved allergen profile and clinical symptoms in soy and peanut allergic patients.  
Vissers YM, Jansen AP, Ruinemans-Koerts J, Wichers HJ, Savelkoul HF.
Allergy 2011 Mar 4;

Affected person of a food hypersensitivity - claim of medical achievements in a Luxembourgian medical surgery.  
Konig V, Rosch N, Miller X, Mosges R.
Allergy 2011 Mar 15;

An explorative study of low levels of allergen-specific IgE and clinical allergy symptoms during early childhood.  
Soderstrom L, Lilja G, Borres MP, Nilsson C.
Allergy 2011 Mar 11;

Eosinophilic panniculitis triggered by intramuscular penicillin and occupational setting.  
Masferrer E, Martin-Ezquerra G, Martinez-Escala E, Pujol RM, Gimenez-Arnau A.
Allergy 2011 Mar;66(3):436-437
Click to view abstract

Desert dust exposure is associated with increased risk of asthma hospitalization in children.  
Kanatani KT, Ito I, Al-Delaimy WK, Adachi Y, Mathews WC, Ramsdell JW.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Dec 15;182(12):1475-1481

Risks of exposure to occupational asthmogens in atopic and nonatopic asthma: a case-control study in Taiwan.  
Wang TN, Lin MC, Wu CC, Leung SY, Huang MS, Chuang HY, Lee CH, Wu DC, Ho PS, Ko AM, Chang PY, Ko YC.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Dec 1;182(11):1369-1376

IgE sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with reduced lung function in asthma.  
Fairs A, Agbetile J, Hargadon B, Bourne M, Monteiro WR, Brightling CE, Bradding P, Green RH, Mutalithas K, Desai D, Pavord ID, Wardlaw AJ, Pashley CH.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Dec 1;182(11):1362-1368

Pollen spectrum and risk of pollen allergy in central Spain.  
Perez-Badia R, Rapp A, Morales C, Sardinero S, Galan C, Garcia-Mozo H.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2010 Jun;17(1):139-151

Genetic aspect of venom allergy: association with HLA class I and class II antigens.  
Karakis GP, Sin B, Tutkak H, Kose K, Misirligil Z.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2010 Jun;17(1):119-123

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms: a retrospective study of 60 cases.  
Chen YC, Chiu HC, Chu CY.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Dec;146(12):1373-1379

A case of bronchial asthma caused by occupational exposure to Trichophyton. [Japanese]  
Hoshi R, Nakagome K, Aoki H, Takaku Y, Yamaguchi T, Soma T, Nishihara F, Komiyama K, Hagiwara K, Kanazawa M, Nagata M.
Arerugi 2011 Feb;60(2):207-213

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis/eosinophilic pneumonia. [Japanese]  
Nakagome K, Nagata M.
Arerugi 2011 Feb;60(2):156-165

Recognition of iodixanol by dendritic cells increases the cellular response in delayed allergic reactions to contrast media.  
Antunez C, Barbaud A, Gomez E, Audonnet S, Lopez S, Gueant-Rodriguez RM, imone-Gastin I, Gomez F, Blanca M, Gueant JL.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Mar 7;

Skin prick testing and peanut-specific IgE can predict peanut challenge outcomes in preschoolchildren with peanut sensitization.  
Johannsen H, Nolan R, Pascoe EM, Cuthbert P, Noble V, Corderoy T, Franzmann A, Loh R, Prescott SL.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Mar 24;

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by basil (Ocimum basilicum).  
Kiec-Swierczynska M, Krecisz B, Chomiczewska D, Swierczynska-Machura D, Palczynski C.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):365-367

Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by occupational exposure to the canine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug carprofen.  
Kiely C, Murphy G.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):364-365

Contact allergy to aliphatic polyisocyanates based on hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate (HDI).  
alto-Korte K, Pesonen M, Kuuliala O, Alanko K, Jolanki R.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):357-363

Characteristics of patch test reactions to common preservatives incorporated in petrolatum and water, respectively.  
Brasch J, Uter W.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):43-48

p-Phenylenediamine sensitization and occupation.  
Malvestio A, Bovenzi M, Hoteit M, Belloni FA, Peserico A, Corradin MT, Larese FF.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):37-42

Fluctuations in the prevalence of chromate allergy in Denmark and exposure to chrome-tanned leather.  
Caroe C, Andersen KE, Thyssen JP, Mortz CG.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):340-346

Allergic contact stomatitis caused by a polyether dental impression material.  
Batchelor JM, Todd PM.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):296-297

Occupational allergy to cinnamal in a baker.  
Guarneri F.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):294

Fixed drug eruption caused by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid.  
Perez-Ezquerra PR, Sanchez-Morillas L, Alvarez AS, Gomez-Tembleque MP, Moratiel HB, Martinez JJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):294-296

Occupational cobalt-allergic contact dermatitis resulting from polyester resin.  
Cahill JL, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):292-294

Contact sensitization to textile dyes in a self-selected population and a dermatological referral population in Beijing.  
Li LF.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):291-292

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecylpropane-1,3-diamine in a surface disinfectant.  
Schliemann S, Zahlten A, Krautheim A, Elsner P.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):290-291

Flare-up of dermatitis following patch testing is more common in polysensitized patients.  
Mose AP, Steenfeldt N, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):289-290

Comparison of three different techniques for application of water solutions to Finn Chambers(R).  
Frick-Engfeldt M, Gruvberger B, Isaksson M, Hauksson I, Ponten A, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):284-288

Contact allergy to essential oils: current patch test results (2000-2008) from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK).  
Uter W, Schmidt E, Geier J, Lessmann H, Schnuch A, Frosch P.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):277-283

Fragrance mix II in the baseline series contributes significantly to detection of fragrance allergy.  
Heisterberg MV, Andersen KE, Avnstorp C, Kristensen B, Kristensen O, Kaaber K, Laurberg G, Menne T, Nielsen NH, Sommerlund M, Thormann J, Veien NK, Vissing S, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):270-276

Patch testing with fragrance mix II: results of the IVDK 2005-2008.  
Krautheim A, Uter W, Frosch P, Schnuch A, Geier J.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):262-269

Fragrance mix I patch test reactions in 5006 consecutive dermatitis patients tested simultaneously with TRUE Test(R) and Trolab(R) test material.  
Mortz CG, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):248-253

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by durable-press finishes does exist in the USA.  
Nedorost S, Warshaw E, Jacob S, Katta R, Zirwas M, Andrew S.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):233-234

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin and colophonium in neoprene thermal sauna shorts.  
Ozkaya E, Elinc-Aslan MS, Mirzoyeva L.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):230-232

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical diltiazem.  
Wong TH, Horn HM.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):228

Contact allergy to diltiazem cream.  
Leinonen PT, Riekki R, Oikarinen A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):228-230

Permanent make-up colorants may cause severe skin reactions.  
Wenzel SM, Welzel J, Hafner C, Landthaler M, Baumler W.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):223-227

Nickel on the Swedish market: follow-up 10 years after entry into force of the EU Nickel Directive.  
Biesterbos J, Yazar K, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):333-339

Contact allergy to fragrances: current patch test results (2005-2008) from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology.  
Uter W, Geier J, Frosch P, Schnuch A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Nov;63(5):254-261

Preservatives in cosmetics: reactivity of allergenic formaldehyde-releasers towards amino acids through breakdown products other than formaldehyde.  
Kireche M, Gimenez-Arnau E, Lepoittevin JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):192-202

Ethosome formulation of contact allergens may enhance patch test reactions in patients.  
Madsen JT, Vogel S, Karlberg AT, Simonsson C, Johansen JD, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):209-214

Study of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile in the patients with parthenium dermatitis.  
Akhtar N, Verma KK, Sharma A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):203-208

Occupational methacrylate and acrylate allergy--cross-reactions and possible screening allergens.  
alto-Korte K, Henriks-Eckerman ML, Kuuliala O, Jolanki R.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Dec;63(6):301-312

Relationship between formaldehyde and quaternium-15 contact allergy. Influence of strength of patch test reactions.  
de Groot AC, Blok J, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Oct;63(4):187-191

Cutaneous adverse drug reaction to heparins with hypereosinophilia and high IgE level.  
Klos K, Spiewak R, Kruszewski J, Bant A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):61-62

Occupational airborne contact dermatitis caused by pantoprazole.  
Neumark M, Ingber A, Levin M, Slodownik D.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):60-61

Leucoderma after Chinese sofa dermatitis.  
Vives R, Ana V, Hervella M, Yanguas J.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):58-59

Contact sensitization to methylisothiazolinone in Finland--a multicentre study.  
Ackermann L, alto-Korte K, Alanko K, Hasan T, Jolanki R, Lammintausta K, Lauerma A, Laukkanen A, Liippo J, Riekki R, Vuorela AM, Rantanen T.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):49-53

Occupational hand eczema caused by nickel and evaluated by quantitative exposure assessment.  
Jensen P, Thyssen JP, Johansen JD, Skare L, Menne T, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):32-36

Nickel reactivity and filaggrin null mutations--evaluation of the filaggrin bypass theory in a general population.  
Ross-Hansen K, Menne T, Johansen JD, Carlsen BC, Linneberg A, Nielsen NH, Stender S, Meldgaard M, Szecsi PB, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jan;64(1):24-31

IgG food allergies - a subject of controversy. [German]  
Weiss J.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr 2011 Jan;136(4):3

Acidic ribosomal protein 60S: A new tomato allergen.  
López-Matas MA, Ferrer A, Larramendi CH, Huertas AJ, Pagán JA, García-Abujeta JL, Bartra J, Andreu C, Lavín JR, Carnés J.
Food Chemistry 2011;127(2):638-640
Abstract

Recombinant allergens. For routine use or still only science? [German]  
Schmid-Grendelmeier P.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):946-953

In vitro allergy diagnosis in dermatology. [German]  
Brehler R, Wedi B.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):935-937

Standards and pitfalls of in-vitro diagnostics of Hymenoptera venom allergy. [German]  
Rueff F, Jappe U, Przybilla B.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):938-945

Inappropriate test methods in allergy. [German]  
Kleine-Tebbe J, Herold DA.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):961-966

Allergy to car seat. [German]  
Wurpts G, Merk HF.
Hautarzt 2010 Nov;61(11):933-934

Age-related differences in the clinical presentation of food-induced anaphylaxis.  
Rudders SA, Banerji A, Clark S, Camargo CA.
J Pediatr 2011 Feb;158(2):326-328

Reshaping the Bet v 1 fold modulates T(H) polarization.  
Wallner M, Hauser M, Himly M, Zaborsky N, Mutschlechner S, Harrer A, Asam C, Pichler U, van RR, Briza P, Thalhamer J, Bohle B, Achatz G, Ferreira F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 17;

Diagnosis and management of drug hypersensitivity reactions.  
Romano A, Torres MJ, Castells M, Sanz ML, Blanca M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3 Suppl):S67-S73
Click to view abstract

Drug hypersensitivity: pharmacogenetics and clinical syndromes.  
Phillips EJ, Chung WH, Mockenhaupt M, Roujeau JC, Mallal SA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3 Suppl):S60-S66
Click to view abstract

Four distinct subtypes of non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies in neonates and infants, distinguished by their initial symptoms.  
Nomura I, Morita H, Hosokawa S, Hoshina H, Fukuie T, Watanabe M, Ohtsuka Y, Shoda T, Terada A, Takamasu T, Arai K, Ito Y, Ohya Y, Saito H, Matsumoto K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):685-688

Prevalence of challenge-proven IgE-mediated food allergy using population-based sampling and predetermined challenge criteria in infants.  
Osborne NJ, Koplin JJ, Martin PE, Gurrin LC, Lowe AJ, Matheson MC, Ponsonby AL, Wake M, Tang ML, Dharmage SC, Allen KJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):668-676

Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy.  
Brown SJ, Asai Y, Cordell HJ, Campbell LE, Zhao Y, Liao H, Northstone K, Henderson J, Alizadehfar R, Ben-Shoshan M, Morgan K, Roberts G, Masthoff LJ, Pasmans SG, van den Akker PC, Wijmenga C.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):661-667

The prevalence and natural course of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome to cow's milk: A large-scale, prospective population-based study.  
Katz Y, Goldberg MR, Rajuan N, Cohen A, Leshno M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):647-653

Freezing does not alter antigenic properties of fresh fruits for skin testing in patients with birch tree pollen-induced oral allergy syndrome.  
Begin P, Des RA, Nguyen M, Masse MS, Paradis J, Paradis L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 14;

Penicillin allergy might not be very common in subjects with cephalosporin allergy.  
Macy E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 11;

Diagnosing IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to sesame by an immediate-reading 'contact test' with sesame oil.  
Alonzi C, Campi P, Gaeta F, Pineda F, Romano A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 4;

Mechanisms underlying differential food allergy response to heated egg.  
Martos G, Lopez-Exposito I, Bencharitiwong R, Cecilia BM, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 4;

Highly accurate prediction of food challenge outcome using routinely available clinical data.  
Dunngalvin A, Daly D, Cullinane C, Stenke E, Keeton D, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, Roberts GC, Lucas J, Hourihane JO.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):633-639

Peanut allergy: Overestimated in epidemiology or underdiagnosed in primary care?  
Custovic A, Nicolaou N.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):631-632

Food allergy: Are we getting closer to a cure?  
Leung DY.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;127(3):555-557

Impaired allergy diagnostics among parasite-infected patients caused by IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha1,3-galactose.  
Arkestal K, Sibanda E, Thors C, Troye-Blomberg M, Mduluza T, Valenta R, Gronlund H, van HM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 2;

Ovalbumin content of 2010-2011 influenza vaccines.  
McKinney KK, Webb L, Petersen M, Nelson M, Laubach S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 10;

Experts hope to clear confusion with first guidelines to tackle food allergy.  
Voelker R.
JAMA 2011 Feb 2;305(5):457

Effects of a restricted elimination diet on the behaviour of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (INCA study): a randomised controlled trial.  
Pelsser LM, Frankena K, Toorman J, Savelkoul HF, Dubois AE, Pereira RR, Haagen TA, Rommelse NN, Buitelaar JK.
Lancet 2011 Feb 5;377(9764):494-503

Restricted elimination diet for ADHD: the INCA study.  
Ghuman JK.
Lancet 2011 Feb 5;377(9764):446-448

Exposure to Anisakis simplex in the fishing industry: an emerging aspect in occupational med. [Italian]  
Arcangeli G, Mucci N, Cupelli V.
Med Lav 2010 Nov;101(6):471-472

Occupational allergic 'march'. Rapid evolution of contact dermatitis to ammonium persulfate into airborne contact dermatitis with rhinitis and asthma in a hairdresser. [Italian]  
Poltronieri A, Patrini L, Pigatto P, Riboldi L, Marsili C, Previdi M, Margonari M, Marraccini P.
Med Lav 2010 Nov;101(6):403-408

Aerosolized amphotericin for the treatment of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.  
Hayes D, Murphy BS, Lynch JE, Feola DJ.
Pediatr Pulmonol 2010 Nov;45(11):1145-1148

Psychotropic drug-related eosinophilia with systemic symptoms after acute caffeine ingestion.  
Mahapatra S, Belgrad JL, Adeoye MA.
Pediatrics 2011 Jan;127(1):e235-e238

Selectively high level of serum interleukin 5 in a newborn infant with cow's milk allergy.  
Koike Y, Takahashi N, Yada Y, Kawamata R, Sato Y, Momoi MY.
Pediatrics 2011 Jan;127(1):e231-e234

Management of food allergy in the school setting.  
Sicherer SH, Mahr T.
Pediatrics 2010 Dec;126(6):1232-1239

Human seminal plasma hypersensitivity: an under-recognized women's health issue.  
Bernstein JA.
Postgrad Med 2011 Jan;123(1):120-125

Relationships between indoor allergens, sensitization, and allergic asthma and rhinitis rhinitis symptoms. [French]  
Casset A, Braun JJ.
Rev Mal Respir 2010 Oct;27(8):913-920

Occupational asthma to solder wire containing an adipic acid flux.  
Moore VC, Burge PS.
Eur Respir J 2010 Oct;36(4):962-963

Adverse respiratory outcomes associated with occupational exposures at a soy processing plant.  
Cummings KJ, Gaughan DM, Kullman GJ, Beezhold DH, Green BJ, Blachere FM, Bledsoe T, Kreiss K, Cox-Ganser J.
Eur Respir J 2010 Nov;36(5):1007-1015

The gastrointestinal system's association with autism. [Danish]  
Schnohr CW.
Ugeskr Laeger 2011 Feb 21;173(8):581-583


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