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 Allergy Advisor Digest - May 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Allergic contact dermatitis from aluminium in deodorants.
Read Linalool--a significant contact sensitizer after air exposure.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis to decyl glucoside in Tinosorb M.
Read Ant venoms. A review
Read Watermelon profilin: characterization of a major allergen as a model for plant-derived food profilins.
Read Local angioedema following exposure to sun.
Read A population-based study on peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy prevalence in Canada.
Read Greater epitope recognition of shrimp allergens by children than adults suggests that shrimp sensitization decreases with age.
Read Recombinant allergen-based IgE testing to distinguish bee and wasp allergy.
Read Early recovery from cow's milk allergy.
Read Seminal allergy
Read Contact allergy in the aeronautics industry
Read Cow milk is an allergen which must be declared on labels
Read Alternaria-sensitivity in children with moderate-severe asthma is associated with HLA-DR and HLA-DQ.
Read Skin prick test evaluation of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus diagnostic extracts from Europe, Mexico, and USA.
Read Blomia tropicalis as a potent allergen in house dust and its role in allergic asthma in Kolkata Metropolis, India.
Read Baker's asthma and wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis
Read Two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis whose causative allergens are usefully diagnosed by patch test.

Abstracts shared in May 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Cross-contamination of foods and implications for food allergic patients.
Read IgE antibody serology: A primer for the practicing North American allergist/immunologist.
Read US prevalence of self-reported peanut, tree nut, and sesame allergy: 11-year follow-up.
Read Peanut lectins
Read Controversy - hypersensitivity to food additives is a clinical reality: Pro
Read Late-onset of IgE sensitization to microbial allergens in young children with atopic dermatitis.
Read An epidemic of furniture-related dermatitis: searching for a cause.
Read IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to methylprednisolone.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis from aluminium in deodorants.
Allergic contact dermatitis from aluminium in deodorants. (Awaiting full text)

Allergic contact dermatitis from aluminium in deodorants.  
Garg S, Loghdey S, Gawkrodger DJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):57-58

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Linalool--a significant contact sensitizer after air exposure.
Linalool is a widely used fragrance terpene. Pure linalool is not allergenic or a very weak allergen, but autoxidizes on air exposure and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. Oxidized (ox.) linalool has previously been patch tested at a concentration of 2.0% in petrolatum (pet.) in 1511 patients, and 1.3% positive patch test reactions were observed. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal patch test concentration for detection of contact allergy to ox. linalool. Raising the patch test concentration for ox. linalool gave a better detection of contact allergy, as many as 5-7% positive patch test reactions were detected. We suggest a patch test concentration of ox. linalool 6.0% pet. for future patch testing, giving a dose per unit area of 2.4 mg/cm(2) when 20 mg test substance is tested in small Finn Chambers

Linalool--a significant contact sensitizer after air exposure.  
Christensson JB, Matura M, Gruvberger B, Bruze M, Karlberg AT.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):32-41

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis to decyl glucoside in Tinosorb M.
Decyl glucoside is a mild non-ionic surfactant used in cosmetic formularies including baby shampoo and in products for individuals with a sensitive skin. Many natural personal care companies use this cleanser because it is plant-derived, biodegradable, and gentle for all hair types. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decyl_glucoside). A number of reports have occurred in the medical literature regarding contact allergy to this ingredient, including this one. Tinosorb M is a benzotriazole-based organic compound that is added to sunscreens to absorb UV rays.

Allergic contact dermatitis to decyl glucoside in Tinosorb M.  
Andrade P, Goncalo M, Figueiredo A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):119-120

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Ant venoms. A review
The review summarizes knowledge about ants that are known to sting humans and their venoms. Fire ants and Chinese needle ants are showing additional spread of range. Fire ants are now important in much of Asia. Venom allergens have been characterized and studied for fire ants and jack jumper ants. The first studies of Pachycondyla venoms have been reported, and a major allergen is Pac c 3, related to Sol i 3 from fire ants. There are very limited data available for other ant groups.

Ant venoms.  
Hoffman DR.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 4;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Watermelon profilin: characterization of a major allergen as a model for plant-derived food profilins.
Watermelon profilin has been reported to be a major allergen in watermelon. In this study, native profilin and recombinant profilin from watermelon were purified. Both show similar IgE reactivity in vitro and are biologically active.

Watermelon profilin: characterization of a major allergen as a model for plant-derived food profilins.  
Cases B, Pastor-Vargas C, Gil DF, Perez-Gordo M, Maroto AS, de Las HM, Vivanco F, Cuesta-Herranz J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 May 18;153(3):215-222

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Local angioedema following exposure to sun.
This study describes 5 patients who developed an angioedema following sun exposures. All patients reported an intensely stinging angioedema strictly limited to face and extremities, when exposed to solar light. Urticarial wheals were never observed or reported by patients, and oral antihistamines proved to be of no help in preventing or improving the condition of lesions. Laboratory and phototesting data allowed ruling out all other acquired or inherited diseases characterized by photosensitivity. The authors propose that solar angioedema should be considered a novel clinical entity.

Local angioedema following sun exposures: a report of five cases.  
Calzavara-Pinton P, Sala R, Venturini M, Rossi MT, Tosoni C, Lodi RF, Zane C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 May 20;153(3):315-320

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A population-based study on peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy prevalence in Canada.
The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy in Canada. A cross-Canada, random telephone survey was conduceted. Food allergy was defined as perceived (based on self-report), probable (based on convincing history or self-report of physician diagnosis), or confirmed (based on history and evidence of confirmatory tests). Of 10,596 households surveyed in 2008 and 2009, 3666 responded (34.6% participation rate), of which 3613 completed the entire interview, representing 9667 individuals. The prevalence of perceived peanut allergy was 1.00%; tree nut, 1.22%; fish, 0.51%; shellfish, 1.60% ; and sesame, 0.10%. The prevalence of probable allergy was 0.93%; 1.14%; 0.48%; 1.42%; and 0.09%, respectively.

A population-based study on peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy prevalence in Canada.  
Ben-Shoshan M, Harrington DW, Soller L, Fragapane J, Joseph L, St PY, Godefroy SB, Elliot SJ, Clarke AE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 6;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Greater epitope recognition of shrimp allergens by children than adults suggests that shrimp sensitization decreases with age.
This study sought to identify the IgE-binding epitopes of the 4 shrimp allergens and to characterize epitope recognition profiles of children and adults with shrimp allergy. Fifty-three subjects, 34 children and 19 adults, were selected with immediate allergic reactions to shrimp, increased shrimp-specific serum IgE levels, and positive immunoblot binding to shrimp. Subjects were tested by means of peptide microarray for IgE binding with synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the sequences of Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp tropomyosin, arginine kinase (AK), myosin light chain (MLC), and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SCP). The median shrimp IgE level was 4-fold higher in children than in adults (47 vs 12.5 kU(A)/L). The frequency of allergen recognition was higher in children (tropomyosin, 81% [94% for children and 61% for adults]; MLC, 57% [70% for children and 31% for adults]; AK, 51% [67% for children and 21% for adults]; and SCP, 45% [59% for children and 21% for adults]), whereas control subjects showed negligible binding. Seven IgE-binding regions were identified in tropomyosin by means of peptide microarray, confirming previously identified shrimp epitopes. In addition, 3 new epitopes were identified in tropomyosin, 5 epitopes were identified in MLC, 3 epitopes were identified in SCP, and 7 epitopes were identified in AK. Interestingly, frequency of individual epitope recognition, as well as intensity of IgE binding, was significantly greater in children than in adults for all 4 proteins. The study concludes that children with shrimp allergy have greater shrimp-specific IgE antibody levels and show more intense binding to shrimp peptides and greater epitope diversity than adults.

Greater epitope recognition of shrimp allergens by children than adults suggests that shrimp sensitization decreases with age.  
Ayuso R, Sanchez-Garcia S, Lin J, Fu Z, Ibanez MD, Carrillo T, Blanco C, Goldis M, Bardina L, Sastre J, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 12;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant allergen-based IgE testing to distinguish bee and wasp allergy.
The objective of this study was to establish recombinant allergen-based IgE tests to diagnose bee and yellow jacket wasp allergy. Sera from patients with bee and/or wasp allergy (n = 43) and patients with pollen allergy with false-positive IgE serology to venom extracts were tested for IgE reactivity in allergen extract-based tests or with purified allergens, including nonglycosylated recombinant (r) Api m 1, rApi m 2, rVes v 5, and insect cell-expressed, glycosylated rApi m 2 as well as 2 natural plant glycoproteins (Phl p 4, bromelain). The patients with venom allergy could be diagnosed with a combination of E coli-expressed rApi m 1, rApi m 2, and rVes v 5 whereas patients with pollen allergy remained negative. For a group of 29 patients for whom the sensitizing venom could not be identified with natural allergen extracts, testing with nonglycosylated allergens allowed identification of the sensitizing venom. Recombinant nonglycosylated allergens also allowed definition of the sensitizing venom for those 14 patients who had reacted either with bee or wasp venom extracts. By IgE inhibition studies, it is shown that glycosylated Api m 2 contains carbohydrate epitopes that cross-react with natural Api m 1, Ves v 2, natural Phl p 4, and bromelain, thus identifying cross-reactive structures responsible for serologic false-positive test results or double-positivity to bee and wasp extracts. Therefore nonglycosylated recombinant bee and wasp venom allergens allow the identification of patients with bee and wasp allergy and should facilitate accurate prescription of venom immunotherapy.

Recombinant allergen-based IgE testing to distinguish bee and wasp allergy.  
Mittermann I, Zidarn M, Silar M, Markovic-Housley Z, Aberer W, Korosec P, Kosnik M, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 11;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Early recovery from cow's milk allergy.
This study concludes that attaining tolerance to cow's milk is associated with decreased epitope binding by IgE and a concurrent increase in corresponding epitope binding by IgG4

Early recovery from cow's milk allergy is associated with decreasing IgE and increasing IgG4 binding to cow's milk epitopes.  
Savilahti EM, Rantanen V, Lin JS, Karinen S, Saarinen KM, Goldis M, Makela MJ, Hautaniemi S, Savilahti E, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 10;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Seminal allergy
"Human seminal plasma allergy (HSPA) is a rare condition but it is less rare than originally reported. It occurs in two forms: a brutal systemic anaphylactic reaction associated with regional signs (70% of the cases) or as an isolated local reaction masked as chronic vulvovaginitis or as a burning semen syndrome, the accurate etiology of which is not always recognized by gynecologists and general practitioners. New data have confirmed the efficacy of immunotherapy (60–70% in the systemic form). The existence of cross antigenicity between prostatic kallikrein (present in human sperm) and the dog allergen Can f 5, which is a dog prostatic kallikrein, has recently been reported. Reactivity to that 28 kDa molecule, which is present in dog dander extracts, is found in 25 to 70% of the sera of patients allergic to dog dander. This cross-reactivity might explain the occurrence of HSPA in some women during their first sexual intercourse."

L’allergie au liquide séminal / Seminal allergy  
Tonnel A-B, Schlatter J.
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):197-199

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact allergy in the aeronautics industry
"Contact allergy in the aeronautics industry involves essentially aircraft manufacturing and maintenance workers. The products most frequently in cause are resins, in particular epoxy resin, cutting fluids and solvents, anti-corrosives and waterproofing materials. This article summarizes the principal recent studies and the evolution of occupational contact dermatitis in the aeronautics industry during the last 50 years."

Allergie de contact et construction aéronautique  
M. Castelain, J. Teston
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):217-221

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cow milk is an allergen which must be declared on labels
"Milk is produced by the mammary glands of mammals. It provides the primary source of nutrition for young mammals. It is rich in proteins and carbohydrates. Numerous dairy products are made from milk. Its components are used as ingredients in industrial products. Cow milk is an allergen which must be declared on labels."

Qu’est-ce que le lait ?  
A.-C. Vilain
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):124-127

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Alternaria-sensitivity in children with moderate-severe asthma is associated with HLA-DR and HLA-DQ.
In children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma, there was increased Th2 sensitivity to Alternaria stimulation. This was associated with HLA-DR restriction and with increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*13 and HLA-DRB1*03. There was decreased frequency of HLA-DQB1*03 in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma, suggesting HLA-DQB1*03 may be protective of the development of Alternaria-sensitive severe asthma

Mold-sensitivity in children with moderate-severe asthma is associated with HLA-DR and HLA-DQ.  
Knutsen AP, Vijay HM, Kumar V, Kariuki B, Santiago LA, Graff R, Wofford JD, Shah MR.
Allergy 2010 May 10;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin prick test evaluation of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus diagnostic extracts from Europe, Mexico, and USA.
The objective of this study was to compare biological activity of various European D pteronyssinus diagnostic extracts against an FDA-validated extract using quantitative skin prick tests. Six diagnostic D pteronyssinus extracts (1 reference extract; 3 European extracts; 1 US-Mexican extract, which is imported as raw material from the United States and sold in Mexico; and 1 Mexican extract) were tested during 2 skin prick test sessions as a concentrate and 2 serial 2-fold dilutions, in quadruplicate, on the backs of 19 patients with D pteronyssinus allergic rhinitis. The study concludes that the study confirmed the results from previous in vitro testing that various diagnostic extracts of D pteronyssinus used in Europe and Mexico are less potent than those used in the United States.

Skin prick test evaluation of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus diagnostic extracts from Europe, Mexico, and the United States.  
Larenas-Linnemann D, Matta JJ, Shah-Hosseini K, Michels A, Mosges R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 May;104(5):420-425

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Blomia tropicalis as a potent allergen in house dust and its role in allergic asthma in Kolkata Metropolis, India.
In a study conducted in Kolkata Metropolis, India, skin prick test was performed on 1079 patients between the age group 5–50 years using a variety of 16 common aero-allergens. Among patients with asthma to house dust and house dust mite allergen tests were as follows: house dust (96.22%), D. pteronyssinus (75.06%), B. tropicalis (72%), and D. farinae (63.72%). The frequency of positive skin response was found to be independent of age and sex. The total serum IgE levels in patients varied between 7.3 and 4040 IU/ml. Specific IgE antibody test proved that 83% patients showed sensitivity toward at least 1 of the allergens tested.

Allergic Response to Common Inhalants (n = 1079)

Allergens / No. Positive / % Positive

Cocos nucifera - 783 - 72.58

Brassica nigra - 598 - 55.42

Delonix sp. - 522 - 48.38

Azadirachta indica - 467 - 43.25

Caesalpinia sp. - 431 - 40.02

Aspergillus fumigatus - 240 - 22.28

Aspergillus niger - 198 - 18.32

Candida albicans - 166 - 15.39

Cladosporium sp. - 125 - 11.58

Alternaria alternate - 44 - 4.1

Dog dander - 99 - 9.23

Cat dander - 61 - 5.71

House dust - 1035 - 96.22

D. pteronyssinus - 809 - 75.06

D. farinae - 688 - 63.72

Blomia tropicalis - 778 - 72.00

Incrimination of Blomia tropicalis as a potent allergen in house dust and its role in allergic asthma in Kolkata Metropolis, India.  
Podder S, Gupta SK, Saha GK.
WAO Journal 2010;3(5):182-187

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Baker's asthma and wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis
A 47 years-old woman with baker's asthma for several years developed anaphylaxis following energetic walking after ingestion of wheat. The combination of exercise, wheat and aspirin induced urticaria and marked elevation of blood gliadin levels. A diagnosis of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) was made from a high titer of omega-5 gliadin specific IgE in her serum and the result of a challenge test. Several bands were detected in her serum which were beta-, gamma- and omega-5 gliadin based on their relative molecular mass. The authors suggest that wheat gliadins might be causative allergen of both baker's asthma and WDEIA in this case.

Analysis of causative allergen of the patient with baker's asthma and wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (wdeia). [Japanese]  
Ueno M, Adachi A, Fukumoto T, Nishitani N, Fujiwara N, Matsuo H, Kohno K, Morita E.
Arerugi 2010 May;59(5):552-557

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis whose causative allergens are usefully diagnosed by patch test.
Case 1: 67-years-old woman with pollen allergy noticed oppressive feeling of chest and back, and heart burn after accidental ingestion of her dental filling and dental treatment. Peripheral blood eosinophils increased to 38.0%. Cedar and cypress specific IgE were positive. Case 2: a 42-years-old-woman with pollen allergy and asthma experienced repeated urticaria, heartburn, diarrhea and peripheral eosinophilia (25%). Specific IgE was positive only for cypress. High infiltrates of eosinophils in the mucosa of alimentary tract resulted in a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in both. In case 1, based on the history and patch-test-positive finding of formalin and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, these were diagnosed as the causative allergens. In case 2, a patch-test-positive finding of garlic and sesame and improvement after removal of the two allergens, led to the conclusion that these two may be causative allergens. The authors conclude that in these two cases, patch test was useful to identify the allergens.

Two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis whose causative allergens are usefully diagnosed by patch test. [Japanese]  
Adachi A.
Arerugi 2010 May;59(5):545-551

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Allergic contact dermatitis associated with mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris).  
Haw S, Cho HR, Lee MH.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):61-63

Occupational contact dermatitis from ninhydrin in a police officer.  
Soost S, Zuberbier T, Zuberbier M, Worm M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):59-60

Allergic contact dermatitis from aluminium in deodorants.  
Garg S, Loghdey S, Gawkrodger DJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):57-58

Concomitant contact allergy to methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and formaldehyde-releasing preservatives.  
Statham BN, Smith EV, Bodger OG, Green CM, King CM, Ormerod AD, Sansom JE, English JS, Wilkinson MS, Gawkrodger DJ, Chowdhury MM.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):56-57

Contact allergy to epoxy resins--a 10-year study.  
Canelas MM, Goncalo M, Figueiredo A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):55

Epicutaneous patch testing in drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DRESS).  
Santiago F, Goncalo M, Vieira R, Coelho S, Figueiredo A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):47-53
Click to view abstract

Contact and photocontact sensitization in chronic actinic dermatitis: a changing picture.  
Chew AL, Bashir SJ, Hawk JL, Palmer R, White IR, McFadden JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):42-46
Click to view abstract

Linalool--a significant contact sensitizer after air exposure.  
Christensson JB, Matura M, Gruvberger B, Bruze M, Karlberg AT.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):32-41

Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 2. Patch test relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, experimental provocation tests, amount of formaldehyde released, and assessment of risk to consumers alle.  
de GA, White IR, Flyvholm MA, Lensen G, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):18-31
Click to view abstract

Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 1. Characterization, frequency and relevance of sensitization, and frequency of use in cosmetics.  
de Groot AC, White IR, Flyvholm MA, Lensen G, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):2-17
Click to view abstract

Allergy 'sucks': leeches may also be harmful.  
Kukova G, Gerber PA, Antal AS, Homey B.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):124-125

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to HBTU [(o-benzotriazole-10yl)-N,N,N',N,-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate].  
McAleer MA, Bourke B, Bourke J.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):123

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to olanzapine.  
Lowney AC, McAleer MA, Bourke J.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):123-124

Allergic contact dermatitis to dimethyl fumarate in footwear.  
Fraga A, Silva R, Filipe P, Scharrer K, Borges Da CJ, Nussbaum P, Gomes MM.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):121-123

Peristomal allergic contact dermatitis to stoma-adhesive paste containing monobutyl ester/maleic acid of polymethylvinylether (Gantrez 425) but not to Isopropyl ester/maleic anhydride of polymethylvinylether (Gantrez 335).  
Field S, O'Sullivan C, Murphy M, Bourke JF.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):120-121

Allergic contact dermatitis to decyl glucoside in Tinosorb M.  
Andrade P, Goncalo M, Figueiredo A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):119-120

An unusual case of cell phone dermatitis.  
Guarneri F, Guarneri C, Patrizia CS.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):117

Lymphomatoid photocontact dermatitis to benzydamine hydrochloride.  
varez-Garrido H, Sanz-Munoz C, Martinez-Garcia G, Miranda-Romero A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):117-119

Temporal trends of preservative allergy in Denmark (1985-2008).  
Thyssen JP, Engkilde K, Lundov MD, Carlsen BC, Menne T, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):102-108
Click to view abstract

Active sensitization and contact allergy to methyl 2-octynoate.  
Heisterberg MV, Vigan M, Johansen JD.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):97-101
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to dimethyl fumarate with multiple concurrent patch test reactions.  
Lammintausta K, Zimerson E, Winhoven S, Susitaival P, Hasan T, Gruvberger B, Williams J, Beck M, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):88-96
Click to view abstract

The epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population--prevalence and main findings.  
Thyssen JP, Johansen JD, Linneberg A, Menne T.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Feb;62(2):75-87
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis to natural resin rare among gum rosin extractors?  
Scherrer M, Junqueira AF.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jan;62(1):64-65

Dangerous allergens: why some allergens are bad actors.  
Georas SN, Rezaee F, Lerner L, Beck L.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Mar;10(2):92-98
Click to view abstract

Food Allergy: Transfused and Transplanted.  
Atkins D, Malka-Rais J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 14;
Click to view abstract

Feeding Disorders in Food Allergic Children.  
Haas AM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 23;
Click to view abstract

Cross-contamination of foods and implications for food allergic patients.  
Taylor SL, Baumert JL.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 24;
Click to view abstract

Food allergy: who's on first and what do they know?  
Atkins D.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 24;

Prevention of occupational asthma.  
Tarlo SM, Liss GM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 28;
Click to view abstract

Occupational asthma and lower airway disease among world trade center workers and volunteers.  
de la Hoz RE.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 28;
Click to view abstract

A developmental, community, and psychosocial approach to food allergies in children.  
Houle CR, Leo HL, Clark NM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 May 13;
Click to view abstract

Management of the patient with multiple food allergies.  
Wang J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Apr 30;
Click to view abstract

Allergenicity of carbohydrates and their role in anaphylactic events.  
Commins SP, Platts-Mills TA.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Jan;10(1):29-33
Click to view abstract

Patch testing in drug allergy.  
Friedmann PS, rdern-Jones M.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 18;
Click to view abstract

A perspective of nanotechnology in hypersensitivity reactions including drug allergy.  
Montanez MI, Ruiz-Sanchez AJ, Perez-Inestrosa E.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 18;
Click to view abstract

Mastocytosis and insect venom allergy.  
Bonadonna P, Zanotti R, Muller U.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 18;
Click to view abstract

Ant venoms.  
Hoffman DR.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 4;

Watermelon profilin: characterization of a major allergen as a model for plant-derived food profilins.  
Cases B, Pastor-Vargas C, Gil DF, Perez-Gordo M, Maroto AS, de Las HM, Vivanco F, Cuesta-Herranz J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 May 18;153(3):215-222
Click to view abstract

Local angioedema following sun exposures: a report of five cases.  
Calzavara-Pinton P, Sala R, Venturini M, Rossi MT, Tosoni C, Lodi RF, Zane C.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 May 20;153(3):315-320
Click to view abstract

Th2 immune response plays a critical role in the development of nickel-induced allergic contact dermatitis.  
Niiyama S, Tamauchi H, Amoh Y, Terashima M, Matsumura Y, Kanoh M, Habu S, Komotori J, Katsuoka K.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 May 20;153(3):303-314
Click to view abstract

Increased adverse drug reactions to cephalosporins in penicillin allergy patients with positive penicillin skin test.  
Park MA, Koch CA, Klemawesch P, Joshi A, Li JT.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 May 19;153(3):268-273
Click to view abstract

Ovalbumin content of influenza vaccines.  
Li JT, Rank MA, Squillace DL, Kita H.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 6;

AAAAI support of the EAACI Position Paper on IgG(4).  
Allan BS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 6;

A population-based study on peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy prevalence in Canada.  
Ben-Shoshan M, Harrington DW, Soller L, Fragapane J, Joseph L, St PY, Godefroy SB, Elliot SJ, Clarke AE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 6;

Human IgE antibody serology: A primer for the practicing North American allergist/immunologist.  
Hamilton RG, Williams PB.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 6;
Click to view abstract

Immunologic features of infants with milk or egg allergy enrolled in an observational study (Consortium of Food Allergy Research) of food allergy.  
Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Stablein D, Burks AW, Liu AH, Jones SM, Fleischer DM, Leung DY, Grishin A, Mayer L, Shreffler W, Lindblad R, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May;125(5):1077-1083
Click to view abstract

Greater epitope recognition of shrimp allergens by children than adults suggests that shrimp sensitization decreases with age.  
Ayuso R, Sanchez-Garcia S, Lin J, Fu Z, Ibanez MD, Carrillo T, Blanco C, Goldis M, Bardina L, Sastre J, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 12;
Click to view abstract

IgE sensitization to fungi mirrors fungal phylogenetic systematics.  
Soeria-Atmadja D, Onell A, Borga A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 11;
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Recombinant allergen-based IgE testing to distinguish bee and wasp allergy.  
Mittermann I, Zidarn M, Silar M, Markovic-Housley Z, Aberer W, Korosec P, Kosnik M, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 11;
Click to view abstract

Visualization of clustered IgE epitopes on alpha-lactalbumin.  
Hochwallner H, Schulmeister U, Swoboda I, Focke-Tejkl M, Civaj V, Balic N, Nystrand M, Harlin A, Thalhamer J, Scheiblhofer S, Keller W, Pavkov T, Zafred D, Niggemann B, Quirce S, Mari A, Paul.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 11;
Click to view abstract

US prevalence of self-reported peanut, tree nut, and sesame allergy: 11-year follow-up.  
Sicherer SH, Munoz-Furlong A, Godbold JH, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 10;

Early recovery from cow's milk allergy is associated with decreasing IgE and increasing IgG4 binding to cow's milk epitopes.  
Savilahti EM, Rantanen V, Lin JS, Karinen S, Saarinen KM, Goldis M, Makela MJ, Hautaniemi S, Savilahti E, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 May 10;
Click to view abstract

A case of hypersensitivity to mosquito bite associated with Epstein-barr viral infection and natural killer cell lymphocytosis.  
Roh EJ, Chung EH, Chang YP, Myoung NH, Jee YK, Seo M, Kang JH.
J Korean Med Sci 2010 Feb;25(2):321-323
Click to view abstract

JAMA patient page. Food allergies.  
Chang HJ, Burke AE, Glass RM.
JAMA 2010 May 12;303(18):1876

Diagnosing and managing common food allergies: a systematic review.  
Chafen JJ, Newberry SJ, Riedl MA, Bravata DM, Maglione M, Suttorp MJ, Sundaram V, Paige NM, Towfigh A, Hulley BJ, Shekelle PG.
JAMA 2010 May 12;303(18):1848-1856
Click to view abstract

Food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of parents with food-allergic children in the United States.  
Gupta RS, Springston EE, Smith B, Kim JS, Pongracic JA, Wang X, Holl J.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 May 14;
Click to view abstract

La lectine de l’arachide  
P. Rougé, R. Culerrier, C. Granier, F. Rancé, A. Barre
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):281-284
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Controverse l’hypersensibilité aux additifs alimentaires est une réalité clinique : pour / Controversy hypersensitivity to food additives is a clinical reality: Pro  
C. Sauvage
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):288-291
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Il faut prémédiquer les allergiques avant un examen d’imagerie avec produits de contraste : pour  
J.-M. Malinovsky, F. Lavaud, P.-M. Mertes
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):295-299
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Communications orales et posters: Allergènes  

Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):308-314
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Communications orales et posters: Allergie alimentaire  

Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):315-326
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Communications orales et posters: Allergie médicamenteuse  

Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):327-338
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

L’allergie au liquide séminal / Seminal allergy  
Tonnel A-B, Schlatter J.
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):197-199
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Les chéilites allergiques  
E. Collet, G. Jeudy, S. Dalac
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):238-243
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Quel bilan faire devant un eczéma des pieds ?  
D. Tennstedt
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):244-247
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Eczéma chez l’enfant : quelles causes alimentaires, quels bilans ?  
F. Giordano-Labadie
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):106-108
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dermatites eczématiformes et métiers de bouche  
C. Géraut, M.B. Cleenewerk, G. Jelen, L. Géraut, D. Tripodi
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):109-12
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Qu’est-ce que le lait ?  
A.-C. Vilain
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):124-127
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L’allergie au lait de chèvre ou de brebis  
E. Bidat
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):128-131
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensibilisation ou allergie aux venins d’hyménoptères : comment faire la différence ? / The diagnosis of hymenoptera venom allergy  
F. Lavaud, J.-M. Perotin, J.-F. Fontaine and et le groupe insecte SFA/Anaforcal
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):132-136
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie aux insectes piqueurs et maladie professionnelle  
J.-M. Renaudin
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(3):137-140
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Late-onset of IgE sensitization to microbial allergens in young children with atopic dermatitis.  
Ong PY, Ferdman RM, Church JA.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Jan;162(1):159-161

An epidemic of furniture-related dermatitis: searching for a cause.  
Lammintausta K, Zimerson E, Hasan T, Susitaival P, Winhoven S, Gruvberger B, Beck M, Williams JD, Bruze M.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Jan;162(1):108-116

Consumer available permanent hair dye products cause major allergic immune activation in an animal model.  
Bonefeld CM, Larsen JM, Dabelsteen S, Geisler C, White IR, Menne T, Johansen JD.
Br J Dermatol 2010 Jan;162(1):102-107
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Ammonium persulfate can initiate an asthmatic response in mice.  
De V, Cruz MJ, Haenen S, Wijnhoven K, Munoz X, Hoet PH, Morell F, Nemery B, Vanoirbeek JA.
Thorax 2010 Mar;65(3):252-257
Click to view abstract

A method for measuring mouse respiratory allergic reaction to low-dose chemical exposure to allergens: an environmental chemical of uncertain allergenicity, a typical contact allergen and a non-sensitizing irritant.  
Fukuyama T, Tajima Y, Ueda H, Hayashi K, Shutoh Y, Harada T, Kosaka T.
Toxicol Lett 2010 May 19;195(1):35-43
Click to view abstract

Mold-sensitivity in children with moderate-severe asthma is associated with HLA-DR and HLA-DQ.  
Knutsen AP, Vijay HM, Kumar V, Kariuki B, Santiago LA, Graff R, Wofford JD, Shah MR.
Allergy 2010 May 10;
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IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to methylprednisolone.  
Aranda A, Mayorga C, Ariza A, Dona I, Blanca-Lopez N, Canto G, Blanca M, Torres MJ.
Allergy 2010 May 10;
Click to view abstract

Season of birth and food-induced anaphylaxis in Boston.  
Vassallo MF, Banerji A, Rudders SA, Clark S, Camargo CA.
Allergy 2010 May 7;

Sugar bandage is not effective for local reactions to bee stings.  
Mosbech H, Poulsen LK, Malling HJ.
Allergy 2010 May 7;

IgE in the human placenta: why there?  
Rindsjo E, Joerink M, Papadogiannakis N, Scheynius A.
Allergy 2010 May;65(5):554-560
Click to view abstract

Systemic IgE-mediated reaction to a dietary slimming bar.  
Cabanillas MB, Crespo JF, Burbano C, Rodriguez J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 May;104(5):450

Skin prick test evaluation of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus diagnostic extracts from Europe, Mexico, and the United States.  
Larenas-Linnemann D, Matta JJ, Shah-Hosseini K, Michels A, Mosges R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 May;104(5):420-425
Click to view abstract

Sensitivity and specificity of skin tests in the diagnosis of clarithromycin allergy.  
Mori F, Barni S, Pucci N, Rossi E, Azzari C, de MM, Novembre E.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 May;104(5):417-419
Click to view abstract

Deming, anaphylaxis, and the tarantella.  
deShazo RD.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 May;104(5):359-360

Aspergillus fumigatus.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 May;104(5):A3

Incrimination of Blomia tropicalis as a potent allergen in house dust and its role in allergic asthma in Kolkata Metropolis, India.  
Podder S, Gupta SK, Saha GK.
WAO Journal 2010;3(5):182-187
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Analysis of causative allergen of the patient with baker's asthma and wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (wdeia). [Japanese]  
Ueno M, Adachi A, Fukumoto T, Nishitani N, Fujiwara N, Matsuo H, Kohno K, Morita E.
Arerugi 2010 May;59(5):552-557
Click to view abstract

Two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis whose causative allergens are usefully diagnosed by patch test. [Japanese]  
Adachi A.
Arerugi 2010 May;59(5):545-551
Click to view abstract

Food allergy. [Japanese]  
Ito S.
Arerugi 2010 May;59(5):497-506


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