Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance InformationAllergy AdvisorAllergy Resources International
Allergy and Intolerance InformationAllAllergy.net
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Index Allergens and Substances List Allergy Advisor Digest Contents of Journals Allergen and Substance Search
Phadia Allergy, Asthma and intolerance information
 Allergy Advisor Digest - May 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

Journals List | Journals Captured this Month | ALL Articles captured this Month

Previous Issues | All
May 2012   June 2012   July 2012   August 2012   September 2012   October 2012   November 2012   December 2012   January 2013   February 2013   March 2013   April 2013   May 2013   June 2013   July 2013   August 2013   September 2013   October 2013   November 2013   December 2013   January 2014   February 2014   March 2014   April 2014   May 2014   June 2014   July 2014   August 2014   September 2014  

This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
Want to subscribe to our reminder service? 

Read What's eating you? Tarantulas
Read Analysis of the allergenic profile of patients hypersensitive to pollen pan-allergens living in two distinct areas of northern Italy.
Read Serum total IgE level during pregnancy and postpartum.
Read Suspicion of macrolide allergy after treatment of infectious diseases including Helicobacter pylori
Read Clinical profile of a Mediterranean population sensitised to date palm pollen
Read Results of the oral egg-challenge test performed on two different groups of children.
Read Can conjunctival provocation test facilitate the diagnosis of food allergy in children?
Read The increase in seroprevalence to Toxocara canis in asthmatic children is related to cross-reaction with Ascaris suum antigens.
Read Safety of ingestion of yellow tartrazine by double-blind placebo controlled challenge in 26 atopic adults.
Read Bee pollen: a dangerous food for allergic children. Identification of responsible allergens.
Read Cardoon allergy.
Read Specific pattern of flea antigen recognition by IgG subclass and IgE during the progression of papular urticaria caused by flea bite.
Read Food allergy to Shiitake mushroom manifesting as probable eosinophilic oesophagitis.
Read The effects of meteorological factors and Alternaria spore concentrations on children sensitised to Alternaria.
Read Patterns of skin prick test positivity in allergic patients: usefulness of a nationwide SPT chart review.
Read Food anaphylaxis in antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombosis.
Read Mite exposure in a Spanish Mediterranean region.
Read An epidemiological survey of hymenoptera venom allergy in the Spanish paediatric population.
Read Patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated cow's milk protein intolerance cannot be diagnosed based on IgG subclass or IgA responses to milk allergens.
Read Multiple wheat flour allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants bind IgE in baker's asthma.
Read Recombinant allergen profiles and health-related quality of life in seasonal allergic rhinitis.
Read Important Florida botanical aeroallergens.
Read Occupational sensitization to soy allergens in workers at a processing facility.
Read Transaldolases are novel and immunoglobulin E cross-reacting fungal allergens.
Read A longitudinal study of resolution of allergy to well-cooked and uncooked egg.
Read A novel algorithm for the diagnosis of celiac disease and a comprehensive review of celiac disease diagnostics.
Read Occupational airborne contact dermatitis caused by Pinus roxburghii (Chir Pine)
Read Distinctions between allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and chronic rhinosinusitis.
Read Pollen and plant food profilin allergens show equivalent IgE reactivity.
Read European and Mexican vs US diagnostic extracts of Bermuda grass and cat in skin testing.
Read Peltophorum pterocarpum (yellow gulmohar tree) pollen: a dominant avenue tree of India.
Read Hyaluronidase and hyaluronan in insect venom allergy.
Read Immunomodulation of skin cytokine secretion by house dust mite extracts.
Read Two newly identified cat allergens: The von Ebner gland protein Fel d 7 and the latherin-like protein Fel d 8.
Read Neighborhood differences in exposure and sensitization to cockroach, mouse, dust mite, cat, and dog allergens in New York City.
Read Tick bites produce IgE antibodies to alpha-gal (oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose).
Read Sensitization to the pollen pan-allergen profilin. Is the detection of immunoglobulin E to multiple homologous proteins from different sources clinically useful?
Read Prediction of anaphylaxis during peanut food challenge: usefulness of the peanut skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE level.
Read A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD.
Read New allergens of relevance in tropical regions: the impact of Ascaris lumbricoides infections.

Abstracts shared in May 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Allergic hypersensitivity to cannabis in patients with allergy and illicit drug users.
Read Clinical significance of cross-reactivity between tobacco and latex.
Read Pistachio allergy-prevalence and in vitro cross-reactivity with other nuts.
Read Component-resolved diagnosis from latex allergy by microarray.
Read Identification of sole parvalbumin as a major allergen: study of cross-reactivity between parvalbumins in a Spanish fish-allergic population.
Read Identification of Bet v 1-related allergens in fig and other Moraceae fruits.
Read Contact dermatitis caused by salami skin.
Read Dietary baked milk accelerates the resolution of cow's milk allergy in children.
Read Hypersensitivity reaction to soybean oil used in a generic drug.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What's eating you? Tarantulas
The greatest potential for injury from tarantula results if the hairs enter the eye. Inflammation can occur at all levels of the eye from the cornea to the retina. Opthalmia nodosa, a chronic granulomatous reaction, may result from tarantula hair penetration but also is associated with vegetable fibers or other arthropod hairs. Secondary glaucoma and cataract formation also have been reported. In addition to their mechanically irritating properties, tarantula hairs act as allergens in individuals handling tarantulas regularly, such as researchers. Symptoms of the hypersensitivity that may result include skin irritation, pruritus, coryza, sneezing, conjunctivitis, and angioedema. IgE titers specific to the urticating hairs are increased in the exposed group when compared to controls. Several studies have reported that most bites to humans result in mild to severe local pain, erythema, joint swelling, muscle cramps, itching, and tenderness that can persist for hours after the bite.

What's eating you? Tarantulas (Theraphosidae).  
Krug LE, Elston DM.
Cutis 2011 Jan;87(1):10-12

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Analysis of the allergenic profile of patients hypersensitive to pollen pan-allergens living in two distinct areas of northern Italy.
This study assessed whether hypersensitivity to profilin and polcalcin follows sensitization to specific allergen sources or represents a primary phenomenon, and examined the sensitization profiles of patients hypersensitive to pollen pan-allergens. IgE reactivity to markers of primary sensitisation to different pollen species including grass, mugwort, ragweed, pellitory, birch, olive, and cypress was detected in sera from 106 pollen-allergic subjects, 86 sensitised to profilin and 29 to polcalcin living in two distinct areas of Northern Italy.

In profilin hypersensitive patients the primary sensitizer was detected in 24/86 (28%) cases: grass (n=15), ragweed (n=7), and birch (n=2). In 62 (72%) cases the primary sensitizing pollen was not detectable. In the polcalcin group the primary sensitizing pollen was detected in 8/29 (28%) cases: grass (n=6), ragweed and pellitory (1 each). All ragweed-allergic subjects were from the Milan area. In the 9 patients hypersensitive to both panallergens the primary sensitizing source could be identified in 2 (23%) cases (grass in both cases). Therefore a putative primary sensitizer to pollen pan-allergens can be detected only in 1/4 of cases, as most patients show IgE specific for >1 pollen species.

Analysis of the allergenic profile of patients hypersensitive to pollen pan-allergens living in two distinct areas of northern Italy.  
Villalta D, Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;43(2):54-57

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Serum total IgE level during pregnancy and postpartum.
In this cross-sectional study, serum total IgE levels showed no statistically significant changes during pregnancy or postpartum. This finding would be of greater weight if reproduced in a larger number of subjects with multiple serial samples at fixed regular time intervals during pregnancy and postpartum.

Serum total IgE level during pregnancy and postpartum.  
Bahna SL, Woo CK, Manuel PV, Guarderas JC.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 25;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Suspicion of macrolide allergy after treatment of infectious diseases including Helicobacter pylori
This study concludes that history alone leads to an over-estimation of macrolide hypersensitivity. Moreover, skin and in vitro tests seem to be not very useful in identifying hypersensitive patients. Challenge tests appear to be necessary for definitely confirming or ruling out macrolide allergy.

Suspicion of macrolide allergy after treatment of infectious diseases including Helicobacter pylori: Results of allergological testing.  
Seitz CS, Brocker EB, Trautmann A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 24;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical profile of a Mediterranean population sensitised to date palm pollen
Date palm pollen allergy is frequently associated with polysensitisation. The objectives of the study were to analyse the clinical characteristics of a group of patients diagnosed of date-palm pollen allergy and to compare them with pollen allergic patients without date-palm sensitisation. Forty-eight palm-pollen sensitised individuals were classified as Group A. A control group of 48 patients sensitised to pollens but without palm-pollen allergy were included as Group B. Significant differences in the family history of atopy and number of sensitisations were observed. Group A showed high prevalence of asthma and higher level of sensitisation to foods. Significant differences were obtained for sensitisation to epithelia and pollens. Pho d 2 was the most commonly recognised allergen (83.3%) in the palm-pollen allergic group. Date-palm pollen allergic patients constitute a homogeneous group characterised for showing bronchial asthma, sensitisation to food allergens and polysensitisation.

Clinical profile of a Mediterranean population sensitised to date palm pollen (Phoenix dactylifera). A retrospective study.  
Huertas AJ, Lopez-Saez MP, Carnes J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May;39(3):145-149

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Results of the oral egg-challenge test performed on two different groups of children.
This study compared the results of the oral egg-challenge test in two groups of egg-sensitised children, with and without prior intake. Group 1: 22 children without prior egg-intake. Group 2: 50 children with a clinical history of adverse reactions after egg intake. The oral egg-challenge tests were performed after a period of egg-avoidance diet and when egg-white specific IgE levels were lower than 1.5K U/L. 31.8% of the children in Group 1 did not tolerate egg-intake whereas 38% of the children in Group 2 did not tolerate egg-intake. Egg-avoidance periods lasted 19.5 and 18 months, respectively. Egg-white specific IgE levels went down in both groups after an egg-avoidance diet. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups and the positivity of oral egg-challenge test.

Results of the oral egg-challenge test performed on two different groups of children. One group with a history, suggestive of allergic reaction with egg intake and the other group sensitised to hen's egg without previous egg intake.  
Fadeeva T, Asin JL, Horrillo ML, Baraut TG, Vela RF, Conde SL, Hontoria OE, Valero CB, Molina AM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):233-240

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Can conjunctival provocation test facilitate the diagnosis of food allergy in children?
For a precise diagnosis of food allergy, oral challenge is necessary, but this is often not performed because of risk of serious allergic reactions. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether conjunctival provocation test would facilitate the diagnosis of IgE-mediated food allergy. Forty-six children with strongly positive conjunctival reactions (rubor, itching, oedema) to fifty food allergens were all proven to have allergy to the food in question. The children with negative conjunctival provocation tests showed no allergic reactions when challenged. The authors conclude that a strongly positive conjunctival reaction to a food allergen correlates well with true allergy. An oral challenge should be carefully performed. With a negative conjunctival test an oral challenge may safely be performed.

Can conjunctival provocation test facilitate the diagnosis of food allergy in children?  
Krane KB, Jacobsen M, Halvorsen R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Nov;38(6):321-326

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The increase in seroprevalence to Toxocara canis in asthmatic children is related to cross-reaction with Ascaris suum antigens.
It has been suggested that the presence of Toxocara canis larvae in lungs is an underlying factor in the onset of asthma. Although the association of asthma and seropositivity to Toxocara has been observed, there are no studies that indicate whether these antibodies are specific against T. canis antigens. Seroprevalence to T. canis excretion-secretion antigens (TcES Ag) were compared between asthmatic children (n=285) and non-asthmatic children (n=152), using IgG-ELISA and IgE-ELISA. IgG-ELISA seroprevalence was 30.8% for asthmatic children and 19.7% for non-asthmatic children (p<0.05). IgE-ELISA seroprevalence was 7.7% for asthmatic children and 6.5% for non-asthmatic children, respectively (p>0.05). Sera of both groups positive to IgG-ELISA recognised 11 TcES Ag bands for IgG. No differences between the groups were observed regarding recognition patterns; the asthmatic group, however, presented significantly higher cross-reaction to Ascaris suum somatic antigens (AsS Ag) than the non-asthmatic group. Sixty-three sera from asthmatic children positive to IgG-ELISA were evaluated by WB for IgE and 58.7% revealed a recognition pattern for IgE. In the group of non-asthmatic children positive to IgG-ELISA, 80% presented IgE band recognition.

The increase in seroprevalence to Toxocara canis in asthmatic children is related to cross-reaction with Ascaris suum antigens.  
Munoz-Guzman MA, Del Rio-Navarro BE, Valdivia-Anda G, ba-Hurtado F.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):115-121

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Safety of ingestion of yellow tartrazine by double-blind placebo controlled challenge in 26 atopic adults.
In a group of atopic subjects with allergic rhinitis, asthma, urticaria or pseudo-allergic reactions to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the administration of 35 mg of the tartrazine dye did not precipitate any kind of significant cutaneous, respiratory or cardiovascular reactions when compared to placebo.

Safety of ingestion of yellow tartrazine by double-blind placebo controlled challenge in 26 atopic adults.  
Pestana S, Moreira M, Olej B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):142-146

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Bee pollen: a dangerous food for allergic children. Identification of responsible allergens.
Bee pollen has been proposed as a food supplement, but it can be a dangerous food for people with allergy. An allergic reaction was experienced by a 4-year-old boy who had developed rhinitis in the last spring and autumn, after ingestion of bee pollen. Prick tests were positive to bee pollen and all local pollens extracts and negative to any other allergen sources. The bee pollen sample contained pollens from Quercus genus, and Asteraceae (Compositae) and Rosaceae families. Total IgE was 435 kU/l. Serum specific IgE to bee pollen was 6 kU/l and greater than 0.35 kU/L against pollens from Artemisia vulgaris, Taraxacum officinalis, Cupressus arizonica, Olea europaea, Platanus acerifolia and Lolium perenne as well as to n Art v 1 and other pollen marker allergens. Immunoblotting-inhibition suggested Asteraceae pollen as the possible cause of the allergic reaction.

Bee pollen: a dangerous food for allergic children. Identification of responsible allergens.  
Martin-Munoz MF, Bartolome B, Caminoa M, Bobolea I, Ara MC, Quirce S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):263-265

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cardoon allergy.
A 12-year-old boy with asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis during springfor the last 6 years. He experienced pruritus around the mouth after eating nuts, apple, melon, peach, oranges and tomatoes and in the previous year, pruritus in the mouth and ears and lip swelling after eating raw cardoon. He tolerated cooked cardoon and artichoke. Skin prick tests with pollen of grass, Olea europaea, Artemisia vulgaris, Parietaria judaica, Platanus acerifolia and nuts (hazelnut, almond, peanut, sunflower seed, pistachio and walnut) were all positive. The prick test with profilin was positive. Prick-by-prick with peach, orange, melon, apple and tomato were positive. Prick-by-prick with raw cardoon was positive and negative with cooked cardoon. Specific IgE was positive to extracts from raw cardoon (0.6kU/L), cooked cardoon (0.4kU/L) and pollens from Lolium perenne (>100kU/L), Olea europaea (>100kU/L), Artemisia vulgaris (10.3kU/L), Platanus acerifolia (12.5kU/L) and Parietaria judaica (1.9kU/L). Protein bands ranging from 66 to 14kDa was shown in raw cardoon extract. Incubation with patient's serum revealed a broad and intense IgE binding area between 97 and 20kDa. Inhibition studies of raw cardoon extract with patient serum showed a total IgE-binding inhibition with extracts from Lolium perenne, Olea europaea, Artemisia vulgaris, Parietaria judaica and Platanus acerifolia. Oral challenge test with raw cardoon produced pruritus in mouth and lips swelling 30 min after the ingestion whereas oral challenge with cooked cardoon did not produce any kind of symptomatology.

Cardoon allergy.  
Davila FG, Zapatero L, Bartolome B, Fuentes V, Alonso E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):165-166

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Specific pattern of flea antigen recognition by IgG subclass and IgE during the progression of papular urticaria caused by flea bite.
Papular urticaria caused by cat flea bite (Ctenocephalides felis) presents clinical symptoms of a hypersensitivity reaction accompanied by skin lesions. However, the pattern of recognition by different antibody isotypes during the progression of the disease is unknown. This study evaluated variations in immunoglobulin E and immunoglobulin G subclass antibody responses to flea antigens during the progression of papular urticaria caused by flea bite. Twenty-five patients clinically diagnosed with papular urticaria due to flea bite were included. The results showed that patients with 2-5 years of papular urticaria evidenced more IgE bands than those with shorter or longer durations of symptoms. The majority of the recognised antigens were low molecular weight proteins (<90 kDa). Proteins with molecular weights between 16-20, 21-25, and 31-35 kDa showed different patterns of recognition between patients and healthy children.

Specific pattern of flea antigen recognition by IgG subclass and IgE during the progression of papular urticaria caused by flea bite.  
Cuellar A, Rodriguez A, Halpert E, Rojas F, Gomez A, Rojas A, Garcia E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):197-202

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food allergy to Shiitake mushroom manifesting as probable eosinophilic oesophagitis.
A 37-year old man with a history of seasonal rhinoconjuntivitis due to grass pollen who developed oesophageal symptoms associated with eating Shiitake mushrooms. He experienced choking lasting a few minutes followed by a discomfort in the same area which lasted for 1–2 h without needing any emergency attention. Consumption of other mushrooms was well tolerated. Skin prick tests were negative except for grass pollen, and for Plantago lanceolata pollen. Prick-to-prick test was positive for fresh Shiitake and negative to other edible fresh mushrooms that the patient usually ate. Clinical symptoms and macroscopic images from the endoscopic study suggested an eosinophilic oesophagitis.

Food allergy to Shiitake (Lentinus edodes) manifested as oesophageal symptoms in a patient with probable eosinophilic oesophagitis.  
Goikoetxea MJ, Fernandez-Benitez M, Sanz ML.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2009 Nov;37(6):333-334

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The effects of meteorological factors and Alternaria spore concentrations on children sensitised to Alternaria.
This study aimed to investigate the effect of outdoor Alternaria spore concentrations on monthly lung function tests, symptoms, and medication scores in children sensitised only to Alternaria. Twenty-five patients with a clinical diagnosis of asthma and/or rhinitis sensitised only to Alternaria were enrolled in the prospective study. The outdoor Alternaria spore concentrations were significantly correlated with the monthly average temperature and monthly average barometric pressure. Similarly, the outdoor Alternaria spore concentrations were significantly correlated with mean monthly asthma medication score, value monthly PEF, value monthly FEF25-75% and, variation in PEF.

The effects of meteorological factors and Alternaria spore concentrations on children sensitised to Alternaria.  
Kilic M, Ufuk AD, Yilmaz M, Guneser KS, Bingol KG, Taskin E, Ceter T, Pinar NM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):122-128

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patterns of skin prick test positivity in allergic patients: usefulness of a nationwide SPT chart review.
This study aimed to describe the SPT sensitivity patterns in the different climatic zones in Mexico and to show the usefulness of a structured SPT chart-review including multiple clinics in obtaining these allergen sensitisation patterns. 4169 skin test charts were recollected. The most important allergens causing sensitisation were very similar in different zones, despite climate variation. The allergen with highest ratio of SPT positivity was Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (51%), with trees (Ash-27%, Alder-22%, Oak19%), and Bermuda grass (26%) as second and third. In the hot zones (humid and dry) Aspergillus was statistically significant more frequently than in more temperate zones. Cockroaches thrive in big cities and humid zones and Mesquite and Poplar in dry zones. Weeds were less important. The study concludes that Mexico has its own SPT sensitisation pattern, which is different from America and Europe.

Patterns of skin prick test positivity in allergic patients: usefulness of a nationwide SPT chart review.  
Larenas-Linnemann DE, Fogelbach GA, Alatorre AM, Cruz AA, Colin DD, Pech JA, Hernandez AM, Imperial DA, Prado ML, Zapien FJ, Huerta RE, Martell JA.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 6;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food anaphylaxis in antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombosis.
These authors have observed that some cases of food anaphylaxis were followed by severe thrombosis associated to anticardiolipin antibodies. The aim of this study was 1) to test anticardiolipin antibodies in an important number of patients with anaphylaxis due to vegetal foods and their relationship with possible thrombosis; and 2) to study seed and fruit hypersensitivity in patients with previous thrombotic events associated with antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL). 30 patients diagnosed of thrombosis associated with aCL, 52 patients who suffered from anaphylaxis due to seeds or fruits, and 120 control patients were included. Seventy-five percent of the patients diagnosed as having antiphospholipid primary syndrome had specific IgE against different proteins from different vegetable allergens, most of them seeds, and clearly against lipoproteins that were also recognised by the patients with food anaphylaxis but not by the control cases. Among the patients with anaphylaxis, 28% had anticardiolipin antibodies and 17.3% thrombosis. The authors suggest that seed lipoproteins which cause severe food anaphylaxis might have a potential role in the antiphospholipid syndrome and related thrombosis

Food anaphylaxis in antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombosis.  
Armentia A, Mazon A, Pineda F, Palacios R, Crespo J, Inglada L, Martin-Santos JM, Garcia-Frade J, Martin-Armentia B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 6;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mite exposure in a Spanish Mediterranean region.
The objectives of this study was to describe the domestic mite fauna in the region of Murcia, Spain. Dust samples were collected in a transversal descriptive study from mattresses of 51 patients and from mattress of 81 neighbours or family members of these patients. Sixteen mite species were identified in the 132 dust samples collected. The most frequent species were Dermatophagoides farinae (36% of the samples), Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (32%) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (5.3%). There were significant differences among climatic regions. The coastal sector had greater mite abundance, being D. pteronyssinus more frequent and abundant than D. farinae. In inland areas D. farinae was the predominant mite species. Allergen levels correlated with the concentration of Dermatophagoides, with higher levels detected in coastal regions. Average annual temperature was the main outdoor factor that correlated with higher mite concentrations. Indoor main predictor of higher levels of mites was the presence of obvious signs of humidity in the home.

Mite exposure in a Spanish Mediterranean region.  
Pagan JA, Huertas AJ, Iraola V, Pinto H, Martinez R, Ramirez M, Martos MD, Carnes J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May 5;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
An epidemiological survey of hymenoptera venom allergy in the Spanish paediatric population.
A study was made to determine the incidence of hymenoptera venom allergy in children, based on an epidemiological survey targeted to all members of the SEICAP (Spanish Society of Paediatric Clinical Immunology and Allergy). 175 patients, mean age was 9.9 +/- 3.6 years, was collected. Seventeen percent (32 patients) were the offspring of beekeepers, and 68.9% had experienced previous stings. The causal insect was Apis melifera, implicated in 55 cases, followed by Polistes dominulus (33 cases). In 151 patients (83.9%) the condition consisted of a local reaction. The most frequent systemic response was urticaria and angio-oedema. Fourteen patients suffered anaphylactic shock. The diagnosis was based on skin test (intradermal and prick) and/or specific IgE testing. 135 patients underwent immunotherapy with a mean duration of 3.5 +/- 1.7 years (range 2-5 years) - with excellent tolerance.

An epidemiological survey of hymenoptera venom allergy in the Spanish paediatric population.  
Martinez-Canavate A, Tabar AI, Eseverri JL, Martin F, Pedemonte-Marco C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):259-262

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated cow's milk protein intolerance cannot be diagnosed based on IgG subclass or IgA responses to milk allergens.
In two-thirds of patients, adverse symptoms following milk ingestion are caused by IgE-mediated allergic reactions, whereas for one-third, the mechanisms are unknown. This study investigated whether patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated cow's milk protein intolerance can be distinguished from persons without cow's milk protein intolerance based on serological measurement of IgG and IgA specific for purified cow's milk antigens. Using recombinant alphaS1-casein, alphaS2-casein, beta-casein, kappa-casein, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin, IgG(1-4) subclass and IgA antibody levels were measured in four patient groups. The study concludes that cow's milk protein intolerant patients cannot be distinguished from persons without cow's milk protein intolerance on the basis of IgG subclass or IgA reactivity to cow's milk allergens.

Patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated cow's milk protein intolerance cannot be diagnosed based on IgG subclass or IgA responses to milk allergens.  
Hochwallner H, Schulmeister U, Swoboda I, Twaroch TE, Vogelsang H, Kazemi-Shirazi L, Kundi M, Balic N, Quirce S, Rumpold H, Froschl R, Horak F, Tichatschek B, Stefanescu CL, Szepfalusi Z, Pa.
Allergy 2011 May 17;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Multiple wheat flour allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants bind IgE in baker's asthma.
The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sensitization to wheat allergens in German bakers. Recombinant wheat flour allergens (five subunits of the wheat alpha-amylase inhibitors, thioredoxin, thiol reductase or 1-cys-peroxiredoxin homologues, triosephosphate-isomerase, alphabeta-gliadin, serpin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, a nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP), dehydrin, profilin and peroxidase) were created. In addition, ImmunoCAPs with the recombinant allergen omega-5-gliadin and two cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs), horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and the N-glycan of bromelain (MUXF), were used. Specific IgE was measured in wheat flour-positive sera from 40 German bakers with work-related asthma/rhinitis and 10 controls with pollinosis.

Thirty bakers (75%) had IgE to at least one of the 19 single allergens. Most frequent was IgE to WDAI-0.19, HRP and MUXF (25% each), followed by WTAI-CM1 (20%), thiol reductase (16%), WTAI-CM3 (15%), WTAI-CM2 and thioredoxin (12.5%), WMAI-28, triosephosphate-isomerase, alphabeta-gliadin (10%), 1-cys-peroxiredoxin (7.5%), dehydrin, serpin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (5%), omega-5-gliadin, nsLTP and profilin (2.5%). Fifteen bakers (38%) had IgE to any alpha-amylase inhibitor and 12 (30%) to at least one CCD. The controls reacted exclusively to CCDs (80%), profilin (60%), thioredoxin (30%), triosephosphate isomerase and nsLTP (10%).

The study concludes that the single allergen sensitization profiles obtained with 17 recombinant wheat flour allergens and two CCDs revealed no major allergen for German bakers. The highest frequencies were found for alpha-amylase inhibitors and CCDs.

Multiple wheat flour allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants bind IgE in baker's asthma.  
Sander I, Rozynek P, Rihs HP, van K, Chew FT, Lee WS, Kotschy-Lang N, Merget R, Bruning T, Raulf-Heimsoth M.
Allergy 2011 May 10;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant allergen profiles and health-related quality of life in seasonal allergic rhinitis.
This study evaluated birch- and timothy-allergic patients for allergen-specific IgE profiles and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in 395 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis against birch or timothy pollen. Sera were analyzed for IgE reactivity to recombinant allergens (Bet v 1, Bet v 2, Bet v 4; Phl p 1/p 5b, Phl p 7, and Phl p 12) and to native pollen extracts (t3 and g6). In patients polysensitized against native birch pollen (n = 233) the prevalence of allergens was 86% for Bet v 1, 15% for Bet v 2, and 5% for Bet v 4. Similar for timothy (n = 256), the prevalence of allergens was 87% rPhl p 1/p 5b, 5% for rPhl p 7, and 14% for rPhl p 12. Values for birch-monosensitized patients (n = 42) were Bet v 1, 100%, and Bet v 2 and Bet v 4, 0%. Values for timothy-monosensitized patients (n = 35) were Phl p 1/p 5b, 100%; rPhl p 7, 0%; and rPhl p 12, 3%. No difference in HRQL existed between patients sensitized solely against major versus minor allergens in birch-allergic patients. Polysensitized cohorts showed sensitization profiles comparable with published data. Monosensitized patients showed IgE against major allergens in 100% of cases. Patients sensitized solely against major or minor allergens showed no differences in HRQL.

Recombinant allergen profiles and health-related quality of life in seasonal allergic rhinitis.  
Canis M, Groger M, Becker S, Klemens C, Kramer MF.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 May;31(3):219-226

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Important Florida botanical aeroallergens.
"Florida is home to approximately 4 million allergy sufferers and almost 15,000 individual species of plants. Only a few of these plants produce pollen with documented allergenicity via in vivo/in vitro testing and provocation challenges. Many plant species with proven allergenicity are present only to a limited degree. Furthermore, allergenic plants in Florida do not follow the same pollinating patterns as the rest of the country, i.e., trees in the spring, grasses in the summer, and weeds in the fall. Media outlets that report pollen counts to the general public may mislead patients without appropriate interpretation. This review highlights clinical studies that document the allergenicity of some pollens and summarizes expert opinion regarding other prevalent and allergenic pollens throughout the state."

Important Florida botanical aeroallergens.  
Phillips JF, Jelks ML, Lockey RF.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Jul;31(4):337-340

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational sensitization to soy allergens in workers at a processing facility.
135 soy flake processing workers (SPWs) in a Tennessee facility were evaluated for immune reactivity to soy. Allergic sensitization to soy was common and was five times more prevalent than in health care worker controls (HCWs) with no known soy exposure.

Sera that were positive to soy ImmunoCAP (n=27) were tested in IgE immunoblots. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) antigens were evaluated, including IgE reactivity towards 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSP), a protein found in TG soy. Immunoblotting of WT and TG soy flake extracts revealed IgE against multiple soy antigens with reactivity towards 48, 54, and 62 kDa bands being the most common. The prominent proteins that bound SPW IgE were identified to be the high molecular weight soybean storage proteins, beta-conglycinin (Gly m 5), and Glycinin (Gly m 6). No specific IgE reactivity could be detected to lower molecular weight soy allergens, Gly m 1 and Gly m 2, in soybean hull (SH) extracts. IgE reactivity was comparable between WT and TG extracts; IgE antibodies to CP4-EPSP could not be detected.

The study concludes that SPWs with specific IgE to soy reacted most commonly with higher molecular weight soybean storage proteins compared with the lower molecular weight SH allergens identified in community asthma studies. High molecular weight soybean storage allergens, Gly m 5 and Gly m 6, may be respiratory sensitizers in occupational exposed SPWs

Occupational sensitization to soy allergens in workers at a processing facility.  
Green BJ, Cummings KJ, Rittenour WR, Hettick JM, Bledsoe TA, Blachere FM, Siegel PD, Gaughan DM, Kullman GJ, Kreiss K, Cox-Ganser J, Beezhold DH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May 5;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Transaldolases are novel and immunoglobulin E cross-reacting fungal allergens.
A novel transaldolase family allergen of Cladosporium and Penicillium species was identified. A 36.5 kDa IgE-binding component in a partially purified C. cladosporioides preparation was identified and analyses suggested this novel IgE-reacting allergen to be a transaldolase, and designated as Cla c 14.0101. The purified rCla c 14.0101 protein reacted with IgE antibodies in 10 (38%) of 26 Cladosporium cladosporioides-sensitized asthmatic patients. Nine of the 10 rCla c 14.0101-positive sera have IgE binding against the recombinant Penicillium transaldolase (rPen ch 35.0101) identified. Among the eight fungal transaldolase-positive sera tested, three showed IgE binding against the recombinant human transaldolase. In cross-reactivity studies between the Cladosporium and Penicillium fungi, IgE cross-reactivity was detected between these two fungal transaldolase allergens.

Transaldolases are novel and immunoglobulin E cross-reacting fungal allergens.  
Chou H, Tam MF, Chiang CH, Chou CT, Tai HY, Shen HD.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):739-749

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A longitudinal study of resolution of allergy to well-cooked and uncooked egg.
Egg allergy is common and although resolution to uncooked egg has been demonstrated, there is lack of evidence to guide reintroduction of well-cooked egg. This study examined the rate of resolution to well-cooked, compared with uncooked egg in children, and safety of egg challenges.

Pre-study historical reactions occurred to baked egg in five (5%), lightly cooked in 58 (61%) and uncooked in nine (9%); respiratory reactions occurred in 11 (12%) and seven (7%) had anaphylaxis; adrenaline was used during five reactions. Tolerance was gained twice as rapidly to well-cooked than uncooked egg (median 5.6 vs. 10.3 years) and continued to 13 years. Nearly 1/3 had resolved allergy to well-cooked egg at 3 years and 2/3 at 6 years. Of 28/77 (37%) positive well-cooked egg challenges, 65% had cutaneous symptoms, 68% gastrointestinal and 39% rhinitis, with no other respiratory reactions. Adrenaline was not required.

A longitudinal study of resolution of allergy to well-cooked and uncooked egg.  
Clark A, Islam S, King Y, Deighton J, Szun S, Anagnostou K, Ewan P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):706-712

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A novel algorithm for the diagnosis of celiac disease and a comprehensive review of celiac disease diagnostics.
"There is an urgent clinical need for a better laboratory celiac disease diagnosis with both less false positive results and minimal underdetection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance and diagnostic accuracy of different assays in an outpatient population setting for the diagnosis for celiac disease (CD) in order to design an optimal algorithm. We used 15 different ELISA assays to assess 47 blood samples of newly diagnosed children (positive biopsy results) and 52 samples from age- and sex-matched children with negative biopsy results for CD. Scoring criteria were established for grading the assays performance and characteristics. The combined gliadin and tTG assays exhibited the best sensitivity (100%). The addition of other assays to the CeliCheck neo-epitopes assay improved specificity so that the final algorithm had 100% sensitivity, 96.2% specificity, and 98.1% accuracy. The clinical demand for both maximal sensitivity and maximal specificity cannot be achieved with a single test. Using a combination of a sensitive assay together with specific assays improved celiac disease detection rates, with an acceptable number of false positive results. This model, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in both children and adults."

A novel algorithm for the diagnosis of celiac disease and a comprehensive review of celiac disease diagnostics.  
Rozenberg O, Lerner A, Pacht A, Grinberg M, Reginashvili D, Henig C, Barak M.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 30;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational airborne contact dermatitis caused by Pinus roxburghii (Chir Pine)
Occupational airborne contact dermatitis caused by Pinus roxburghii (Chir Pine) sawdust. A 30-year-old man presented with recurrent episodes of dermatitis affecting his face, trunk and extremities for 12 months. The dermatitis began over his upper eyelids and nasolabial folds, and spread to involve other body areas. He was a professional wood sawyer. Moistened sawdust of the woods with which he had been working, showed positive reactions to colophonium and P. roxburghii sawdust.

Occupational airborne contact dermatitis caused by Pinus roxburghii sawdust.  
Mahajan VK, Sharma NL.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Feb;64(2):110-111

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Distinctions between allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and chronic rhinosinusitis.
The authors state that they have shown a clear immunologic difference between allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients. The overwhelming evidence of increased total IgE and fungal-specific IgE in AFRS supports an allergic component in AFRS. IgG anti-Alternaria-specific antibodies also point to an exaggerated fungal immune response in these patients. These results support the existence of AFRS as a separate, distinct entity of CRS. It is important to recognize AFRS to ensure proper treatment in these patients.

Distinctions between allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and chronic rhinosinusitis.  
Hutcheson PS, Schubert MS, Slavin RG.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 Nov;24(6):405-408

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen and plant food profilin allergens show equivalent IgE reactivity.
Profilins are commonly involved in polysensitization of allergic patients; therefore, appropriate markers should be used in component-resolved diagnosis. This study evaluated the immunological equivalence between profilins from pollens and plant-derived foods, to be used in component-resolved diagnosis. Specific IgG against pollen and fruit profilins, as well as sera from patients allergic to mustard, melon, or olive pollen, were used. Purified profilins from mustard seeds, fruit melon, and chenopod and birch pollen were assayed. Significant correlation was found in the response of purified profilins by ELISA and immunoblotting for both specific IgG and IgE. The highest levels of IgE binding were obtained for olive pollen-allergic patients, which could be related to the route of sensitization. The responses of individual patients to profilins were also similar and independent of the sensitizing source. The inhibition between pairs of allergens was generally higher than 70%, indicating that profilins share most of the IgE epitopes. The study suggests that sensitization could be attributable to any profilin present in the environment of the patients.

Pollen and plant food profilin allergens show equivalent IgE reactivity.  
Sirvent S, Tordesillas L, Villalba M, az-Perales A, Cuesta-Herranz J, Salcedo G, Rodriguez R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):429-435

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
European and Mexican vs US diagnostic extracts of Bermuda grass and cat in skin testing.
This study compared European and Mexican Bermuda grass (BG) and cat diagnostic extracts against an FDA-validated extract using QSPT. The potency of some diagnostic extracts of BG and cat used in Europe, Mexico, and the United States differs, with the US extracts being generally more potent. On the basis of provocation tests, optimal diagnostic concentrations should be determined.

European and Mexican vs US diagnostic extracts of Bermuda grass and cat in skin testing.  
Larenas-Linnemann D, Cruz AA, Gutierrez IR, Rodriguez P, Shah-Hosseini K, Michels A, Mosges R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):421-428

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peltophorum pterocarpum (yellow gulmohar tree) pollen: a dominant avenue tree of India.
Peltophorum pterocarpum (PP) (yellow gulmohar, Yellow Poinciana / Yellow flame tree) pollen is an important aeroallergen for type I hypersensitivity in the tropics. This study isolated and characterized the IgE-binding proteins of PP pollen. SPT results on the respiratory allergic patients of Calcutta showed that 32.77% showed positivity with PP pollen. Eight IgE-reactive protein components were found in crude extract. Maximum IgE reactivity was to a 28 kDa IgE-reactive component which was recognized by 75% of PP-sensitive patients.

Clinical and immunobiochemical characterization of airborne Peltophorum pterocarpum (yellow gulmohar tree) pollen: a dominant avenue tree of India.  
Mandal J, Roy I, Gupta-Bhattacharya S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):412-420

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hyaluronidase and hyaluronan in insect venom allergy.
Insect venoms contain an allergen hyaluronidase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of hyaluronan (HA), a polymer of disaccharide GlcUA-GlcNAc in skin. Has depending on their size have variable function in inflammation and immunity. This paper reports on whether hyaluronidase, HA polymers and oligomers can promote antibody response in mice. The study concludes that hyaluronidase by its action on HA in skin can function indirectly as adjuvant to promote IgE and IgG1 response in mice. Insect venoms also have cytolytic peptides and phospholipases with inflammatory roles. These activities found in mice may contribute to venom allergenicity in susceptible people.

Hyaluronidase and hyaluronan in insect venom allergy.  
King TP, Wittkowski KM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 May 19;156(2):205-211

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunomodulation of skin cytokine secretion by house dust mite extracts.
Measures to reduce contact with mite molecules such as frequent vacuuming of upholstered furniture and carpets and laundering of clothing and bedding to remove mite molecules and allergens could reduce skin contact with mite molecules and diminish exacerbations of skin inflammation in patients with atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases

Immunomodulation of skin cytokine secretion by house dust mite extracts.  
Arlian LG, Morgan MS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 May 17;156(2):171-178

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Two newly identified cat allergens: The von Ebner gland protein Fel d 7 and the latherin-like protein Fel d 8.
This study reports on the isolation of two new cat allergens. Fel d 7, an 18 kDa von Ebner gland protein Can f 1 homologue, was isolated from the tongue library. Fel d 8, a 24-kDa latherin-like protein with homology to Equ c 5, was isolated from the submandibular library. The frequency of IgE binding of cat-allergic sera to recombinant Fel d 1, 7 and 8 was 60.5, 37.6 and 19.3%, respectively. Inhibition studies indicated some IgE binding cross-reactivity between Fel d 7 and dog dander extracts. For cat-allergic individuals with moderate to mild rhinoconjunctivitis these allergens may play a more important role in the manifestation of their allergic disease.

Two newly identified cat allergens: The von Ebner gland protein Fel d 7 and the latherin-like protein Fel d 8.  
Smith W, O'Neil SE, Hales BJ, Chai TL, Hazell LA, Tanyaratsrisakul S, Piboonpocanum S, Thomas WR.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 May 17;156(2):159-170

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Neighborhood differences in exposure and sensitization to cockroach, mouse, dust mite, cat, and dog allergens in New York City.
Asthma prevalence varies widely among neighborhoods within New York City. Exposure to mouse and cockroach allergens has been suggested as a cause. High asthma prevalence neighborhoods (HAPNs) homes had higher Bla g 2 (P = .001), Mus m 1 (P = .003), and Fel d 1 (P = .003) and lower Der f 1 (P = .001) than low asthma prevalence neighborhoods (LAPNs) homes. Sensitization to indoor allergens was associated with asthma, but relevant allergens differed between LAPNs and HAPNs. Sensitization to cockroach was more common among HAPN than LAPN children (23.7% vs 10.8%; P = .011). Increasing allergen exposure was associated with increased probability of sensitization (IgE) to cockroach (P < .001), dust mite (P = .009), and cat (P = .001), but not mouse (P = .58) or dog (P = .85). These findings further suggest that cockroach allergen exposure could contribute to the higher asthma prevalence observed in some compared with other New York City neighborhoods

Neighborhood differences in exposure and sensitization to cockroach, mouse, dust mite, cat, and dog allergens in New York City.  
Olmedo O, Goldstein IF, Acosta L, Divjan A, Rundle AG, Chew GL, Mellins RB, Hoepner L, Andrews H, Lopez-Pintado S, Quinn JW, Perera FP, Miller RL, Jacobson JS, Perzanowski MS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Apr 30;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tick bites produce IgE antibodies to alpha-gal (oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose).
A novel form of delayed anaphylaxis to red meat that is related to serum IgE antibodies to the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) was previously reported. Most of these patients had tolerated meat for many years previously. The implication is that some exposure in adult life had stimulated the production of these IgE antibodies. This study sought to investigate possible causes of this IgE antibody response, focusing on evidence related to tick bites, which are common in the region where these reactions occur.

Serum assays were carried out with biotinylated proteins and extracts bound to a streptavidin ImmunoCAP. Prospective studies on IgE antibodies in 3 subjects after tick bites showed an increase in levels of IgE to alpha-gal of 20-fold or greater. Other evidence included (1) a strong correlation between histories of tick bites and levels of IgE to alpha-gal, (2) evidence that these IgE antibodies are common in areas where the tick Amblyomma americanum is common, and (3) a significant correlation between IgE antibodies to alpha-gal and IgE antibodies to proteins derived from A americanum. The results presented here provide evidence that tick bites are a cause, possibly the only cause, of IgE specific for alpha-gal in this area of the United States. Both the number of subjects becoming sensitized and the titer of IgE antibodies to alpha-gal are striking. Here we report the first example of a response to an ectoparasite giving rise to an important form of food allergy.

The relevance of tick bites to the production of IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.  
Commins SP, James HR, Kelly LA, Pochan SL, Workman LJ, Perzanowski MS, Kocan KM, Fahy JV, Nganga LW, Ronmark E, Cooper PJ, Platts-Mills TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May;127(5):1286-1293

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to the pollen pan-allergen profilin. Is the detection of immunoglobulin E to multiple homologous proteins from different sources clinically useful?
Sera from 43 subjects sensitized to profilin selected in 2 allergy centers in Northern Italy showing a different pollen exposure profile were studied for their IgE reactivity to 5 profilins (Bet v 2, Ole e 2, Hev b 8, Mer a 1, and Phl p 12) using an allergen microarray immunoassay. All 43 patients (100%) were positive to at least 1 profilin, although reactivity to all 5 profilins was observed in only 37 cases (86%). In approximately half of the reactors, IgE reactivity to Ole e 2 was much weaker than that to other profilins irrespective of the primary sensitizing allergen source, suggesting a low sensitivity of this allergen. Much discrepancy in IgE to Bet v 2 measured by ISAC microarray and ImmunoCAP was observed. Therefore detecting IgE reactivity to a single marker protein (eg, Bet v 2) is suffi cient to diagnose or exclude sensitization to profilin. Detecting IgE to multiple homologous, cross-reacting allergen proteins is not clinically more informative and increases the risk of confusion and misinterpretation.

Sensitization to the pollen pan-allergen profilin. Is the detection of immunoglobulin E to multiple homologous proteins from different sources clinically useful?  
Villalta D, Asero R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):591-5.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prediction of anaphylaxis during peanut food challenge: usefulness of the peanut skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE level.
This study aimed at determining the usefulness of allergy tests for predicting the risk of anaphylaxis on challenge following the ingestion of up to 12 g of peanut in peanut-sensitized children. The challenge protocol provided for challenges to be continued beyond initial mild reactions. Children who completed the challenge and did not react (n = 28) or reacted without anaphylaxis (n = 6) represented the comparison group (n = 34). The study group comprised 21 children whose challenge resulted in anaphylaxis. The mean peanut SPT wheal size and specific IgE level were associated with the severity of reactions on challenge. Among the 21 children, who developed anaphylaxis, in only 3 cases was anaphylaxis the initial reaction. Unexpectedly, a history of anaphylaxis was not predictive of anaphylaxis on challenge. Anaphylaxis developed at cumulative doses of peanut ranging from 0.02 to 11.7 g. Provided that a fixed amount of peanut is ingested, available tests for peanut allergy may assist in predicting the risk of anaphylaxis during challenge in peanut-sensitized children

Prediction of anaphylaxis during peanut food challenge: usefulness of the peanut skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE level.  
Wainstein BK, Studdert J, Ziegler M, Ziegler JB.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun;21(4 Pt 1):603-611

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD.
The United Kingdom and European Union recently restricted the use of artificial food colorings (AFCs) to improve the health of children. These decisions provide an interesting case study of the role of scientific evidence in the assessment of food additives and risk to children's health and formulation of food policy. Although there continues to be uncertainty concerning the link between AFCs and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), policy decisions have been made that have far-reaching implications. In addition, publicity surrounding the policy changes may shape public perceptions concerning effective management of ADHD. We believe that the balance of existing evidence neither refutes nor supports the link between AFCs and ADHD, which highlights the need for carefully designed studies to further investigate the link between AFCs and ADHD. In this article we describe a model for such studies. In developing our model, we drew from current investigative standards in ADHD research, such as those used in the landmark Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. These standards encompass methodologic considerations including sample selection, outcome assessment, and data analyses. It is our hope that this model research methodology may prove valuable in addressing design considerations in future studies of AFCs and ADHD with the goal of producing reliable data that will enable policy-makers to better formulate effective, evidence-based food-policy decisions.

A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD.  
Kleinman RE, Brown RT, Cutter GR, Dupaul GJ, Clydesdale FM.
Pediatrics 2011 May 16. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
New allergens of relevance in tropical regions: the impact of Ascaris lumbricoides infections.
"One of the many aspects of the relationships between parasite infections and allergic diseases is the possibility that allergens from parasites enhance the TH2 responses, especially IgE production, in allergic diseases such as asthma. In this review we discuss about the allergenic composition of the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and their potential impact on allergy sensitization and asthma pathogenesis and prevalence in populations living in the tropics and naturally exposed to both, mite allergens and helminth infections."

New allergens of relevance in tropical regions: the impact of Ascaris lumbricoides infections.  
Caraballo L, Acevedo N.
WAO Journal 2011;4(5):77-84.

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Recent advances in guidelines associated with food allergy (how to cope with food allergy patients).. [Japanese]  
Ebisawa M.
Arerugi 2011 May 30;60(5):551-558

Association between allergic sensitization and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  
Suwan P, Akaramethathip D, Noipayak P.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2011 Mar;29(1):57-65

Investigation of indoor molds and allergic diseases in public primary schools in Edirne city of Turkey.  
Celtik C, Okten S, Okutan O, Aydogdu H, Bostancioglu M, Ekuklu G, Asan A, Yazicioglu M.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2011 Mar;29(1):42-49

Quantification of Der f 1 in houses of patients allergic to house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae, using a locally produced detection reagents.  
Sookrung N, Kamlanghan T, Indrawattana N, Tungtrongchitr A, Tantilipikorn P, Bunnag C, Pattanapanyasat K, Chaicumpa W.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2011 Mar;29(1):78-85

Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis: How Are They Connected?  
Heratizadeh A, Wichmann K, Werfel T.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2011 May 26;

What's eating you? Tarantulas (Theraphosidae).  
Krug LE, Elston DM.
Cutis 2011 Jan;87(1):10-12

Analysis of the allergenic profile of patients hypersensitive to pollen pan-allergens living in two distinct areas of northern Italy.  
Villalta D, Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;43(2):54-57
Click to view abstract

Cereal pollen sensitisation in pollen allergic patients: to treat or not to treat?  
Damialis A, Konstantinou GN.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar;43(2):36-44
Click to view abstract

Serum total IgE level during pregnancy and postpartum.  
Bahna SL, Woo CK, Manuel PV, Guarderas JC.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 25;

Allergic hypersensitivity to cannabis in patients with allergy and illicit drug users.  
Armentia A, Castrodeza J, Ruiz-Munoz P, Martinez-Quesada J, Postigo I, Herrero M, Gonzalez-Sagrado M, de LD, Martin-Armentia B, Guisantes JA.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 25;

Food allergy to spinach in an infant.  
Ferrer M, Redon B, Bartolome B, Michavila A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 24;

Suspicion of macrolide allergy after treatment of infectious diseases including Helicobacter pylori: Results of allergological testing.  
Seitz CS, Brocker EB, Trautmann A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 24;

Anaphylaxis during skin test with vecuronium.  
Duman H, Dogru M, Misirlioglu F, Ozmen S, Bostanci I.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar 21;

Short protocol for the study of paediatric patients with suspected betalactam antibiotic hypersensitivity and low risk criteria.  
Moral L, Garde J, Toral T, Fuentes MJ, Marco N.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar 21;

Allergy to curry: case report.  
Perez BS, varez-Perea A, De BM, Tomas M, Luisa BM, Bartolome-Zavala B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar 18;

Tonic water: A rare cause of exanthema.  
Marques JG, Calado G, Martins P, Pinto PL.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar 16;

Clinical profile of a Mediterranean population sensitised to date palm pollen (Phoenix dactylifera). A retrospective study.  
Huertas AJ, Lopez-Saez MP, Carnes J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May;39(3):145-149

Thrombocytosis as an overt sign of cow's milk allergic proctocolitis.  
Fretzayas A, Moustaki M, Priftis KN, Attilakos A, Lapa E, Nicolaidou P.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Feb 23;

The analysis of Hymenoptera hypersensitive patients in Ankara, Turkey.  
Karakaya G, Celebioglu E, Demir AU, Kalyoncu AF.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Feb 21;

Anaphylaxis to omeprazole. Cross-reactivity with the other proton pump inhibitors.  
Perez-Ezquerra PR, Morillas LS, Martinez JJ, Fernandez GD, Gomez-Tembleque MP, Alvarez AS, Sanz ML.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan;39(1):54

Role of aeroallergen nasal challenge in asthmatic children.  
Hervas D, Rodriguez R, Garde J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan;39(1):17-22

Immediate-type drug hypersensitivity and associated factors in a general population.  
Kurt E, Demir AU, Cadirci O, Yildirim H, Pinar ET.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan;39(1):27-31

What to do with children who have never eaten egg and are egg-sensitised.  
Ibanez MD, Escudero C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):231-232

Results of the oral egg-challenge test performed on two different groups of children. One group with a history, suggestive of allergic reaction with egg intake and the other group sensitised to hen's egg without previous egg intake.  
Fadeeva T, Asin JL, Horrillo ML, Baraut TG, Vela RF, Conde SL, Hontoria OE, Valero CB, Molina AM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):233-240

Monthly variation of Dermatophagoides allergens and its influence on respiratory allergy in a high altitude environment (Quito, 2800 m a.s.l. in Andean Ecuador).  
Valdivieso R, Iraloa V.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan;39(1):10-16

Can conjunctival provocation test facilitate the diagnosis of food allergy in children?  
Krane KB, Jacobsen M, Halvorsen R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Nov;38(6):321-326

The increase in seroprevalence to Toxocara canis in asthmatic children is related to cross-reaction with Ascaris suum antigens.  
Munoz-Guzman MA, Del Rio-Navarro BE, Valdivia-Anda G, ba-Hurtado F.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):115-121

Bronchial asthma, sensitisation and exposure to Der p1 and Der f1 in an Andean Ecuadorian school.  
Valdivieso R, Iraola V, Estupinan M, Correa E, del CR.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Mar;38(2):100-102

Anaphylaxis to mefenamic acid in a patient with new onset of systemic lupus erythematosus.  
Couto M, Duarte C, Geraldes L, Ines L, Malcata A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):224-226

Safety of ingestion of yellow tartrazine by double-blind placebo controlled challenge in 26 atopic adults.  
Pestana S, Moreira M, Olej B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):142-146

Bee pollen: a dangerous food for allergic children. Identification of responsible allergens.  
Martin-Munoz MF, Bartolome B, Caminoa M, Bobolea I, Ara MC, Quirce S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):263-265

Dentists' knowledge about anaphylaxis caused by local anaesthetics.  
Cetinkaya F, Sezgin G, Aslan OM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 12;

The importance of in vitro component-resolved diagnosis in paediatric patients.  
Goikoetxea MJ, Cabrera-Freitag P, Sanz ML, Fernandez-Benitez M.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jan;38(1):37-40

Cardoon allergy.  
Davila FG, Zapatero L, Bartolome B, Fuentes V, Alonso E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):165-166

Microarrays: molecular allergology and nanotechnology for personalised medicine (I).  
Lucas JM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):153-161

Specific pattern of flea antigen recognition by IgG subclass and IgE during the progression of papular urticaria caused by flea bite.  
Cuellar A, Rodriguez A, Halpert E, Rojas F, Gomez A, Rojas A, Garcia E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):197-202

Clinical significance of cross-reactivity between tobacco and latex.  
Armentia A, Duenas-Laita A, Bartolome B, Martin-Gil FJ, San MA, Castrodeza JJ.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):187-196

Vinegar decreases allergenic response in lentil and egg food allergy.  
Armentia A, Duenas-Laita A, Pineda F, Herrero M, Martin B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Mar;38(2):74-77

Stevens-Jonhson syndrome after acetaminophen ingestion, confirmed by challenge test in an eleven-year-old patient.  
Trujillo C, Gago C, Ramos S.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Mar;38(2):99-100

Food allergy to Shiitake (Lentinus edodes) manifested as oesophageal symptoms in a patient with probable eosinophilic oesophagitis.  
Goikoetxea MJ, Fernandez-Benitez M, Sanz ML.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2009 Nov;37(6):333-334

Systemic anaphylaxis caused by moxifloxacin.  
Sanchez-Morillas L, Rojas Perez-Ezquerra P, Reano-Martos M, Laguna-Martinez JJ, Gomez-Tembleque P.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):226-227

Different clinical presentation of Anisakis simplex associated urticaria is dependent on the frequency of raw fish intake.  
Daschner A, De FC, Valls A, Vega de la OF.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):166-167

The effects of meteorological factors and Alternaria spore concentrations on children sensitised to Alternaria.  
Kilic M, Ufuk AD, Yilmaz M, Guneser KS, Bingol KG, Taskin E, Ceter T, Pinar NM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 May;38(3):122-128

Anaphylaxis in children: A nine years retrospective study (2001-2009).  
Silva R, Gomes E, Cunha L, Falcao H.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Apr 13;

The values of nasal provocation test and basophil activation test in the different patterns of ASA/NSAID hypersensitivity.  
Wismol P, Putivoranat P, Buranapraditkun S, Pinnobphun P, Ruxrungtham K, Klaewsongkram J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Apr 12;

Patterns of skin prick test positivity in allergic patients: usefulness of a nationwide SPT chart review.  
Larenas-Linnemann DE, Fogelbach GA, Alatorre AM, Cruz AA, Colin DD, Pech JA, Hernandez AM, Imperial DA, Prado ML, Zapien FJ, Huerta RE, Martell JA.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 6;

Food anaphylaxis in antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombosis.  
Armentia A, Mazon A, Pineda F, Palacios R, Crespo J, Inglada L, Martin-Santos JM, Garcia-Frade J, Martin-Armentia B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 6;

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from monoethanolamine in a metal worker.  
Arias IJ, Garrido BP.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May;39(3):187-188

Mite exposure in a Spanish Mediterranean region.  
Pagan JA, Huertas AJ, Iraola V, Pinto H, Martinez R, Ramirez M, Martos MD, Carnes J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May 5;

Allergic contact dermatitis to cocamidopropyl betaine in Colombia.  
Yepes-Nunez JJ, Gomez Rendon FE, Nunez-Rinta R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Apr 22;

The association of food anaphylaxis in antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombosis cannot be considered a coincidence.  
Armentia A, Mazon F, Pineda F, Palacios R, Crespo J, Inglada L, Martin Santos JM, Garcia FJ, Martin-Armentia B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Apr 20;

An epidemiological survey of hymenoptera venom allergy in the Spanish paediatric population.  
Martinez-Canavate A, Tabar AI, Eseverri JL, Martin F, Pedemonte-Marco C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):259-262

Measuring potency of allergenic extracts.  
Finegold I.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):169

Sitagliptin intolerance.  
Kargili A, Karakurt F, Kankilic MN, Kankilic ES, Bozkurtl B.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):290-291

Microarrays: Molecular allergology and nanotechnology for personalised medicine (II).  
Lucas JM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Jul;38(4):217-223

Drug provocation tests to betalactam antibiotics: experience in a paediatric setting.  
Chambel M, Martins P, Silva I, Palma-Carlos S, Romeira AM, Leiria PP.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Nov;38(6):300-306

Prick test: a survey and comparison between Iranian allergic children and adults.  
Arshi S, Zarrinfard R, Poorsattar A, Fereshtehnejad SM, Javahertarash N.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Sep;38(5):287-290

Anaphylaxis caused by honey ingestion in an infant.  
Tuncel T, Uysal P, Hocaoglu AB, Erge DO, Firinci F, Karaman O, Uzuner N.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar;39(2):112-113

Repeated episodes of anaphylaxis after the first consumption of egg.  
Sanchez J, Ramirez R, Chinchilla C, Cardona R.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May;39(3):183-184

Hodgkin's lymphoma and late onset egg allergy: is there a causal relationship?  
Calado G, Machado D, Ribeiro C, Loureiro G, Tavares B, Pereira C, Cunha R, Chieira C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 3;

An infant with chickpea and egg allergy.  
Dibek ME, Ozmen S, Bostanci I.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May;39(3):186-187

Rhinoconjunctivitis-asthma due to sensitisation to gladiolus.  
Sansosti A.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar;39(2):111-112

Two adolescent patients with high IgE levels and hypereosinophilia are associated with cockroach allergen.  
Bostanci I, Misirlioglu ED, Ozmen S, Ginis T.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Mar;39(2):114-115

Antihistamines in chronic urticaria: threat or treat?  
Aydin O, Celik G, Misirligil Z.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Jan 3;

Phytodermatitis caused by Agave americana.  
Linares T, Fernandez A, Escudero E, Soto T.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 May;39(3):184-185

Sulfite sensitivity in a patient with allergic asthma.  
Marenco A, Reano MM, Rodriguez CM, Bueso FA, Garcia LJ, Rodriguez MM.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Dec 16;

Fixed drug eruptions induced by cross-reactive imidazoles.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Gonzalez-Aveledo LA.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Dec 10;

Delayed hypersensitivity challenged by subcutaneous Bemiparin.  
Moreno Escobosa MC, Moya Quesada MC, Granados SC, Amat LJ.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Dec 1;

Airborne pollen calendar of Salamanca, Spain, 2000-2007.  
Rodriguez-de la CD, Sanchez-Reyes E, vila-Gonzalez I, Lorente-Toledano F, Sanchez-Sanchez J.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2010 Nov;38(6):307-312

The influence of environmental exposure to formaldehyde in nasal mucosa of medical students during cadaver dissection.  
Hisamitsu M, Okamoto Y, Chazono H, Yonekura S, Sakurai D, Horiguchi S, Hanazawa T, Terada N, Konno A, Matsuno Y, Todaka E, Mori C.
Allergol Int 2011 May 25;

Pistachio allergy-prevalence and in vitro cross-reactivity with other nuts.  
Noorbakhsh R, Mortazavi SA, Sankian M, Shahidi F, Tehrani M, Jabbari AF, Behmanesh F, Varasteh A.
Allergol Int 2011 May 25;

Dose-response effects of TPI ASM8 in asthmatics after allergen.  
Gauvreau GM, Pageau R, Seguin R, Carballo D, Gauthier J, D'Anjou H, Campbell H, Watson R, Mistry M, Parry-Billings M, Killian K, Renzi PM.
Allergy 2011 May 24;

Mechanisms of chemical-induced innate immunity in allergic contact dermatitis.  
Martin SF, Esser PR, Weber FC, Jakob T, Freudenberg MA, Schmidt M, Goebeler M.
Allergy 2011 May 21;

Patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated cow's milk protein intolerance cannot be diagnosed based on IgG subclass or IgA responses to milk allergens.  
Hochwallner H, Schulmeister U, Swoboda I, Twaroch TE, Vogelsang H, Kazemi-Shirazi L, Kundi M, Balic N, Quirce S, Rumpold H, Froschl R, Horak F, Tichatschek B, Stefanescu CL, Szepfalusi Z, Pa.
Allergy 2011 May 17;

Is 99.9% purity good enough for allergens?  
Aalberse RC.
Allergy 2011 May 13;

Pollen-food syndrome is related to Bet v 1/PR-10 protein sensitisation, but not all patients have spring rhinitis.  
Rashid RS, Smith KA, Nambiar KZ, Frew AJ, Tarzi MD.
Allergy 2011 May 13;

Multiple wheat flour allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants bind IgE in baker's asthma.  
Sander I, Rozynek P, Rihs HP, van K, Chew FT, Lee WS, Kotschy-Lang N, Merget R, Bruning T, Raulf-Heimsoth M.
Allergy 2011 May 10;

Molecular cloning and immunologic characterization of for t 2: a major allergen from the biting midge Forcipomyia taiwana.  
Chen YH, Hwang GY, Chen PC, Tu WC, Lee MF.
Allergy 2011 May;66(5):703-705

Recombinant allergen profiles and health-related quality of life in seasonal allergic rhinitis.  
Canis M, Groger M, Becker S, Klemens C, Kramer MF.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 May;31(3):219-226

Atmospheric pollen count in Monterrey, Mexico.  
Gonzalez-Diaz SN, Rodriguez-Ortiz PG, rias-Cruz A, ias-Weinmann A, Cid-Guerrero D, Sedo-Mejia GA.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Jul;31(4):341-348

Disparity between the presence and absence of food allergy action plans in one school district.  
Pulcini JM, Sease KK, Marshall GD.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Mar;31(2):141-146

Aeroallergen sensitization in asthma: prevalence and correlation with severity.  
Craig TJ.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Mar;31(2):96-102

Aeroallergen sensitization in asthma: genetics, environment, and pathophysiology.  
Long A.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Mar;31(2):89-95

Eosinophilia as a predictor of food allergy in atopic dermatitis.  
Noh G, Jin H, Lee J, Noh J, Lee WM, Lee S.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Mar;31(2):e18-e24

Clinical characteristics of oral tolerance induction of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated food allergy using interferon gamma.  
Lee JH, Noh G, Noh J, Lee S, Choi WS, Kim HS, Lee K, Choi S, Jin H, Cho S, Lee S.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Jul;31(4):e39-e47

Important Florida botanical aeroallergens.  
Phillips JF, Jelks ML, Lockey RF.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Jul;31(4):337-340

Repeat epinephrine treatments for food-related allergic reactions that present to the emergency department.  
Banerji A, Rudders SA, Corel B, Garth AM, Clark S, Camargo CA.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Jul;31(4):308-316

Allergic sensitization in kidney-transplanted patients prevails under tacrolimus treatment.  
Gruber S, Tiringer K, Dehlink E, Eiwegger T, Mayer E, Konstantin H, Kikic Z, Graf A, Szepfalusi Z.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May 5;

Occupational sensitization to soy allergens in workers at a processing facility.  
Green BJ, Cummings KJ, Rittenour WR, Hettick JM, Bledsoe TA, Blachere FM, Siegel PD, Gaughan DM, Kullman GJ, Kreiss K, Cox-Ganser J, Beezhold DH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May 5;

Component-resolved diagnosis from latex allergy by microarray.  
Ebo DG, Hagendorens MM, De Knop KJ, Verweij MM, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Stevens WJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Feb;40(2):348-358

Childhood asthma and early life exposure to indoor allergens, endotoxin and beta(1,3)-glucans.  
Bertelsen RJ, Carlsen KC, Carlsen KH, Granum B, Doekes G, Haland G, Mowinckel P, Lovik M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Feb;40(2):307-316

Pollen-derived low-molecular weight factors inhibit 6-sulfo LacNAc+ dendritic cells' capacity to induce T-helper type 1 responses.  
Gilles S, Jacoby D, Blume C, Mueller MJ, Jakob T, Behrendt H, Schaekel K, Traidl-Hoffmann C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Feb;40(2):269-278

Genetic determinants of both ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism influence alcohol hypersensitivity and drinking behaviour among Scandinavians.  
Linneberg A, Gonzalez-Quintela A, Vidal C, Jorgensen T, Fenger M, Hansen T, Pedersen O, Husemoen LL.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jan;40(1):123-130

BSACI guidelines for the investigation of suspected anaphylaxis during general anaesthesia.  
Ewan PW, Dugue P, Mirakian R, Dixon TA, Harper JN, Nasser SM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Jan;40(1):15-31

Could T cell component-resolved diagnosis differentiate between food sensitization and food allergy?  
Turcanu V.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr;40(4):531-533

Identification of sole parvalbumin as a major allergen: study of cross-reactivity between parvalbumins in a Spanish fish-allergic population.  
Perez-Gordo M, Cuesta-Herranz J, Maroto AS, Cases B, Ibanez MD, Vivanco F, Pastor-Vargas C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):750-758

Transaldolases are novel and immunoglobulin E cross-reacting fungal allergens.  
Chou H, Tam MF, Chiang CH, Chou CT, Tai HY, Shen HD.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):739-749

Restaurant staff's knowledge of anaphylaxis and dietary care of people with allergies.  
Bailey S, Albardiaz R, Frew AJ, Smith H.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):713-717

A longitudinal study of resolution of allergy to well-cooked and uncooked egg.  
Clark A, Islam S, King Y, Deighton J, Szun S, Anagnostou K, Ewan P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):706-712

Clonorchis sinensis infection is positively associated with atopy in endemic area.  
Choi MH, Chang YS, Lim MK, Bae YM, Hong ST, Oh JK, Yun EH, Bae MJ, Kwon HS, Lee SM, Park HW, Min KU, Kim YY, Cho SH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):697-705

Re-defining food allergy phenotypes and management paradigm: is it time for individualized egg allergy management?  
Leonard SA, Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):609-611

Utility of inhaled allergen challenge in clinical diagnosis and management of asthma: What never? Well, hardly ever!.  
Robinson DS.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 May;41(5):606-608

Sensitivity to sulphite additives.  
Schroecksnadel S, Jenny M, Fuchs D.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr;40(4):688-689

Identification of Bet v 1-related allergens in fig and other Moraceae fruits.  
Hemmer W, Focke M, Marzban G, Swoboda I, Jarisch R, Laimer M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Apr;40(4):679-687

A novel algorithm for the diagnosis of celiac disease and a comprehensive review of celiac disease diagnostics.  
Rozenberg O, Lerner A, Pacht A, Grinberg M, Reginashvili D, Henig C, Barak M.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Jan 30;

Contact dermatitis caused by salami skin.  
Wantke F, Simon-Nobbe B, Poll V, Gotz M, Jarisch R, Hemmer W.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Feb;64(2):111-114

Occupational airborne contact dermatitis caused by Pinus roxburghii sawdust.  
Mahajan VK, Sharma NL.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Feb;64(2):110-111

Correlation analysis of two serum-specific Immunoglobulin E test systems and skin-prick test in allergic rhinitis patients from northeast China.  
Jiang XD, Li GY, Dong Z, Zhu DD.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2011 Jan 28;

The diagnosis of food allergy.  
Lieberman JA, Sicherer SH.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 Nov;24(6):439-443

Antigen selection in IgE antibodies from individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.  
Pratt E, Collins AM, Sewell WA, Harvey RJ.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 Nov;24(6):416-421

Distinctions between allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and chronic rhinosinusitis.  
Hutcheson PS, Schubert MS, Slavin RG.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 Nov;24(6):405-408

Report on the house-dust mite nasal provocation test.  
Wiwanitkit V.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2010 Jul;24(4):315

Seasonal eosinophilic bronchitis due to allergy to Cupressus arizonica pollen.  
Bobolea I, Barranco P, Sastre B, Fernandez-Nieto M, Del P, Quirce S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):448-449

Contact urticaria to raw arugula and parsley.  
Foti C, Cassano N, Mistrello G, Amato S, Romita P, Vena GA.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):447-448

Safe administration of seasonal influenza vaccine to children with egg allergy of all severities.  
Howe LE, Conlon AS, Greenhawt MJ, Sanders GM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):446-447

Association of dermographic urticaria with the use of progesterone in cottonseed oil.  
Herman-Kideckel SM, Cadesky K, Sussman D, Maclachlan S, Sussman G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):439-440

Pollen and plant food profilin allergens show equivalent IgE reactivity.  
Sirvent S, Tordesillas L, Villalba M, az-Perales A, Cuesta-Herranz J, Salcedo G, Rodriguez R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):429-435

European and Mexican vs US diagnostic extracts of Bermuda grass and cat in skin testing.  
Larenas-Linnemann D, Cruz AA, Gutierrez IR, Rodriguez P, Shah-Hosseini K, Michels A, Mosges R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):421-428

Clinical and immunobiochemical characterization of airborne Peltophorum pterocarpum (yellow gulmohar tree) pollen: a dominant avenue tree of India.  
Mandal J, Roy I, Gupta-Bhattacharya S.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):412-420

The possible influence of the environment on respiratory allergy: a survey on immigrants to Italy.  
Lombardi C, Canonica GW, Passalacqua G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):407-411

Anaphylaxis in emergency department patients 50 or 65 years or older.  
Campbell RL, Hagan JB, Li JT, Vukov SC, Kanthala AR, Smith VD, Manivannan V, Bellolio MF, Decker WW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):401-406

Potency variability in diagnostic allergen extracts: is there an optimal strength?  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):353-354

On the cover - buffalo grass.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 May;106(5):A10

Incidence of anaphylaxis in hospitalized patients.  
Tejedor Alonso MA, Moro MM, Hernandez JE, Mugica Garcia MV, Albelda CV, Ingelmo AR, Encinas MP, Lorena W, Abreu A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 May 19;156(2):212-220

Hyaluronidase and hyaluronan in insect venom allergy.  
King TP, Wittkowski KM.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 May 19;156(2):205-211

Two newly identified cat allergens: The von Ebner gland protein Fel d 7 and the latherin-like protein Fel d 8.  
Smith W, O'Neil SE, Hales BJ, Chai TL, Hazell LA, Tanyaratsrisakul S, Piboonpocanum S, Thomas WR.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 May 17;156(2):159-170

Allergen-induced expression of IL-25 and IL-25 receptor in atopic asthmatic airways and late-phase cutaneous responses.  
Corrigan CJ, Wang W, Meng Q, Fang C, Eid G, Caballero MR, Lv Z, An Y, Wang YH, Liu YJ, Kay AB, Lee TH, Ying S.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 12;

Mold allergen sensitization in adult asthma according to integrin beta3 polymorphisms and Toll-like receptor 2/+596 genotype.  
Smit LA, Bouzigon E, Bousquet J, Le MN, Nadif R, Pin I, Lathrop M, Demenais F, Kauffmann F, Siroux V.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 12;

Peanut allergy and the impact of maternal consumption during pregnancy and breast-feeding.  
Des RA, Begin P, Infante-Rivard C, Paradis J, Paradis L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 10;

Immediate-type hypersensitivity to systemic glucocorticoids: An underrated drug allergy.  
Calogiuri G, Di LE, Nettis E, Vacca A, Ferrannini A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 10;

IgE to Gly m 5 and Gly m 6 is associated with severe allergic reactions to soybean in Japanese children.  
Ito K, Sjolander S, Sato S, Moverare R, Tanaka A, Soderstrom L, Borres M, Poorafshar M, Ebisawa M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 7;

Children in the inner city of New York have high rates of food allergy and IgE sensitization to common foods.  
Maloney JM, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Wang J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 7;

Structure and function of immunoglobulins.  
Schroeder HW, Cavacini L.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S41-S52

Drug allergy.  
Khan DA, Solensky R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S126-S137

IgE, mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils.  
Stone KD, Prussin C, Metcalfe DD.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S73-S80

Neighborhood differences in exposure and sensitization to cockroach, mouse, dust mite, cat, and dog allergens in New York City.  
Olmedo O, Goldstein IF, Acosta L, Divjan A, Rundle AG, Chew GL, Mellins RB, Hoepner L, Andrews H, Lopez-Pintado S, Quinn JW, Perera FP, Miller RL, Jacobson JS, Perzanowski MS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Apr 30;

Dietary baked milk accelerates the resolution of cow's milk allergy in children.  
Kim JS, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Sicherer SH, Noone S, Moshier EL, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 20;

Profilin: A relevant aeroallergen?  
Ruiz-Garcia M, Garcia Del PM, Fernandez-Nieto M, Barber D, Jimeno-Nogales L, Sastre J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 30;

The relevance of tick bites to the production of IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose.  
Commins SP, James HR, Kelly LA, Pochan SL, Workman LJ, Perzanowski MS, Kocan KM, Fahy JV, Nganga LW, Ronmark E, Cooper PJ, Platts-Mills TA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May;127(5):1286-1293

Detection of IgE to recombinant Api m 1 and rVes v 5 is valuable but not sufficient to distinguish bee from wasp venom allergy.  
Sturm GJ, Hemmer W, Hawranek T, Lang R, Ollert M, Spillner E, Blank S, Bokanovic D, Aberer W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Mar 23;

Retesting in children with beta-lactam allergy.  
Matheu V, Iglesias-Souto J, Gonzalez R, Poza P, Sanchez-Machin I.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 May 17;

Association between prenatal and postnatal tobacco smoke exposure and allergies in young children.  
Tanaka K, Miyake Y.
J Asthma 2011 Jun;48(5):458-463

Environmental risk factors in the first year of life and childhood asthma in the central South of Chile.  
Boneberger A, Haider D, Baer J, Kausel L, Von KR, Kabesch M, Radon K, Calvo M.
J Asthma 2011 Jun;48(5):464-469

Sensitization to the pollen pan-allergen profilin. Is the detection of immunoglobulin E to multiple homologous proteins from different sources clinically useful?  
Villalta D, Asero R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):591-5.
Abstract

Hypersensitivity Reaction to Generic Drug-Containing Soybean Oil, Soybean - Biochemistry, Chemistry and Physiology, Tzi-Bun Ng (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-307-219-7, InTech.  
Fernando Pineda, Alicia Armentia, Antonio Duen~as-Laita, Blanca Marti´n and Ricardo Palacios.
Miscellaneous 2011
Abstract

The risk of generalized allergic reactions to skin prick testing may be higher in poly-sensitized individuals and in those who underwent SPT with fresh foods.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, D'Amato G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun;21(4 Pt 1):656-657

Dysregulated Th1 and Th2 responses in food-allergic children--does elimination diet contribute to the dysregulation?  
Tomicic S, Falth-Magnusson K, Bottcher MF.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun;21(4 Pt 1):649-655
Click to view abstract

Partially hydrolyzed cow's milk formula has a therapeutic effect on the infants with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind study.  
Jin YY, Cao RM, Chen J, Kaku Y, Wu J, Cheng Y, Shimizu T, Takase M, Wu SM, Chen TX.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 May 4;
Click to view abstract

The incidence and risk factors of immediate type food allergy during the first year of life in Korean infants: a birth cohort study.  
Kim J, Chang E, Han Y, Ahn K, Lee SI.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 May 4;
Click to view abstract

Fungal DNA, allergens, mycotoxins and associations with asthmatic symptoms among pupils in schools from Johor Bahru, Malaysia.  
Cai GH, Hashim JH, Hashim Z, Ali F, Bloom E, Larsson L, Lampa E, Norback D.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 May;22(3):290-297
Click to view abstract

Effects of pet exposure in the first year of life on respiratory and allergic symptoms in 7-yr-old children. The SIDRIA-2 study.  
Lombardi E, Simoni M, La GS, Viegi G, Bisanti L, Chellini E, Dell'Orco V, Migliore E, Petronio MG, Pistelli R, Rusconi F, Sestini P, Forastiere F, Galassi C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Mar;21(2 Pt 1):268-276
Click to view abstract

Prediction of anaphylaxis during peanut food challenge: usefulness of the peanut skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE level.  
Wainstein BK, Studdert J, Ziegler M, Ziegler JB.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun;21(4 Pt 1):603-611
Click to view abstract

Intrauterine exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fine particulate matter and early wheeze. Prospective birth cohort study in 4-year olds.  
Jedrychowski WA, Perera FP, Maugeri U, Mrozek-Budzyn D, Mroz E, Klimaszewska-Rembiasz M, Flak E, Edwards S, Spengler J, Jacek R, Sowa A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Jun;21(4 Pt 2):e723-e732
Click to view abstract

A research model for investigating the effects of artificial food colorings on children with ADHD.  
Kleinman RE, Brown RT, Cutter GR, Dupaul GJ, Clydesdale FM.
Pediatrics 2011 May 16. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Critical Documents on Cow's Milk Allergy and Anaphylaxis: Two Recent WAO Position Papers  
Rosenwasser, Lanny J.
WAO Journal 2011;4(5):76-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

New allergens of relevance in tropical regions: the impact of Ascaris lumbricoides infections.  
Caraballo L, Acevedo N.
WAO Journal 2011;4(5):77-84.
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


Previous Issues of Allergy Advisor Digest
January 2010   February 2010   March 2010   April 2010   May 2010   June 2010   July 2010   August 2010   September 2010   October 2010   November 2010   December 2010   January 2011   February 2011   March 2011   April 2011   May 2011   June 2011   July 2011   August 2011   September 2011   October 2011   November 2011   December 2011   January 2012   February 2012   March 2012   April 2012   May 2012   June 2012   July 2012   August 2012   September 2012   October 2012   November 2012   December 2012   January 2013   February 2013   March 2013   April 2013   May 2013   June 2013   July 2013   August 2013   September 2013   October 2013   November 2013   December 2013   January 2014   February 2014   March 2014   April 2014   May 2014   June 2014   July 2014   August 2014   September 2014  


To subscribe to future Digest installments , subscribe here, and we will notify you when the new Digest is published.


Allergy and Intolerance Information