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 Allergy Advisor Digest - November 2011
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Cutaneous adverse reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics.
Read A case of eosinophilic pneumonia in a tobacco harvester.
Read Pollen augments the influence of desert dust on symptoms of adult asthma patients.
Read Practical guide to skin prick tests in allergy to aeroallergens.
Read Influenza immunization in egg allergy: an update for the 2011-2012 season.
Read Mammalian lipocalin allergens - insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.
Read Gram-positive bacteria on grass pollen exhibit adjuvant activity inducing inflammatory T cell responses.
Read Immunoglobulin E-binding autoantigens: biochemical characterization and clinical relevance.
Read Occupational contact dermatitis caused by asparagus.
Read Allergic contact dermatitis caused by ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate.
Read Effect of repetitive mowing on common ragweed pollen and seed production.
Read A possible role of chitin in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergy.
Read Negativity of the basophil activation test in quinolone hypersensitivity: a breakthrough for provocation test decision-making.
Read Walnut allergy in peanut-allergic patients: significance of sequential epitopes of walnut homologous to linear epitopes of Ara h 1, 2 and 3 in relation to clinical reactivity.
Read Does air pollution increase the effect of aeroallergens on hospitalization for asthma?
Read A new major dog allergen, Can f 6, a lipocalin, is highly cross-reactive with Fel d 4 in a population of cat- and dog-sensitized patients.
Read Traffic-related air pollution and development of allergic sensitization in children during the first 8 years of life.
Read Crustacean allergens from the North Sea Shrimp Crangon crangon.

Abstracts shared in November 2011 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Continuous apple consumption induces oral tolerance in birch-pollen-associated apple allergy.
Read Der p 10: a diagnostic marker for broad sensitization in house dust mite allergy.
Read Dau c PRPlike protein (Dau c 1.03) as a new allergenic isoform in carrots (cultivar Rodelika).
Read Allergenic activity of different tomato cultivars in tomato allergic subjects.
Read Severe allergic reaction to lactulose in a child with milk allergy.
Read The eliciting dose of peanut in double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges decreases with increasing age and specific IgE level in children and young adults.
Read Wheat allergens associated with Baker's asthma.
Read A deadly aversion to pork.
Read Reported symptoms of food hypersensitivity and sensitization to common foods in 4-year-old children.
Read The IgE repertoire in children and adolescents resolved at component level: A cross-sectional study.
Read The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United States.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cutaneous adverse reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics.
Sulfonamides are divided into two main groups which are sulfonamide antibiotics and sulfonamide non-antibiotics. The wide use of sulfonamide antibiotics leads to increasing incidence of sulfonamide cutaneous reactions. The purpose of this study is to explore the cutaneous manifestations induced by sulfonamide antibiotics in a large number of Thai patients, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and non-HIV infected individuals. The second purpose is to determine the risk factors for development of sulfonamide cutaneous reactions. 191 patients with sulfonamide antibiotics cutaneous reactions were evaluated. Maculopapular rash was the most common cutaneous manifestation (37.7%) followed by fixed drug eruption (22%), angioedema with or without urticaria (12.6%) and urticaria alone (12%). Among those with known HIV serology, maculopapular eruption occurred more frequently in the HIV positive group while fixed drug eruption occurred more frequently in HIV-negative group.

Cutaneous adverse reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics.  
Chantachaeng W, Chularojanamontri L, Kulthanan K, Jongjarearnprasert K, Dhana N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2011 Sep;29(3):284-289

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of eosinophilic pneumonia in a tobacco harvester.
A 60-year-old nonsmoking female, who had started to harvest and sort tobacco leaves two months before presentation, was admitted because of persistent coughing, breathlessness, and general malaise. Her laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia. Chest computed tomography showed nonsegmental airspace consolidations bilaterally. A bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis also revealed that the numbers of total cells and eosinophils had increased. Although the urine level of cotinine was within the normal range, positive findings were found in the skin scratch-patch tests using tobacco leaf and its extracts, and a biopsy specimen obtained from the positive site demonstrated infiltration of eosinophils in the dermis. The patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids. Green tobacco sickness, a type of nicotine poisoning caused by the dermal absorption of nicotine, is a well known occupational illness of tobacco harvesters. Although it is unclear whether the present case could be identified as a subtype of green tobacco sickness, this is the first report of eosinophilic pneumonia occurred in a tobacco harvester which was possibly induced by tobacco leaf exposure.

A case of eosinophilic pneumonia in a tobacco harvester.  
Yoshioka D, Ishii H, Hatano Y, Umeki K, Sakamoto N, Shirai R, Fujiwara S, Kadota J.
Allergol Int 2011 Nov;60(4):551-554

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollen augments the influence of desert dust on symptoms of adult asthma patients.
East Asian desert dust storms that occur during mainly spring are called Asian dust storms (ADS). Our objective was to study the association of pollen and ADS with symptoms of adult asthma patients in Japan. This study investigated the symptoms of asthma patients during ADS and concludes that pollen augmented symptoms in adult asthma patients, but ADS on its own also were able to aggravate symptoms and pulmonary function

Pollen augments the influence of desert dust on symptoms of adult asthma patients.  
Watanabe M, Igishi T, Burioka N, Yamasaki A, Kurai J, Takeuchi H, Sako T, Yoshida A, Yoneda K, Fukuoka Y, Nakamoto M, Hasegawa Y, Chikumi H, Matsumoto S, Minato S, Horasaki K, Shimizu E.
Allergol Int 2011 Nov;60(4):517-524

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Practical guide to skin prick tests in allergy to aeroallergens.
This pocket guide is the result of a consensus reached between members of the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2) LEN) and Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA). The aim of the current pocket guide is to offer a comprehensive set of recommendations on the use of skin prick tests in allergic rhinitis-conjunctivitis and asthma in daily practice. This pocket guide is meant to give simple answers to the most frequent questions raised by practitioners in Europe, including 'practicing allergists', general practitioners and any other physicians with special interest in the management of allergic diseases. It is not a long or detailed scientific review of the topic. However, the recommendations in this pocket guide were compiled following an in-depth review of existing guidelines and publications, including the 1993 European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology position paper, the 2001 ARIA document and the ARIA update 2008 (prepared in collaboration with GA(2) LEN). The recommendations cover skin test methodology and interpretation, allergen extracts to be used, as well as indications in a variety of settings including paediatrics and developing countries

Practical guide to skin prick tests in allergy to aeroallergens.  
Bousquet J, Heinzerling L, Bachert C, Papadopoulos NG, Bousquet PJ, Burney PG, Canonica GW, Carlsen KH, Cox L, Haahtela T, Lodrup Carlsen KC, Price D, Samolinski B, Simons FE, Wickman M, nne.
Allergy 2011 Nov 4;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Influenza immunization in egg allergy: an update for the 2011-2012 season.
Flu vaccines contain detectable amounts of egg protein, which may pose a risk to egg-allergic individuals. The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic required mass vaccination in many countries, and the safety of flu immunization in egg allergy became of increasing public health importance. This article reviews recent literature and provides an updated guideline for immunization during the 2011-2012 flu season. Recent experience suggests that some vaccines with very low ovalbumin concentrations may be safe for use in primary care in carefully assessed low-risk individuals.

Influenza immunization in egg allergy: an update for the 2011-2012 season.  
Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, Lucas JS, Warner JO.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct;41(10):1367-1370

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Mammalian lipocalin allergens - insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.
"Most of the important mammal-derived respiratory allergens, as well as a milk allergen and a few insect allergens, belong to the lipocalin protein family. As mammalian lipocalin allergens are found in dander, saliva and urine, they disperse effectively and are widely present in the indoor environments. Initially, lipocalins were characterized as transport proteins for small, principally hydrophobic molecules, but now they are known to be involved in many other biological functions. Although the amino acid identity between lipocalins is generally at the level of 20-30%, it can be considerably higher. Lipocalin allergens do not exhibit any known physicochemical, functional or structural property that would account for their allergenicity, that is, the capacity to induce T-helper type 2 immunity against them. A distinctive feature of mammalian lipocalin allergens is their poor capacity to stimulate the cellular arm of the human or murine immune system. Nevertheless, they induce IgE production in a large proportion of atopic individuals exposed to the allergen source. The poor capacity of mammalian lipocalin allergens to stimulate the cellular immune system does not appear to result from the function of regulatory T cells. Instead, the T cell epitopes of mammalian lipocalin allergens are few and those examined have proved to be suboptimal. Moreover, the frequency of mammalian lipocalin allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells is very low in the peripheral blood. Importantly, recent research suggests that the lipocalin allergen-specific T cell repertoires differ considerably between allergic and healthy subjects. These observations are compatible with our hypothesis that the way CD4(+) T-helper cells recognize the epitopes of mammalian lipocalin allergens may be implicated in their allergenicity. Indeed, as several lipocalins exhibit homologies of 40-60% over species, mammalian lipocalin allergens may be immunologically at the borderline of self and non-self, which would not allow a strong anti-allergenic immune response against them."

Mammalian lipocalin allergens - insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.  
Virtanen T, Kinnunen T, Rytkonen-Nissinen M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov 9;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Gram-positive bacteria on grass pollen exhibit adjuvant activity inducing inflammatory T cell responses.
The data from this study indicates that grass pollen is colonized by several microorganisms that influence the immune response differently. Similar to LPS, supernatants of homogenized Gram-positive bacteria may serve as adjuvants by augmenting DC maturation and inflammatory Th1, Th2 and Th17 responses helping to initiate allergic immune responses

Gram-positive bacteria on grass pollen exhibit adjuvant activity inducing inflammatory T cell responses.  
Heydenreich B, Bellinghausen I, Konig B, Becker WM, Grabbe S, Petersen A, Saloga J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct 18;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immunoglobulin E-binding autoantigens: biochemical characterization and clinical relevance.
"Although immediate-Type I skin reactions to human dander have been described six decades ago, only the recent application of molecular biology to allergology research allowed fast and detailed characterization of IgE-binding autoantigens. These can be functionally subdivided into three classes: (1) self-antigens with sequence homology to environmental allergens belonging to the class of phylogenetically conserved proteins, (2) self-antigens without sequence homology to known environmental allergens, and (3) chemically modified self-antigens deriving from workplace exposure. As environmental allergens, also IgE-binding autoantigens belong to different protein families without common structural features that would explain their IgE-binding capability. Many of the self-antigens showing sequence homology to environmental allergens, are phylogenetically conserved proteins like manganese dependent superoxide dismutase, thioredoxin or cyclopilin. Their IgE-binding capability can be explained by molecular mimicry resulting from shared B-cell epitopes. A common factor of IgE-binding self-antigens without sequence homology to known environmental allergens is that they elicit IgE responses only in individuals suffering from long-lasting atopic diseases. In contrast, IgE-mediated reactions to modified self-antigens might be explained with the generation of novel B-cell epitopes. Chemically modified self-antigens are likely to be recognized as non-self by the immune system. The clinical relevance of IgE responses to self-antigens remains largely unclear. Well documented is their ability to induce immediate Type I skin reactions in vivo, and to induce mediator release from effector cells of sensitized individuals in vitro. Based on these observations it is reasonable to assume that IgE-mediated cross-linking of FcRIepsilon receptors on effector cells can elicit the same symptoms as those induced by environmental allergens, and this could explain exacerbations of chronic allergic diseases in the absence of external exposure. However, because most of the described IgE-binding self-antigens are intracellular proteins normally not accessible for antigen-antibody interactions, local release of the antigens is required to explain the induction of symptoms."

Immunoglobulin E-binding autoantigens: biochemical characterization and clinical relevance.  
Crameri R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct 10;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational contact dermatitis caused by asparagus.
Occupational contact dermatitis caused by asparagus. A 67-year-old Japanese woman presented with a 2-year history of a recurrent pruritic erythema on the face, arms and hands. She had worked in an asparagus cannery for 20 years. The dermatitis cleared quickly with courses of anti-histamines and topical steroids but relapsed within days of returning to work. Patch test with asparagus showed a strongly positive reaction (++), whereas all metals and white petrolatum were negative. Skin prick test with raw asparagus showed no skin reaction.

Occupational contact dermatitis caused by asparagus.  
Yanagi T, Shimizu H, Shimizu T.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):54

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic contact dermatitis caused by ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate.
Allergic contact dermatitis. A 54-year-old non-atopic woman presented with a history of a skin reaction 2 days after the first application of an anti-ageing skin care product. She was probably primarily sensitized by isothiazolinones present in wipes; this was followed by airborne dermatitis caused by acrylic wallpaint exposure, and a reaction following application of an anti-ageing cream, the responsible allergen

of which was ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate, which might have been present in previously applied anti-ageing products.

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate.  
Swinnen I, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Apr;64(4):241-242

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Effect of repetitive mowing on common ragweed pollen and seed production.
As roadside weeds are increasingly controlled by mowing alone, the effect of a mowing treatment on pollen production was evaluated. Mowed plants produced less pollen per unit of inflorescence length than intact plants. Pollen production per plant was reduced by a factor of 8.84 by the double mowing treatment, while viable seed production per plant was reduced by a factor of 4.66, irrespective of density. Mowing twice has the potential to reduce airborne pollen loads but Ambrosia artemisiifolia seed banks are unlikely to be depleted by this management strategy.

Effect of repetitive mowing on common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) pollen and seed production.  
Simard MJ, Benoit DL.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2011 Jun;18(1):55-62

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A possible role of chitin in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergy.
"Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide in the world; it is found in insects, parasites and fungi. Chitinases break down chitin, and are a part of the defence mechanism against chitin-containing parasites in lower life forms. This review is based on the results of PubMed-searches using the search-terms: chitin, chitinase, allergy and asthma. Research in murine models has proved that chitin is a size-dependent microbial-associated molecular pattern, with the ability to induce an immunological response via pattern recognition receptors. Medium-sized chitin micro-particles (CMPs) have been shown to induce inflammation, while small-sized CMPs reduce inflammation. The amount of acidic mammalian chitinase correlates with asthma, and the enzyme has been shown to induce chemokine secretion in murine lungs. The high prevalence of asthma among people working with chitinous substances, such as crabs and fungi, supports the hypothesis that chitin might be an allergen playing a role of significance in the development of asthma. This new knowledge about chitin and chitinases, combined with the hygiene-hypothesis, may contribute to a model for the pathogenesis of allergic conditions where chitin and chitinases are potential therapeutic targets."

A possible role of chitin in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergy.  
Brinchmann BC, Bayat M, Brogger T, Muttuvelu DV, Tjonneland A, Sigsgaard T.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2011 Jun;18(1):7-12

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Negativity of the basophil activation test in quinolone hypersensitivity: a breakthrough for provocation test decision-making.
Quinolone hypersensitivity reactions are being more frequently reported. Skin tests in investigations of patients are known to not be fully reliable. The provocation test thus remains the gold standard in the definitive diagnosis of allergy, despite the risks involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate basophil activation tests (BATs) in the diagnosis of immediate-type reactions to quinolones. The study suggests that the BAT, if negative for the culprit quinolone, is a valuable tool in the decision whether or not to perform provocation tests in patients with a history of immediate-type reaction to quinolones, in order to exclude an allergic reaction.

Negativity of the basophil activation test in quinolone hypersensitivity: a breakthrough for provocation test decision-making.  
Rouzaire P, Nosbaum A, Denis L, Bienvenu F, Berard F, Cozon G, Bienvenu J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Oct 31;157(3):299-302

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Walnut allergy in peanut-allergic patients: significance of sequential epitopes of walnut homologous to linear epitopes of Ara h 1, 2 and 3 in relation to clinical reactivity.
While the allergens of peanut and walnut have a high degree of homology in their amino-acid sequences, it is unknown whether this similarity is responsible for the observed co-reactivity. This study analyzed the binding of specific IgE antibodies to sequential epitopes of peanut and walnut in peanut-allergic patients with and without walnut allergy. The IgE binding to previously described sequential epitopes of peanut and the homologous regions of walnut was assessed in 32 peanut-allergic patients using a peptide microarray technology. Twelve patients had a clinically relevant walnut allergy and 20 were tolerant to walnut. No differences in the recognition of sequential epitopes could be found between peanut-allergic patients with or without walnut allergy. Only a few patients showed IgE binding to walnut sequences that corresponded to sequential epitopes of peanut. In the inhibition assays, no relevant cross-reacting IgE antibodies could be detected for the peptides analyzed. These results indicate that although they share a rather high degree of homology with the corresponding regions of walnut allergens, the sequence stretches previously identified as sequential IgE binding epitopes of Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 have no IgE binding equivalents in walnut allergens.

Walnut allergy in peanut-allergic patients: significance of sequential epitopes of walnut homologous to linear epitopes of Ara h 1, 2 and 3 in relation to clinical reactivity.  
Rosenfeld L, Shreffler W, Bardina L, Niggemann B, Wahn U, Sampson HA, Beyer K.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Oct 27;157(3):238-245

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Does air pollution increase the effect of aeroallergens on hospitalization for asthma?
This study identified an association between aeroallergens and hospitalizations for asthma, which was enhanced on days of higher air pollution. Minimizing exposure to air pollution might reduce allergic exacerbations of asthma.

Does air pollution increase the effect of aeroallergens on hospitalization for asthma?  
Cakmak S, Dales RE, Coates F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Oct 26;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A new major dog allergen, Can f 6, a lipocalin, is highly cross-reactive with Fel d 4 in a population of cat- and dog-sensitized patients.
Identification of a new major dog allergen highly cross-reactive with Fel d 4 in a population of cat- and dog-sensitized patients. Forty-four patients seen for diagnostic workup of inhalant or cutaneous allergy were selected for combined sensitization to cat and dog as shown by skin prick tests and in vitro specific IgE to cat and dog dander. Thirty-two patients had rhinitis and/or asthma related to cat and/or dog exposure. Five patients had atopic eczema possibly related to cat and/or dog exposure. Fifty-two per- cent of the patients had IgE antibodies to rFel d 4 (range 1.4-51 kUA/L), and 61% had IgE antibodies to rCan f 6 (range 0.8-152 kUA/L). IgE binding to rCan f 6 was significantly correlated with IgE binding to dog dander. This strongly suggested that this patient was sensitized to Can f 6 and IgE is cross-reacting with Fel d 4. However, for patient 32, an asthmatic cat owner, sensitization to Fel d 4 and cross-reactive IgE to Can f 6 was shown. As this patient was negative for Can f 1 and Can f 2, this supported the assumption that she was primarily sensitized to cat dander.

Identification of a new major dog allergen highly cross-reactive with Fel d 4 in a population of cat- and dog-sensitized patients.  
Hilger C, Swiontek K, Arumugam K, Lehners C, Hentges F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 19;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Traffic-related air pollution and development of allergic sensitization in children during the first 8 years of life.
Traffic-related air pollution exposure does not seem to increase the overall risk of sensitization to common inhalant and food allergens up to school age, but sensitization to certain allergens might be related to exposure during infancy

Traffic-related air pollution and development of allergic sensitization in children during the first 8 years of life.  
Gruzieva O, Bellander T, Eneroth K, Kull I, Melen E, Nordling E, van HM, Wickman M, Moskalenko V, Hulchiy O, Pershagen G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 19;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Crustacean allergens from the North Sea Shrimp Crangon crangon.
The North Sea shrimp (Crangon crangon), which is frequently consumed in Europe, was studied. tropomyosin (TM) and arginine kinase (AK) were directly cloned and produced as recombinant proteins. Additional IgE-reactive proteins were isolated and identified, cloned and expressed in E. coli. The relevance of the 6 cloned crustacean allergens was confirmed with sera of 31 shrimp-allergic subjects, 12 of which had a positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to shrimp and 19 a convincing history of food allergy to shrimp, including 5 cases of anaphylaxis. Quantitative IgE measurements were performed by ImmunoCAP. Six recombinant crustacean proteins: TM, AK, sarcoplasmic Ca-binding protein (SCP), a novel myosin light chain (MLC), troponin C (TnC), and triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) bound IgE in ImmunoCAP analysis. Specific IgE to at least one of these single shrimp allergens was detected in 90% of the study population, thus the in vitro diagnostic sensitivity was comparable to that of shrimp extract (97%). In 75% of the subjects, the combined technical sensitivity was similar to or greater with single shrimp allergens than with natural shrimp extract.

Generation of a comprehensive panel of crustacean allergens from the North Sea Shrimp Crangon crangon.  
Bauermeister K, Wangorsch A, Garoffo LP, Reuter A, Conti A, Taylor SL, Lidholm J, Dewitt AM, Enrique E, Vieths S, Holzhauser T, Ballmer-Weber B, Reese G.
Mol Immunol 2011 Sep;48(15-16):1983-1992

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Dermatitis to FD&C yellow No. 6 dye in orange antiseptic solution.  
McCleskey PE.
Arch Dermatol 2011 Sep;147(9):1124-1125

Interstitial granulomatous drug reaction to sorafenib.  
Martinez-Moran C, Najera L, Ruiz-Casado AI, Romero-Mate A, Espinosa P, Meseguer-Yebra C, Cordoba S, Borbujo JM.
Arch Dermatol 2011 Sep;147(9):1118-1119

Lymphomatoid drug reaction to ustekinumab.  
Jung J, Levin EC, Jarrett R, Lu D, Mann C.
Arch Dermatol 2011 Aug;147(8):992-993

Cutaneous adverse reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics.  
Chantachaeng W, Chularojanamontri L, Kulthanan K, Jongjarearnprasert K, Dhana N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2011 Sep;29(3):284-289
Click to view abstract

Therapeutics in food allergy: the current state of the art.  
Otsu K, Fleischer DM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2011 Nov 19;
Click to view abstract

Patch testing with a textile dye mix in a baseline series in two countries.  
Ryberg K, Goossens A, Isaksson M, Gruvberger B, Zimerson E, Bruze M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2011 Jun;91(4):422-427
Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis to lansoprazole with tolerance to omeprazole.  
Aksu K, Kurt E.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2011 Nov 22;

A case of trimebutine-induced anaphylaxis.  
Lee SY, Kim MY, Kang SY, Song WJ, Kang HR.
Allergol Int 2011 Nov;60(4):555-556
Click to view abstract

A case of eosinophilic pneumonia in a tobacco harvester.  
Yoshioka D, Ishii H, Hatano Y, Umeki K, Sakamoto N, Shirai R, Fujiwara S, Kadota J.
Allergol Int 2011 Nov;60(4):551-554
Click to view abstract

Pollen augments the influence of desert dust on symptoms of adult asthma patients.  
Watanabe M, Igishi T, Burioka N, Yamasaki A, Kurai J, Takeuchi H, Sako T, Yoshida A, Yoneda K, Fukuoka Y, Nakamoto M, Hasegawa Y, Chikumi H, Matsumoto S, Minato S, Horasaki K, Shimizu E.
Allergol Int 2011 Nov;60(4):517-524
Click to view abstract

Continuous apple consumption induces oral tolerance in birch-pollen-associated apple allergy.  
Kopac P, Rudin M, Gentinetta T, Gerber R, Pichler C, Hausmann O, Schnyder B, Pichler WJ.
Allergy 2011 Nov 10;
Click to view abstract

Cross-reactions vs co-sensitization evaluated by in silico motifs and in vitro IgE microarray testing.  
Pfiffner P, Stadler BM, Rasi C, Scala E, Mari A.
Allergy 2011 Nov 5;
Click to view abstract

Pulpitis as clinical presentation of photoallergic contact dermatitis due to chlorpromazine.  
Monteagudo-Paz A, Salvador JS, Martinez NL, Granados PA, Martinez PS.
Allergy 2011 Nov;66(11):1503-1504

Comparison of five techniques of skin prick tests used routinely in Europe.  
Masse MS, Granger VA, Chiriac A, Dhivert-Donnadieu H, Bousquet-Rouanet L, Bousquet PJ, Demoly P.
Allergy 2011 Nov;66(11):1415-1419
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to furry animals in an urban atopic population living in Naples, Italy.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Piccolo A, Russo M, D'Amato G.
Allergy 2011 Nov;66(11):1500-1501

House dust mite avoidance measures for perennial allergic rhinitis: an updated Cochrane systematic review.  
Nurmatov U, van Schayck CP, Hurwitz B, Sheikh A.
Allergy 2011 Nov 22;
Click to view abstract

A multi-allergen standard for the calibration of immunoassays: CREATE principles applied to eight purified allergens.  
Filep S, Tsay A, Vailes L, Gadermaier G, Ferreira F, Matsui E, King EM, Chapman MD.
Allergy 2011 Nov 18;
Click to view abstract

Practical guide to skin prick tests in allergy to aeroallergens.  
Bousquet J, Heinzerling L, Bachert C, Papadopoulos NG, Bousquet PJ, Burney PG, Canonica GW, Carlsen KH, Cox L, Haahtela T, Lodrup Carlsen KC, Price D, Samolinski B, Simons FE, Wickman M, nne.
Allergy 2011 Nov 4;
Click to view abstract

Influenza immunization in egg allergy: an update for the 2011-2012 season.  
Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, Lucas JS, Warner JO.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct;41(10):1367-1370
Click to view abstract

Molecular characterization of Der p 10: a diagnostic marker for broad sensitization in house dust mite allergy.  
Resch Y, Weghofer M, Seiberler S, Horak F, Scheiblhofer S, Linhart B, Swoboda I, Thomas WR, Thalhamer J, Valenta R, Vrtala S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct;41(10):1468-1477.
Abstract Click to view abstract

The psychological impact of diagnostic food challenges to confirm the resolution of peanut or tree nut allergy.  
Knibb RC, Ibrahim NF, Stiefel G, Petley R, Cummings AJ, King RM, Keeton D, Brown L, Erlewyn-Lajeunesse M, Roberts G, Lucas JS.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov 15;
Click to view abstract

Mammalian lipocalin allergens - insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.  
Virtanen T, Kinnunen T, Rytkonen-Nissinen M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov 9;
Click to view abstract

Identification of a Dau c PRPlike protein (Dau c 1.03) as a new allergenic isoform in carrots (cultivar Rodelika).  
Wangorsch A, Weigand D, Peters S, Mahler V, Fotisch K, Reuter A, Imani J, Dewitt AM, Kogel KH, Lidholm J, Vieths S, Scheurer S.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov 15;
Click to view abstract

A statement on cefazolin immediate hypersensitivity: data from a large database, and focus on the cross-reactivities.  
Pipet A, Veyrac G, Wessel F, Jolliet P, Magnan A, Demoly P, Bousquet PJ.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov;41(11):1602-1608
Click to view abstract

The clinical evaluation of penicillin allergy: what is necessary, sufficient and safe given the materials currently available?  
Macy E.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov;41(11):1498-1501

Gram-positive bacteria on grass pollen exhibit adjuvant activity inducing inflammatory T cell responses.  
Heydenreich B, Bellinghausen I, Konig B, Becker WM, Grabbe S, Petersen A, Saloga J.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct 18;

Results of drug hypersensitivity evaluations in a large group of children and adults.  
Rubio M, Bousquet PJ, Gomes E, Romano A, Demoly P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct 13;
Click to view abstract

Increased chitinase expression and fungal-specific antibodies in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of asthmatic children.  
Goldman DL, Li X, Tsirilakis K, Andrade C, Casadevall A, Vicencio AG.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct 10;
Click to view abstract

Longitudinal relationship of early life immunomodulatory T cell phenotype and function to development of allergic sensitization in an urban cohort.  
McLoughlin RM, Calatroni A, Visness CM, Wallace PK, Cruikshank WW, Tuzova M, Ly NP, Ruiz-Perez B, Kattan M, Bloomberg GR, Lederman H, Gern JE, Gold DR.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov 9;
Click to view abstract

Immunoglobulin E-binding autoantigens: biochemical characterization and clinical relevance.  
Crameri R.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Oct 10;
Click to view abstract

Allergenic activity of different tomato cultivars in tomato allergic subjects.  
Dolle S, Lehmann K, Schwarz D, Weckwert W, Scheler C, George E, Franken P, Worm M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2011 Nov;41(11):1643-1652
Click to view abstract

A contemporary review of seafood allergy.  
Hajeb P, Selamat J.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Nov 3;
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Occupational contact dermatitis caused by asparagus.  
Yanagi T, Shimizu H, Shimizu T.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):54

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate.  
Swinnen I, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Apr;64(4):241-242

Palladium allergy prevalence is underestimated because of an inadequate test allergen.  
Muris J, Feilzer AJ, Rustemeyer T, Kleverlaan CJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):62

Revision of the European standard for control of the EU nickel restriction--a probable improvement for European citizens.  
Thyssen JP, Uter W, Menne T, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):60-61

Bullous allergic contact dermatitis caused by Critonia aromatisans.  
Gomez-Fernandez C, Ramirez-Marin P, Rubio-Perez M, Casado-Verrier B, Sendagorta-Cudos E, Velayos-Rodriguez M, Vidaurrazaga-Diaz de AC.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):57-58

A case of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolysed wheat protein in a soap.  
Chinuki Y, Kaneko S, Sakieda K, Murata S, Yoshida Y, Morita E.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):55-57

Allergic contact dermatitis in a nurse caused by airborne rubber additives.  
Jensen P, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):54-55

Clinical work-up of a highly reactive nickel-allergic patient.  
Thyssen JP, Johansen JD, Liden C, Moller P, Jellesen MS, Menne T.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):51-53

Contact dermatitis caused by chlorothalonil on imported roses: irritant or allergic reaction?  
Lensen G, Coenraads PJ, Jungbauer F, Schuttelaar ML.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):50-51

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by Tinosorb(R) M.  
O'Connell M, Kirk S, Wilkinson MS.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):48-49

Fixed drug eruption caused by iodinated contrast media.  
Frias M, Fernandez E, Audicana MT, Longo N, Munoz D, Reyes SM.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):43-44

Time trends of contact allergy to a modified European baseline series in Beijing between 2001 and 2006.  
Cheng S, Cao M, Zhang Y, Peng S, Dong J, Zhang D, Jiang Z, He Y.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):22-27
Click to view abstract

Multicentre patch testing with a resol resin based on phenol and formaldehyde.  
Isaksson M, Inerot A, Liden C, Matura M, Stenberg B, Moller H, Bruze M.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):34-37
Click to view abstract

Textile allergy--the Melbourne experience.  
Slodownik D, Williams J, Tate B, Tam M, Cahill J, Frowen K, Nixon R.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):38-42
Click to view abstract

A retrospective study of patch tests in Chongqing, China from 2004 to 2009.  
Yin R, Huang XY, Zhou XF, Hao F.
Contact Dermatitis 2011 Jul;65(1):28-33
Click to view abstract

Effect of repetitive mowing on common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) pollen and seed production.  
Simard MJ, Benoit DL.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2011 Jun;18(1):55-62
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Course of occupational asthma depending on the duration of workplace exposure to allergens - a retrospective cohort study in bakers and farmers.  
Broding HC, Frank P, Hoffmeyer F, Bunger J.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2011 Jun;18(1):35-40
Click to view abstract

Mite allergy and mite exposure in Iceland.  
Hallas TE, Gislason T, Gislason D.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2011 Jun;18(1):13-17
Click to view abstract

A possible role of chitin in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergy.  
Brinchmann BC, Bayat M, Brogger T, Muttuvelu DV, Tjonneland A, Sigsgaard T.
Ann Agric Environ Med 2011 Jun;18(1):7-12
Click to view abstract

Severe allergic reaction to lactulose in a child with milk allergy.  
Maiello N, Del Giudice MM, Capristo C, Decimo F, Santaniello F, Perrone L, Boner A.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Jul;107(1):85

On the cover - annual saltbush.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2011 Nov;107(5):A13

When the workplace air makes me wheeze--occupational asthma.  
Alam R.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Nov;31(4):ix-ix

Irritant-induced airway disorders.  
Brooks SM, Bernstein IL.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Nov;31(4):747-68, vi
Click to view abstract

Old and new causes of occupational asthma.  
Quirce S, Bernstein JA.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Nov;31(4):677-98, v
Click to view abstract

The epidemiology of work-related asthma.  
Smith AM.
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Nov;31(4):663-75, v
Click to view abstract

In Shape - The Art of Mapping Conformational Epitopes.  
Gadermaier E.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Nov 23;157(4):321-322
Click to view abstract

Diagnosis of Immediate Hypersensitivity to beta-Lactam Antibiotics Can Be Made Safely with Current Approaches.  
Celik GE, Aydin O, Dogu F, Cipe F, Boyvat A, Ikinciogullari A, Akyol A, Demirel YS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Nov 1;157(3):311-317
Click to view abstract

Negativity of the basophil activation test in quinolone hypersensitivity: a breakthrough for provocation test decision-making.  
Rouzaire P, Nosbaum A, Denis L, Bienvenu F, Berard F, Cozon G, Bienvenu J.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Oct 31;157(3):299-302
Click to view abstract

Walnut allergy in peanut-allergic patients: significance of sequential epitopes of walnut homologous to linear epitopes of Ara h 1, 2 and 3 in relation to clinical reactivity.  
Rosenfeld L, Shreffler W, Bardina L, Niggemann B, Wahn U, Sampson HA, Beyer K.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2011 Oct 27;157(3):238-245
Click to view abstract

Lenalidomide-induced purpuric eruption: a new adverse cutaneous reaction.  
Kuohung V, Goldberg LJ, Demierre MF.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Sep;65(3):654-656

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) caused by telavancin.  
Turrentine JE, Dharamsi JW, Miedler JD, Pandya AG.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Sep;65(3):e100-e101

Personal and parental nativity as risk factors for food sensitization.  
Keet CA, Wood RA, Matsui EC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 8;
Click to view abstract

Oral food challenge practices among allergists in the United States.  
Pongracic JA, Bock SA, Sicherer SH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Oct 26;

Does air pollution increase the effect of aeroallergens on hospitalization for asthma?  
Cakmak S, Dales RE, Coates F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Oct 26;
Click to view abstract

Evaluation of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network criteria for the diagnosis of anaphylaxis in emergency department patients.  
Campbell RL, Hagan JB, Manivannan V, Decker WW, Kanthala AR, Bellolio MF, Smith VD, Li JT.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 1;
Click to view abstract

The eliciting dose of peanut in double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges decreases with increasing age and specific IgE level in children and young adults.  
van der Zee T, Dubois A, Kerkhof M, van der Heide S, Vlieg-Boerstra B.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov;128(5):1031-1036
Click to view abstract

Identification of a new major dog allergen highly cross-reactive with Fel d 4 in a population of cat- and dog-sensitized patients.  
Hilger C, Swiontek K, Arumugam K, Lehners C, Hentges F.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 19;

Anthropogenic climate change and allergen exposure: The role of plant biology.  
Ziska LH, Beggs PJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 19;
Click to view abstract

A protocol for risk stratification of patients with carboplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions.  
Patil SU, Long AA, Ling M, Wilson MT, Hesterberg P, Wong JT, Banerji A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 16;
Click to view abstract

Traffic-related air pollution and development of allergic sensitization in children during the first 8 years of life.  
Gruzieva O, Bellander T, Eneroth K, Kull I, Melen E, Nordling E, van HM, Wickman M, Moskalenko V, Hulchiy O, Pershagen G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Nov 19;
Click to view abstract

Fungal chitin from asthma-associated home environments induces eosinophilic lung infiltration.  
Van Dyken SJ, Garcia D, Porter P, Huang X, Quinlan PJ, Blanc PD, Corry DB, Locksley RM.
J Immunol 2011 Sep 1;187(5):2261-2267
Click to view abstract

Wheat allergens associated with Baker's asthma.  
Salcedo G, Quirce S, Diaz-Perales A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):81-92; quiz 94.
Abstract

A case of piperacillin-induced occupational anaphylaxis: detection of serum IgE to piperacillin-HSA conjugate.  
Kim JE, Kim SH, Kim JH, Bahn JW, Jin HJ, Ye YM, Park HS.
J Korean Med Sci 2011 May;26(5):682-685
Click to view abstract

Urticaria and periorbital edema as prodromal presenting signs of acute hepatitis B infection.  
van AR, de Pagter AP, van Genderen PJ.
J Travel Med 2011 May;18(3):224-225
Click to view abstract

A deadly aversion to pork.  
Fournier PE, Thuny F, Grisoli D, Lepidi H, Vitte J, Casalta JP, Weiller PJ, Habib G, Raoult D.
Lancet 2011 Apr 30;377(9776):1542

Reported symptoms of food hypersensitivity and sensitization to common foods in 4-year-old children.  
Ostblom E, Wickman M, van Hage M, Lilja G.
Miscellaneous Acta Paediatr 2008 Jan;97(1):85-90.
Abstract

Generation of a comprehensive panel of crustacean allergens from the North Sea Shrimp Crangon crangon.  
Bauermeister K, Wangorsch A, Garoffo LP, Reuter A, Conti A, Taylor SL, Lidholm J, Dewitt AM, Enrique E, Vieths S, Holzhauser T, Ballmer-Weber B, Reese G.
Mol Immunol 2011 Sep;48(15-16):1983-1992
Click to view abstract

Desensitisation to circumvent hypersensitivity reactions; treatment with docetaxel still possible. [Dutch]  
Luiting J, de Monchy JG, Hiltermann TJ, Oude Elberink JN.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2011;155A2980
Click to view abstract

Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline can be more firm--the food allergy test does not exist. [Dutch]  
Brand PL.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2011;155(18):A3104
Click to view abstract

Summary of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on food hypersensitivity. [Dutch]  
Luning-Koster MN, Lucassen PL, Boukes FS, Goudswaard AN.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2011;155(18):A3063
Click to view abstract

Cow's milk allergy in infants: new insights. [Dutch]  
Brand PL, Rijk-van GH.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2011;155(27):A3508
Click to view abstract

The IgE repertoire in children and adolescents resolved at component level: A cross-sectional study.  
Melioli G, Marcomini L, Agazzi A, Bazurro G, Tosca M, Rossi GA, Minale P, Rossi R, Reggiardo G, Canonica GW, Passalacqua G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2011 Nov 22;
Click to view abstract

Domestic exposure to aeroallergens in Hong Kong families with asthmatic children.  
Leung TF, Wong YS, Chan IH, Yung E, Sy HY, Lam CW, Wong GW.
Pediatr Pulmonol 2011 Jul;46(7):632-639
Click to view abstract

The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United States.  
Gupta RS, Springston EE, Warrier MR, Smith B, Kumar R, Pongracic J, Holl JL.
Pediatrics 2011 Jul;128(1):e9-17
Click to view abstract

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by velvet antler.  
Yoon TY, Lee DY, Kim YJ, Lee JY, Kim MK.
Br J Dermatol 2011 Aug;165(2):447-448

A World Allergy Organization International Survey on Diagnostic Procedures and Therapies in Drug Allergy/Hypersensitivity  
Thong, Bernard Yu-Hor; Mirakian, Rita; Castells, Mariana; Pichler, Werner; Romano, Antonino; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Diana, Deleanu; Kowalski, Marek; Yanez, Anahi; et al.
WAO Journal 2011;4(12):257–270
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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