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 Allergy Advisor Digest - November 2012
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read A case of allergy to zucchini.
Read Triclosan exposure and allergic sensitization in Norwegian children.
Read Anaphylaxis from ingestion of mites: Pancake anaphylaxis.
Read Urticaria-angioedema due to carboxymethylcellulose eye drops.
Read Variable content of Fel d 1 variants in house dust and cat extracts may have an impact on allergen measurement.
Read Age-dependent sensitization to the 7S-vicilin-like protein Cor a 11 from hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in a birch-endemic region.
Read A sea urchin roe tropomyosin-like protein is recognized in vitro by shrimp-allergic individuals.
Read Aseptic meningitis induced by vitamin B complex.
Read Custard apple and latex allergy: a new type of cross-reaction?
Read Correlation between Alt a 1 levels and clinical symptoms in Alternaria alternata-monosensitized patients.
Read Anaphylaxis associated with the ingestion of Goji berries.
Read Cupressus arizonica pollen: a new pollen involved in the lipid transfer protein syndrome?
Read Eosinophilic gastroenteritis due to allergy to cow's milk.
Read Identification of allergens in chicken meat allergy.
Read Allergy to freshwater crayfish, red swamp crayfish.
Read Anaphylaxis due to orange soft drinks.
Read Allergy to spearmint (Mentha spicata).
Read Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to corn: a case report.
Read Occupational asthma caused Tyrophagus putrescentiae in a dry-cured ham transporter allergic to shrimp.
Read Hev b 5: latex allergen implicated in clinically relevant cross-reactivity with manioc.
Read Delayed anaphylactic reaction to mammalian meat (pork).
Read Anaphylaxis to vapors of roasting chicken controlled by omalizumab.
Read Specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to saprophytic yeasts in sera of atopic patients allergic to house dust mites.
Read Potential hypersensitivity due to the food or food additive content of medicinal products in Spain.
Read Allergy to red caviar.
Read Induction of oral tolerance to peanut: a successful home-based protocol.
Read Cross-reactive food allergies
Read Emerging allergen: soy
Read Dimethylfumarate: life and survival of a hapten
Read Severe anaphylaxis wine and grape grape involving LTP (Vit v 1): report of two cases
Read Changing spectrum of allergy to lipid transfer proteins by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory.

Abstracts shared in November 2012 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Kiwifruit allergy across Europe: Clinical manifestation and IgE recognition patterns to kiwifruit allergens.
Read Asthma after chicken consumption due to cross-reactivity between fish and chicken parvalbumin.
Read Hypersensitivity to cassava: an allergen-based assessment.
Read Goji berries (Lycium barbarum): risk of allergic reactions in individuals with food allergy.
Read Neuropsychiatric reactions to montelukast.
Read Cutaneous allergy at the supermarket.(onion and zucchini)
Read Anaphylaxis to sunflower seed.
Read Anaphylaxis to apple
Read Kidney bean: a major sensitizer among legumes in asthma and rhinitis patients from India.
Read Vespa velutina (Asian hornet): a new Bee in France
Read Severe anaphylaxis to wine and to grape induced by sensitization to grape lipid transfert protein (Vit v 1)

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of allergy to zucchini.
A case of isolated zucchini allergy is reported occuring in a 46-year-old man who reported 3 episodes of urticaria with angioedema at both hands and head associated with severe gastric pain; in all cases the episodes occurred few minutes after the ingestion of cooked zucchini. Symptoms lasted about 45 minutes and subsided spontaneously. He tolerated other foods. Skin tests were negative to all allerens tested, including latex, except was strongly positive to fresh zucchini (prick-prick test). Immunoblot was negative, however this patient reacted to zucchini-specific allergens, as shown by the lack of IgE reactivity to potential cross-reacting pan-allergens, including profilin, natural rubber latex, Bet v 1- like, and lipid transfer protein. The offending zucchini allergen(s) were both heat-stable and pepsin-stable, as shown by the fact that all 3 allergic reactions were caused by cooked zucchini and that the offending food induced systemic symptoms in all cases.

A case of allergy to zucchini.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;44(5):205-206

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Triclosan exposure and allergic sensitization in Norwegian children.
Exposure to the synthetic antimicrobial chemical, triclosan, used in personal care products, has been hypothesized to lead to allergic disease. This study investigated whether triclosan exposure was associated with allergic sensitization and symptoms in 10-year-old Norwegian children. Urinary concentrations of triclosan were measured in one first morning void from 623 children. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for allergic sensitization among those in the fourth quartile of triclosan concentration was 2.0 compared with the reference group, and the aOR per log(10) unit increase in triclosan was 1.2. The aOR for current rhinitis was 1.9 for the fourth quartile and 1.2 per log(10) unit increase in triclosan. Therefore triclosan concentrations were associated with allergic sensitization, especially inhalant and seasonal allergens, rather than food allergens.

Triclosan exposure and allergic sensitization in Norwegian children.  
Bertelsen RJ, Longnecker MP, Lovik M, Calafat AM, Carlsen KH, London SJ, Lodrup Carlsen KC.
Allergy 2012 Nov 12;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis from ingestion of mites: Pancake anaphylaxis.
Oral mite anaphylaxis is a new syndrome characterized by severe allergic symptoms occurring immediately after eating foods made with mite-contaminated wheat flour. This syndrome, which is more prevalent in tropical environments, is triggered more often by pancakes, and for that reason, it has been designated 'the pancake syndrome.' Because cooked foods are able to induce the symptoms, it has been suggested that thermoresistant allergens are involved in its pathogenesis. A variety of this syndrome can occur during physical exercise (dust mite ingestion-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis)

Anaphylaxis from ingestion of mites: Pancake anaphylaxis.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Suarez CR, Capriles-Hulett A, Caballero-Fonseca F, Fernandez-Caldas E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov 12;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Urticaria-angioedema due to carboxymethylcellulose eye drops.
Urticaria-Angioedema due to carboxymethylcellulose eye drops in a a 44-year-old man. Immediately after applying the drops, he developed intense conjunctival erythema and bilateral periocular edema with urticarial lesions on the face and trunk. 6 months before the reaction he had developed generalized urticaria, without angioedema or respiratory distress, immediately after a lumbar epidural infiltration with Trigon Depot (triamcinolone + Tween 80 + CMC + benzyl alcohol)

Urticaria-angioedema due to carboxymethylcellulose eye drops.  
Carbonell A, Miralles JC, Escudero AI, Martinez A, Pineda F, Aldana D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):288-289

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Variable content of Fel d 1 variants in house dust and cat extracts may have an impact on allergen measurement.
Despite a common pattern of Fel d 1 variants in cat extracts and house dust, variations in the tetramer-to-dimer ratio among samples may introduce major discordances in cat allergen measurements using immunoassays.

Variable content of Fel d 1 variants in house dust and cat extracts may have an impact on allergen measurement.  
Bienboire-Frosini C, Lebrun R, Vervloet D, Pageat P, Ronin C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):270-279

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Age-dependent sensitization to the 7S-vicilin-like protein Cor a 11 from hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in a birch-endemic region.
This study evaluated sensitization to Cor a 11 in different age groups of hazelnut-allergic patients and infants with atopic dermatitis (AD) sensitized to hazelnut in a birch-endemic region. Sera from 80 hazelnut-allergic patients, 33 infants under 1 year of age with AD, healthy controls, and 29 birch pollen–allergic but hazelnut-tolerant individuals were tested for IgE reactivity to Cor a 11. IgE reactivity to Cor a 1.01, Cor a 1.04, Cor a 8, and Cor a 9 was studied by ISAC microarray. Forty patients (22 preschool children, 10 schoolchildren, and 8 adults) with systemic reactions on consumption of hazelnut were sensitized to Cor a 11 (respective rates of 36%, 40%, and 12.5%). Forty patients (6 preschool children, 10 schoolchildren, and 24 adults) reported oral allergy syndrome but only 2 of them (of preschool age) were sensitized to Cor a 11. Two (8%) of the AD infants sensitized to hazelnut showed IgE reactivity to Cor a 11. This reactivity was not observed in any of the AD infants without sensitization to hazelnut, in any of the birch-pollen allergic patients without hazelnut allergy, or in any of the healthy control individuals. Sensitization to Cor a 11 in a birch-endemic region is predominantly found in children with severe hazelnut allergy, a fi nding that is consistent with observations concerning sensitization to Cor a 9.

Age-dependent sensitization to the 7S-vicilin-like protein Cor a 11 from hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in a birch-endemic region.  
Verweij MM, Hagendorens MM, Trashin S, Cucu T, De MB, Devreese B, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):245-251

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A sea urchin roe tropomyosin-like protein is recognized in vitro by shrimp-allergic individuals.
A sea urchin roe tropomyosin-like protein is recognized in vitro by shrimp-allergic individuals.

A sea urchin roe tropomyosin-like protein is recognized in vitro by shrimp-allergic individuals.  
Pascal M, Grishina G, Yang A, Ayuso R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):306-307

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Aseptic meningitis induced by vitamin B complex.
The authors report the first case of aseptic meningitis (AM) due to a hypersensitivity reaction to vitamin B complex. A 29-year-old woman with a history of autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism attended the emergency room with generalized seizure, neck stiffness, and lethargy. A lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was positive with B1.

Aseptic meningitis induced by vitamin B complex.  
Galindo Bonilla PA, Sanchez RN, Castro JA, Munoz-Torrero Rodriguez JJ, Bellon HT, Feo BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):225-226

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Custard apple and latex allergy: a new type of cross-reaction?
Custard apple and latex allergy: a new type of cross-reaction? A 28-year-old woman who worked as a fishmonger was examined at our hospital. During the previous year, she had developed pruritus, erythema, and wheals on her fingers, hands, and forearms while working. These symptoms improved on weekends and vacation. She wore latex gloves at work and reported no symptoms when touching or eating fish. During the previous 4 years, she had also experienced tongue and pharyngeal pruritus and labial erythema after eating custard apple. A custard apple IgE-binding band

of 14 kDa was detected. This allergen displayed cross-reactivity with latex, papaya, and avocado, but not with Hev b 1 or profilin. High sequence homology was found between peptides of this 14-kDa band and acyl carrier protein. We suggest that this could be a new allergen involved in cherimoya and latex cross-reaction, although further studies would be necessary to prove its allergenicity.

Custard apple and latex allergy: a new type of cross-reaction?  
Santos-Magadan S, Bartolome-Zavala B, Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Heras-Mendaza F, Conde-Salazar L, Martinez-Cocera C, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):223-224

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Correlation between Alt a 1 levels and clinical symptoms in Alternaria alternata-monosensitized patients.
Alt a 1, which has been described as the major allergen in A alternata, shows a good correlation with A alternata spores only when they have germinated. This study correlated spore counts and clinical symptoms in patients with allergic asthma and/or rhinitis monosensitized to A alternata. A alternata spores were detected throughout the year, whereas Alt a 1 was detected only between March and December. Symptoms showed positive and significant correlations with spore counts, and Alt a 1 levels. The correlation between spores and Alt a 1 was low. In patients who are allergic to A alternata, Alt a 1 levels can be considered an important marker for predicting the risk of respiratory symptoms.

Correlation between Alt a 1 levels and clinical symptoms in Alternaria alternata-monosensitized patients.  
Feo BF, Alonso AM, Carnes J, Martin-Martin R, Fernandez-Caldas E, Galindo PA, Alfaya T, mo-Salas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):154-159

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis associated with the ingestion of Goji berries.
Two patients who experienced allergic symptoms after Goji berry consumption, 1 of which was an anaphylactic reaction, after Goji berry ingestion. A positive skin prick test and specific IgE to Goji berry was detected in both cases. Serum samples recognized a 9-kDa band, probably related to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Cross-reactivity with tomato was analyzed by inhibition studies, which showed that the 9-kDa band was totally inhibited by the tomato extract. This study describes the first 2 cases of allergic reaction following Goji berry ingestion. LTPs seem to be involved in allergic sensitization to Goji berries, as evidenced by cross-reactivity with tomato.

Anaphylaxis associated with the ingestion of Goji berries (Lycium barbarum).  
Monzon BS, Lopez-Matas MA, Saenz AD, Perez-Cinto N, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):567-570

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cupressus arizonica pollen: a new pollen involved in the lipid transfer protein syndrome?
6 patients with cypress pollinosis and food allergy to peach were evaluated. SPT were positive for C arizonica, peach, lettuce, mustard, and hazelnut in all patients. Specific IgE to C arizonica and Pru p 3 was positive in all but 1 patient, whose Pru p 3 IgE was negative. Immunoblotting under nonreducing conditions with C arizonica extract and patients' sera showed a band at 14-15 kDa that was inhibited by Pru p 3. Pru p 3 partially inhibited the C arizonica pollen extract in EAST-inhibition. Pru p 3-like LTP was localized in the cytoplasm and walls of C arizonica pollen grains. A 15-kDa allergen in C arizonica pollen was found in a group of patients presenting peach allergy and respiratory symptoms to cypress. In vitro tests and immunocytochemical techniques indicate that this protein is an LTP.

Cupressus arizonica pollen: a new pollen involved in the lipid transfer protein syndrome?  
Sanchez-Lopez J, Asturias JA, Enrique E, Suarez-Cervera M, Bartra J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):522-526

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis due to allergy to cow's milk.
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition that is characterized by infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by eosinophils. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented 4 episodes of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Skin prick tests and patch tests with different allergens were all negative. The patient's eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) level was very high. Given that one of the most common causes of this condition is allergy to cow's milk, ECP levels were determined during a diet with and without cow's milk. ECP levels were considerably elevated during the diet with milk, although they returned to normal values several months after milk was withdrawn. The favorable clinical outcome and normalization of ECP levels point to a very probable association with cow's milk in the eosinophilic gastroenteritis presented by our patient.

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis due to allergy to cow's milk.  
Rodriguez JB, Dominguez OJ, Gonzalez Garcia JM, Kindelan RC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):150-152

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of allergens in chicken meat allergy.
Chicken meat is widely consumed. Most cases of chicken meat allergy are associated with hypersensitivity to egg and/ or feather, thus prompting the so-called bird–egg syndrome, with a-livetin (Gal d 5) as the most frequent cross-reacting protein. Few cases of chicken meat allergy without egg hypersensitivity have been published, and its profile of allergen sensitization has seldom been investigated, although a-parvalbumin was recently identified as the allergen implicated in a case of poultry meat allergy. A 20-year-old man experienced oropharyngeal and palmar itching, facial hives, lip swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and heartburn 15 minutes after eating chicken. He tolerated turkey, but did not eat any other poultry meat or meats such as veal, pork, and rabbit. IgE immunoblotting assays were carried out and revealed reactivity to bands of 16 and 27 kDa in boiled chicken extract, 16 and 28 kDa in boiled duck extract, and 16 kDa in boiled turkey extract and were identified the 16-kDa band as a-parvalbumin and the 27-kDa band as myosin light chain 1 (MLC). Although shrimp MLC (Lit v 3) has been identified as a new major shrimp allergen, MLC has never been described as an allergen in chicken meat.

Identification of allergens in chicken meat allergy.  
Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Pastor C, Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Gandolfo-Cano M, Melendez A, Cuesta J, Zapatero A, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):326-327

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to freshwater crayfish, red swamp crayfish.
An 18-year-old woman presented with chest tightness, wheezing, headache, and hives on the abdomen that had appeared within minutes of eating Procambarus clarkii, a crayfish belonging to the Cambaridae family. She said that she had never developed symptoms after eating crustaceans or molluscs on previous occasions. Skin prick tests to common aeroallergens, crustaceans, molluscs, and Anisakis simplex were positive result only to grass and olea pollen. Protein extracts from raw and boiled P clarkii shell (PCSr and PCSb, respectively) and flesh (PCFr and PCFb) were prepared. Prick- by-prick tests with PCFr and PCFb yielded a wheal of 3 mm in both cases. Serum-specific IgE against commercial crab extract was <0.35 kU/L, and sIgE determinations against PCSr, PCSb, PCFr, and PCFb yielded

kU/L for PCSr (total IgE of 90 IU/mL) and were negative for the rest of the extracts. Protein bands ranging between 14 and 99 kDa were isolated for the PCFr and PCSr extracts. SDS-PAGE IgE-immunoblotting assays revealed IgE-reactivity with a 21-kDa protein in both extracts, but with stronger labeling in PCSr. Protein databases identified the sequence as ferritin. In vertebrates, these subunits can be light-type (L) or heavy- type (H) subunits, with a molecular weight of 19 kDa and 21 kDa, respectively

Allergy to crayfish.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Pastor-Vargas C, Gandolfo-Cano M, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Melendez-Baltanas A, Morales-Barrios MP, Perez-Gordo M, Vivanco F, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):318-319

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis due to orange soft drinks.
Anaphylaxis due to orange soft drinks. A 23-year-old woman experienced an episode of anaphylaxis 10 minutes after handling sweet oranges in a fruit warehouse where she had been working for a month. Because of this episode, she left the job and some months later experienced contact urticaria when squeezing an orange; she also experienced oral allergy syndrome after drinking several orange soft drinks that she had previously tolerated. She had not eaten sweet oranges for 15 fifteen years. SPTs with the soft drink extracts were negative but the corresponding intradermal tests were positive. 1 hour after the intradermal test with orange extract (pulp and peel), the patient developed facial edema, dyspnea, and wheezing that required urgent medical attention. Total serum IgE was 6.7 IU/mL and serum specific IgE against orange peel and pulp extracts was <0.35 kU/L (class 0). IgE immunoblotting with the patient’s serum revealed IgE-binding bands of approximately 75 kDa, 66 kDa, 57 kDa, 28 kDa, 22 kDa, and 18 kDa. The immunoblotting profile of 3 orange soft drink extracts showed a strong band of 28 kDa. The 28-kDa IgE binding protein was identified as Cit s 1. Oral provocation test was refused. The authors conclude that this nonatopic patient showed clinically relevant monosensitization to Cit s 1, a sweet orange allergen, which appeared as an active allergenic component in orange soft drinks.

Anaphylaxis due to orange soft drinks.  
Navarro LA, Pastor-Vargas C, Liñana JJ, Martínez I, Maroto AS, Vivanco F, Bartolomé B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):297-9.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to spearmint (Mentha spicata).
A 41-year-old female with rhinoconjunctivitis from house dust mite and cat experienced recurrent episodes of uvular angioedema that appeared a few hours after ingestion of fresh mint leaves (used as a condiment) or inhalation of mint essence during a massage. Notably, no reactions were related to ingestion of other foods, including aromatic herbs from the mint family, or cutaneous reactions in the areas where the mint essence was applied. Prick-by-prick testing and RAST with substrates of other members of the Lamiaceae family (oregano, rosemary, basil, and thyme) were all negative. Prick-by- prick testing was performed with fresh mint leaves were positive. Specific IgE binding showed a single immunoreactive band of approximately 50 kDa.

Allergy to mint (Mentha spicata).  
Damiani E, Aloia AM, Priore MG, Pastore A, Lippolis C, Lovecchio A, Rossi MP, Macchia L, Ferrannini A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):309-10.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to corn: a case report.
Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to corn: a case report. A 7 months old girl ate 4 teaspoons of vegetable, corn, and tapioca, and 2.5 hours later developed repeated episodes of diarrhea and vomiting with pallor, hypotonia, and lethargy. Acute viral gastrointestinal infection was diagnosed. Ten days later, she consumed breast milk followed by 80 g of pear homogenate (with corn starch), and developed profuse vomiting, diarrhea, pallor, and lethargy after 2 hours. Anaphylaxis due to cow’s milk (CM) protein was suspected. The infant was exclusively breastfed for 10 days, after which she ate 60 g of pear homogenate (still with corn starch). Four hours later, she experienced profuse vomiting, without pallor or lethargy. FPIES to corn, the only food present in all 3 critical episodes, was suspected. Prick to prick tests with corn and other grains not yet eaten by the infant were negative. An OFC to test tolerance to corn was performed 1 year after the last episode, when the infant was 18-months-old, with negative results. At follow-up 2 months later, the child had eaten corn several times and experienced no further episodes of FPIES.

Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to corn: a case report.  
Sopo SM, Filoni S, Giorgio V, Monaco S, Onesimo R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):391-392

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational asthma caused Tyrophagus putrescentiae in a dry-cured ham transporter allergic to shrimp.
A 43-year-old man living in Madrid, (low prevalence of mite sensitization) had worked transporting dry-cured ham in a van for 13 years. A few years after starting, he developed moderate persistent rhinoconjunctivitis, cutaneous pruritus, and dyspnea that worsened on week days and improved at weekends and during holidays. Three years earlier he experienced 2 episodes of oral pruritus and lip angioedema immediately after eating boiled shrimp. Subsequently he developed oral pruritus on trying small amounts of other crustaceans at home. He tolerated cephalopods, molluscs, and dry-cured ham, including the ham he delivered. A prick to prick test with a portion of the dry-cured ham the patient transported was negative for the meat but positive for the crust of the ham. Total IgE was 287 kUA/L, and specific IgE 12.5 kUA/L for T putrescentiae and 3.11 kUA/L for shrimp, and negative for rPen a 1 (tropomyosin). A sample of dry-cured ham provided by the patient demonstrated extensive contamination with Tyrophagus species. The patient reported that the inside of his delivery van was filled with mites. A specific positive bronchial challenge with a commercial extract of T putrescentiae was positive. No late-phase response was observed. A low degree of crossreactivity between T putrescentiae and shrimp was demonstrated. The sera of the patient bound specific IgE to bands at approximately 26 kDa in the T putrescentiae extract and to 4 bands between 15 and 20 kDa in the shrimp extract.

Occupational asthma caused by the inhalation of Tyrophagus putrescentiae allergens in a dry-cured ham transporter allergic to shrimp.  
Rodriguez del RP, Tudela Garcia JI, Narganes NJ, Fernandez-Caldas E, Rodriguez-Garcia V, Subiza J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):383-384

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hev b 5: latex allergen implicated in clinically relevant cross-reactivity with manioc.
Hev b 5, a latex allergen is implicated in clinically relevant cross-reactivity with manioc (cassava). This study evaluated 2 patients with manioc induced anaphylaxis, both of whom also had anaphylaxis to latex, were included. Patient 1 was a 59-year-old Portuguese woman with severe latex allergy related to multiple surgeries, and latex-fruit syndrome. She had an anaphylactic reaction with generalized urticaria, bronchospasm, and laryngeal edema 30 minutes after eating boiled manioc, and a similar reaction 5 minutes after eating raw manioc (tapioca flour). Patient 2 was a 46-year-old Portuguese woman with a severe latex allergy related to occupational exposure (health care worker) and multiple surgeries, and latex-fruit syndrome. She had had an anaphylactic reaction with generalized pruritus, lip and hand angioedema, bronchospasm, and laryngeal edema 10 minutes after eating boiled manioc, and a similar reaction 5 minutes after eating raw manioc (tapioca flour). The results strongly suggest that manioc allergy was a consequence of primary latex sensitization. The latex allergen responsible for this cross-reactivity was Hev b 5. This protein is a strong antigen and one of the most important latex allergens, with a high prevalence in health care workers; furthermore, it has previously been associated with a homologous protein in kiwi fruit.

Hev b 5: latex allergen implicated in clinically relevant cross-reactivity with manioc.  
Gaspar A, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Rihs HP, Pires G, Morais-Almeida M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):450-451

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Delayed anaphylactic reaction to mammalian meat (pork).
A 74-year-old woman with no historyof atopy of allergic disorders developed anaphylaxis 5 hours after eating mammalian meat. Two months after being bitten by ticks 3 years earlier, she experienced delayed anaphylaxis following ingestion roast beef. She also developed anaphylaxis 2 hours after drinking a glass of cow’s milk. Serum specific IgE antibodies against beef (2.46 kUA/mL), pork (1.51 kUA/mL), mutton (2.61 kUA/mL), and milk (1.52 kUA/mL). The patient ate 50 g each of roast chicken and roast pork without seasoning. She did not develop allergic reactions after eating chicken. However, she developed swelling and redness of the face and generalized wheals 5 hours after eating pork. Allergy was attributed to alpha-gal. Moreover, the patient also experienced anaphylaxis after ingestion of milk, possibly owing to the presence of alpha-gal in milk.

Delayed anaphylactic reaction to mammalian meat.  
Sekiya K, Fukutomi Y, Nakazawa T, Taniguchi M, Akiyama K.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):446-447

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylaxis to vapors of roasting chicken controlled by omalizumab.
Anaphylaxis to the vapors of roasting chicken that resolved after treatment with omalizumab. A 16-year-old girl consulted for several episodes of allergic reaction (about 10 episodes) following exposure to roasting poultry (chicken and turkey) during the previous 16 months. On at least 2 occasions, she presented laryngeal angioedema with dyspnea, wheeze, and bronchospasm for which she received inhaled adrenaline combined with systemic corticosteroids and emergency care. She had also experienced oral allergy syndrome after eating chicken during the previous 4 years and abdominal pain after eating turkey meat during the previous year. Skin prick tests were positive to fresh chicken and turkey meat, negative for cooked chicken and turkey meat, and negative for the remaining foods tested (spices, chicken liver, and eggs). Specific IgE was negative for chicken serum proteins, cat dander, mustard, beef, turkey meat, dog albumin, ovalbumin, and conalbumin. Total serum IgE was 250 kUA/L. A blinded challenge test with chicken roasting in an oven resulted in wheezing, throat discomfort, and dizziness after 3 minutes of exposure.

IgE immunoblotting of the extract from native chicken leg with the patient’s serum showed a band at 75 kDa that was not inhibited by chicken serum albumin, an allergen known to migrate within a similar molecular weight range. IgE reactivity to the 75-kDa band disappeared after cooking the extract for 20 minutes. The patient’s serum showed no IgE reactivity when immunoblotted with roasted skin and roasted leg extract. No IgE binding was detected in the solution eluted from the glass-fiber filter used to collect vapors while the chicken was roasting in the oven. Anaphylaxis to the vapors of roasting poultry is uncommon.

Anaphylaxis to vapors of roasting chicken controlled by omalizumab.  
Barnig C, Hilger C, Muti D, Blaumeiser M, Purohit A, Hentges F, de BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):439-440

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to saprophytic yeasts in sera of atopic patients allergic to house dust mites.
The results of the present study suggest that C pelliculosa and house dust mites share common antigens. This study aimed to investigate the presence of specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies to the yeast species Candida pelliculosa, Candida guilliermondii, Candida famata, and Rhodotorula rubra in the sera of AD patients and to evaluate possible cross-reactivity between yeasts and allergens of Dermatophagoides. All house dust mite–positive sera had specific IgE antibodies to the yeast species tested: 42% of these sera reacted with all 4 yeast species. The inhibition study demonstrated partial cross-reactivity between IgE class antibodies with the yeast species. This finding indicates that different Candida species and R rubra have species-specific and cross-reactive antigens with partially overlapping epitopes, thus suggesting cross-reactivity with mite allergens. The results of the present study suggest that C pelliculosa and house dust mites share common antigens.

Specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to saprophytic yeasts in sera of atopic patients allergic to house dust mites.  
Zinkeviciene A, Girkontaite I, Citavicius D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):412-418

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Potential hypersensitivity due to the food or food additive content of medicinal products in Spain.
The Drug Allergy Committee of the Spanish Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology reviewed the allergenic potential of several substances of food origin that are found in the composition of some drugs. Despite recent legislation on labeling, many labels do not clearly state whether the drug contains raw material (active ingredients, excipient, or other manufacturing intermediate) with an origin in any of the substances in the list of the 14 groups of food allergens that are subject to mandatory declaration. The objective of legislation is that the drug package, the Summary of Product Characteristics, and the patient information leaflet clearly state the food content in order to improve the safety of allergic patients. Therefore, any food or allergen derivative that must be declared should be clearly stated on the drug label. Of all the evaluated products, egg and milk derivatives are the most frequently discussed in literature reviews. The natural or synthetic origin of potentially allergenic substances such as lysozyme, casein, lactose, albumin, phosphatide, and aromatic essences should be clearly stated. Providing this information has 2 clear advantages. First, allergic reactions to drugs in patients with food allergy could be avoided (if the substances have a natural origin). Second, prescription would improve by not restricting drugs containing synthetic substances (which do not usually induce allergic reactions).

Potential hypersensitivity due to the food or food additive content of medicinal products in Spain.  
Audicana Berasategui MT, Barasona Villarejo MJ, Corominas Sánchez M, De Barrio Fernández M, García Avilés MC, García Robaina JC, Gastaminza Lasarte G, Laguna Martínez JJ, et al.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):496-506

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to red caviar.
Salmon roe (SR), also known as red caviar due to its red-orange hue, is widely consumed since it is considerably cheaper than black caviar, is more versatile, and can be eaten with many different foods. A 56-year-old man presented with oral pruritus, vomiting, chest tightness, and dysphagia within minutes of eating red caviar. He did not report any previous or subsequent symptoms after eating any kind of fish or fish or bird eggs. Skin prick tests to common commercial fish (including hake, trout, salmon, monkfish, sardine, sole, and tuna), crustaceans, molluscs, Anisakis simplex, egg yolk, egg white, ovalbumin, and ovomucoid were performed, with negative results. Prick-by-prick tests carried out with salmon roe was positive. Serum-specific IgE against commercial salmon extract, egg yolk, egg white, ovalbumin, and ovomucoid were negative. sIgE for trout roe (TR) and salted hake roe (SHR) were 0.5 kU/L and 0.4 kU/L, respectively. An IgE-immunoblot assay revealed IgE reactivity with 18-kDa and 21-kDa proteins in the SR extract, an 18-kDa protein in the TR extract, and 18- kDa and 30-kDa proteins in the SHR extract. Inhibition assay with SR extract as an inhibitor and TR and SHR extracts in solid phase showed complete IgE-binding inhibition. The relevant allergens are subfragments of vitellogenin such as lipovitellin and ߒ-c. Cross-reactivity with TR and SHR has also been demonstrated for the first time.

Allergy to red caviar.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Rodriguez-Marco A, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Gandolfo-Cano M, Melendez-Baltanas A, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):493-494

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Induction of oral tolerance to peanut: a successful home-based protocol.
In Spain, peanut allergy is increasingly prevalent. Successful protocols for the induction of oral tolerance (LOT) with several foods have been reported. We aimed to induce clinical tolerance to peanut in a child with severe peanut allergy (age 4 years, facial urticaria and lip angioedema upon licking a peanut; peanut skin prick test, 13 x 10 mm; specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E > 100 kUA/L). At age 6, the threshold oral challenge dose was 62.5 mg. Several peanut solutions were prepared and sequentially administered at the patient's home. Over 138 days, the dose was increased from 0.625 to 5500 mg. There were 43 mild-to-moderate reactions (28% of the doses administered). Pre-LOT and post-LOT peanut IgE and IgG4 values were 265 vs 487 kUA/L, and 6.11 vs 14.8 mg/L. This is the first report of successful LOT to peanut in Spain. This home-based regimen is safe under permanent and close medical supervision by an allergist.

Induction of oral tolerance to peanut: a successful home-based protocol.  
Ojeda P, Ojeda I, Pineda F, Alfaya T, Ojeda JA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):524-528

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactive food allergies
The diagnostic approach to cross-reactions to foods has evolved with molecular allergy, and the possibility of investigating the presence of specific serum IgE to recombinant allergens invites the physician to delve into the complex biological mechanisms involved. To appreciate these mechanisms, some landmarks are necessary. In all cases, the allergist must take into consideration the context of the diagnosis of multiple food sensitization, of the clinical symptoms and their severity, of the types of sensitization observed, e.g., to food allergens alone or to food allergens and aeroallergens, and to the families of allergens involved. All these elements must be interpreted according to the cross-reactions previously recognized in vivo, and to those possibly identified in vitro.

Allergies alimentaires croisées : comment s’y retrouver ? / Food allergies cross: how to find?  
J.-F. Fontaine
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(5):380-384

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Emerging allergen: soy
"Allergy to soybean is rare, whereas the latest data from the allergovigilence network show that soybeans are one of the principal emerging allergens. The clinical manifestations are essentially IgE mediated, with a risk of severe anaphylaxis mainly in patients allergic to peanut or to birch pollen; association with allergy to cow's milk proteins appears to be less frequent. One special feature of soybean allergy is that the threshold for triggering symptoms is often elevated. Characterization of the major allergens and the recent availability of specific IgE assays for nGly m 5, nGly m6 and nGly m 4 provide a better basis for understanding soybean-induced anaphylaxis."

Un allergène émergent : le soja / Emerging allergen: soy  
S.-A. Gomez-Andre, A. Deschildre, F. Bienvenu, J. Just
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(6):448-453

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dimethylfumarate: life and survival of a hapten
"The story of the dimethyl fumarate allergy is a summary of the various problems put in dermato-allergy. It has needed first of all, to perceive the originality of some cases and to identify the causal agent. This substance was used as anti-mould in objects of common use: armchairs, sofas and clothing articles, mainly shoes. The symptoms does not seem to limit itself to skin because respiratory and ophtalmologic symptoms are indicated by patients’ associations as well as certain degree of persistence It is thus important to confirm it and to envisage a follow-up of the patients. Finally, the institutional attentivenesses, the legislator and the administrations asked to apply their decisions also had an important role to eliminate this severe allergic contact dermatitis."

Diméthylfumarate : vie et survie d’un haptène / Dimethylfumarate: life and survival of a hapten  
J.-L. Bourrain
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(6):454-456

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe anaphylaxis wine and grape grape involving LTP (Vit v 1): report of two cases
Anaphylaxis to grape, induced by prick-test to natural grapes, and a case of anaphylaxis to wine are reported. Both were induced by exercise. The first case was allergic to Artemisia and birch pollens. The second case has past multiple allergies to several other fruit and vegetable. Specific IgE to Pru p 3 and Art v 3 were present in both cases. In case 1, the inhibition test of Cap to grape by Bet v 1 was negative. A 95 % inhibition was observed by Art v 3, documenting the involvement of Vit v 1. A primary sensitization to fruit LTP is suggested in case 2. A primary sensitization to Art v 3 is highly probable in case 1. The great variability of the LTP syndrome is emphasized. Because the foods at risk are unpredictable, anti H1, corticosteroids and even self-injectable epinephrine should be prescribed in all the cases.

Anaphylaxie sévère au vin et au raisin impliquant la LTP de raisin (Vit v 1) : à propos de deux cas / Severe anaphylaxis wine and grape grape involving LTP (Vit v 1): report of two cases  
V. Doyen, D.A. Moneret-Vautrin, M. Dron-Gonzalves
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(7):480-483

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Changing spectrum of allergy to lipid transfer proteins by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory.
Pru p3, a lipid transfer protein (LTP) is one of peach major allergens. A 38 year-old woman had a history of isolated peach allergy since the childhood (contact urticaria). Consumption of peeled peaches and other rosaceae was well tolerated. She occasionally took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on demand for migraine. She presented anaphylactic symptoms three hours after nectarine consumption. She had taken ketoprofen before meal. Positive skin prick tests were observed for peach, nectarine, plum and cherry. Specific IgE to Pru p3 were positive, specific IgE for other peach allergens remained negative. Challenge test with nectarine alone and NSAID alone were negative. The authors hypothesize that intake of NSAID before fruit eating may have increased the level of LTP allergen in the serum, leading to clinical manifestations. A similar mechanism has already been descri bed in food anaphylaxis due to wheat with previous NSAID intake. (Lamon 2011 ref.28372 9)

Changing spectrum of allergy to lipid transfer proteins by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory.  
Lamon T, Mailhol C, Didier A
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(7):640-641

Abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Specific IgE Levels to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus are associated with meteorological factors.  
Hervas D, Pons J, Mila J, Matamoros N, Hervas JA, Garcia-Marcos L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Nov 22;160(4):383-386
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Strategies to query and display allergy-derived epitope data from the immune epitope database.  
Vaughan K, Peters B, Larche M, Pomes A, Broide D, Sette A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Nov 21;160(4):334-345
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The right timing for shrimp tropomyosins.  
Arruda LK.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Nov 21;160(4):331-333
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On mite allergy in dogs and humans.  
Fernandez-Caldas E.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2012 Nov 21;160(4):329-330
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A case of rice allergy in a patient with baker's asthma.  
Villalta D, Longo G, Mistrello G, Amato S, Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;44(5):207-209
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A case of allergy to zucchini.  
Asero R, Mistrello G, Amato S.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;44(5):205-206
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Sensitization to rodents (mouse/rat) in an urban atopic population without occupational exposure living in Naples, Italy.  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Sofia M, Piccolo A, Dente B, Russo M, D'Amato M, Stanziola A, D'Amato G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Oct;44(5):200-204
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Fixed drug eruption caused by fluconazole: a case report and mini-review of the literature.  
Nakai N, Katoh N.
Allergol Int 2012 Nov 25;

Risk factors for the development of egg allergy: progress to date and future directions.  
Nwaru BI, Sheikh A.
Allergy 2012 Nov;67(11):1325-1326

Triclosan exposure and allergic sensitization in Norwegian children.  
Bertelsen RJ, Longnecker MP, Lovik M, Calafat AM, Carlsen KH, London SJ, Lodrup Carlsen KC.
Allergy 2012 Nov 12;
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Lipids are required for the development of Brazil nut allergy: the role of mouse and human iNKT cells.  
Mirotti L, Florsheim E, Rundqvist L, Larsson G, Spinozzi F, Leite-de-Moraes M, Russo M, Alcocer M.
Allergy 2012 Nov 9;
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Abstracts of the XXXI Congress of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Geneva, Switzerland. June 16-20, 2012.  

Allergy 2012 Nov;67 Suppl 961-687

Allergen of the month-witch hazel.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Nov;109(5):A17

Induction of tolerance in a patient with a history of exfoliative dermatitis to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.  
Rabbat JC, Lin MY, Moy JN.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Nov;109(5):360-361

Self-reported hand symptoms: a role in monitoring health care workers for latex sensitization?  
Wang ML, Kelly KJ, Klancnik M, Petsonk EL.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Nov;109(5):314-318
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Predicting food challenge outcomes for baked milk: role of specific IgE and skin prick testing.  
Bartnikas LM, Sheehan WJ, Hoffman EB, Permaul P, Dioun AF, Friedlander J, Baxi SN, Schneider LC, Phipatanakul W.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2012 Nov;109(5):309-313
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Sodium nitroprusside and toxic epidermal necrolysis.  
Kilic M, Ozturk F, Genc G, Guner SN, Yildiz L, Sancak R.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Sep;30(3):243-245
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Comparison of allergenic components and biopotency in whole body extracts of wild and laboratory reared American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana.  
Tungtrongchitr A, Sookrung N, Chaicumpa W, Indrawattana N, Meechan T, Thavara U, Visitsunthorn N, Bunnag C.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Sep;30(3):231-238
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Multiplex PCR for identifying common dust mites species (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae and Blomia tropicalis).  
Thet-Em T, Tungtrongchitr A, Tiewcharoen S, Malainual N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2012 Sep;30(3):224-230
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Lipid transfer proteins: the most frequent sensitizer in Italian subjects with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Romano A, Scala E, Rumi G, Gaeta F, Caruso C, Alonzi C, Maggioletti M, Ferrara R, Palazzo P, Palmieri V, Zeppilli P, Mari A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Nov;42(11):1643-1653
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Sensitization induces hypersensitivity in trigeminal nerve.  
Wang X, Liang H, Zhou C, Xu M, Xu L.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Nov;42(11):1638-1642
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Individual cow's milk allergens as prognostic markers for tolerance development?  
Ahrens B, Lopes de Oliveira LC, Grabenhenrich L, Schulz G, Niggemann B, Wahn U, Beyer K.
Clin Exp Allergy 2012 Nov;42(11):1630-1637
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The biochemical basis and clinical evidence of food allergy due to lipid transfer proteins: a comprehensive review.  
Van Winkle RC, Chang C.
Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2012 Nov 23;
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Fungal Disease of the Nose and Sinuses: An Updated Overview.  
Chang C, Gershwin ME, Thompson GR.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012 Nov 8;
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Severe and complex allergies  
D Hawarden, S Emanuel
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2012;25(3):114-
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Severe food allergies  
C Gray
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2012;25(3):124-
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Hypersensitivity to stinging insects  
S Karabus
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2012;25(3):132
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Shellfish allergy diagnosis - gaps and needs  
AL Lopata, S Kamath
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2012;25(2):60-
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Occupational dermatitis in food processing workers with a special focus on the seafood processing industry - a Review  
A Burdzik, MF Jeebhay, G Todd
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2012;25(2):88-
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Egg-allergic patients can be safely vaccinated against influenza.  
Des RA, Paradis L, Gagnon R, Lemire C, Begin P, Carr S, Chan ES, Paradis J, Frenette L, Ouakki M, Benoit M, De SG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov;130(5):1213-1216

Identifying infants at high risk of peanut allergy: The Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) screening study.  
Du TG, Roberts G, Sayre PH, Plaut M, Bahnson HT, Mitchell H, Radulovic S, Chan S, Fox A, Turcanu V, Lack G.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov 19;
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Anaphylaxis from ingestion of mites: Pancake anaphylaxis.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Suarez CR, Capriles-Hulett A, Caballero-Fonseca F, Fernandez-Caldas E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov 12;
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Induced bronchospasm after handling of orange flavedo (zest).  
Felix R, Martorell C, Martorell A, Pineda F, Cerda JC, De LM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov 10;

Kiwifruit allergy across Europe: Clinical manifestation and IgE recognition patterns to kiwifruit allergens.  
Le TM, Bublin M, Breiteneder H, Fernandez-Rivas M, Asero R, Ballmer-Weber B, Barreales L, Bures P, Belohlavkova S, de BF, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Gislason D, van HE, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov 6;
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A role for food allergy testing in eosinophilic esophagitis.  
Gottlieb SJ, Johnston DT, Markowitz JE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov 2;

Cutaneous drug reactions.  
Khan DA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012 Nov;130(5):1225-1225

Looking at allergens increases symptom report in patients with allergic asthma.  
von LA, Dahme B.
J Asthma 2012 Nov 2;
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Frey syndrome in children: a nonallergic cause of facial erythema triggered by food.  
Ortega CC, Sanchez-Garcia S, Rodriguez del RP, Escudero C, Andregnette V, Ibanez MD.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):295-297

Occupational asthma due to western red cedar in a guitar maker.  
Barranco P, Olalde S, Caminoa M, Bobolea I, Caballero T, del P, Quirce S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):293-294

Skin reactions to gadolinium-based contrast media.  
Tomas M, Fuentes A, Zapatero RL, Alonso LE, Infante HS.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):292-293

Urticaria-angioedema due to carboxymethylcellulose eye drops.  
Carbonell A, Miralles JC, Escudero AI, Martinez A, Pineda F, Aldana D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):288-289

Variable content of Fel d 1 variants in house dust and cat extracts may have an impact on allergen measurement.  
Bienboire-Frosini C, Lebrun R, Vervloet D, Pageat P, Ronin C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):270-279

Age-dependent sensitization to the 7S-vicilin-like protein Cor a 11 from hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in a birch-endemic region.  
Verweij MM, Hagendorens MM, Trashin S, Cucu T, De MB, Devreese B, Bridts CH, De Clerck LS, Ebo DG.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):245-251

Episodic hemorrhage during honeybee venom anaphylaxis: potential mechanisms.  
Mingomataj EC, Bakiri AH.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):237-244

A sea urchin roe tropomyosin-like protein is recognized in vitro by shrimp-allergic individuals.  
Pascal M, Grishina G, Yang A, Ayuso R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):306-307

Delayed-type hypersensitivity to fenofibrate.  
Pecora V, Nucera E, Aruanno A, Buonomo A, Schiavino D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):304-305

Persistence of allergy to goat's milk after specific induction of tolerance to cow's milk.  
Martorell AA, Martorell CC, Pineda F, Felix TR, Cerda Mir JC, de lM.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):301-302

Can birdseed contribute to the spread of ragweed?  
Thibaudon M, Colonnello C, Besancenot JP, Toloba Y, Francois H, Caillaud D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):234-236

Severe drug hypersensitivity induced by erdosteine and doxofylline as confirmed by patch and lymphocyte transformation tests: a case report.  
Song WJ, Shim EJ, Kang MG, Sohn SW, Kang HR.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):230-232

Nine cases of allergy to omeprazole.  
Abdul RE, Tomas M, Tornero P, Herrero T.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):228-230

Asthma after chicken consumption due to cross-reactivity between fish and chicken parvalbumin.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Bartolome B, Maroto AS, Vivanco F, Pastor-Vargas C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):227-228

Aseptic meningitis induced by vitamin B complex.  
Galindo Bonilla PA, Sanchez RN, Castro JA, Munoz-Torrero Rodriguez JJ, Bellon HT, Feo BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):225-226

Custard apple and latex allergy: a new type of cross-reaction?  
Santos-Magadan S, Bartolome-Zavala B, Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Heras-Mendaza F, Conde-Salazar L, Martinez-Cocera C, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):223-224

Cold urticaria induced by alprazolam.  
Gandolfo-Cano M, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Gonzalez-de OD, Melendez-Baltanas A, Mohedano-Vicente E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):222

Correlation between Alt a 1 levels and clinical symptoms in Alternaria alternata-monosensitized patients.  
Feo BF, Alonso AM, Carnes J, Martin-Martin R, Fernandez-Caldas E, Galindo PA, Alfaya T, mo-Salas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):154-159

Anaphylaxis caused by Crematogaster cutellaris sting in an Italian child.  
Monti G, Cosentino V, Castagno E, Nebiolo F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):576-577

Usefulness of lymphocyte activation test in atorvastatin hypersensitivity.  
Pinero Saavedra MC, Prados CM, Sanchez B, Lucena Soto JM, Avila CR, Ortega-Camarero M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):574-575

Anaphylaxis associated with the ingestion of Goji berries (Lycium barbarum).  
Monzon BS, Lopez-Matas MA, Saenz AD, Perez-Cinto N, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):567-570

Unpredicted adverse reaction to omalizumab.  
Jandus P, Hausmann O, Haeberli G, Gentinetta T, Mueller U, Helbling A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):563-566

Prevalence, severity, and time trends of allergic conditions in 6-to-7-year-old schoolchildren in Taipei.  
Wu WF, Wan KS, Wang SJ, Yang W, Liu WL.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):556-562

Cupressus arizonica pollen: a new pollen involved in the lipid transfer protein syndrome?  
Sanchez-Lopez J, Asturias JA, Enrique E, Suarez-Cervera M, Bartra J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):522-526

Prevalence of sensitization to lipid transfer proteins and profilins in a population of 430 patients in the south of Madrid.  
Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Trujillo MJ, Santos S, Gandolfo-Cano M, Melendez A, Juarez R, Morales P, Calso A, Mazuela O, Zapatero A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):278-282

Enhanced diagnosis of pollen allergy using specific immunoglobulin E determination to detect major allergens and panallergens.  
Orovitg A, Guardia P, Barber D, de la TF, Rodriguez R, Villalba M, Salcedo G, Monteseirin J, Conde J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):253-259

Occupational asthma induced by Mucor species contaminating esparto fibers.  
Enriquez A, Fernandez C, Jimenez A, Seoane E, Alcorta AR, Rodriguez J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):251-252

Drug fever caused by piperacillin-tazobactam.  
Linares T, Fernandez A, Soto MT, Escudero E, Gacias L.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):250-251

Hypersensitivity to repaglinide.  
Rojas P, Sanchez L, Santos A, Goomez MP, Blanco H, Laguna JJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):245-247

Swimming pool-induced asthma.  
Beretta S, Vivaldo T, Morelli M, Carlucci P, Zuccotti GV.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):240-241

Relationship between airborne pollen counts and the results obtained using 2 diagnostic methods: allergen-specific immunoglobulin E concentrations and skin prick tests.  
Rodriguez D, Davila I, Sanchez E, Barber D, Lorente F, Sanchez J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):222-228

Hypersensitivity reactions to blood components: document issued by the allergy committee of the French medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency.  
Mertes PM, Bazin A, Alla F, Bienvenu J, Caldani C, Lamy B, Laroche D, Leconte des Floris MF, Py JY, Rebibo D, Willaert B, Demoly P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):171-178

Cross-reactivity syndromes in food allergy.  
Garcia BE, Lizaso MT.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(3):162-170

The basophil activation test as a promising diagnostic tool in hypersensitivity to chironomid larvae.  
Cabrera-Freitag P, Ferrer M, Martinez R, Javaloyes G, Sanz ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):158-159

Urticaria due to articaine.  
Moreno Escobosa MC, Cruz GS, Moya Quesada MC, Amat LJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):155-156

Hand contact dermatitis made a patient blind for the second time!.  
Machado D, Loureiro G, Tavares B, Calado G, Pereira C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):154

Fixed drug eruption due to nabumetone in a patient with previous fixed drug eruptions due to naproxen.  
Perez-Calderon R, Gonzalo-Garijo MA, Perez-Rangel I, Sanchez-Vega S, Zambonino MA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):153-154

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis due to allergy to cow's milk.  
Rodriguez JB, Dominguez OJ, Gonzalez Garcia JM, Kindelan RC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):150-152

Incidence of anaphylaxis and subtypes of anaphylaxis in a general hospital emergency department.  
Moro MM, Tejedor Alonso MA, Esteban HJ, Mugica Garcia MV, Rosado IA, Vila AC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):142-149

Is sensitization to furry animals an independent allergic phenotype in nonoccupationally exposed individuals?  
Liccardi G, Passalacqua G, Salzillo A, Piccolo A, Falagiani P, Russo M, Canonica GW, D'Amato G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):137-141

Lipid transfer protein cross-reactivity assessed in vivo and in vitro in the office: pros and cons.  
Asero R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):129-136

Personal exposure to particulate matter is associated with worse health perception in adult asthma.  
Maestrelli P, Canova C, Scapellato ML, Visentin A, Tessari R, Bartolucci GB, Simonato L, Lotti M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(2):120-128

Antituberculosis drug-induced drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome confirmed by patch testing.  
Lee SW, Yoon NB, Park SM, Lee SM, Um SJ, Lee SK, Son CH, Kim YH, Kim KH, Roh MS.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):631-632

Nonimmediate systemic hypersensitivity reaction to beta-lactam intradermal tests.  
Makris MP, Koulouris S, Kalogeromitros D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):630-631

Fixed drug eruption due to propofol after an intradermal test.  
Dominguez-Ortega J, Rodriguez-Jimenez B, Gonzalez-Herrada C, El-Bouayadi L, Kindelan C, Gonzalez JM.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):629

Aquagenic urticaria in 2 adolescents.  
Yavuz ST, Sahiner UM, Tuncer A, Sackesen C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):624-625

Etiology and clinical picture of anaphylaxis in ambulatory patients from Caracas, Venezuela.  
Sanchez-Borges M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):623-624

Topical drug-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis misdiagnosed as an oral drug-related eruption.  
Cubero JL, Garces MM, Segura N, Sobrevia MT, Fraj J, Lezaun A, Colas C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):620-621

Allergy to quinolones: low cross-reactivity to levofloxacin.  
Lobera T, Audicana MT, Alarcon E, Longo N, Navarro B, Munoz D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):607-611

Latex allergy in primary care providers.  
Galindo MJ, Quirce S, Garcia OL.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):459-465

Reducing the risk of anaphylaxis during anesthesia: 2011 updated guidelines for clinical practice.  
Mertes PM, Malinovsky JM, Jouffroy L, Aberer W, Terreehorst I, Brockow K, Demoly P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):442-453

Drug fever caused by eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream.  
Kamata M, Tada Y, Yazawa N, Watanabe T, Kikuchi K, Sato S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):421

Fixed drug eruption due to meloxicam.  
Ozdemir SK, Erkekol FO, Aydin O, Celik GE, Misirligil Z.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):419-420

A severe case of lipoatrophy due to human insulin and insulin analogs in a patient with diabetes: is an immunological mechanism involved?  
Cabrera-Freitag P, Escalada J, Goikoetxea MJ, Laguna S, Sanz ML, Gastaminza G.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):417-419

Selective hypersensitivity with positive immediate skin tests to nimesulide.  
Astarita C, Savoia A, Sepe C, Ivo AM, Di SG.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):415-416

An immediate hypersensitivity reaction caused by tolperisone hydrochloride.  
Gluck J, Rymarczyk B, Rogala B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):411-412

Storage mites in flour samples in Wellington, New Zealand.  
Cotter M, Siebers R, Pike A, Fitzharris P, Crane J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):410-411

Phosphorylation reduces the allergenicity of cow casein in children with selective allergy to goat and sheep milk.  
Cases B, Garcia-Ara C, Boyano MT, Perez-Gordo M, Pedrosa M, Vivanco F, Quirce S, Pastor-Vargas C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(5):398-400

Effect of alcohol consumption and cessation on serum total immunoglobulin E concentrations.  
Coutinho V, Vidal C, Vizcaino L, Gonzalez-Quintela A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):327-329

Identification of allergens in chicken meat allergy.  
Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Pastor C, Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Gandolfo-Cano M, Melendez A, Cuesta J, Zapatero A, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):326-327

Immediate type 1 hypersensitivity to apomorphine: a case report.  
Gutierrez D, Foncubierta A, Espinosa R, Astorga S, Leon A, Fernandez S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):325-326

Hypersensitivity to pollen panallergens (profilin and polcalcin) detected in vitro and in vivo: a comparative analysis.  
Asero R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):323-324

Anaphylactic shock caused by antihistamines.  
Mur GP, Alfaya AT, Iglesias AM, Lombardero VM, Sastre B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):321-322

Allergy to crayfish.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Pastor-Vargas C, Gandolfo-Cano M, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Melendez-Baltanas A, Morales-Barrios MP, Perez-Gordo M, Vivanco F, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):318-319

Anaphylaxis to dimenhydrinate caused by the theophylline component.  
Mitsias DI, Vovolis V.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):317-318

Contact angioedema and rhinoconjunctivitis caused by Dendrobaena species and Sarcophaga carnaria used as fishing bait.  
Garcia-Loria J, Rodriguez-Perez R, Iglesias A, Moneo I, Caballero ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(4):305-309

Anaphylaxis due to orange soft drinks.  
Navarro LA, Pastor-Vargas C, Liñana JJ, Martínez I, Maroto AS, Vivanco F, Bartolomé B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):297-9.
Abstract

Allergy to mint (Mentha spicata).  
Damiani E, Aloia AM, Priore MG, Pastore A, Lippolis C, Lovecchio A, Rossi MP, Macchia L, Ferrannini A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(4):309-10.
Abstract

Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) to corn: a case report.  
Sopo SM, Filoni S, Giorgio V, Monaco S, Onesimo R.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):391-392

Erythema and hand edema due to flavoxate.  
Moreno Escobosa MC, Cruz GS, Moya Quesada MC.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):390-391

Hypersensitivity to cassava: an allergen-based assessment.  
ntolin-Amerigo D, Rodriguez-Rodriguez M, Barbarroja-Escudero J, Postigo R, Uribe-Etxebarria MC, varez-Mon M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):385-386

Occupational asthma caused by the inhalation of Tyrophagus putrescentiae allergens in a dry-cured ham transporter allergic to shrimp.  
Rodriguez del RP, Tudela Garcia JI, Narganes NJ, Fernandez-Caldas E, Rodriguez-Garcia V, Subiza J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):383-384

Severe reaction following sugammadex injection: hypersensitivity?  
Soria A, Motamed C, Gaouar H, Chemam S, Amsler E, Frances C.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):382

Anaphylaxis due to sulpiride and sensitization to metamizole.  
Alvarado MI, Camara C, Trabado A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):379-380

Specific immunoglobulin E to Echinococcus granulosus in children allergic to cow's milk proteins.  
Garcia-Ara MC, Bobolea I, Caballero T, Quirce S, Boyano-Martinez MT.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):374-375

Urticaria due to an intradermal test with articaine hydrochloride.  
vila-Fernandez G, Sanchez-Morillas L, Rojas P, Laguna JJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):373-374

A delayed reaction to oxaliplatin.  
Masse MS, Caimmi D, Demoly P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):372-373

Drug hypersensitivity reactions: response patterns, drug involved, and temporal variations in a large series of patients.  
Dona I, Blanca-Lopez N, Torres MJ, Garcia-Campos J, Garcia-Nunez I, Gomez F, Salas M, Rondon C, Canto MG, Blanca M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):363-371

Self-reported drug allergy in health care workers in conservative and surgical medicine departments.  
Zilinskaite L, Tamasauskas D, Kvedariene V, Sitkauskiene B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):357-362

Goji berries (Lycium barbarum): risk of allergic reactions in individuals with food allergy.  
Larramendi CH, Garcia-Abujeta JL, Vicario S, Garcia-Endrino A, Lopez-Matas MA, Garcia-Sedeno MD, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):345-350

Latex allergy: Position Paper.  
Cabanes N, Igea JM, de la HB, Agustin P, Blanco C, Dominguez J, Lazaro M, Lleonart R, Mendez J, Nieto A, Rodriguez A, Rubia N, Tabar A, Beitia JM, Dieguez MC, Martinez-Cocera C, Quirce S.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(5):313-330

Neuropsychiatric reactions to montelukast.  
Callero-Viera A, Infante S, Fuentes-Aparicio V, Zapatero L, onso-Lebrero E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):452-453

Hev b 5: latex allergen implicated in clinically relevant cross-reactivity with manioc.  
Gaspar A, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Rihs HP, Pires G, Morais-Almeida M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):450-451

Delayed anaphylactic reaction to mammalian meat.  
Sekiya K, Fukutomi Y, Nakazawa T, Taniguchi M, Akiyama K.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):446-447

Cutaneous allergy at the supermarket.  
Arochena L, Gamez C, del P, Fernandez-Nieto M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):441-442

Anaphylaxis to vapors of roasting chicken controlled by omalizumab.  
Barnig C, Hilger C, Muti D, Blaumeiser M, Purohit A, Hentges F, de BF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):439-440

Specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to saprophytic yeasts in sera of atopic patients allergic to house dust mites.  
Zinkeviciene A, Girkontaite I, Citavicius D.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):412-418

The role of inhalant allergens in allergic airways disease.  
Custovic A, Simpson A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(6):393-401

Selective nonimmediate reaction to ampicillin.  
Sanchez-Morillas L, Rojas Perez-Ezquerra P, Reano-Martos M, Gonzalez-Mendiola R, Mayorga C, Laguna Martinez JJ.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):218-219

A case of cimetidine-induced immediate hypersensitivity.  
Cho HJ, Yoo HS, Park SY, Yang EM, Yoon MG, Park HS, Ye YM.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22(3):216-218

Potential hypersensitivity due to the food or food additive content of medicinal products in Spain.  
Audicana Berasategui MT, Barasona Villarejo MJ, Corominas Sánchez M, De Barrio Fernández M, García Avilés MC, García Robaina JC, Gastaminza Lasarte G, Laguna Martínez JJ, et al.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(7):496-506

Cosmetic facial peel-induced contact anaphylaxis: chestnut allergy without latex-fruit syndrome.  
Seitz CS, Trautmann A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):494-495

Allergy to red caviar.  
Gonzalez-de-Olano D, Rodriguez-Marco A, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, Gandolfo-Cano M, Melendez-Baltanas A, Bartolome B.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):493-494

Immediate allergy to mepivacaine.  
Estrada JL, Perez-Laiz JL, Latasa M, Rodriguez-Paredes A.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):492-493

Proposed GA2LEN standardized allergen battery: what about regional sensitization differences?  
Couto M, Miranda M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):491-492

NSAID-sensitive antihistamine-induced urticaria/angioedema.  
Cimbollek S, Ortega CM, Avila R, Quiralte J, Prados M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):488-490

Ibuprofen-induced aseptic meningoencephalitis confirmed by drug challenge.  
Moreno-Ancillo A, Gil-Adrados AC, Jurado-Palomo J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2011;21(6):484-487

Production and immunogenicity of hypoallergenic codon-optimized DNA vaccine encoding mature Der p 1 allergen.  
Pulsawat P, Piboonpocanun S, Sirivichayakul S, Buranapraditkun S, Jacquet A, Shimada M, Okuda K, Ruxrungtham K.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):582-590

General trends in airborne pollen production and pollination periods at a Mediterranean site (Badajoz, southwest Spain).  
Tormo-Molina R, Gonzalo-Garijo MA, Silva-Palacios I, Munoz-Rodriguez AF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):567-574

Clinical features of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome in 38 patients.  
Um SJ, Lee SK, Kim YH, Kim KH, Son CH, Roh MS, Lee MK.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):556-562

Cleaning agents and asthma.  
Quirce S, Barranco P.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(7):542-550

Metrorrhagia as an uncommon symptom of anaphylaxis.  
Gonzalo-Garijo MA, Perez-Rangel I, varado-Izquierdo MI, Perez-Calderon R, Sanchez-Vega S, Zambonino MA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):540-541

Efficacy of the slow dose-up method for specific oral tolerance induction in children with cow's milk allergy: comparison with reported protocols.  
Kaneko H, Teramoto T, Kondo M, Morita H, Ohnishi H, Orii K, Matsui E, Kondo N.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):538-539

Systemic corticosteroid hypersensitivity in children.  
de Sousa NG, Santa-Marta C, Morais-Almeida M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):529-532

Induction of oral tolerance to peanut: a successful home-based protocol.  
Ojeda P, Ojeda I, Pineda F, Alfaya T, Ojeda JA.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):524-528

Allergy workup in immediate-type local reactions to glatiramer acetate.  
Sanchez-Lopez J, Rodriguez del RP, Cases-Ortega B, Martinez-Cocera C, Fernandez-Rivas M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):521-523

Estimating allergenicity of latex gloves using Hev b 1 and hevamine.  
Lee MF, Wang NM, Han JL, Lin SJ, Tsai JJ, Chen YH.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):499-505

Guidelines on ambient intramural airborne fungal spores.  
Fairs A, Wardlaw AJ, Thompson J, Pashley CH.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):490-498

Double (honeybee and wasp) immunoglobulin E reactivity in patients allergic to Hymenoptera venom: the role of cross-reactive carbohydrates and alcohol consumption.  
Carballada FJ, Gonzalez-Quintela A, Nunez-Orjales R, Vizcaino L, Boquete M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(6):484-489

Codeine-induced generalized dermatitis and tolerance to other opioids.  
Iriarte SP, Lopez AR, Gracia Bara MT, Castro MM, Sesma SP.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):89-90

Anaphylaxis to sunflower seed.  
Couto M, Gaspar A, Piedade S, Postigo I, Martinez J, Morais-Almeida M.
Miscellaneous Rev Port Imunoalergol 2012; 20(2):139-143.
Abstract

Anaphylaxis to apple  
Santos N, Gaspar A, Pires G, Mprais-Almeida M.
Miscellaneous Rev Port Imunoalergol 2011;19(4):223-227
Abstract

Kidney bean: a major sensitizer among legumes in asthma and rhinitis patients from India.  
Kasera R, Singh BP, Lavasa S, Prasad KN, Sahoo RC, Singh AB.
Miscellaneous 592 2011;6(11):e27193.
Abstract

Why do few food-allergic adolescents treat anaphylaxis with adrenaline? - reviewing a pressing issue.  
Marrs T, Lack G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2012 Nov 22;
Click to view abstract

Allergies aux anesthésiques généraux. Résultats d’une enquête à l’hôpital Ibn-Sina de Rabat / Allergies to general anesthetics. Results of a survey to Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat  
M. Elftouh, K. Bouti, E. Ardouz, R. Moussaoui, M.T. El Fassy Fihry, A. Azzouzi
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(5):371-374
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergies alimentaires croisées : comment s’y retrouver ? / Food allergies cross: how to find?  
J.-F. Fontaine
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(5):380-384
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Vespa velutina (frelon asiatique) : un nouvel hyménoptère en France / Vespa velutina (Asian hornet): a new Bee in France  
C. Schwartz, C. Villemant, Q. Rome, F. Muller
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(5):397-401
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sensibilisation masquée aux curares chez un patient allergique à la pholcodine / Awareness masked to muscle relaxants in a patient allergic to pholcodine  
F. Touraine, J. Sainte-Laudy, M. Mertès, B. Eichler, C. Brianchon, L. Sagot
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(5):402-404
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Comment tester les produits apportés par les patients ? Les cosmétiques / How to test the products supplied by the patients? Cosmetics  
F. Giordano-Labadie
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(6):440-443
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Un allergène émergent : le soja / Emerging allergen: soy  
S.-A. Gomez-Andre, A. Deschildre, F. Bienvenu, J. Just
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(6):448-453
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Diméthylfumarate : vie et survie d’un haptène / Dimethylfumarate: life and survival of a hapten  
J.-L. Bourrain
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(6):454-456
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Lupus érythémateux systémique induit par l’isoniazide / Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by isoniazid  
J. Ben Amar, B. Dhahri, H. Smadhi, S. Azzabi, M.A. Baccar, H. Aouina, L. El Gharbi, H. Bouacha
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(6):462-464
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Asthme professionnel aux produits de pyrolyse des matières plastiques dans une entreprise de fabrication de masques de protection respiratoire. / Occupational asthma pyrolysis products of plastics in a manufacturing company of respirators.  
A. Benzarti Mezni, S. Babay, A. Ben Jemaâ
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(7):474-479
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxie sévère au vin et au raisin impliquant la LTP de raisin (Vit v 1) : à propos de deux cas / Severe anaphylaxis wine and grape grape involving LTP (Vit v 1): report of two cases  
V. Doyen, D.A. Moneret-Vautrin, M. Dron-Gonzalves
Rev Fr Allergol 2012;52(7):480-483
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Severe anaphylaxis to wine and to grape induced by sensitization to grape lipid transfert protein (Vit v 1): Report of two cases.  
Doyen V, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Dron-Gonzalves M.
Rev Fr Allergol 2012(0):-
Abstract

Changing spectrum of allergy to lipid transfer proteins by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory.  
Lamon T, Mailhol C, Didier A
Rev Fr Allergol 2011;51(7):640-641
Abstract

Case Reports: Gluteal subcutaneous atrophy after depot steroid injection for allergic rhinitis  
Ameratunga, Rohan
WAO Journal 2012;5(11):168–169
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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