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 Allergy Advisor Digest - November 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the November 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.
Read Detection of risk factors for systemic adverse reactions to SCIT with natural depot allergen extracts: a retrospective study.
Read One-year survey of paediatric anaphylaxis in an allergy department.
Read Haemaphysalis longicornis tick bites are a possible cause of red meat allergy in Japan.
Read House dust mite-specific IgA2 is associated with protection against eczema in allergic patients.
Read Peanut sensitization pattern in Norwegian children and adults with specific IgE to peanut show age related differences.
Read A retrospective comparison of false negative skin test rates in penicillin allergy
Read Factors associated with the course of egg allergy in children.
Read Six cases of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in children.
Read Peanut allergic patients in the MIRABEL survey: characteristics, allergists' dietary advice and lessons from real life.
Read Serological, genomic, and structural analyses of the major mite allergen Der p 23.
Read Identification of Aspergillus (A flavus and A niger) allergens and heterogeneity of allergic patients' IgE response.
Read Skin testing in the evaluation and management of carboplatin-related hypersensitivity reactions.
Read Performance and pain tolerability of current diagnostic allergy skin prick test devices.
Read Clinical history-driven diagnosis of allergic diseases: utilizing in vitro IgE testing.
Read Serological IgE analyses in the diagnostic algorithm for allergic disease.
Read The icing on the cake or chip ISAC® interest in exploring a food allergy

Snippets posted in the November 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Asparagus-induced fixed food eruptions mimicking cutaneous lupus.
Read Allergenicity of Artemisia contained in bee pollen is proportional to its mass.
Read An oral challenge test with carmine red (E120)(Cochineal) in skin prick test positive patients.
Read New insights into ragweed pollen allergens.
Read Toxocara canis IgG seropositivity in patients with chronic urticaria.
Read Shrimp allergy: gastrointestinal symptoms commonly occur in the absence of IgE sensitization.
Read Molecular allergen-specific IgE assays as a complement to allergen extract-based sensitization assessment.
Read 'Cows' milk exclusion diet during infancy: Is there a long term effect on children's eating behaviour and food preferences?'.
Read The influence of gastric digestion on the development of food allergy
Read Kiwifruit allergy across Europe
Read Cannabis-fruits and vegetables syndrome: an update

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.
Plant allergens, being one of the most widespread allergenic substances, are hard to avoid. Hence, their identification and characterization are of prime importance for the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy. The reported allergies to fruits mainly evoke oral allergy syndrome caused by the presence of cross-reactive IgE to certain pollens and thus, allergy to fruits has also been linked to particular pollens. Many fruit allergies are being studied for their causative allergens, and are being characterized. Some tropical or exotic fruits are responsible for region-specific allergies for which only limited information is available, and generally lack allergen characterization. From a survey of the literature on fruit allergy, it is clear that some common fruits (apple, peach, musk melon, kiwi fruit, cherry, grape, strawberry, banana, custard apple, mango and pomegranate) and their allergens appear to be at the center of current research on food allergy. The present review focuses on common fruits reported as allergenic and their identified allergens; a brief description of allergens from six rare/tropical fruits is also covered

An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.  
Hassan AK, Venkatesh YP.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):180-187

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Detection of risk factors for systemic adverse reactions to SCIT with natural depot allergen extracts: a retrospective study.
Some patients seem to show a particular propensity to experience systemic reactions (SR) when undergoing SCIT. This study looked at their features. This study concludes that young patients or women hypersensitive to grass and ragweed pollen seem at higher risk for SR during SCIT

Detection of risk factors for systemic adverse reactions to SCIT with natural depot allergen extracts: a retrospective study.  
Asero R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):211-217

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
One-year survey of paediatric anaphylaxis in an allergy department.
This study from Portugal, aimed to determine the frequency of anaphylaxis in an allergy outpatient department. From among 3646 patients up to 18 years old observed during one-year period, those with history of anaphylaxis reported by allergists were included. Sixty-four children had history of anaphylaxis with mean age 8.1 +/- 5.5 years. Median age of the first anaphylactic episode was 3 years (1 month - 17 years). The majority of patients had food-induced anaphylaxis (84%): milk 22, egg 7, peanut 6, tree nuts 6, fresh fruits 6, crustaceans 4, fish 4 and wheat 2. Food-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis was reported in 2 adolescents. Drug-induced anaphylaxis occurred in 8%: 4 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 1 amoxicillin. Three children had cold-induced anaphylaxis, one adolescent had anaphylaxis to latex and one child had anaphylaxis to insect sting. The majority (73%) had no previous diagnosis of the etiologic factor. Symptoms reported were mainly mucocutaneous (94%) and respiratory (84%), followed by gastrointestinal (42%) and cardiovascular (25%). Recurrence of anaphylaxis occurred in 26 patients (3 or more episodes in 14).

One-year survey of paediatric anaphylaxis in an allergy department.  
Gaspar A, Santos N, Piedade S, Santa-Marta C, Pires G, Sampaio G, Arede C, Borrego LM, Morais-Almeida M.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):197-205

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Haemaphysalis longicornis tick bites are a possible cause of red meat allergy in Japan.
Recent studies revealed that Amblyomma or Ixodes tick bites may cause red meat allergy, in which galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-Gal) is a major IgE-binding epitope. The incidence of red meat allergy is high in Shimane prefecture, as is tick-transmitted Japanese spotted fever. Therefore, we speculated that tick bites may cause these meat allergies. The carbohydrate alpha-Gal was detected in the salivary gland protein of Haemaphysalis longicornis (H. longicornis), the vector for Japanese spotted fever, by immunoblotting using anti-alpha-Gal antibody. H. longicornis salivary gland protein-specific IgE was detected in the sera of 24 of 30 patients with red meat allergies. These results further indicate that the alpha-Gal epitope is present not only in Amblyomma or Ixodes, but also in Haemaphysalis.

Haemaphysalis longicornis tick bites are a possible cause of red meat allergy in Japan.  
Chinuki Y, Ishiwata K, Yamaji K, Takahashi H, Morita E.
Allergy 2015 Nov 9;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
House dust mite-specific IgA2 is associated with protection against eczema in allergic patients.
Taken together, the authors assert that the findings indicate that HDM-specific IgA2, but not IgA1, levels in serum and saliva are reduced in HDM-allergic patients suffering from eczema.

House dust mite-specific IgA2 is associated with protection against eczema in allergic patients.  
den HG, van Neerven RJ, Boot JD, Jansen AP, Savelkoul HF.
Allergy 2015 Nov 19;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut sensitization pattern in Norwegian children and adults with specific IgE to peanut show age related differences.
This study investigated the sensitization pattern to the individual peanut allergens in a Norwegian population. Cases reported to the Norwegian Food Allergy Register with sera positive to peanut extract were analyzed for specific IgE (sIgE) to the recombinant peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 8 and Ara h 9 and to birch pollen extract. Serum samples negative to the above allergens were analyzed for sIgE to Ara h 6, and sIgE to Pru p 3 in peach were analyzed in sera positive to the cross-reactive allergen Ara h 9. Highest frequency of sIgE to Ara h 2, often co-sensitized to Ara h 1 and 3, were found in the small children up to 6 years of age. From the age of 6 years, sensitization to Ara h 8 was predominant. The sIgE levels to the storage proteins Ara h 1, 2 and 3 were strongly correlated, as was the sIgE levels to Ara h 8 and birch pollen extract. A low sensitization rate of sIgE to Ara h 9 in young adults was observed, which sIgE levels were very strongly correlated to Pru p 3. Therefore sensitization to peanut allergens in a Norwegian population shows a clear age dependent pattern.

Peanut sensitization pattern in Norwegian children and adults with specific IgE to peanut show age related differences.  
Namork E, Stensby BA.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1132

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A retrospective comparison of false negative skin test rates in penicillin allergy
A history of penicillin allergy in patients is common, but only 10-15 % are truly allergic. While the gold standard for diagnosing penicillin allergy is challenge, it is not recommended that this be done without first carrying out diagnostic skin testing. This is carried out with the major determinant benzylpenicilloyl (PPL) and the minor determinant mixture (MDM), consisting of penilloate, penicilloate and Penicillin G. However, since availability of the MDM is limited, Penicillin G alone has been used. A retrospective chart review was carried out on patients tested for penicillin allergy in the Clinical Immunology and Allergy Clinic at the Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada between 2005 and 2013. A total of 521 patients charts were reviewed, of whom 240 had skin testing, ImmunoCap(R) for IgE to Penicillin G and V and had oral challenges with penicillin, amoxicillin or cloxacillin. 17/240 (7.5 %) were skin test positive, 8 to PPL, 4 to MDM and 5 to Penicillin G. One was also positive on ImmunoCap(R) testing. Three patients had negative skin tests but weakly positive ImmunoCap(R). 222 patients with negative skin tests and serological tests were challenged. Of these, 12 patients reacted to challenge. Three of the challenges were equivocal. Of the nine patients with definite positive challenges, three were tested with Penicillin G and six with MDM. Therefore the false negative rates for testing were 2.3 % with PPL and Penicillin G and 6.97 % for PPL and MDM. The difference was not significant (p = 0.0856). In this group of patients with a history of penicillin allergy tested with the major determinant of benzyl penicillin and either MDM or Penicillin G, there was no difference in the rate of false negative testing, based on oral penicillin challenges. Therefore, Penicillin G can be safely used as an alternative to MDM in diagnosing penicillin allergy

A retrospective comparison of false negative skin test rates in penicillin allergy, using pencilloyl-poly-lysine and minor determinants or Penicillin G, followed by open challenge.  
Rosenfield L, Kalicinsky C, Warrington R.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1134

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Factors associated with the course of egg allergy in children.
This study investigated the factors associated with the course of egg allergy and anaphylaxis in children. Children who had been diagnosed as having an IgE-mediated egg allergy and followed up until 6 years of age were enrolled. A total of 203 (56%) of 363 egg allergic children were followed up until 6 years of age. Egg allergy resolved in 92 children (45%) at 2 years of age, 134 children (66%) at 4 years of age, and 145 children (71%) at 6 years of age. The resolution of egg allergy was associated with baseline egg sIgE level of 6.2 kU/L or less and the absence of anaphylaxis (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.21-0.49; P < .001; and hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.21-0.69; P = .001, respectively). Baseline factors, including cut-off level of egg sIgE level greater than 6.2 kU/L, egg sIgE level, gastrointestinal symptoms after egg exposure, anaphylaxis with egg, and concomitant cow's milk allergy, were significantly associated with later resolution of egg allergy.

Factors associated with the course of egg allergy in children.  
Arik YE, Cavkaytar O, Buyuktiryaki B, Sekerel BE, Soyer O, Sackesen C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Nov;115(5):434-438

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Six cases of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in children.
A report on six cases (aged 7-16 years) of children with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA), who had no clinical history of immediate-type wheat allergy but who were diagnosed by a wheat ingestion + exercise provocation test. The specific IgE to wheat ranged <0.35-3.49 UA/ml. Skin prick tests using wheat extract were performed on 3 patients who showed either a negative or low specific IgE titer to wheat, and all of them resulted in negative findings. The specific IgE to omega-5 gliadin was below the detection limit in all cases. Aspirin-supplemented provocation tests were performed to 4 cases who had negative results in the wheat + exercise test. All of these resulted in a positive reaction, and two of them provoked the occurrence of anaphylactic shock, which was relieved by the intramuscular injection of adrenaline. WDEIA in children cannot be ruled out by serological tests alone. On the other hand, severe symptoms might be provoked by the provocation test. Therefore, a safe procedure is warranted for the diagnosis of WDEIA in children

Six cases of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in children. [Japanese]  
Nakagawa T, Sakai K, Hayashi N, Sato A, Sasaki K, Matsui T, Sugiura S, Kando N, Ito K.
Arerugi 2015 Aug;64(8):1169-1173

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut allergic patients in the MIRABEL survey: characteristics, allergists' dietary advice and lessons from real life.
The MIRABEL survey is an observational study on peanut allergy in France, Belgium and Luxemburg. The objectives are to provide data on a large population, to analyze the consumer behavior, to study the presence of peanut traces in pre-packed foods with/without precautionary allergen labeling (PAL), and to combine these data to quantify allergic risk and produce a cost/benefit analysis. This paper reports a real life observatory of 785 patients (<16y: 86%): medical characteristics, eliciting doses (ED) in real life and in oral food challenges (OFC), factors associated with severe reactions, allergist dietary advice and patients' anxiety regarding their allergy. Median age was 3 years. 85% were declared allergic. Severe/potentially severe reactions were reported in 30% of the allergic patients: serious systemic reaction (15%), laryngeal angioedema (8%), shock (4%) and acute asthma (3%). 66% had atopic dermatitis, 58% asthma. Median rAra h2 sIgE level was 11.5 kUA/L. Of the 278 OFCs, 225 were positive (median ED: 67.3 mg). Real-life ED was <100 mg in 44.3%. Severe reactions were significantly more frequent in teenagers and adults (p=0.004), asthmatic patients (p=0.033), and patients who reacted to inhalation (p<0.001). Anxiety was significantly associated to strict avoidance (p<0.001).

Peanut allergic patients in the MIRABEL survey: characteristics, allergists' dietary advice and lessons from real life.  
Deschildre A, Elegbede CF, Just J, Bruyere O, Van dB, Papadopoulos A, Beaudouin E, Renaudin JM, Crepet A, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov 20;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Serological, genomic, and structural analyses of the major mite allergen Der p 23.
Der p 23 was recently identified in a European population as a major allergen and potentially a chitin binding protein. This study sought to assess the importance of Der p 23 among other Dermatophagoides allergens in a North American population, and to determine the structure for functional characterization. IgE binding to Der p 23, Der p 1, Der p 2, Der p 5, Der p 7, and Der p 8 was measured by ELISA. Despite a high prevalence of Der p 23, (75% versus 87% and 79% for Der p 1 and Der p 2, respectively), the anti-Der p 23 IgE levels were relatively low. The patient response to the 6 allergens tested was variable (n=47), but on average anti-Der p 1 and anti-Der p 2 together accounted for 85% of the specific IgE. In terms of abundance, the RNA expression level of Der p 23 is the lowest of the major allergens, 30-fold less that Der p 1 and 7-fold less than Der p 2. The structure of Der p 23 is a small, globular protein stabilized by two disulfide bonds, which is structurally related to allergens such as Blo t 12 that contain carbohydrate binding domains that bind chitin. Functional assays failed to confirm chitin binding by Der p 23. Therefore Der p 23 accounts for a small percentage of the IgE response to mite allergens, which is dominated by Der p 1 and Der p 2.

Serological, genomic, and structural analyses of the major mite allergen Der p 23.  
Mueller GA, Randall TA, Glesner J, Pedersen LC, Perera L, Edwards LL, DeRose EF, Chapman MD, London RE, Pomes A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of Aspergillus (A flavus and A niger) allergens and heterogeneity of allergic patients' IgE response.
Aspergillus species (A flavus and A niger) are important sources of inhalant allergens. Current diagnostic modalities employ crude Aspergillus extracts which only indicate the source to which the patient has been sensitized, without identifying the number and type of allergens in crude extracts. This study reports on the identification of major and minor allergens of the two common airborne Aspergillus species and heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to them. Evaluation of 300 patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis, found positive cutaneous responses in 17% and 14.7% of patients with A flavus and A niger extracts, respectively. EAST positivity was 69.2% and 68.7%. In immunoblots, 5 allergenic proteins were identified in A niger extract, major allergens being 49, 55.4 and 81.5 kDa. Twelve proteins bound patients' IgE in A flavus extract, three being major allergens (13.3, 34 and 37 kDa). The number and molecular weight of IgE-binding proteins in both the Aspergillus extracts varied among patients. Evidence of heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to major/minor Aspergillus allergens was demonstrated.

Identification of Aspergillus (A flavus and A niger) allergens and heterogeneity of allergic patients' IgE response.  
Vermani M, Kandi-Vijayan V, Kumar-Agarwal M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Aug;14(4):361-369

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin testing in the evaluation and management of carboplatin-related hypersensitivity reactions.
Carboplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) are a frequent occurrence in patients being retreated for malignancy. The most common and severe reactions are thought to be IgE mediated. Currently, skin testing is the only method used clinically to identify individuals sensitized to carboplatin. Despite almost 20 years of clinical use, a standardized approach to skin testing and its use in the management of carboplatin HSRs has not been well established. We review the utility of carboplatin skin testing and discuss factors that influence the interpretation of skin testing results.

Skin testing in the evaluation and management of carboplatin-related hypersensitivity reactions.  
Lax T, Long A, Banerji A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):856-862

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Performance and pain tolerability of current diagnostic allergy skin prick test devices.
The aim of this study was to compare the performance of 10 current allergy skin prick test devices. Single- and multiheaded skin test devices (n = 10) were applied by a single operator in a prospective randomized manner. Twenty-four subjects provided consent, and 768 skin tests were placed. All 10 skin prick test devices displayed good analytical sensitivity and specificity; however, 3 mm cannot arbitrarily be used as a positive threshold. The use of histamine at 1 mg/mL is unacceptable for certain devices but may be preferable for the most sensitive devices. On average, there was no pain score difference between multiheaded and single-head devices

Performance and pain tolerability of current diagnostic allergy skin prick test devices.  
Tversky JR, Chelladurai Y, McGready J, Hamilton RG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):888-893

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical history-driven diagnosis of allergic diseases: utilizing in vitro IgE testing.
This case illustrates the importance of a thorough clinical history in providing an interpretation of previously collected IgE antibody serology as part of a workup for allergic disease. Although a yellow-jacket sting was the allergenic insult that led the patient to the emergency department, nonindicated IgE antibody serology tests were ordered that subsequently required interpretation. This report systematically evaluates the relative significance of previously measured IgE antibody serology responses to 4 major allergen groups (inhalants [aeroallergens], foods, venoms, and drugs) within the context of the patient's history. An algorithm that takes into account the pretest likelihood of disease and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the available IgE antibody tests is proposed for decisions about further IgE testing. This case study concludes that selection of testing methods, extract and molecular allergen specificities, and the final interpretation of the results from tests of sensitization such as serological (in vitro) IgE antibody assays requires knowledge of test parameters and clinical judgments based largely on a carefully collected clinical history and physical examination

Clinical history-driven diagnosis of allergic diseases: utilizing in vitro IgE testing.  
Adkinson NF, Hamilton RG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):871-876

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Serological IgE analyses in the diagnostic algorithm for allergic disease.
IgE antibody analyses using serological methods are an integral part of the diagnostic evaluation of a patient for allergic disease. They serve to clarify whether a state of sensitization exists in the patient as one of the many risk factors for elicitation of allergic symptoms. This overview examines the role that IgE antibody measurements play in the diagnostic algorithm when considering the pretest likelihood of disease on the basis of the patient's clinical history. Each of the 4 allergen groups (inhalants, venoms, drugs, and foods) are discussed in the context of the various in vitro and in vivo modalities for evaluating sensitization to allergens. Both the past and present analytical methods for IgE antibody detection and quantification in serum are critiqued. Causes for discordant IgE antibody levels with allergy symptoms are discussed with a special focus on analytically valid but clinically irrelevant positive IgE responses. Finally, applications are discussed where allergenic molecules provide enhanced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity when compared with results generated with allergen extract-based IgE assays

Serological IgE analyses in the diagnostic algorithm for allergic disease.  
Hamilton RG, Oppenheimer J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):833-840

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The icing on the cake or chip ISAC® interest in exploring a food allergy
Molecular allergy is of great interest in investigations of food allergy, especially in the case of pollen-food allergy cross-reactivity. A 39-year-old man consulted us for symptoms of severe oral allergy syndrome and urticaria induced by various fruits and vegetables. The symptoms were particularly severe after eating cherries. Skin prick tests were positive for birch pollen and for many fruits. The ISAC® biochip revealed the presence of specific IgE against all the PR10s in the biochip but none against LTPs. This investigation allowed us to adapt an emergency kit for the patient's use, to advise him on food avoidance and to assure him about the risk of severe anaphylactic reactions.

La cerise sur le gâteau ou intérêt de la puce ISAC® dans l’exploration d’une allergie alimentaire / The icing on the cake or chip ISAC® interest in exploring a food allergy  
P. Vermersch, C. Mailhol, L. Tetu, A. Didier
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(6):406-409

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Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Asparagus-induced fixed food eruptions mimicking cutaneous lupus.  
Gaus BM, Scheiba N, Schakel K.
Acta Derm Venereol 2014 Nov;94(6):731-732

Conctact dermatitis: some important topics.  
Pigatto PD.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):188-191
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An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.  
Hassan AK, Venkatesh YP.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):180-187
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An unusual case of delayed-type hypersensitivity to ceftriaxone and meropenem.  
as de CE, Leblanc A, Sarmento A, Cernadas JR.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):225-227
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Allergenicity of Artemisia contained in bee pollen is proportional to its mass.  
Nonotte-Varly C.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):218-224
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An oral challenge test with carmine red (E120) in skin prick test positive patients.  
Liippo J, Lammintausta K.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):206-210
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One-year survey of paediatric anaphylaxis in an allergy department.  
Gaspar A, Santos N, Piedade S, Santa-Marta C, Pires G, Sampaio G, Arede C, Borrego LM, Morais-Almeida M.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;47(6):197-205
Click to view abstract

Can pet keeping be considered the only criterion of exposure to cat/dog allergens in the first year of life?  
Liccardi G, Salzillo A, Calzetta L, Pignatti P, Rogliani P.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Nov 16;

Haemaphysalis longicornis tick bites are a possible cause of red meat allergy in Japan.  
Chinuki Y, Ishiwata K, Yamaji K, Takahashi H, Morita E.
Allergy 2015 Nov 9;
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Is it the true incidence of IgE-cow's milk allergy (CMA) or CMA or IgE-CMA in some countries and CMA in others.  
Katz Y, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Grimshaw KE, Beyer K, Grabenhenrich L, Keil T, Sprikkelman AB, Roberts G.
Allergy 2015 Nov;70(11):1509-1510

House dust mite-specific IgA2 is associated with protection against eczema in allergic patients.  
den HG, van Neerven RJ, Boot JD, Jansen AP, Savelkoul HF.
Allergy 2015 Nov 19;
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Evaluation of anxiety levels and factors associated with positive test results in patients with drug hypersensitivity.  
Comert S, Erdogan T, Demir AU, Karakaya G, Kalyoncu AF.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Nov;36(6):439-446
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Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome.  
Spriet S, Banks TA.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Nov;36(6):501-505
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Prevalence and clinical impact of IgE-mediated food allergy in school children with asthma: a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge study.  
Krogulska A, Dynowski J, Funkowicz M, Malachowska B, Wasowska-Krolikowska K.
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015 Nov;7(6):547-556
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Peanut sensitization pattern in Norwegian children and adults with specific IgE to peanut show age related differences.  
Namork E, Stensby BA.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1132
Click to view abstract

A retrospective comparison of false negative skin test rates in penicillin allergy, using pencilloyl-poly-lysine and minor determinants or Penicillin G, followed by open challenge.  
Rosenfield L, Kalicinsky C, Warrington R.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1134
Click to view abstract

Allergen of the Month-English Oak.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Nov;115(5):A13

Factors associated with the course of egg allergy in children.  
Arik YE, Cavkaytar O, Buyuktiryaki B, Sekerel BE, Soyer O, Sackesen C.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Nov;115(5):434-438
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Anaphylaxis-a practice parameter update 2015.  
Lieberman P, Nicklas RA, Randolph C, Oppenheimer J, Bernstein D, Bernstein J, Ellis A, Golden DB, Greenberger P, Kemp S, Khan D, Ledford D, Lieberman J, Metcalfe D, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, et al.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Nov;115(5):341-384

Penicillin skin testing is a safe method to guide beta-lactam administration in the intensive care unit.  
Arroliga ME, Vazquez-Sandoval A, Dvoracek J, Arroliga AC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Nov 17;

Hidden allergens: a challenge for allergists.  
Rodriguez CG, Borja J, Bartolome B, Torrijos EG, Rodriguez RG.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Nov 17;

Six cases of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in children. [Japanese]  
Nakagawa T, Sakai K, Hayashi N, Sato A, Sasaki K, Matsui T, Sugiura S, Kando N, Ito K.
Arerugi 2015 Aug;64(8):1169-1173
Click to view abstract

What makes children outgrow food allergy?  
Nowak-Wegrzyn A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov;45(11):1618-1620

Peanut allergic patients in the MIRABEL survey: characteristics, allergists' dietary advice and lessons from real life.  
Deschildre A, Elegbede CF, Just J, Bruyere O, Van dB, Papadopoulos A, Beaudouin E, Renaudin JM, Crepet A, Moneret-Vautrin DA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov 20;
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Comment on IgE responses to Ascaris and mite tropomyosins are risk factors for asthma.  
Takeuchi H, Khan AF, Hasan MI, Hawlader MD, Yunus M, Zaman K, Chowdhury HR, Takanashi S, Wagatsuma Y, Iwata T.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov 20;
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Reply to 'Comments on IgE responses to Ascaris and mite tropomyosins are risk factors for asthma'.  
Caraballo L, Ahumada V.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov 20;
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Serological, genomic, and structural analyses of the major mite allergen Der p 23.  
Mueller GA, Randall TA, Glesner J, Pedersen LC, Perera L, Edwards LL, DeRose EF, Chapman MD, London RE, Pomes A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov 25;
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Immunologic responses to the major allergen of Olea europaea in local and systemic allergic rhinitis subjects.  
Campo P, Villalba M, Barrionuevo E, Rondon C, Salas M, Galindo L, Rodriguez MJ, Lopez-Rodriguez JC, Prieto-Del Prado MA, Torres MJ, Blanca M, Mayorga C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Nov;45(11):1703-1712
Click to view abstract

Risk of anaphylaxis in patients with large local reactions to hymenoptera stings: a retrospective and prospective study.  
Pucci S, D'Alo S, De PT, Illuminati I, Makri E, Incorvaia C.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;1321
Click to view abstract

New insights into ragweed pollen allergens.  
Bordas-Le F, Groeme R, Chabre H, Baron-Bodo V, Nony E, Mascarell L, Moingeon P.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Nov;15(11):63
Click to view abstract

Delayed anaphylaxis after ingestion of meat. Carbohydrate epitope galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose as cause of severe anaphylactic reactions. [German]  
Soemantri SP, Hoxtermann S, Holz-Larose R, Altmeyer P, Dickel H.
Hautarzt 2015 Feb;66(2):117-120
Click to view abstract

Molecular cloning and expression of a new allergen of acacia farnesiana (Aca f 2).  
Sepahi N, Khodadadi A, Assarehzadegan M, Amini A, Zarinhadideh F, li-Sadeghi H.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Aug;14(4):370-378
Click to view abstract

Identification of Aspergillus (A flavus and A niger) allergens and heterogeneity of allergic patients' IgE response.  
Vermani M, Kandi-Vijayan V, Kumar-Agarwal M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Aug;14(4):361-369
Click to view abstract

Toxocara canis IgG seropositivity in patients with chronic urticaria.  
Burak-Selek M, Baylan O, Kutlu A, Ozyurt M.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Aug;14(4):450-456
Click to view abstract

Skin testing in the evaluation and management of carboplatin-related hypersensitivity reactions.  
Lax T, Long A, Banerji A.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):856-862
Click to view abstract

Shrimp allergy: gastrointestinal symptoms commonly occur in the absence of IgE sensitization.  
Gleich GJ, Sebastian K, Firszt R, Wagner LA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov 7;

Cephalosporin side chain cross-reactivity.  
Ledford DK.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):1006-1007

Statin allergy: an evidence-based approach.  
Aberer W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):996-997

Are all skin testing devices created equal?  
Matsui EC, Keet CA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):894-895

Performance and pain tolerability of current diagnostic allergy skin prick test devices.  
Tversky JR, Chelladurai Y, McGready J, Hamilton RG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):888-893
Click to view abstract

Clinical history-driven diagnosis of allergic diseases: utilizing in vitro IgE testing.  
Adkinson NF, Hamilton RG.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):871-876
Click to view abstract

Molecular allergen-specific IgE assays as a complement to allergen extract-based sensitization assessment.  
Aalberse RC, Aalberse JA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):863-869
Click to view abstract

Serological IgE analyses in the diagnostic algorithm for allergic disease.  
Hamilton RG, Oppenheimer J.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov;3(6):833-840
Click to view abstract

Natural history of food-triggered atopic dermatitis and development of immediate reactions in children.  
Chang A, Robison R, Cai M, Singh AM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Nov 17;
Click to view abstract

Subgroups in cephalosporin allergy, making a patient-tailored approach redundant?  
Tuyls S, Breynaert C, Schrijvers R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov 6;

Changes in IgE sensitization and total IgE levels over 20 years of follow-up.  
Amaral AF, Newson RB, Abramson MJ, Anto JM, Bono R, Corsico AG, de MR, Demoly P, Forsberg B, Gislason T, Heinrich J, Huerta I, Janson C, Jogi R, Kim JL, Maldonado J, Martinez-Moratalla RJ, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov 13;
Click to view abstract

How to apply the LEAP study.  
Kelso JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov 13;

Sensitization phenotypes based on protein groups and associations to allergic diseases in children.  
Schoos AM, Kattan JD, Gimenez G, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov 12;

Pollen food syndrome amongst children with seasonal allergic rhinitis attending allergy clinic.  
Ludman S, Jafari-Mamaghani M, Ebling R, Fox AT, Lack G, du Toit G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Nov 4;
Click to view abstract

Prevention, treatment and food allergy phenotypes: an update.  
Sanchez-Garcia S, Cipriani F, Ricci G.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Nov 23;
Click to view abstract

'Cows' milk exclusion diet during infancy: Is there a long term effect on children's eating behaviour and food preferences?'.  
Maslin K, Grundy J, Glasbey G, Dean T, Arshad SH, Grimshaw K, Oliver E, Roberts G, Venter C.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Nov 23;
Click to view abstract

Fixed drug eruption after taking ethambutol. [French]  
Bakayoko AS, Kaloga M, Kamagate M, Kone Z, Daix AT, Ohui E, Gbery I, Domoua K.
Rev Mal Respir 2015 Jan;32(1):48-51
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Sensitization to Blomia tropicalis among asthmatic patients in Yaounde, Cameroon. [French]  
Pefura-Yone EW, fane-Ze E, Kuaban C.
Rev Mal Respir 2015 Jan;32(1):24-29
Click to view abstract

Un nouveau symposium CICBAA / A new symposium CICBAA  
F. de Blay
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):435
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie alimentaire et tube digestif / Food allergies and digestive tract  
P. Molkhou
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):436-437
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: A distinct form of food allergy  
J. Molina-Infante
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):438-443
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

The influence of gastric digestion on the development of food allergy.  
E. Untersmayr
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):444-447
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Proctitis and constipation: A symptom of food allergy?  
G. Iacono, C. Scalici, S. Iacono
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):448-451
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Data from the anaphylaxis registry of the German-speaking countries  
M. Worm, S. Dölle, W. Francuzik
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):452-455
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxies alimentaires en milieu scolaire : à propos de 56 cas déclarés au réseau d’allergovigilance entre 2005 et 2015 / Food anaphylaxis in schools: about 56 cases reported allergovigilance network between 2005 and 2015  
D. Sabouraud-Leclerc, E. Beaudouin, A. Chabbert, C. Larue, M.-D. Donnou, M. Boulègue, C. Nootens, D.-A. Moneret-Vautrin
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):456-462
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Sécurité aérienne pour les allergiques alimentaires : données actuelles et recommandations / Air safety for food allergy: current data and recommendations  
P. Beaumont, J.-M. Renaudin, P. Dumond, M. Drouet, D.A. Moneret-Vautrin
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):463-469
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Kiwifruit allergy across Europe  
T.M. Le, A.C. Knulst
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):470-473
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Phénotypes des allergies alimentaires : expériences des cohortes / Phenotypes of food allergies: cohort experiences  
J. Just, F. Amat, A. Deschildre
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):474-479
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Le syndrome cannabis–fruits et légumes : une mise au point / Cannabis-fruits and vegetables syndrome: an update  
I.I. Decuyper, A.L. Van Gasse, M.A. Faber, M.M. Hagendorens, V. Sabato, C.H. Bridts, D.G. Ebo
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):480-482
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Information des consommateurs allergiques et étiquetage : actualités / Information allergen labeling and consumer: News  
G. Kanny, D. Dano, J.-L. Danan, C. Astier, S. Lefevre
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):483-491
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergie à galactose-a1,3 galactose (a-Gal) : une observation singulière et revue bibliographique  
E. Beaudouin, H. Thomas, V.M. Nguyen-Grosjean, J. Picaud, L. Moumane, C. Richard, A. Léon, S. Jacquenet, D. Sabouraud-Leclerc, J.M. Renaudin, A. Barbaud, D.A. Moneret-Vautrin
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(7):492-497
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Hypersensibilités aux AINS : phénotypes cliniques et arbre décisionnel / Hypersensitivity to NSAIDs: clinical phenotypes and decision tree  
M. Pontac, T. Bourrier, C. Le Heron, F. Rocher, C.-H. Marquette, S. Leroy
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(6):392-400
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Les enfants multi-allergiques : qui sont-ils ? / The multi-allergic children: who are they?  
C. Karila, P. Scheinmann, J. de Blic
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(6):401-405
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La cerise sur le gâteau ou intérêt de la puce ISAC® dans l’exploration d’une allergie alimentaire / The icing on the cake or chip ISAC® interest in exploring a food allergy  
P. Vermersch, C. Mailhol, L. Tetu, A. Didier
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(6):406-409
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Dermatose collective des mains à une huile de coupe. À propos de 5 cas / Dermatosis collective hands to cutting oil. About 5 cases  
C. Michaud-Vinez, A. Kuntz, H. Godefroy, P. Joly, F. Tetart
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(6):410-412
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

What's new in Pediatric Allergy in 2014? General epidemiology, diagnostics (early) treatment, anaphylaxis, food and drug allergy and venom and saliva of insects (a review of the international literature 2014)  
C. Ponvert
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(6):413-433
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Trends in lead exposure in a rural mining town in South Africa, 1991-2008.  
Naicker N, Mathee A.
S Afr Med J 2015 Jul;105(7):515


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