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 Allergy Advisor Digest - October 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Lupin allergy: a hidden killer at home, a menace at work; occupational disease due to lupin allergy.
Read Sensitization to thiourea derivatives among Finnish patients with suspected contact dermatitis.
Read Identification of IgE-reactive proteins in patients with wheat protein contact dermatitis.
Read Nickel (Ni) allergic patients with complications to Ni containing joint replacement show
Read Fragrance allergy: assessing the safety of washed fabrics.
Read Photoallergic contact dermatitis to 8-methoxypsoralen in Ficus carica.
Read The coumarin herniarin as a sensitizer in German chamomile
Read Frequency of sensitization to common allergens: comparison between Europe and the USA.
Read Diagnosis of Food Allergy: Epicutaneous Skin Tests, In Vitro Tests, and Oral Food Challenge.
Read Purification of the major group 1 allergen from Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1.
Read Detection of Bet v1, Bet v2 and Bet v4 specific IgE antibodies in the sera of children and adult patients allergic to birch pollen: evaluation of different ige reactivity profiles depending on age and local sensitization.
Read Rye exposure to elevated ozone levels increases the allergen content in pollen.
Read Can early introduction of egg prevent egg allergy in infants?
Read A diagnostic model for the detection of sensitization to wheat allergens was developed and validated in bakery workers.
Read Lipid transfer proteins in saffron hypersensitivity
Read Peanut allergy: is maternal transmission of antigens during pregnancy and breastfeeding a risk factor?
Read Microarrays of recombinant Hevea brasiliensis proteins
Read Evidence of bacterial biofilms in nasal polyposis.
Read Cloning and Expression of Che a 1, the major allergen of Chenopodium album (Goosefoot).
Read Der f 7, an allergen of Dermatophagoides farinae from China.
Read The most important contact sensitizers in Polish children and adolescents with atopy and chronic recurrent eczema.
Read What's new in pediatric allergology in 2009? Part 1
Read Do environmentally-friendly building and decorating materials also have little impact on health?
Read A case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia following short-term passive smoking
Read Exposure to cadmium-contaminated soils increases allergenicity of Poa annua L. pollen.
Read Fungal exposure modulates the effect of polymorphisms of chitinases on emergency department visits and hospitalizations.
Read Bullying among pediatric patients with food allergy.
Read Recombinant Cup a 4 from Cupressus arizonica

Abstracts shared in October 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to molds in a saxophone player.
Read Does airborne nickel exposure induce nickel sensitization?
Read Peach-induced contact urticaria is associated with lipid transfer protein sensitization.
Read Dog lipocalin allergen Can f 2: implications for cross-reactivity to the cat allergen Fel d 4.
Read Recurrent anaphylaxis due to lupin flour: primary sensitization through inhalation.
Read Multiple acute parasitization by Anisakis simplex.
Read Clinically relevant cross-sensitization between Goldenrod and natural rubber latex.
Read Mite-specific immunoglobulin E in patients with aspirin-induced urticaria and angioedema.
Read Occupational asthma caused by turbot fish allergy in 3 fish-farm workers.
Read Molecular allergology in practice: a polysensitized patient with multiple severe food allergies
Read Allergic contact dermatitis to synthetic rubber gloves: changing trends in patch test reactions to accelerators.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lupin allergy: a hidden killer at home, a menace at work; occupational disease due to lupin allergy.
Occupational sensitization to lupin with occupational rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma was first described in 2001, and confirmed in a larger cross-sectional study in a food processing company in 2006. Sensitization by inhalation may result in occupational asthma, work-exacerbated asthma, occupational rhinitis and conjunctivitis. The incidence of occupational sensitization may be as high as 29%. Cross-sensitization to other legumes, particularly peanuts, has been shown by skin prick testing, with potential for serious anaphylactic reactions. This review summarizes the available literature on occupational sensitization to lupin products. It is one of two reviews, one covering the problem of lupin allergy in the home, while the present article deals with lupin sensitization in the workplace.

Lupin allergy: a hidden killer at home, a menace at work; occupational disease due to lupin allergy.  
Campbell CP, Yates DH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Oct;40(10):1467-1472

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to thiourea derivatives among Finnish patients with suspected contact dermatitis.
Thiourea derivatives in rubber products may induce contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis. Sensitization is most often from neoprene rubber, but the multitude of possible sensitizing products has remained poorly characterized.

A mixture of dibutyl-, diethyl-, and diphenylthiourea was included in patch test baseline series in five Finnish dermatology clinics. In addition, an extended series of rubber chemicals was tested in patients with suspected rubber allergy. Sources of sensitization to thioureas were analysed in sensitized patients. Thiourea mix yielded positive patch test reactions in 59 of 15,100 patients (0.39%); 33/59 patients were also tested with individual rubber chemicals. Diethylthiourea was positive in 24/33, diphenylthiourea in 5, and dibutylthiourea in 1 patient. The most common sources of sensitization included various neoprene-containing orthopaedic braces, sports equipment, and foot wear.

Sensitization to thiourea derivatives among Finnish patients with suspected contact dermatitis.  
Liippo J, Ackermann L, Hasan T, Laukkanen A, Rantanen T, Lammintausta K.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):37-41

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of IgE-reactive proteins in patients with wheat protein contact dermatitis.
Wheat protein and its derivatives can cause protein contact dermatitis (PCD), which mainly occurs in bakers. The aim of this study was to identify allergenic wheat proteins in patients with wheat PCD. IgE antibodies from patients' sera reacted with water-soluble proteins rather than water-insoluble proteins. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the IgE-binding proteins led to the identification of three glycoproteins, wheat 27-kDa allergen, peroxidase, and purple acid phosphatase. Wheat 27-kDa allergen, peroxidase and purple acid phosphatase are candidate allergens for wheat PCD. The results suggest that glycan moieties in these proteins are involved in IgE binding.

Identification of IgE-reactive proteins in patients with wheat protein contact dermatitis.  
Matsuo H, Uemura M, Yorozuya M, Adachi A, Morita E.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):23-30

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Nickel (Ni) allergic patients with complications to Ni containing joint replacement show
Some nickel (Ni) allergic patients develop complications following Ni-containing arthroplasty. In the peri-implant tissue of such patients, the authors had observed lymphocyte dominated inflammation together with IFN-gamma and IL-17 expression. Based on history and patch testing in 15 Ni-allergic patients (five without implant, five with symptom-free arthroplasty, five with complicated arthroplasty) and five non-allergic individuals, lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was performed using PBMC. All 15 Ni-allergic individuals showed enhanced LTT reactivity to Ni compared to the non-allergic control group. In contrast, in the five Ni-allergic patients with arthroplasty-linked complications a predominant, significant IL-17 expression to Ni was seen but not in patients with symptom-free arthroplasty. The study concludes that the predominant IL-17 type response to Ni may characterize a subgroup of Ni-allergic patients prone to develop lymphocytic peri-implant hyper-reactivity.

Nickel (Ni) allergic patients with complications to Ni containing joint replacement show preferential IL-17 type reactivity to Ni.  
Summer B, Paul C, Mazoochian F, Rau C, Thomsen M, Banke I, Gollwitzer H, Dietrich KA, Mayer-Wagner S, Ruzicka T, Thomas P.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):15-22

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Fragrance allergy: assessing the safety of washed fabrics.
This study concludes that on the basis of the examples studied, fragrance chemical residues present on fabric do not appear to present a risk of the elicitation of immediate or delayed allergic skin reactions on individuals already sensitized

Fragrance allergy: assessing the safety of washed fabrics.  
Basketter DA, Pons-Guiraud A, van AA, Laverdet C, Marty JP, Martin L, Berthod D, Siest S, Giordano-Labadie F, Tennstedt D, Baeck M, Vigan M, Laine G, Le Coz CJ, Jacobs MC, Bayrou O, Germaux MA.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):349-354

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Photoallergic contact dermatitis to 8-methoxypsoralen in Ficus carica.
Photocontact dermatitis to Ficus carica (fig) is induced by furocoumarins present in sap. These substances are generally considered to cause phototoxic reactions. This study conducted patch and photopatch testing with serial dilutions of two natural furocoumarins [5-methoxypsoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP)] contained in plant sap in 47 patients. Positive photopatch tests reactions to 8-MOP were obtained in 12 of 47 patients, in 4 of them down to a concentration of 0.0001%. Patch tests and photopatch tests to the other two furocoumarins were negative. Histopathological findings on biopsies from positive photopatch tests to 8-MOP showed a dermatitis. This study demonstrates that phytophoto allergic contact dermatitis resulting from furocoumarins is not an exceptional finding, and should be suspected in subjects with diffuse clinical manifestations in photo-exposed but also non-exposed sites.

Photoallergic contact dermatitis to 8-methoxypsoralen in Ficus carica.  
Bonamonte D, Foti C, Lionetti N, Rigano L, Angelini G.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):343-348

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The coumarin herniarin as a sensitizer in German chamomile
The clinical results suggest that herniarin indeed is one of the non-sesquiterpene lactone sensitizers in German chamomile and that sensitization may occur through, for example, external use of chamomile tea or use of chamomile-containing topical herbal remedies.

The coumarin herniarin as a sensitizer in German chamomile [Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert, Compositae].  
Paulsen E, Otkjaer A, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):338-342

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Frequency of sensitization to common allergens: comparison between Europe and the USA.
The objective of this study was to determine any differences in frequencies of sensitization to contact allergens in the United States and Europe. Major differences were found only for neomycin (USA 10.0-11.8%, mean 11.4%; Europe 1.2-5.4%, mean 2.6%). Most allergens had somewhat higher prevalence in the United States, with rates versus Europe ranging from 1.3 to 1.9.

Frequency of sensitization to common allergens: comparison between Europe and the USA.  
de Groot AC, Maibach HI.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):325-329

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Diagnosis of Food Allergy: Epicutaneous Skin Tests, In Vitro Tests, and Oral Food Challenge.
"Food allergy is becoming an increasingly common diagnosis. Because of this increase in prevalence, it is imperative that physicians evaluating patients with possible adverse reactions to foods understand the currently available assays and how they should best be used to accurately diagnose the disease. Simple tests such as skin prick testing (SPT) and serum food-specific IgE testing are the most commonly used diagnostic tests to evaluate for IgE-mediated food reactions. However, these tests, which measure sensitization and not clinical allergy, are not without pitfalls, and their utility must be appreciated to avoid over- and underdiagnosis. Although the physician-supervised oral food challenge remains the gold standard for food allergy diagnosis, a careful medical history paired with SPT and serum food-specific IgE testing often can provide a reliable diagnosis. In this review, we examine the usefulness and pitfalls of SPT and serum food-specific IgE levels, as well as examine atopy patch testing and other emerging tests, such as component-resolved diagnostics and the basophil activation test. Finally, we describe the use of the double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenge as the current gold standard for food allergy diagnosis."

Diagnosis of food allergy: epicutaneous skin tests, in vitro tests, and oral food challenge.  
Lieberman JA, Sicherer SH.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Oct 5;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Purification of the major group 1 allergen from Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1.
Bahia grass is distinct from temperate grasses and has a prolonged pollination period and wide distribution in warmer climates. This study describes the purification of the group 1 pollen allergen, Pas n 1, from Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum), an important subtropical aeroallergen source. Pas n 1 was purified to a single 29-kDa protein band containing two dominant isoforms. The frequency of serum IgE reactivity with purified Pas n 1 in 51 Bahia grass pollen-allergic patients was 90.6%.

Purification of the major group 1 allergen from Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1.  
Drew AC, Davies JM, Dang TD, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 20;154(4):295-298

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Detection of Bet v1, Bet v2 and Bet v4 specific IgE antibodies in the sera of children and adult patients allergic to birch pollen: evaluation of different ige reactivity profiles depending on age and local sensitization.
Rapidly expanding knowledge of the allergenic molecules enables us to better recognize the individual differences between the reactivity of specific IgE antibodies of individual patients and allergic populations living in various regions of the world. A group of birch pollen-allergic patients living in the Czech Republic (107 children, 71 adults) were investigated for the presence of Bet v1, Bet v2 and Bet v4 specific IgE antibodies. Bet v1 specific IgE antibodies were identified in most patients without any significant differences between children and adults. Bet v2 positivity was found more frequently in the group of children than in adults (p = 0.02). In most adult patients Bet v1 monospecificity was more expressed as compared to the pediatric group. More allergic subjects reacted against minor birch allergens in the pediatric group (p = 0.02). Specific IgE antibodies against Bet v1 were not detected in 10% of the tested patients. In this group, 5% of birch pollen-allergic patients were found to not have specific IgE antibodies against any of the tested recombinant allergens. This investigation of specific IgE antibodies against Bet v1, Bet v2 and Bet v4 demonstrated that the specificity of allergen-induced IgE antibodies in birch pollen-allergic individuals is dependent not only on the region in which a patient lives but also on age. In particular, in children, there is an increase in the number of allergic subjects who do not react exclusively against the major allergen.

Detection of Bet v1, Bet v2 and Bet v4 specific IgE antibodies in the sera of children and adult patients allergic to birch pollen: evaluation of different ige reactivity profiles depending on age and local sensitization.  
Sekerkova A, Polackova M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 20;154(4):278-285

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Rye exposure to elevated ozone levels increases the allergen content in pollen.
Exposure of rye (Secale cereale) to elevated ozone levels increases the allergen content in pollen.

Exposure of rye (Secale cereale) cultivars to elevated ozone levels increases the allergen content in pollen.  
Eckl-Dorna J, Klein B, Reichenauer TG, Niederberger V, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jul 30. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Can early introduction of egg prevent egg allergy in infants?
This study aimed to determine whether confirmed egg allergy in 12-month-old infants is associated with (1) duration of breast-feeding and (2) ages of introducing egg and solids. The study concludes that introduction of cooked egg at 4 to 6 months of age might protect against egg allergy.

Can early introduction of egg prevent egg allergy in infants? A population-based study.  
Koplin JJ, Osborne NJ, Wake M, Martin PE, Gurrin LC, Robinson MN, Tey D, Slaa M, Thiele L, Miles L, Anderson D, Tan T, Dang TD, Hill DJ, Lowe AJ, Matheson MC, Ponsonby AL, Tang ML, Dharmage SC, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct;126(4):807-813

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A diagnostic model for the detection of sensitization to wheat allergens was developed and validated in bakery workers.
The objective of this study was to develop and validate a prediction model to detect sensitization to wheat allergens in 867 Dutch bakery workers. The prediction model contained the predictors nasoconjunctival symptoms, asthma symptoms, shortness of breath and wheeze, work-related upper and lower respiratory symptoms, and traditional bakery. The model showed good discrimination with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area of 0.76 (and 0.75 after internal validation). Application of the model in the validation set gave a reasonable discrimination (ROC area=0.69) and good calibration after a small adjustment of the model intercept.

A diagnostic model for the detection of sensitization to wheat allergens was developed and validated in bakery workers.  
Suarthana E, Vergouwe Y, Moons KG, de MJ, Grobbee D, Heederik D, Meijer E.
J Clin Epidemiol 2010 Sep;63(9):1011-1019

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Lipid transfer proteins in saffron hypersensitivity
Six patients with rhinitis and positive skin prick test (SPT) results to saffron extract were evaluated. Two recombinant LTPs from saffron were isolated. The molecular weight of rCro s 3.01 and rCro s 3.02 was 9.15 kDa and 9.55 kDa, respectively. The sequences obtained had a 47% identity with each other and 51% and 43% with Pru p 3. Specific IgE to the purified allergens was found in 50% of patients for rCro s 3.01 and 33% for rCro s 3.02 and Pru p 3 in the saffron-allergic patients. (Gómez-Gómez 2010 ref.25399 0)

Involvement of lipid transfer proteins in saffron hypersensitivity: molecular cloning of the potential allergens.  
Gómez-Gómez L, Feo-Brito F, Rubio-Moraga A, Galindo PA, Prieto A, Ahrazem O.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(5):407-12.

Abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Peanut allergy: is maternal transmission of antigens during pregnancy and breastfeeding a risk factor?
This study enrolled 403 infants in a case-control study. The cases were infants aged 18 months or less with a diagnosis of peanut allergy based on a history of clinical reaction after exposure to peanuts and the presence of peanut-specific immunoglobulin E. Controls were age-matched infants with no known clinical history or signs of atopic disease. The mean (SD) age of cases was 1.23 (0.03) years. The groups were comparable in terms of the rate and duration of breastfeeding. However, the reported consumption of peanuts during pregnancy and breastfeeding was higher in the case group and associated with an increased risk of peanut allergy in offspring. Overall, the infants with peanut allergy did not seem to be more exposed to peanut products in their environment than the controls. Therefore early exposure to peanut allergens, whether in utero or through human breast milk, seems to increase the risk of developing peanut allergy.

Peanut allergy: is maternal transmission of antigens during pregnancy and breastfeeding a risk factor?  
DesRoches A, Infante-Rivard C, Paradis L, Paradis J, Haddad E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):289-294

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Microarrays of recombinant Hevea brasiliensis proteins
This study evaluated the utility of microarray-based immunoglobulin (Ig) E detection in the diagnostic workup of NRL allergy and to compare this new diagnostic tool with established methods of NRL-specific IgE detection: 52 adults with immediate-type NRL allergy and 50 control patients were investigated. Determination of specific serum IgE against 8 recombinant Hevea brasiliensis allergen components was performed. The panel of microarrayed allergen components was shown to represent a comprehensive repertoire of clinically relevant NRL proteins. NRL-specific IgE recognition patterns and sensitization rates determined by microarray analysis were similar to those obtained by conventional FEIA. The diagnostic sensitivity rates of combined single-component data were not significantly different for the respective recombinant test system, whereas the sensitivity level of extract-based FEIA analysis was markedly higher.

Microarrays of recombinant Hevea brasiliensis proteins: a novel tool for the component-resolved diagnosis of natural rubber latex allergy.  
Ott H, Schroder C, Raulf-Heimsoth M, Mahler V, Ocklenburg C, Merk HF, Baron JM.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(2):129-138

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Evidence of bacterial biofilms in nasal polyposis.
This study demonstrates the presence of bacterial biofilms in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis. This chronic inflammatory factor might contribute to nasal mucosa damage, increased inflammatory cells in tissue, and the subsequent hyperplasic process

Evidence of bacterial biofilms in nasal polyposis.  
Zernotti ME, Angel VN, Roques RM, Baena-Cagnani CE, rce Miranda JE, Paredes ME, Albesa I, Paraje MG.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(5):380-385

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cloning and Expression of Che a 1, the major allergen of Chenopodium album (Goosefoot).
Chenopodium album pollen represents a predominant allergen source in Iran. The aim of this work was to clone the Che a 1. Inhibition assays demonstrated allergic subjects sera reacted with rChe a 1 similar to natural Che a 1 in crude extract of C. album pollen. (Vahedi 2010 ref.25403 7)

Cloning and Expression of Che a 1, the major allergen of Chenopodium album in Escherichia coli.  
Vahedi F, Sankian M, Moghadam M, Mohaddesfar M, Ghobadi S, Varasteh AR.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 Sep 25. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Der f 7, an allergen of Dermatophagoides farinae from China.
Der f 7 from Dermatophagoides farina from China was cloned and expressed. Der f 7 allergen had a molecular mass of approximately 21.88 kDa. Group 7 allergens are present in Pyroglyphidae, Acaridae, and Glycyphagidae families, and homology analysis revealed a 86% similarity between Der f 7 and Der p 7.

Cloning, expression, and characterization of Der f 7, an allergen of Dermatophagoides farinae from China.  
Cui YB, Cai HX, Zhou Y, Gao CX, Shi WH, Yu M, Li L.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 Sep;47(5):868-76.

Abstract

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The most important contact sensitizers in Polish children and adolescents with atopy and chronic recurrent eczema.
The differential diagnostic work-up of children with chronic eczema should involve patch testing, also in cases with confirmed atopy. In a previous study by the authors, contact allergy was detected in every second child with chronic eczema. The aim of the present study was to identify the most important sensitizers in atopic children with eczema. During an allergy screening program, 103 consecutive children aged 7-8 and 93 adolescents aged 16-17 were enrolled. The inclusion criterion was chronic recurrent eczema and atopy, defined as positive skin prick test to one or more common airborne or food allergens. The children were patch-tested with the newly extended European Baseline Series (EBS, 28 test substances) supplemented with propolis, thimerosal, benzalkonium chloride, and 2-phenoxyethanol. In total, 67.0% children and 58.1% adolescents were found patch test positive. Among children, 35.9% reacted to nickel, 16.5% propolis, 11.7% thimerosal, 9.7% cobalt, each 6.8% fragrance mix (FM) I and chromium, and 5.8% to FM II. Among adolescents, 37.6% reacted to thimerosal, 19.4% to nickel, 6.5% to cobalt, and 5.4% to propolis.

The most important contact sensitizers in Polish children and adolescents with atopy and chronic recurrent eczema as detected with the extended European Baseline Series.  
Czarnobilska E, Obtulowicz K, Dyga W, Spiewak R.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 25;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What's new in pediatric allergology in 2009? Part 1
"Numerous studies have been published between late 2008 and late 2009 in the fields of epidemiology, (early) diagnosis and prevention of atopy and allergic diseases in children. Atopy and allergy depend on multiple and complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, and between genetic and environmental factors themselves. In at-risk children, the type, the level and the period of exposition to allergens (foods, domestic and atmospheric aeroallergens) and adjuvant factors such as atmospheric and domestic pollutants, including tobacco smoke, etc., play a major role in the development of atopy and allergic diseases. Although the “atopic/allergic march” is highly variable from one child to another one, children with early and strong sensitizations are at higher risk to develop multiple sensitizations and multiple, persistent and severe symptoms than the other children. The good sensitivity and specificity of a new test (ImmunoCap® Rapid) suggest that this test may be used as a first-rate tool, in the primary care clinic, for the evaluation of children with allergic (like) symptoms. Primary allergy prevention is baed on measures, which are easy to apply (breastfeeding for 4–6 months and/or extensively or partially hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins, careful introduction of solid food between the 4th and 6th months of life). Finally, the influence of probiotics on the “atopic/allergic march” is highly dependent on the type and the period of administration of probiotics."

Quoi de neuf en allergologie pédiatrique en 2009? / What's new in pediatric allergology in 2009? Part 1: epidemiology, prevention and early diagnosis (a review of international literature in late 2008 to late 2009)  
C. Ponvert
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(6):516-538 Pages

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Do environmentally-friendly building and decorating materials also have little impact on health?
"Do environmentally-friendly building and decorating materials also have little impact on health? Health assessment for these materials requires, as with all other such materials, measurement of emission of aldehydes, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, fibers and particles, odors, tests of fungal and bacterial resistance, measurements of radioactive elements from mineral products, and the presence or absence of cancerogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic substances CMR 1 and 2 as well as toxic substances T and T+. Only results obtained from mineral or wood-based products, vegetal and animal insulation products, vegetal and mineral paints, allow judgment of their potential for harm to human health for building workers and occupants."

Les matériaux de construction et de décoration écologiques sont-ils allergisants ?  
S. Déoux
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(6):481-484

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia following short-term passive smoking
"Acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) is characterized by febrile illness, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia. The pathogenesis is not well understood. We report a case of 22-year-old men who never smoke presented with AEP 2 days after acute passive smoke exposure. He developed acute respiratory failure despite having no history of the disease. Computed tomography of the lung revealed diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Lung biopsy specimens revealed marked eosinophil infiltration in the alveolar septa without signs of vasculitis. Two days prior to the disease, he was exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 hours in a closed area. In the absence of other causes, passive smoking may cause lung inflammatory responses. The level of urinary cotinine, which is a biomarker of smoke exposure, was considerably higher (0.198mug/ml[201ng/mg Creatinine]) than that in nonsmokers, but never detected following period. This case suggests that short-term passive smoking may cause AEP."

A case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia following short-term passive smoking: an evidence of very high level of urinary cotinine.  
Komiya K, Teramoto S, Kawashima M, Kurosaki Y, Shoji S, Hebisawa A.
Allergol Int 2010 Oct 25;59(4):

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Exposure to cadmium-contaminated soils increases allergenicity of Poa annua L. pollen.
This study assessed the effects of plant exposure to cadmium-contaminated soil on allergenicity of the annual blue grass, Poa annua L, pollen. Pollen from Cd-exposed plants released a higher amount of allergenic proteins than control plants. Cd-exposed pollen released allergens-containing cytoplasmic grains much more promptly than control pollen. Group 1 and 5 allergens, the major grass pollen allergens, were detected both in control and Cd-exposed extracts. These were the only allergens reacting with patient's sera in control pollen, whereas additional proteins strengthening the signal in the gel region reacting with patient's sera were present in Cd-exposed pollen. These included a pectinesterase, a lipase, a nuclease, and a secretory peroxydase. A PR3 class I chitinase-like protein was also immunodetected in exposed plants.

Exposure to cadmium-contaminated soils increases allergenicity of Poa annua L. pollen.  
Aina R, Asero R, Ghiani A, Marconi G, Albertini E, Citterio S.
Allergy 2010 Oct;65(10):1313-1321

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Fungal exposure modulates the effect of polymorphisms of chitinases on emergency department visits and hospitalizations.
Chitinases are enzymes that cleave chitin, which is present in fungal cells. Two types of human chitinases, chitotriosidase and acidic mammalian chitinase, and the chitinase-like protein, YKL-40, seem to play an important role in asthma. The authors hypothesized that exposure to environmental fungi may modulate the effect of chitinases in individuals with asthma. In this study of 395 subjects, high mold exposure significantly modified the relation between three SNPs in CHIT1 (rs2486953, rs4950936, and rs1417149) and severe exacerbations (P for interaction 0.0010 for rs2486953, 0.0008 for rs4950936, and 0.0005 for rs1417149). High mold exposure did not significantly modify the relationship between any of the other variants and outcomes. The study concludes that environmental exposure to fungi modifies the effect of CHIT1 SNPs on severe asthma exacerbations.

Fungal exposure modulates the effect of polymorphisms of chitinases on emergency department visits and hospitalizations.  
Wu AC, Lasky-Su J, Rogers CA, Klanderman BJ, Litonjua AA.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Oct 1;182(7):884-889

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Bullying among pediatric patients with food allergy.
This study concludes that bullying, teasing, and harassment of children with food allergy seems to be common, frequent, and repetitive. These actions pose emotional and physical risks that should be addressed in food allergy management

Bullying among pediatric patients with food allergy.  
Lieberman JA, Weiss C, Furlong TJ, Sicherer M, Sicherer SH.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Oct;105(4):282-286

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Recombinant Cup a 4 from Cupressus arizonica
Cup a 4, from C. arizonica pollen, was cloned. The new allergen has high sequence identity with Prickly Juniper allergen Jun o 4 and contains four EF-hand domains. The recombinant protein has structural similarities with other calcium binding allergens such as Ole e 3, Ole e 8 and Phl p 7. Cup a 4 is expressed in mature pollen grains and shares antigenic properties with the recombinant form. Sera from 9.6% C. arizonica allergic patients contain specific IgE antibodies against recombinant Cup a 4. (Pico 2010 ref.25404 3)

Molecular cloning and characterization of Cup a 4, a new allergen from Cupressus arizonica.  
Pico de Coaña Y, Parody N, Fuertes MÁ, Carnés J, Roncarolo D, Ariano R, Sastre J, Mistrello G, Alonso C.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2010 Oct 22;401(3):451-7.

Abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Trombone player's lung: a probable new cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis.  
Metersky ML, Bean SB, Meyer JD, Mutambudzi M, Brown-Elliott BA, Wechsler ME, Wallace RJ.
Chest 2010 Sep;138(3):754-756

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to molds in a saxophone player.  
Metzger F, Haccuria A, Reboux G, Nolard N, Dalphin JC, De VP.
Chest 2010 Sep;138(3):724-726
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Wind-instruments lung: a foul note.  
Cormier Y.
Chest 2010 Sep;138(3):467-468

Lupin allergy: a hidden killer at home, a menace at work; occupational disease due to lupin allergy.  
Campbell CP, Yates DH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Oct;40(10):1467-1472
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The role of food allergy in the atopic march.  
Allen KJ, Dharmage SC.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Oct;40(10):1439-1441

Delayed urticaria with oxaliplatin.  
Villee C, Tennstedt D, Marot L, Goossens A, Baeck M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):50-53

Allergic contact dermatitis in a girl due to several cosmetics containing diazolidinyl-urea or imidazolidinyl-urea.  
Garcia-Gavin J, Gonzalez-Vilas D, Fernandez-Redondo V, Toribo J.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):49-50

Changing delayed-type sensitizations to the baseline series allergens over a decade at the Zurich University Hospital.  
Janach M, Kuhne A, Seifert B, French LE, Ballmer-Weber B, Hofbauer GF.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):42-48
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Sensitization to thiourea derivatives among Finnish patients with suspected contact dermatitis.  
Liippo J, Ackermann L, Hasan T, Laukkanen A, Rantanen T, Lammintausta K.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):37-41
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Formaldehyde exposure and patterns of concomitant contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers.  
Lundov MD, Johansen JD, Carlsen BC, Engkilde K, Menne T, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):31-36
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Identification of IgE-reactive proteins in patients with wheat protein contact dermatitis.  
Matsuo H, Uemura M, Yorozuya M, Adachi A, Morita E.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):23-30
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Nickel (Ni) allergic patients with complications to Ni containing joint replacement show preferential IL-17 type reactivity to Ni.  
Summer B, Paul C, Mazoochian F, Rau C, Thomsen M, Banke I, Gollwitzer H, Dietrich KA, Mayer-Wagner S, Ruzicka T, Thomas P.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):15-22
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Generalized exacerbation of systemic allergic dermatitis due to zinc patch test and dental treatments.  
Saito N, Yamane N, Matsumura W, Fujita Y, Inokuma D, Kuroshima S, Hamasaka K, Shimizu H.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):372-373

Contact sensitization to European baseline series of allergens in university students in Beijing.  
Li LF.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):371-372

Does airborne nickel exposure induce nickel sensitization?  
Mann E, Ranft U, Eberwein G, Gladtke D, Sugiri D, Behrendt H, Ring J, Schafer T, Begerow J, Wittsiepe J, Kramer U, Wilhelm M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):355-362
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Fragrance allergy: assessing the safety of washed fabrics.  
Basketter DA, Pons-Guiraud A, van AA, Laverdet C, Marty JP, Martin L, Berthod D, Siest S, Giordano-Labadie F, Tennstedt D, Baeck M, Vigan M, Laine G, Le Coz CJ, Jacobs MC, Bayrou O, Germaux MA.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):349-354
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Photoallergic contact dermatitis to 8-methoxypsoralen in Ficus carica.  
Bonamonte D, Foti C, Lionetti N, Rigano L, Angelini G.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):343-348
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The coumarin herniarin as a sensitizer in German chamomile [Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert, Compositae].  
Paulsen E, Otkjaer A, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):338-342
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Frequency of sensitization to common allergens: comparison between Europe and the USA.  
de Groot AC, Maibach HI.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jun;62(6):325-329
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Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 2. Formaldehyde-releasers in clothes: durable press chemical finishes.  
de Groot AC, Le Coz CJ, Lensen GJ, Flyvholm MA, Maibach HI, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 Jul;63(1):1-9
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Diagnosis of food allergy: epicutaneous skin tests, in vitro tests, and oral food challenge.  
Lieberman JA, Sicherer SH.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Oct 5;
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Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: An Update on Diagnosis and Treatment.  
Barg W, Medrala W, Wolanczyk-Medrala A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Oct 5;
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Allergic Reactions to Clopidogrel and Cross-Reactivity to Other Agents.  
Lokhandwala J, Best PJ, Henry Y, Berger PB.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Oct 13;
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Traffic-related air pollution and childhood asthma.  
Cetta F, Sala M, Camatini M.
Environ Health Perspect 2010 Jul;118(7):A283-A284

Common Filaggrin Null Alleles Are Not Associated with Hymenoptera Venom Allergy in Europeans.  
Aslam A, Lloyd-Lavery A, Warrell DA, Misbah S, Ogg GS.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 26;154(4):353-355
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Peach-induced contact urticaria is associated with lipid transfer protein sensitization.  
Asero R.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 26;154(4):345-348
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The Prevention Pendulum: Avoidance or Introduction.  
Hauswirth DW, Erwin EA.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 20;154(4):275-277
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Partial protein-hydrolyzed infant formula decreased food sensitization but not allergic diseases in a prospective birth cohort study.  
Kuo HC, Liu CA, Ou CY, Hsu TY, Wang CL, Huang HC, Chuang H, Liang HM, Yang KD.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 25;154(4):310-317
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Purification of the major group 1 allergen from Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1.  
Drew AC, Davies JM, Dang TD, Rolland JM, O'Hehir RE.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 20;154(4):295-298
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Detection of Bet v1, Bet v2 and Bet v4 specific IgE antibodies in the sera of children and adult patients allergic to birch pollen: evaluation of different ige reactivity profiles depending on age and local sensitization.  
Sekerkova A, Polackova M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 20;154(4):278-285
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The prevalence of celiac autoantibodies in hepatitis patients.  
Sima H, Hekmatdoost A, Ghaziani T, Alavian SM, Mashayekh A, Zali MR.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;9(3):157-162
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The accuracy of serum galactomannan assay in diagnosing invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.  
Sarrafzadeh SA, Hoseinpoor RA, Ardalan M, Mansouri D, Tabarsi P, Pourpak Z.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;9(3):149-155
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Crystal structure of the dog lipocalin allergen Can f 2: implications for cross-reactivity to the cat allergen Fel d 4.  
Madhurantakam C, Nilsson OB, Uchtenhagen H, Konradsen J, Saarne T, Högbom E, Sandalova T, Grönlund H, Achour A.
J Mol Biol 2010 Aug 6;401(1):68-83.
Abstract

Quality of life and pets.  
Brenna OV.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct 4;

Exposure of rye (Secale cereale) cultivars to elevated ozone levels increases the allergen content in pollen.  
Eckl-Dorna J, Klein B, Reichenauer TG, Niederberger V, Valenta R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Jul 30. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Can early introduction of egg prevent egg allergy in infants? A population-based study.  
Koplin JJ, Osborne NJ, Wake M, Martin PE, Gurrin LC, Robinson MN, Tey D, Slaa M, Thiele L, Miles L, Anderson D, Tan T, Dang TD, Hill DJ, Lowe AJ, Matheson MC, Ponsonby AL, Tang ML, Dharmage SC, .
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct;126(4):807-813
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National prevalence and risk factors for food allergy and relationship to asthma: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006.  
Liu AH, Jaramillo R, Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Bock SA, Burks AW, Massing M, Cohn RD, Zeldin DC.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct;126(4):798-806
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Impaired T(H)17 responses in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis with and without autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy.  
Ng WF, von DA, Carmichael AJ, Arkwright PD, Abinun M, Cant AJ, Jolles S, Lilic D.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Oct 7;
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A diagnostic model for the detection of sensitization to wheat allergens was developed and validated in bakery workers.  
Suarthana E, Vergouwe Y, Moons KG, de MJ, Grobbee D, Heederik D, Meijer E.
J Clin Epidemiol 2010 Sep;63(9):1011-1019
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Recurrent anaphylaxis due to lupin flour: primary sensitization through inhalation.  
Prieto A, Razzak E, Lindo DP, varez-Perea A, Rueda M, Baeza ML.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(1):76-79
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Involvement of lipid transfer proteins in saffron hypersensitivity: molecular cloning of the potential allergens.  
Gómez-Gómez L, Feo-Brito F, Rubio-Moraga A, Galindo PA, Prieto A, Ahrazem O.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(5):407-12.
Abstract

Identification of clinically relevant cross-sensitization between Soliadgo virgaurea (goldenrod) and Hevea brasiliensis (natural rubber latex).  
Bains SN, Hamilton RG, Abouhassan S, Lang D, Han Y, Hsieh FH.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):331-339
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Grass pollen, aeroallergens, and clinical symptoms in Ciudad Real, Spain.  
Feo BF, Mur GP, Carnes J, Fernandez-Caldas E, Lara P, Alonso AM, Garcia R, Guerra F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):295-302
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Peanut allergy: is maternal transmission of antigens during pregnancy and breastfeeding a risk factor?  
DesRoches A, Infante-Rivard C, Paradis L, Paradis J, Haddad E.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):289-294
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Pattern of sensitization to major allergens Der p 1 and Der p 2 in mite-sensitized individuals from Galicia, Spain.  
Iraola V, Boquete M, Pinto H, Carballada F, Carballas C, Carnes J.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(3):270-272

Beta-lactam hypersensitivity: from guidelines to daily practice.  
Campina CS, Neto M, Trindade M.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(2):175-176

Cinitapride-induced exanthema.  
Gonzalez Gutierrez ML, Rubio PM, Vazquez CS, Martinez Gonzalez de LB.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(2):174

Immunoglobulin E-mediated severe anaphylaxis to paclitaxel.  
Prieto GA, Pineda de la LF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(2):170-171

A case of famotidine-induced anaphylaxis.  
Kim YI, Park CK, Park DJ, Wi JO, Han ER, Koh YI.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(2):166-169
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Increased total and mite-specific immunoglobulin E in patients with aspirin-induced urticaria and angioedema.  
Sanchez-Borges M, Acevedo N, Caraballo L, Capriles-Hulett A, Caballero-Fonseca F.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(2):139-145
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2-phenoxyethanol-induced contact urticaria and anaphylaxis.  
Nunez OR, Carballas VC, Carballada GF, Boquete PM.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):354-355

Anaphylaxis due to Pachycondyla goeldii ant: a case report.  
Costa ME, Croce M, Pinto JR, Souza SK, Delazari SL, Baptista DN, Palma MS.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):352-353

Occupational asthma caused by turbot allergy in 3 fish-farm workers.  
Perez CC, Martin-Lazaro J, Ledesma A, de la TF.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):349-351
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Anaphylactic reaction due to cyclopentolate in a 4-year-old child.  
Tayman C, Mete E, Catal F, Akca H.
J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2010;20(4):347-348
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Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms secondary to sulfasalazine.  
Rosenbaum J, Alex G, Roberts H, Orchard D.
J Paediatr Child Health 2010 Apr;46(4):193-196
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Cloning and Expression of Che a 1, the major allergen of Chenopodium album in Escherichia coli.  
Vahedi F, Sankian M, Moghadam M, Mohaddesfar M, Ghobadi S, Varasteh AR.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 Sep 25. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

The most important contact sensitizers in Polish children and adolescents with atopy and chronic recurrent eczema as detected with the extended European Baseline Series.  
Czarnobilska E, Obtulowicz K, Dyga W, Spiewak R.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 25;
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Heredity of food allergies in an unselected child population: An epidemiological survey from Finland.  
Pyrhonen K, Hiltunen L, Kaila M, Nayha S, Laara E.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Oct 20;
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Allergologie moléculaire en pratique : à propos d’un patient polysensibilisé présentant plusieurs allergies alimentaires sévères / Molecular allergology in practice: about an polysensitized patients with multiple severe food allergies  
G. Pauli, T. Chivato
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(6):513-515 Pages
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Long-term exposure to close-proximity air pollution and asthma and allergies in urban children.  
Penard-Morand C, Raherison C, Charpin D, Kopferschmitt C, Lavaud F, Caillaud D, nnesi-Maesano I.
Eur Respir J 2010 Jul;36(1):33-40
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Infant swimming in chlorinated pools and the risks of bronchiolitis, asthma and allergy.  
Voisin C, Sardella A, Marcucci F, Bernard A.
Eur Respir J 2010 Jul;36(1):41-47
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A case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia following short-term passive smoking: an evidence of very high level of urinary cotinine.  
Komiya K, Teramoto S, Kawashima M, Kurosaki Y, Shoji S, Hebisawa A.
Allergol Int 2010 Oct 25;59(4):
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A convenient and sensitive allergy test: IgE crosslinking-induced luciferase expression in cultured mast cells.  
Nakamura R, Uchida Y, Higuchi M, Nakamura R, Tsuge I, Urisu A, Teshima R.
Allergy 2010 Oct;65(10):1266-1273
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Exposure to cadmium-contaminated soils increases allergenicity of Poa annua L. pollen.  
Aina R, Asero R, Ghiani A, Marconi G, Albertini E, Citterio S.
Allergy 2010 Oct;65(10):1313-1321
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Pet dander and difficult-to-control asthma: Therapeutic options.  
Ling M, Long AA.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Sep;31(5):385-391
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Pet dander and difficult-to-control asthma: The burden of illness.  
Ownby DR.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2010 Sep;31(5):381-384
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Fungal exposure modulates the effect of polymorphisms of chitinases on emergency department visits and hospitalizations.  
Wu AC, Lasky-Su J, Rogers CA, Klanderman BJ, Litonjua AA.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Oct 1;182(7):884-889
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Challenges faced by expatriate children with food allergy in an Asian country.  
Sivaraj H, Rajakulendran M, Lee BW, Shek L.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Oct;105(4):323-324

Variations in quality of life among caregivers of food allergic children.  
Springston EE, Smith B, Shulruff J, Pongracic J, Holl J, Gupta RS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Oct;105(4):287-294
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Bullying among pediatric patients with food allergy.  
Lieberman JA, Weiss C, Furlong TJ, Sicherer M, Sicherer SH.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Oct;105(4):282-286
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Drug allergy: an updated practice parameter.  

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Oct;105(4):259-273
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On the cover - date palm.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Oct;105(4):A4

Psoriatic skin lesions induced by certolizumab pegol.  
Klein RQ, Spivack J, Choate KA.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Sep;146(9):1055-1056

Allergic contact dermatitis to synthetic rubber gloves: changing trends in patch test reactions to accelerators.  
Cao LY, Taylor JS, Sood A, Murray D, Siegel PD.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Sep;146(9):1001-1007
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Molecular cloning and characterization of Cup a 4, a new allergen from Cupressus arizonica.  
Pico de Coaña Y, Parody N, Fuertes MÁ, Carnés J, Roncarolo D, Ariano R, Sastre J, Mistrello G, Alonso C.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2010 Oct 22;401(3):451-7.
Abstract


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