Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance InformationAllergy AdvisorAllergy Resources International
Allergy and Intolerance InformationAllAllergy.net
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Allergy and Intolerance Information
Index Allergens and Substances List Allergy Advisor Digest Contents of Journals Allergen and Substance Search
Phadia Allergy, Asthma and intolerance information
 Allergy Advisor Digest - October 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

Journals List | Journals Captured this Month | ALL Articles captured this Month

Previous Issues | All
August 2015   September 2015   October 2015   November 2015   December 2015   January 2016   February 2016   March 2016   April 2016   May 2016   June 2016   July 2016   August 2016   September 2016   October 2016   November 2016   December 2016   January 2017   February 2017   March 2017   April 2017   May 2017   June 2017   July 2017  

This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
Want to subscribe to our reminder service? 

Snippets NOT posted in the October 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Severe adverse drug reaction following Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) administration for copperhead snakebite.
Read A case of oral allergy syndrome due to star fruit (Carambola) sensitized from atopic hands.
Read Sensitization to fungal allergens: Resolved and unresolved issues.
Read Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.
Read Allergens, sources, particles, and molecules: Why do we make IgE responses?
Read Update on food allergy.
Read Allergic manifestation 15 years after early intervention with hydrolyzed formulas - the GINI Study.
Read Low indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in persistent food allergy in children.
Read Tobacco smoke exposure and multiplexed immunoglobulin E sensitization in children: a population-based study.
Read Drug Hypersensitivity in children: report from the pediatric task force of the EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group.
Read Epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions to food-allergic patients in primary care in The Netherlands.
Read Microbial transglutaminase: a new and emerging occupational allergen.
Read Occupational contact allergy in nurses
Read Food avoidance diets for dermatitis.
Read Methylisothiazolinone outbreak in the European Union.
Read Epidemiology of food allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis: is there really a Western world epidemic?
Read Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-associated plant food sensitization in Uganda and Germany: differences and similarities.
Read Patterns of sensitization to inhalant allergens in Japanese lower-grade schoolchildren and related factors.
Read Cross-reactivity among non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from food and pollen allergenic sources.
Read Anaphylactic reactions to low-molecular weight chemicals

Snippets posted in the October 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Diagnosis of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to sesame seeds supplemented with lipid body proteins.
Read A case of an anaphylactic reaction due to oats in granola.
Read Par j 2 (Wall Pellitory) IgE measurement for distinguishing between sensitization and allergy.
Read Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.
Read Staphylococcal enterotoxin IgE sensitization in late-onset severe eosinophilic asthma in the elderly.
Read Guidelines for the use and interpretation of diagnostic methods in adult food allergy.
Read Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.
Read Autoimmune diseases and celiac disease which came first: genotype or gluten?
Read Galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose allergy is not a hitherto unrecognized cause of chronic spontaneous urticaria.
Read Testing of gastric contents for peanut proteins in a 13-year old anaphylaxis victim.
Read Mouse sensitivity is an independent risk factor for rhinitis in children with asthma.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Severe adverse drug reaction following Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) administration for copperhead snakebite.
A 68-year-old man presented with progressive envenomation after receiving a copperhead snakebite on each hand. Crotalinae Fab antivenom was administered. While the initial and only dose was partially infusing, the patient developed an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of urticaria and hypotension, which resolved with cessation of the infusion, recurred with resumption of the infusion, and ultimately was completed with supportive care. An additional episode of hypotension, urticaria, and angioedema occurred shortly after antivenom therapy completion. Epinephrine was administered, resolving the reaction with complete patient recovery. The event received a Naranjo score of 10, indicating a definite ADR. DISCUSSION: Treating copperhead snakebites with antivenom is a matter of debate. Concern over adverse events and cost induce some physicians to manage copperhead bites without antivenom because they are generally milder in severity.

Severe adverse drug reaction following Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) administration for copperhead snakebite.  
Lepak MR, Bochenek SH, Bush SP.
Ann Pharmacother 2015 Jan;49(1):145-149

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A case of oral allergy syndrome due to star fruit (Carambola) sensitized from atopic hands.
A case of oral allergy syndrome due to star fruit sensitized from atopic hands. A 27-year-old Japanese female had worked as a pastry chef. She experienced an itching and burning sensation in the lips, mouth, and ear canal within fifteen minutes of consuming star fruit. The patient had experienced similar OAS symptoms previously after consuming kiwi fruit and papaya. Severe erythema, erosion, fissures and lichenification developed particularly on the hands. Prick-by-prick test showed a positive reaction to star fruit (3+), kiwi (3+), papaya (3+). The result of immunoblotting detected two bands for the star fruit proteins, 52 kDa and 92 kDa, in the patient's serum. Star fruit did not demonstrate any cross-reactivity with Japanese cedar, Hinoki cypress pollen, kiwi and papaya.

A case of oral allergy syndrome due to star fruit sensitized from atopic hands.  
Numata T, Ito T, Egusa C, Kobayashi Y, Maeda T, Tsuboi R.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):393-395

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to fungal allergens: Resolved and unresolved issues.
Although numerous species of fungi have been associated with allergic diseases in the literature, the significance of fungi from the genera Alternaria, Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Malassezia has been well documented. However, it should be emphasized that the contribution of different fungal allergens to allergic diseases is not identical, but species-specific. Alternaria and Cladosporium species are considered to be important outdoor allergens, and sensitization and exposure to species of these genera is related to the development of asthma and rhinitis, as well as epidemics of asthma exacerbation, including life-threatening asthma exacerbation. In contrast, xerophilic species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, excluding Aspergillus fumigatus, are implicated in allergic diseases as indoor allergens. A. fumigatus has a high capacity to colonize the bronchial tract of asthmatic patients, causing severe persistent asthma and low lung function, and sometimes leading to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Malassezia are common commensals of healthy skin, although they are also associated with atopic dermatitis, especially on the head and neck, but not with respiratory allergies. Despite its importance in the management of allergic diseases, precise recognition of species-specific IgE sensitization to fungal allergens is often challenging because the majority of fungal extracts exhibit broad cross-reactivity with taxonomically unrelated fungi. Recent progress in gene technology has contributed to the identification of specific and cross-reactive allergen components from different fungal sources. However, data demonstrating the clinical relevance of IgE reactivity to these allergen components are still insufficient

Sensitization to fungal allergens: Resolved and unresolved issues.  
Fukutomi Y, Taniguchi M.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):321-331

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.
The allergenic load of house dust mite allergy is largely constituted by a few proteins with a hierarchical pattern of allergenicity. The serodominant specificities are the group 1&2 and the group 23 faecal allergens. The collective IgE binding to the group 1&2 allergens can measure unequivocal HDM sensitisation better than HDM extracts although discrepancies have been found in regions with complex acarofauna suggesting a need to investigate the specificity with allergen components. The group 4, 5, 7&21 allergens that each induce responses in about 40% of subjects are mid-tier allergens accounting for most of the remaining IgE binding. Their titres are proportional to the concomitant responses to Der p1&2. Group 2 allergen variants have different antibody binding. Body proteins only occasionally induce sensitisation although a higher prevalence of binding by atopic dermatitis patients provides a new avenue of research. A broad spectrum of IgE binding has been associated with diverse symptoms but not with the severity of asthma which is associated with low IgG antibody. Some allergens such as the group 14 large lipid binding proteins and the recently described proteins Der f 24-33, need further investigation but with the cognoscence that other denominated allergens have been found to be minor sensitisers by comparative quantitative analyses. Scabies is a confounder for diagnosis with extracts, inducing cross-reactive antibodies with Der p 4&20 as is seafood allergy with cross reactivity to Der p 10 a minor HDM allergen. The HDM genome sequence can now be used to verify allelic and paralogous variations

Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.  
Thomas WR.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):304-311

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergens, sources, particles, and molecules: Why do we make IgE responses?
Allergens are foreign proteins or glycoproteins that are the target of IgE antibody responses in humans. The relationship between subsequent exposure and the allergic symptoms is often or usually obvious; however, there is increasing evidence that in asthma, atopic dermatitis and some forms of food allergy the induction of symptoms is delayed or chronic. The primary exposure to inhaled allergens is to the particles, which are capable of carrying allergens in the air. Thus, the response reflects not only the properties of the proteins, but also the biological properties of the other constituents of the particle. This is best understood in relation to the mite fecal particles in which the contents include many different immunologically active substances. Allergic disease first became a major problem over 100 years ago, and for many years sensitization to pollens was the dominant form of these diseases. The rise in pediatric asthma correlates best with the move of children indoors, which started in 1960 and was primarily driven by indoor entertainment for children. While the causes of the increase are not simple they include both a major increase in sensitization to indoor allergens and the complex consequences of inactivity. Most recently, there has also been an increase in food allergy. Understanding this has required a reappraisal of the importance of the skin as a route for sensitization. Overall, understanding allergic diseases requires knowing about the sources, the particles and the routes of exposure as well as the properties of the individual allergens

Allergens, sources, particles, and molecules: Why do we make IgE responses?  
Woodfolk JA, Commins SP, Schuyler AJ, Erwin EA, Platts-Mills TA.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):295-303

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Update on food allergy.
Food allergies are a global health issue with increasing prevalence. Allergic reactions can range from mild local symptoms to severe anaphylactic reactions. Immense progress has been made in diagnostic tools such as component-resolved diagnostics and its impact on risk stratification as well as in therapeutic approaches including biologicals. However, a cure for food allergy has not yet been achieved and patients and their families are forced to alter eating habits and social engagements, impacting their quality of life. New technologies and improved in vitro and in vivo models will advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis of food allergies and multicenter - multinational cohort studies will elucidate interactions between genetic background, lifestyle, and environmental factors. This review focuses on new insights and developments in the field of food allergy and summarizes recently published articles.

Update on food allergy.  
Carrard A, Rizzuti D, Sokollik C.
Allergy 2015 Oct 7;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergic manifestation 15 years after early intervention with hydrolyzed formulas - the GINI Study.
This study concludes that in high-risk children, early intervention using different hydrolyzed formulas has variable preventative effects on asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema up to adolescence.

Allergic manifestation 15 years after early intervention with hydrolyzed formulas - the GINI Study.  
Berg V, Filipiak-Pittroff B, Schulz H, Hoffmann U, Link E, Sussmann M, Schnappinger M, Bruske I, Standl M, Kramer U, Hoffmann B, Heinrich J, Bauer CP, Koletzko S, Berdel D.
Allergy 2015 Oct 14;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Low indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in persistent food allergy in children.
Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which degrades tryptophan (Trp) to kynurenine (Kyn) has been demonstrated to contribute to modulation of allergic responses. However, the role of IDO in food allergy has not yet been elucidated. This study concludes that the results imply the probability of involvement of IDO in development of tolerance process and we presume that high IDO activity is associated with non-responsiveness to food allergens despite allergen sensitization.

Low indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in persistent food allergy in children.  
Buyuktiryaki B, Sahiner UM, Girgin G, Birben E, Soyer OU, Cavkaytar O, Cetin C, Arik YE, Yavuz ST, Kalayci O, Baydar T, Sackesen C.
Allergy 2015 Oct 9;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Tobacco smoke exposure and multiplexed immunoglobulin E sensitization in children: a population-based study.
The association between tobacco smoke exposure and IgE sensitization to environmental allergens varies for different allergens among children. This study demonstrates that elevated serum cotinine levels are significantly associated with IgE sensitization to cockroaches, grass pollen, and certain foods, with potential dose-dependent relationships

Tobacco smoke exposure and multiplexed immunoglobulin E sensitization in children: a population-based study.  
Yao TC, Chang SW, Hua MC, Liao SL, Tsai MH, Lai SH, Tseng YL, Yeh KW, Tsai HJ, Huang JL.
Allergy 2015 Sep 28;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Drug Hypersensitivity in children: report from the pediatric task force of the EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group.
When questioned, about 10% of the parents report suspected hypersensitivity to at least one drug in their children. However, only a few of these reactions can be confirmed as allergic after a diagnostic workup. There is still a lack of knowledge on drug hypersensitivity epidemiology, clinical spectrum and appropriate diagnostic methods particularly in children. Meanwhile, the tools used for drug hypersensitivity management in adults are applied also for children. Whereas this appears generally acceptable, some aspects of drug hypersensitivity and management differ with age. Most reactions in children are still attributed to betalactams. Some manifestations, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-associated angioedema and serum sickness-like reactions are more frequent among young patients as compared to adults. Risk factors such as viral infections are particularly frequent in children, making the diagnosis challenging. The practicability and validity of skin test and other diagnostic procedures need further assessment in children. This paper presents an up-to-date review on epidemiology, clinical spectrum, diagnostic tools and current management of drug hypersensitivity in children. A new general algorithm for the study of these reactions in children is proposed. Data are presented focusing on reported differences between pediatric and adult patients, also identifying unmet needs to be addressed in further research.

Drug Hypersensitivity in children: report from the pediatric task force of the EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group.  
Gomes E, Brockow K, Kuyucu S, Saretta F, Mori F, Blanca-Lopez N, Ott H, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Kidon M, Caubet JC, Terreehorst I.
Allergy 2015 Sep 28;

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions to food-allergic patients in primary care in The Netherlands.
This study shows that high risk food-allergic patients that visit their GPs are often not prescribed an EAI. Thus, previously identified low rates of EAI ownership may be partly due to GPs not prescribing this medication to patients for whom it would be appropriate to do so. These data suggest that there is a need for improvement of the quality of care for high risk food-allergic patients in primary care

Epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions to food-allergic patients in primary care in The Netherlands.  
Saleh-Langenberg J, Dubois AE, Groenhof F, Kocks JW, van der MT, Flokstra-de Blok BM.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1128

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Microbial transglutaminase: a new and emerging occupational allergen.
A case of occupational sensitization to microbial transglutaminase in a worker from a company that commercializes ingredients for the food industry. In the plant, raw materials are weighed and mixed in various ?nished goods. Microbial transglutaminase was introduced in the productive cycle as dry powder preparations. Approximately 6 months after microbial transglutaminase introduction, a 40-year-old man suddenly developed wheezing, cough, and shortness of breath during and after the shift. The symptoms rose acutely at work soon after the inhalation of microbial transglutaminase and continued outside. High- resolution computed tomography of the thorax revealed broad centrolobular and particularly paraseptal emphysema, mainly in the upper lobes, thickness of bronchial walls, and bronchial mucous impaction in peripheral bronchial airways. Skin prick tests for common aeroallergens and foods were negative, but there was a clear immediate positive to a diluted solution of microbial transglutaminase. Increased microbial transglutaminase speci?c IgE levels was detected in the patient compared with other workers. An immunoreactive band of approximately 40 kDa, consistent with microbial transglutaminase molecular weight (38 kDa) was demonstrated.

Microbial transglutaminase: a new and emerging occupational allergen.  
De Palma G, Apostoli P, Mistrello G, Zanotta S, Bertorelli G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jun;112(6):553-4.

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Occupational contact allergy in nurses
Healthcare workers are occupationally exposed to various allergens in protective gloves, surface or instrument disinfectants, drugs, and skin care products. The purpose of this study was to update the range of occupational allergens in healthcare professionals. Patch test data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK), 2003-2012 was retrospectively analysed. Patch test results from 2248 nurses with OCD were compared with those of 2138 nurses without OCD. Significantly increased sensitization rates were found for thiuram mix (6.7%), potassium dichromate (5.7%), methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (4.4%), colophonium (3.4%), 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol (1.7%), and zinc diethyldithiocarbamate (1.7%). Patch testing with products from the patients' workplaces gave additional clues to further allergens, for example tetrazepam.

Occupational contact allergy in nurses: results from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology 2003-2012.  
Molin S, Bauer A, Schnuch A, Geier J.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Mar;72(3):164-171

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Food avoidance diets for dermatitis.
The authors conducted a systematic review of food avoidance diets in delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. While beneficial in some clinical circumstances, avoidance diets should be used with caution in infants and children, as growth impairment and developmental delay may result. Ultimately, dermatitis is highly multifactorial and avoidance diets may not improve symptoms of delayed-type food allergy until combined with other targeted therapies, including restoring balance in the skin microbiome and re-establishing proper skin barrier function

Food avoidance diets for dermatitis.  
Scott JF, Hammond MI, Nedorost ST.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Oct;15(10):563

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Methylisothiazolinone outbreak in the European Union.
The aim of this review was to examine the current outbreak of cases of contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone in Europe, a phenomenon that has also been observed worldwide, despite initial legislative control of the introduction of methylisothiazolinone into the market. Reported allergic contact reactions are primarily eczematous, most commonly in women over 40 from cosmetic use, but there are reports of noneczematous eruptions such as lichen planus-like or lymphomatoid reactions. Methylisothiazolinone in cosmetic, personal care, for example, wet wipe, and household products are the most common exposure. Occupational exposure is represented by workplace use of hygiene (healthcare) and beauty products (hairdressers, beauticians) together with water-based paints and other aqueous solutions such as cutting fluid.Methylisothiazolinone should be patch tested at a concentration of 2000 ppm (0.2% aqueous) to maximize sensitivity of the test.Notwithstanding the recommendation to discontinue the use of methylisothiazolinone in leave-on cosmetics, studies suggest safer use of concentrations should also be determined for rinse-off products. Legislation to improve labelling of industrial materials is also required.Going forward there is a need for collaboration between the cosmetic industry and interested physicians to break the recurrent cycle of sensitization to preservatives as one is replaced with another to maintain the risk of sensitization at an acceptably low level. Methylisothiazolinone is particularly relevant at present as strategies to control the outbreak are yet to be enforced and there is no current evidence of the outbreak abating.

Methylisothiazolinone outbreak in the European Union.  
Latheef F, Wilkinson SM.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Oct;15(5):461-466

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Epidemiology of food allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis: is there really a Western world epidemic?
The rise in food allergy prevalence in Western countries has happened more quickly than changes to the genome can occur; thus, environmental changes are likely to be important. Recent studies, however, suggest that genetic risk determines responses to environmental risk factors. Environmental peanut exposure has been associated with increased peanut allergy risk in individuals with filaggrin null mutations, consistently with sensitization occurring through a damaged skin barrier. Reduced microbial and vitamin D exposure is also leading candidates for risk factors for food allergy in the context of genetic susceptibility. In addition, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ gene region variants appear to play a role in peanut allergy, although no studies have yet assessed their susceptibility to environmental cues. Finally, findings from observational cohorts and the first large-scale intervention trials for food allergy prevention support early oral allergen exposure to reduce the prevalence of specific food allergies, which is informing changes in public health guidelines at the population level. Further research will be required to assess the impact of these guideline changes on the population prevalence of food allergy.

Epidemiology of food allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis: is there really a Western world epidemic?  
Koplin JJ, Mills EN, Allen KJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Oct;15(5):409-416

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-associated plant food sensitization in Uganda and Germany: differences and similarities.
This study aimed to investigate Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-associated plant food sensitization in atopic patients from Uganda and compare it with sensitization rates in German patients. Sera from 83 Ugandan and 97 German atopic patients were analysed for allergen-specific IgE against the birch tree pollen allergens Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 as well as the plant foods hazelnut, apple, kiwi, pea, peach, cherry, litchi, peanut, and soy. As expected, sensitization to Bet v 1 and cross-reactive plant food allergens was more common in German atopic patients. In contrast, the prevalence of sensitization against Bet v 2 was remarkably similar in Ugandan and German patients. Interestingly, in Ugandan patients IgE-mediated sensitization against plant foods such as hazelnut, pea, peach, cherry, and litchi that are neither cultivated nor consumed in Uganda was found. The study concludes that for Ugandan atopic patients, sensitization against the Bet v 2 allergen (a plant profilin) may explain cross-reactivity to several plant foods which are not consumed in Uganda. Additionally, it is probable that sensitization of Ugandan atopics to alder pollen (Alnus acuminata, plant family Betulaceae) caused serological cross-reactivity with Betula verrucosa-related allergens

Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-associated plant food sensitization in Uganda and Germany: differences and similarities.  
Odongo L, Mulyowa G, Goebeler M, Trautmann A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;167(4):264-269

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Patterns of sensitization to inhalant allergens in Japanese lower-grade schoolchildren and related factors.
This study clarified sensitization patterns to house dust mite (HDM) and Japanese cedar pollen (JCP) in Japanese lower-grade schoolchildren. The subjects comprised 8,815 pupils aged 6-9 years. The distribution of HDM- and JCP-specific IgE, respectively, was obtained as a marker of sensitization. Sensitization to HDM and JCP was detected in 51 and 39% of subjects, respectively, occurring more often in boys and at older ages.

Patterns of sensitization to inhalant allergens in Japanese lower-grade schoolchildren and related factors.  
Yamazaki S, Shima M, Nakadate T, Ohara T, Omori T, Ono M, Sato T, Nitta H.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;167(4):253-263

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Cross-reactivity among non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from food and pollen allergenic sources.
Non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are a family of pan-allergens present in foods and pollen. However, sequence homology among them is limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the IgE-mediated cross-reactivity between nsLTPs from different sources and evaluate the allergenic properties of LTPs from peach (Pru p 3) and pellitory (Par j 1/Par j 2), major fruit and pollen allergens. Both proteins were purified and characterised. Cross-reactivity studies among nsLTPs from different foods and pollens were performed by immunoblot inhibition using sera specific to peach or pellitory pollen. Cross-reactivity with Pru p 3 was observed in hazelnut, onion, corn, peanut and apple while in pollens, none of the extracts was inhibited with Par j 1/2. In conclusion, Pru p 3 did not inhibit LTPs from most fruits. Therefore, although Pru p 3 covers the largest number of epitopes, diagnosis with only this allergen may not detect all LTP sensitivities.

Cross-reactivity among non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from food and pollen allergenic sources.  
Morales M, López-Matas MÁ, Moya R, Carnés J.
Miscellaneous Food Chem 2014 Dec 15;165:397-402.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Anaphylactic reactions to low-molecular weight chemicals
Low-molecular weight chemicals (haptens) include a large group of chemical compounds occurring in work environment, items of everyday use (cleaning products, clothing, footwear, gloves, furniture), jewelry (earrings, bracelets), drugs, especially in cosmetics. They cause type IV hypersensitive reactions. During the induction phase of delayed-type hypersensitivity, haptens form complexes with skin proteins. After internalization through antigen presenting cells, they are bound to MHC class II molecules. Next, they are exposed against specific T-lymphocytes, what triggers activation of Th1 cells mainly. After repeating exposition to that hapten, during effector phase, Th1 induce production of cytokines affecting non-specific inflammatory cells. Usually, it causes contact dermatitis. However, occasionally incidence of immediate generalized reactions after contact with some kinds of haptens is noticed. A question arises, how the hapten does induce symptoms which are typical for anaphylaxis, and what contributes to amplification of this mechanism. It seems that this phenomenon arises from pathomechanism occurring in contact urticaria syndrome in which an anaphylactic reaction may be caused either by contact of sensitized skin with protein antigens, high-molecular weight allergens, or haptens. One of the hypotheses indicates the leading role of basophiles in this process. Their contact with haptens, may cause to release mediators of immediate allergic reaction (histamine, eicosanoids) and to produce cytokines corresponding to Th2 cells profile. Furthermore, Th17 lymphocytes secreting pro-inflammatory interleukin-17 might be engaged into amplifying hypersensitivity into immediate reactions and regulatory T-cells may play role in the process, due to insufficient control of the activity of effector cells

[Anaphylactic reactions to low-molecular weight chemicals].  
Nowak D, Panaszek B.
Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online ) 2015;69197-206

Click to view abstract

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Choosing the best panel of aeroallergen prick-tests for patients in Lebanon with rhinitis and asthma: A retrospective study of 2350 patients. [French]  
Bazarbachi T, Haddad Y, Irani C, Salameh P, Khoury D, Khayat G, Aoun Z, Riachy M, Dabar G, Ibrahim I.
Rev Mal Respir 2014 Nov;31(9):839-848
Click to view abstract

Severe adverse drug reaction following Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) administration for copperhead snakebite.  
Lepak MR, Bochenek SH, Bush SP.
Ann Pharmacother 2015 Jan;49(1):145-149
Click to view abstract

Diagnosis of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to sesame seeds supplemented with lipid body proteins.  
Barbarroja-Escudero J, Sanchez-Gonzalez MJ, ntolin-Amerigo D, Rodriguez-Rodriguez M, Pineda F, varez-Mon M.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):396-398

A case of oral allergy syndrome due to star fruit sensitized from atopic hands.  
Numata T, Ito T, Egusa C, Kobayashi Y, Maeda T, Tsuboi R.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):393-395

Usefulness of rapid measurement of serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine level in diagnosing drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.  
Komatsu-Fujii T, Ohta M, Niihara H, Morita E.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):388-389

A case of an anaphylactic reaction due to oats in granola.  
Ototake Y, Inomata N, Sano S, Takahashi S, Aihara M.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):386-387

Par j 2 IgE measurement for distinguishing between sensitization and allergy.  
Comite P, Ferrero F, Mussap M, Ciprandi G.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):384-385

A case of fixed drug eruption caused by loxoprofen sodium hydrate.  
Nakai N, Katoh N.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):377-378

Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.  
Matsuo H, Yokooji T, Taogoshi T.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):332-343
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to fungal allergens: Resolved and unresolved issues.  
Fukutomi Y, Taniguchi M.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):321-331
Click to view abstract

Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.  
Thomas WR.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):304-311
Click to view abstract

Allergens, sources, particles, and molecules: Why do we make IgE responses?  
Woodfolk JA, Commins SP, Schuyler AJ, Erwin EA, Platts-Mills TA.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):295-303
Click to view abstract

Allergens in modern society: Updated catalogs and future prospects.  
Takai T, Izuhara K.
Allergol Int 2015 Oct;64(4):293-294

Update on food allergy.  
Carrard A, Rizzuti D, Sokollik C.
Allergy 2015 Oct 7;
Click to view abstract

Allergic manifestation 15 years after early intervention with hydrolyzed formulas - the GINI Study.  
Berg V, Filipiak-Pittroff B, Schulz H, Hoffmann U, Link E, Sussmann M, Schnappinger M, Bruske I, Standl M, Kramer U, Hoffmann B, Heinrich J, Bauer CP, Koletzko S, Berdel D.
Allergy 2015 Oct 14;
Click to view abstract

Low indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in persistent food allergy in children.  
Buyuktiryaki B, Sahiner UM, Girgin G, Birben E, Soyer OU, Cavkaytar O, Cetin C, Arik YE, Yavuz ST, Kalayci O, Baydar T, Sackesen C.
Allergy 2015 Oct 9;
Click to view abstract

Tobacco smoke exposure and multiplexed immunoglobulin E sensitization in children: a population-based study.  
Yao TC, Chang SW, Hua MC, Liao SL, Tsai MH, Lai SH, Tseng YL, Yeh KW, Tsai HJ, Huang JL.
Allergy 2015 Sep 28;

Drug Hypersensitivity in children: report from the pediatric task force of the EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group.  
Gomes E, Brockow K, Kuyucu S, Saretta F, Mori F, Blanca-Lopez N, Ott H, tanaskovic-Markovic M, Kidon M, Caubet JC, Terreehorst I.
Allergy 2015 Sep 28;

Escalating incidence of eosinophilic esophagitis in Canton of Vaud, Switzerland, 1993-2013: a population-based study.  
Giriens B, Yan P, Safroneeva E, Zwahlen M, Reinhard A, Nydegger A, Vavricka S, Sempoux C, Straumann A, Schoepfer AM.
Allergy 2015 Aug 25;

Allergens in veterinary medicine.  
Mueller RS, Janda J, Jensen-Jarolim E, Rhyner C, Marti E.
Allergy 2015 Aug 17;

Prevalence of self reported food allergy in US adults: 2001, 2006, and 2010.  
Verrill L, Bruns R, Luccioli S.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Oct 8;
Click to view abstract

Epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions to food-allergic patients in primary care in The Netherlands.  
Saleh-Langenberg J, Dubois AE, Groenhof F, Kocks JW, van der MT, Flokstra-de Blok BM.
Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2015;1128
Click to view abstract

Microbial transglutaminase: a new and emerging occupational allergen.  
De Palma G, Apostoli P, Mistrello G, Zanotta S, Bertorelli G.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2014 Jun;112(6):553-4.

A novel approach to improving antibiotic selection in patients reporting penicillin allergy.  
Solensky R.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct;115(4):257-258

Increased basophil activation in adult patients with anaphylaxis.  
Kim JH, Kim SH, Palikhe S, Yang EM, Ye YM, Park HS.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct 1;

Allergen of the Month-Monk's Rhubarb.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct;115(4):A13

Delayed red meat allergy: clinical ramifications of galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose sensitization.  
Stewart PH, McMullan KL, LeBlanc SB.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Oct;115(4):260-264

Symptoms and hindrances due to pediatric JCP evaluated by patients and their parents. [Editorial][Japanese]  
Masuda S, Usui S.
Arerugi 2015 Jul;64(7):942-951
Click to view abstract

Indoor dampness and mould health effects - ongoing questions on microbial exposures and allergic versus nonallergic mechanisms.  
Cox-Ganser JM.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Oct;45(10):1478-1482

Anti-OX40L alone or in combination with anti-CD40L and CTLA4Ig does not inhibit the humoral and cellular response to a major grass pollen allergen.  
Gattringer M, Baranyi U, Pilat N, Hock K, Klaus C, Ramsey HE, Wrba F, Valenta R, Wekerle T.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Oct 14;
Click to view abstract

High prevalence of sIgE to Galactose-alpha1,3-galactose in rural pre-Alps area: a cross-sectional study.  
Villalta D, Pantarotto L, Da RM, Conte M, Sjolander S, Borres MP, Martelli P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Oct 9;
Click to view abstract

Staphylococcal enterotoxin IgE sensitization in late-onset severe eosinophilic asthma in the elderly.  
Song WJ, Sintobin I, Sohn KH, Kang MG, Park HK, Jo EJ, Lee SE, Yang MS, Kim SH, Park HK, Kwon YE, Kim TB, Kim SH, Park HW, Chang YS, Lee BJ, Jee YK, Choi BW, Bachert C, Cho SH.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Oct 5;
Click to view abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis in children; has there been a change in allergens?  
Vongyer GA, Green C.
Clin Exp Dermatol 2015 Jan;40(1):31-34
Click to view abstract

Guidelines for the use and interpretation of diagnostic methods in adult food allergy.  
Macchia D, Melioli G, Pravettoni V, Nucera E, Piantanida M, Caminati M, Campochiaro C, Yacoub MR, Schiavino D, Paganelli R, Di GM.
Clin Mol Allergy 2015;1327
Click to view abstract

Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.  
Skypala IJ, Williams M, Reeves L, Meyer R, Venter C.
Clin Transl Allergy 2015;534
Click to view abstract

Occupational contact allergy in nurses: results from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology 2003-2012.  
Molin S, Bauer A, Schnuch A, Geier J.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Mar;72(3):164-171
Click to view abstract

Investigation of diethylthiourea and ethyl isothiocyanate as potent skin allergens in chloroprene rubber.  
Ramzy AG, Hagvall L, Pei MN, Samuelsson K, Nilsson U.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Mar;72(3):139-146
Click to view abstract

Occupational exposure to metallic cobalt in a baker.  
Bregnbak D, Zachariae C, Thyssen JP.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Feb;72(2):118-119

Reduced content of chloroatranol and atranol in oak moss absolute significantly reduces the elicitation potential of this fragrance material.  
Andersen F, Andersen KH, Bernois A, Brault C, Bruze M, Eudes H, Gadras C, Signoret AC, Mose KF, Muller BP, Toulemonde B, Andersen KE.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Feb;72(2):75-83
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to palladium in Europe.  
Muris J, Goossens A, Goncalo M, Bircher AJ, Gimenez-Arnau A, Foti C, Bruze M, Andersen KE, Rustemeyer T, Feilzer AJ, Kleverlaan CJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2015 Jan;72(1):11-19
Click to view abstract

Food avoidance diets for dermatitis.  
Scott JF, Hammond MI, Nedorost ST.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Oct;15(10):563
Click to view abstract

Allergic Inflammation in Aspergillus fumigatus-Induced Fungal Asthma.  
Ghosh S, Hoselton SA, Schuh JM.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Oct;15(10):561
Click to view abstract

Methylisothiazolinone outbreak in the European Union.  
Latheef F, Wilkinson SM.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Oct;15(5):461-466
Click to view abstract

Epidemiology of food allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis: is there really a Western world epidemic?  
Koplin JJ, Mills EN, Allen KJ.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Oct;15(5):409-416
Click to view abstract

Autoimmune diseases and celiac disease which came first: genotype or gluten?  
Diamanti A, Capriati T, Bizzarri C, Ferretti F, Ancinelli M, Romano F, Perilli A, Laureti F, Locatelli M.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2015 Oct 16;1-11
Click to view abstract

Steviol glycoside safety: are highly purified steviol glycoside sweeteners food allergens?  
Urban JD, Carakostas MC, Taylor SL.
Food Chem Toxicol 2015 Jan;7571-78
Click to view abstract

Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-associated plant food sensitization in Uganda and Germany: differences and similarities.  
Odongo L, Mulyowa G, Goebeler M, Trautmann A.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;167(4):264-269
Click to view abstract

Galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose allergy is not a hitherto unrecognized cause of chronic spontaneous urticaria.  
Maurer M, Church MK, Metz M, Starkhammar M, Hamsten C, van Hage M.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;167(4):250-252
Click to view abstract

Patterns of sensitization to inhalant allergens in Japanese lower-grade schoolchildren and related factors.  
Yamazaki S, Shima M, Nakadate T, Ohara T, Omori T, Ono M, Sato T, Nitta H.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;167(4):253-263
Click to view abstract

BCG for the prevention of food allergy - exploring a new use for an old vaccine.  
Kiraly N, Allen KJ, Curtis N.
Med J Aust 2015 Jun 15;202(11):565-566

Cross-reactivity among non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from food and pollen allergenic sources.  
Morales M, López-Matas MÁ, Moya R, Carnés J.
Miscellaneous Food Chem 2014 Dec 15;165:397-402.
Abstract

Testing of gastric contents for peanut proteins in a 13-year old anaphylaxis victim.  
Beavers C, Stauble ME, Jortani SA.
Miscellaneous 592 2014 Feb 15;429:1-3.
Abstract

A tegument-specific venom allergen-like protein of Clonorchis sinensis.  
Woo HS, Kim TY, Sohn WM, Yong TS.
Parasitol Res 2015 Jan;114(1):329-333
Click to view abstract

Retracted: Immunopathology and Immunogenetics of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis,  
Journal of Allergy
J Allergy 2015 (2015), Article ID 213928, 1 page
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Anaphylaxis preparedness among preschool staff before and after an educational intervention.  
Ashley A. Foster, Ronna L. Campbell, Sangil Lee, and Jana L. Anderson
J Allergy 2015 (2015), Article ID 231862, 5 pages
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Persistent food allergy and food allergy coexistent with eczema is associated with reduced growth in the first 4 years of life.  
Beck C, Koplin J, Dharmage S, Wake M, Gurrin L, McWilliam V, Tang M, Sun C, Foskey R, Allen KJ.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Oct 1;
Click to view abstract

Mouse sensitivity is an independent risk factor for rhinitis in children with asthma.  
Sedaghat AR, Matsui EC, Baxi SN, Bollinger ME, Miller R, Perzanowski M, Phipatanakul W.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Oct 1;
Click to view abstract

Knowledge, practice, and views on precautionary allergen labeling for the management of patients with IgE-mediated food allergy-a survey of Australasian and UK health care professionals.  
Turner PJ, Allen KJ, Mehr S, Campbell DE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Oct 15;

Testing for clarithromycin hypersensitivity: A diagnostic challenge in childhood.  
Cavkaytar O, Karaatmaca B, Yilmaz EA, Sekerel BE, Soyer O.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Oct 15;

[Anaphylactic reactions to low-molecular weight chemicals].  
Nowak D, Panaszek B.
Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online ) 2015;69197-206
Click to view abstract

Hypoallergenicity of a new extensively hydrolyzed 100% whey-based formula containing probiotics  
Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, Laura A Czerkies, Heidi M Storm, Rosa Real, Barbara Collins and José M Saavedra
J Aller Ther 2015;6(5):221
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Tryptase levels in children presenting with anaphylaxis: Temporal trends and associated factors.  
De SS, Halbrich M, Clarke A, La VS, Eisman H, Alizadehfar R, Joseph L, Morris J, Ben-Shoshan M.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Oct 15;
Click to view abstract

Quantitative multiplex real-time PCR assay for shrimp allergen: comparison of commercial master mixes and PCR platforms in rapid cycling.  
Eischeid AC, Kasko SM.
J Food Prot 2015 Jan;78(1):230-234
Click to view abstract


Previous Issues of Allergy Advisor Digest
January 2010   February 2010   March 2010   April 2010   May 2010   June 2010   July 2010   August 2010   September 2010   October 2010   November 2010   December 2010   January 2011   February 2011   March 2011   April 2011   May 2011   June 2011   July 2011   August 2011   September 2011   October 2011   November 2011   December 2011   January 2012   February 2012   March 2012   April 2012   May 2012   June 2012   July 2012   August 2012   September 2012   October 2012   November 2012   December 2012   January 2013   February 2013   March 2013   April 2013   May 2013   June 2013   July 2013   August 2013   September 2013   October 2013   November 2013   December 2013   January 2014   February 2014   March 2014   April 2014   May 2014   June 2014   July 2014   August 2014   September 2014   October 2014   November 2014   December 2014   January 2015   February 2015   March 2015   April 2015   May 2015   June 2015   July 2015   August 2015   September 2015   October 2015   November 2015   December 2015   January 2016   February 2016   March 2016   April 2016   May 2016   June 2016   July 2016   August 2016   September 2016   October 2016   November 2016   December 2016   January 2017   February 2017   March 2017   April 2017   May 2017   June 2017   July 2017  


To subscribe to future Digest installments , subscribe here, and we will notify you when the new Digest is published.


Allergy and Intolerance Information