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 Allergy Advisor Digest - September 2010
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Read Prevalence and distribution of sensitization to foods in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey: a EuroPrevall analysis.
Read Contact urticaria induced by hydrolyzed wheat proteins in cosmetics.
Read Dog characteristics and allergen levels in the home.
Read Bridging allergologic and botanical knowledge in seasonal allergy: a role for phenology.
Read Octocrylene, an emerging photoallergen.
Read Microarray and allergenic activity assessment of milk allergens.
Read Allergy to rodents - Review.
Read Characterization of peach thaumatin-like proteins and their identification as major peach allergens.
Read Angioedema-like allergic contact dermatitis to castor oil.
Read Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy.
Read The role of inhalant food allergens in occupational asthma.
Read Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?
Read A serine protease, a major allergen of Curvularia lunata.
Read Skin prick test extracts for dog allergy diagnosis show considerable variations regarding the content of major and minor dog allergens.
Read A novel immunoassay using recombinant allergens simplifies peanut allergy diagnosis.
Read Allergenicity of Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and IgE sensitization
Read Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by means of peptide microarray immunoassay.
Read Sensitization to Dermatophagoides, Blomia tropicalis, and other mites in Israeli atopic patients.
Read Immuno-reactive molecules identified from the secreted proteome of Aspergillus fumigatus.
Read A major IgE epitope of rainbow trout collagen alpha2 chain.
Read Proteolytic processing of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2
Read Establishing the diagnosis of peanut allergy in children never exposed to peanut or with an uncertain history: a cross-Canada study.
Read Novel IgE-binding proteins from the German cockroach (Blattella germanica)
Read Clinical significance of decline in serum IgE levels in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.
Read Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti
Read Sensitization to Ficus benjamina prevalence in adult patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis.
Read Consumption of camel's milk by patients intolerant to lactose.
Read Sensitization to Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, farinae and siboney prevalence in patients with rhinitis, allergic asthma, or both, in a population of a metropolitan area of Mexico City.
Read Enterocolitis syndrome induced by dietary protein
Read A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to Art v 1 from mugwort.

Abstracts shared in September 2010 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Partial characterization of red gram (Cajanus cajan) (pigeon pea) antigens recognized by patients exhibiting rhinitis and bronchial asthma.
Read Shiitake dermatitis now occurs in France.
Read Lupine allergy in lentil-allergic patients.
Read The hazards of moist toilet paper: allergy to a preservative
Read Physico-chemical features of the environment affect the protein conformation and the immunoglobulin E reactivity of kiwellin (Act d 5).
Read The role of lipid transfer proteins in allergic diseases.
Read Characterization of potential allergens in fenugreek
Read Characterization of lupin major allergens (Lupinus albus L.).
Read First case of allergy to spiruline in a 13-year-old child.
Read Iodine toxicity from soy milk and seaweed ingestion is associated with serious thyroid dysfunction.

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence and distribution of sensitization to foods in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey: a EuroPrevall analysis.
Sera from the 'random sample' of young adults seen during the second phase of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey were analysed for IgE against 24 foods using ImmunoCAP. Sera were tested on five food mixes, and subsequently on individual foods in each positive mix. Sera from 4522 individuals living in 13 countries were tested for at least one food allergen mix. Prevalence of sensitization to any of the 24 food allergens ranged from 24.6% in Portland (USA) to 7.7% in Reykjavik (Iceland). With few exceptions, the relative prevalence of sensitization to different foods was similar in all countries. Sensitization rates to egg, fish and milk were each less than 1%, and the most common sensitizations are not represented in current commercial mixes. The prevalence of sensitization to foods was not related to that of sensitization to aeroallergens but was related to the geometric mean total IgE for the country.

Prevalence and distribution of sensitization to foods in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey: a EuroPrevall analysis.  
Burney P, Summers C, Chinn S, Hooper R, van RR, Lidholm J.
Allergy 2010 Sep;65(9):1182-1188

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Contact urticaria induced by hydrolyzed wheat proteins in cosmetics.
Hydrolyzed wheat protein, produced by hydrolysis of gluten, is used in certain cosmetics and foods as emulsifiers and stabilizers. It can induce contact urticaria to cosmetics and/or anaphylaxis to food via an immunologic mechanism.

A 28-year-old female beautician presented with recurrent contact urticaria, initially on the hands and then more diffused, immediately after applying cosmetics of the same brand containing hydrolyzed wheat protein. Skin tests were positive. A 34-year-old woman presented with four episodes of generalized urticaria after eating industrially prepared foods. She had also experienced contact urticaria with cosmetics. Skin tests with hydrolyzed wheat protein were positive. They were both tolerant to traditional wheat products, such as bread and pastries.

Contact urticaria induced by hydrolyzed wheat proteins in cosmetics. [French]  
Olaiwan A, Pecquet C, Mathelier-Fusade P, Frances C.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 Apr;137(4):281-284

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Dog characteristics and allergen levels in the home.
This study aimed to identify environmental factors and dog-specific characteristics that influence the accumulation of Canis familiaris 1 (Can f 1) in homes. Dust samples were collected from the floor of infants' bedrooms at a Wayne County Health, Environment, Allergy, & Asthma Longitudinal Study birth cohort study home visit and processed for Can f 1 using a standardized protocol. Households with dogs had higher levels of dog allergen in the home than those without dogs; however, the number of dogs in the home was not related to dog allergen levels. Homes with exclusively outdoor dogs had significantly higher dog allergen levels than homes without any dogs but significantly lower levels of dog allergen than homes with indoor dogs. Homes where the dog was allowed in the infant's bedroom had significantly higher Can f 1 levels on the child's bedroom floor than homes where it was not. The homes of altered dogs had higher Can f 1 levels than did their unaltered counterparts. No dog characteristic, other than altered status, was associated with allergen levels in the home.

Dog characteristics and allergen levels in the home.  
Nicholas C, Wegienka G, Havstad S, Zoratti E, Ownby D, Johnson CC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;105(3):228-233

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Bridging allergologic and botanical knowledge in seasonal allergy: a role for phenology.
"Background: Grass pollen is a worldwide cause of respiratory allergy. Identifying the causative species is essential, for example for choosing the appropriate immunotherapy, because not all grass allergens are totally cross-reacting, and the pollen calendars provide only a gross estimate. Phenologic analyses allow identification of the pollen release for each individual grass.

Objectives: To assess, using phenologic analyses, the true flowering periods of grasses and to compare the data with the standard pollen calendar.

Methods: Phenologic analyses were performed of the following grasses: black grass, sweet vernal grass, common wild oat, barren brome, cocksfoot, tall fescue, Yorkshire fog, ryegrass, Timothy grass, bulbous meadow-grass, Kentucky bluegrass, and Bermuda grass. Sampling was performed every 10 days, starting in April 2009, at 50 stations distributed across Italy. The flowering phase was assessed using a stereomicroscopy-based method for the detection of spreading stamens. The official pollen calendar was used for comparison.

Results: Relevant differences were found between grass pollen count and effective flowering of the grass species. Only some species contributed to the pollen peak, and a relevant pollen load for other species was also present out of the peak. Important Pooideae, such as Timothy grass, were not present during the pollen peak in northern and central Italy, and the same occurred with Bermuda grass.

Conclusions: The various species of grasses release their pollen grains at different times during the pollen season, and this information is missing with pollen calendars. This may have a relevant effect on the choice of an appropriate immunotherapy."

Bridging allergologic and botanical knowledge in seasonal allergy: a role for phenology.  
Frenguelli G, Passalacqua G, Bonini S, Fiocchi A, Incorvaia C, Marcucci F, Tedeschini E, Canonica GW, Frati F.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;105(3):223-227

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Octocrylene, an emerging photoallergen.
A report and discussion of 50 cases of photoallergic contact dermatitis from octocrylene, a UV filter. An unexpected association in adults with a history of photoallergic contact dermatitis from ketoprofen is described. Group A comprised 11 children; group B, 28 adults with a history of photoallergy from sunscreen products; and group C, 14 adults systematically tested with octocrylene because of a history of photoallergy from ketoprofen. All patients but 3 in group C had positive test reactions to octocrylene. Ten of 11 children in group A and 9 of 28 adults in group B had positive patch test reactions to octocrylene. One child in group A, the other 19 adults in group B, and 11 of 14 adults in group C had positive photopatch test reactions to octocrylene. All adults in group C and 24 of 28 adults in group B had a history of photoallergy from ketoprofen and positive patch test or photopatch test reactions to other allergens that are often positive in patients with photoallergy from ketoprofen, especially fragrance components. Patients with photoallergy from ketoprofen frequently have positive photopatch test reactions to octocrylene. These patients need to be informed of sunscreen products not containing octocrylene, benzophenone-3, or fragrances.

Octocrylene, an emerging photoallergen.  
venel-Audran M, Dutartre H, Goossens A, Jeanmougin M, Comte C, Bernier C, Benkalfate L, Michel M, Ferrier-Lebouedec MC, Vigan M, Bourrain JL, Outtas O, Peyron JL, Martin L.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Jul;146(7):753-757

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Microarray and allergenic activity assessment of milk allergens.
The objective of this study was to analyse the frequency of IgE reactivity and to determine the allergenic activity of individual cow's milk allergens. A nitrocellulose-based microarray, based on purified natural and recombinant cow's milk allergens was used to determine IgE reactivity profiles using sera from 78 cow's milk-sensitized individuals of varying ages. Using the microarray and the RBL (rat basophil leukaemia cells) assay, cow's milk allergens were assessed for frequency of IgE recognition and allergenic activity. The RBL assay allowed distinguishing individuals without or with mild clinical reactions from those with severe systemic or gastrointestinal symptoms as well as persons who grew out cow's milk allergy from those who did not.

Microarray and allergenic activity assessment of milk allergens.  
Hochwallner H, Schulmeister U, Swoboda I, Balic N, Geller B, Nystrand M, Harlin A, Thalhamer J, Scheiblhofer S, Niggemann B, Quirce S, Ebner C, Mari A, Pauli G, Herz U, Van Tol EA, Valenta R, .
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep 22;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergy to rodents - Review.
"Allergy to rodents in the workplace is an important occupational health problem affecting research, pharmaceutical and toxicological sectors and can have a serious impact on employees working in this area. Despite measures to reduce aeroallergen exposures to rodents in the workplace, there are few signs that this occupational health problem is declining. Rodent allergens are well characterized and exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated to be complex. More recently, the importance of rodent allergens outside of the workplace has been demonstrated in several studies of individuals with asthma. This review focuses on rodent allergy both in the workplace and in the home and examines the complex exposure-response relationships between allergen exposure and sensitization and asthma. Risk factors for rodent allergy and mechanisms of tolerance to rodent allergens are discussed."

Allergy to rodents: an update.  
Jeal H, Jones M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep 14;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Characterization of peach thaumatin-like proteins and their identification as major peach allergens.
Pru p 3, the lipid transfer protein of peach, has been described as the principal allergen responsible for cross-reactivities with other foods and pollen and the severity of clinical symptoms. Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) have been described as food allergen in several fruits, such as apple, cherry, kiwi and banana, and pollen. This study's objective was to identify members of the TLP family in peach fruit and to characterize putative allergens. Three isoforms, belonging to the TLP family, were purified: 2 peach-TLPs, Pru p 2.0101 and Pru p 2.0201, were identified as IgE-binding spots. Another peach-TLP, Pru p 2.0301, was cloned and produced as recombinant protein. All showed beta-1,3-glucanase activity and inhibition of fungal growth. The three TLPs were recognized by around 50% of the sera from 31 patients. All three gave a positive response to an SPT and/or in basophil activation experiments. Their prevalence, observed in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo analyses, suggests that they are important allergens and should therefore be included in the routine diagnosis of peach allergy, at least in the Mediterranean area.

Characterization of peach thaumatin-like proteins and their identification as major peach allergens.  
Palacin A, Tordesillas L, Gamboa P, Sanchez-Monge R, Cuesta-Herranz J, Sanz ML, Barber D, Salcedo G, az-Perales A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep;40(9):1422-1430

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Angioedema-like allergic contact dermatitis to castor oil.
A report of angioedema-like allergic contact dermatitis to castor oil.

Angioedema-like allergic contact dermatitis to castor oil.  
Sanchez-Guerrero IM, Huertas AJ, Lopez MP, Carreno A, Ramirez M, Pajaron M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):318-319

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy.
"This is one of a series of review articles on formaldehyde-releasers and their relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy and in this paper formaldehyde-releasers used as durable press chemical finishes (DPCF) in textiles are discussed. The literature on allergy to DPCF since 1980 is presented in two parts. Part 1 (this article) presents a short historical overview of the problems with formaldehyde in clothes and discusses the chemistry of durable press chemical finishes, legislation in various countries, and studies on the amount of formaldehyde present in clothes. In addition, the DPCF that have caused contact allergy are presented with CAS, synonyms, molecular formula, chemical structure, applications, and patch test studies. In the forthcoming part 2, the frequency of sensitization to DPCF, occupational contact sensitization, relevance of patch test reactions, and relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of both parts of the article together."

Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Formaldehyde-releasers in clothes: durable press chemical finishes. Part 1.  
de Groot AC, Le Coz CJ, Lensen GJ, Flyvholm MA, Maibach HI, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):259-271

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
The role of inhalant food allergens in occupational asthma.
"Workers handling food products and derivatives are at increased risk of developing occupational asthma. Exposure to food allergens occurs primarily through inhalation of dust, steam, vapors, and aerosolized proteins generated during cutting, scrubbing or cleaning, cooking or boiling, and drying activities. Suspicion of the diagnosis of occupational asthma should lead to proper investigation to confirm the diagnosis objectively. Most inhaled food allergy is IgE mediated, and skin prick tests or specific IgE tests are useful tools to support the diagnosis, but objective evidence of asthma by monitoring of peak expiratory flows at and off work or specific inhalation challenges offers a better diagnostic value. This article provides a list of the various foods, food additives, and contaminants that have been associated with occupational asthma."

The role of inhalant food allergens in occupational asthma.  
Cartier A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):349-356

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?
"Overall, properly collected and analyzed data appear to both support and refute the hypothesis that specific allergen sensitization is inherited, even when attempting to account for the complexities of varying study methodologies and the evaluation of diverse populations and communities"

Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?  
Misiak RT, Wegienka G, Zoratti E.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):336-339

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A serine protease, a major allergen of Curvularia lunata.
This study aimed to clone, express and characterize a serine protease from Curvularia lunata. A clone showed significant homology to subtilisin like serine proteases from Aspergillus and Penicillium species. The protein resolved at 54-kDa and was recognized as a major allergen in 13/16 C. lunata sensitive patients' sera. Significant homology to subtilisin like serine proteases from Aspergillus and Penicillium species was demonstrated.

Molecular and immunological characterization of subtilisin like serine protease, a major allergen of Curvularia lunata.  
Tripathi P, Nair S, Singh BP, Arora N.
Immunobiology 2010 Jul 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Skin prick test extracts for dog allergy diagnosis show considerable variations regarding the content of major and minor dog allergens.
The total protein content and composition of dog SPT extracts from 5 European manufacturers were compared. Specific antibody probes were generated to detect major and minor allergens in each extract by immunoblotting. Additionally, sera of patients suffering from dog allergy were used to detect dog allergens in SPT extracts. SPT extracts showed a 20-fold variation regarding the total protein content. The contents of the major dog allergen Can f 1 and of Can f 2 varied considerably between the extracts. In one of the extracts, neither Can f 1 nor Can f 2 could be detected by immunoblotting. The contents of the minor dog allergen Can f 3, albumin, also showed great variability. In one of the dog SPT extracts, the presence of human serum albumin (HSA) was detected with HSA-specific antibodies.

Skin prick test extracts for dog allergy diagnosis show considerable variations regarding the content of major and minor dog allergens.  
Curin M, Reininger R, Swoboda I, Focke M, Valenta R, Spitzauer S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):258-263

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A novel immunoassay using recombinant allergens simplifies peanut allergy diagnosis.
Double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is currently considered the gold standard for peanut allergy diagnosis. A simpler and safer diagnosis procedure is needed. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of a new set of in vitro blood tests for peanut allergy. The levels of IgE directed towards peanut extract and recombinant peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 6, Ara h 7, and Ara h 8 were measured in 3 groups of patients enrolled at 2 independent centers: patients with proven peanut allergy (n = 166); pollen-sensitized subjects without peanut allergy (n = 61), and control subjects without allergic disease (n = 10). Seventy-nine percent of the pollen-sensitized patients showed IgE binding to peanut, despite their tolerance to peanut. In contrast, combining the results of specific IgE to peanut extract and to recombinant Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 yielded a peanut allergy diagnosis with a 98% sensitivity and an 85% specificity at a positivity threshold of 0.10 kU/l. Use of a threshold of 0.23 kU/l for recombinant Ara h 2 increased specificity (96%) at the cost of sensitivity (93%). However, DBPCFC will remain useful for the few cases where immunological and clinical observations yield conflicting results.

A novel immunoassay using recombinant allergens simplifies peanut allergy diagnosis.  
Codreanu F, Collignon O, Roitel O, Thouvenot B, Sauvage C, Vilain AC, Cousin MO, Decoster A, Renaudin JM, Astier C, Monnez JM, Vallois P, Morisset M, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Brulliard M, Ogier V.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):216-226

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergenicity of Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and IgE sensitization
Ascaris lumbricoides induces a Th2 response and specific IgE synthesis in humans. This confers antiparasite immunity but could modify the natural history of allergic diseases in the tropics, justifying the study of its allergenic composition. This study analyzed the allergenic properties of Ascaris tropomyosin and the frequency of sensitization in subjects exposed to the parasite. Specific IgE was measured by ELISA in 175 asthmatics and 170 nonasthmatics naturally exposed to the parasite and sensitized to the Ascaris extract. The 40-kDa protein was recognized by human serum and affinity-purified anti-rBlo t 10 IgE. Specific IgE to tropomyosin could represent approximately 50% of the total IgE response to the extract. Although the prevalence of IgE to Ascaris tropomyosin was higher in asthmatic patients, analysis suggested that this result was biased by sensitization to mites. Therefore, A. lumbricoides tropomyosin (Asc l 3) is a new allergen that binds specific IgE, induces mediator release from effector cells and is cross-reactive to mite tropomyosins. IgE reactivity to this allergen is very frequent in both asthmatic and normal subjects sensitized to Ascaris extract.

Allergenicity of Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and IgE sensitization among asthmatic patients in a tropical environment.  
Acevedo N, Erler A, Briza P, Puccio F, Ferreira F, Caraballo L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):195-206

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by means of peptide microarray immunoassay.
Lentils are often responsible for allergic reactions to legumes in Mediterranean children. The objective of this study was to identify IgE-binding epitopes of Len c 1 and relate epitope binding to clinical characteristics. One hundred thirty-five peptides corresponding to the primary sequence of Len c 1 were probed with sera from 33 patients with lentil allergy by means of microarray immunoassay. Hierarchic clustering of microarray data was used to correlate binding patterns with clinical findings. The patients with lentil allergy specifically recognized IgE-binding epitopes located in the C-terminal region between peptides 107 and 135. Linkage of cluster results with clinical data and lentil-specific IgE levels displayed a positive correlation between lentil-specific IgE levels, epitope recognition, and respiratory symptoms. The Len c 1 epitopes identified appear to be exposed on the surface of the molecule.

Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by means of peptide microarray immunoassay.  
Vereda A, Andreae DA, Lin J, Shreffler WG, Ibanez MD, Cuesta-Herranz J, Bardina L, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Sep;126(3):596-601

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to Dermatophagoides, Blomia tropicalis, and other mites in Israeli atopic patients.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of sensitization to various HDMs in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis and asthma in Israel. Sensitization of 117 patients with persistent rhinitis who attended the Allergy and Asthma Center in Tel Aviv were evaluated for Dermatophagoides farinae (DF), Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD), Blomia tropicalis (BT), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP), Acarus siro (AS), Glycyphagus domesticus (GD), Blomia kulagini (BK), and Tetranychus urticae (TU) sensitisation. Most patients (n = 95, 81%) had a positive SPT to at least one mite extract. The three most frequent positive reactions were to DF (78%), DP (75%), and, unexpectedly, BT (77%).

Sensitization to Dermatophagoides, Blomia tropicalis, and other mites in atopic patients.  
Sade K, Roitman D, Kivity S.
J Asthma 2010 Sep 17;

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Immuno-reactive molecules identified from the secreted proteome of Aspergillus fumigatus.
The secreted proteomes of a three week old culture of an Indian (190/96) and a German (DAYA) Aspergillus fumigatus isolate were investigated for reactivity with IgG and/or IgE antibodies derived from pooled ABPA patients' sera. 35 proteins from the two A. fumigatus strains were revealed. There were seven known A. fumigatus allergens among them (Asp f1-4, Asp f9, Asp f10 and Asp f13/15), whereas three proteins displaying significant sequence similarity to known fungal allergens have were assigned as predicted allergens (Dipeptidyl-peptidase-V precursor, Nuclear transport factor 2 and Malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent). Eight IgG and IgE reactive proteins were common in both strains; however, twelve proteins specifically reacted in 190/96 and fifteen in DAYA. Further testing with sera of 5 individual ABPA patients demonstrated that 12 out of 20 immunoreactive proteins of 190/96 strain of A. fumigatus had consistent reactivity with IgE. Seven of these proteins reacted with IgG also. 25 of 35 identified proteins were novel with respect to immuno-reactivity with ABPA patients' sera and could form a panel of molecules to improve the currently existing less sensitive diagnostic methods. (Singh 2010 ref.25306 7) (Singh 2010 ref.25306 5)

Immuno-reactive molecules identified from the secreted proteome of Aspergillus fumigatus.  
Singh B, Oellerich M, Kumar R, Kumar M, Bhadoria DP, Reichard U, Gupta VK, Sharma GL, Asif AR.
Miscellaneous J Proteome Res 2010 Sep 9. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A major IgE epitope of rainbow trout collagen alpha2 chain.
Bovine collagen is allergenic and its major IgE epitope has already been identified. Fish collagen is also allergenic but shows no IgE cross-reactivity with bovine collagen, implying that it has specific IgE epitopes. This study was initiated to elucidate IgE epitopes of rainbow trout collagen alpha2 chain.Using 10 patients' sera reacting to fish collagen revealed that the major IgE epitope is included in the R5 protein (region 821-1,041). Region 941-960 was found to be most IgE-reactive - this region accounted for more than 50% of the IgE reactivity to the R5 protein. The same region was found to be IgE-reactive in bastard halibut and zebrafish collagen alpha2 chains, but not in bovine collagen alpha2 chain. These results strongly suggest that region 941-960 is a major common IgE epitope of fish collagen alpha2 chains. (Shiomi 2010 ref.25309 3)

A major IgE epitope of rainbow trout collagen alpha2 chain.  
Shiomi K, Yoshida S, Sawaguchi T, Ishizaki S.
Miscellaneous 592 2010;51(4):153-9.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Proteolytic processing of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2
Proteolytic processing has been shown to be required for the maturation process of Ara h 6. The aim of this study was to examine whether Ara h 2 undergoes proteolytic processing and, if so, whether proteolytic processing influences its ability to bind human immunoglobulin E (IgE). Ara h 2 undergoes proteolytic processing by peanut proteases that involves C-terminal removal of a dipeptide. Hence Ara h 2 isolated from peanut extract is a complex mixture of two isoforms expressed by different genes, Ara h 2.01 and Ara h 2.02, as well as truncated forms generated by the proteolytic processing of these isoforms. (Radosavljevic 2010 ref.25324 5)

Insights into proteolytic processing of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2 by endogenous peanut proteases.  
Radosavljevic J, Dobrijevic D, Jadranin M, Blanusa M, Vukmirica J, Cirkovic Velickovic T.
Miscellaneous 592 2010;90(10):1702-8.

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Establishing the diagnosis of peanut allergy in children never exposed to peanut or with an uncertain history: a cross-Canada study.
"The diagnosis of peanut allergy (PA) can be complex especially in children never exposed to peanut or with an uncertain history. The aim of the study is to determine which diagnostic algorithms are used by Canadian allergists in such children. Children 1-17 yrs old never exposed to peanut or with an uncertain history having an allergist-confirmed diagnosis of PA were recruited from the Montreal Children's Hospital (MCH) and allergy advocacy organizations. Data on their clinical history and confirmatory testing were compared to six diagnostic algorithms: I. Skin prick test (SPT) >or=8 mm or specific IgE >or=5 kU/l or positive food challenge (+FC); II. SPT >or=8 or IgE >or=15 or +FC; III. SPT >or=13 or IgE >or=5 or +FC; IV. SPT >or=13 or IgE >or=15 or +FC; V. SPT >or=3 and IgE >or=5 or IgE >or=5 or +FC; VI. SPT >or=3 and IgE >or=15 or IgE >or=15 or +FC. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the use of each algorithm. Of 497 children recruited, 70% provided full data. The least stringent algorithm, algorithm I, was applied in 81.6% (95% CI, 77-85.6%) of children and the most stringent, algorithm VI, in 42.6% (95% CI, 37.2-48.1%).The factor most associated with the use of all algorithms was diagnosis made at the MCH in those never exposed to peanut. Other factors associated with the use of specific diagnostic algorithms were higher paternal education, longer disease duration, and the presence of hives, asthma, eczema, or other food allergies. Over 18% (95% CI, 14.4-23.0%) of children were diagnosed with PA without fulfilling even the least stringent diagnostic criteria."

Establishing the diagnosis of peanut allergy in children never exposed to peanut or with an uncertain history: a cross-Canada study.  
Ben-Shoshan M, Kagan R, Primeau MN, Alizadehfar R, Turnbull E, Harada L, Dufresne C, Allen M, Joseph L, St PY, Clarke A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep;21(6):920-926

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Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Novel IgE-binding proteins from the German cockroach (Blattella germanica)
Many proteins from the German cockroach show high IgE reactivity, but have never been comprehensively characterized. To identify these potential allergens, proteins anlaysed using a combination of proteomic techniques and bioinformatic allergen database analysis: a total of ten new B. germanica IgE-binding proteins were identified. Of these, aldolase, arginine kinase, enolase, Hsp70, triosephosphate isomerase, and vitellogenin have been reported as allergens in species other than B. germanica. Analysis indicated that arginine kinase, enolase, and triosephosphate isomerase showed significant potential cross-reactivity with other related allergens. This study revealed that vitellogenin is an important novel B. germanica allergen. Personalized profiling and reactivity of IgE Abs against the panel of IgE-binding proteins varied between cockroach-allergic individuals. (Chuang 2010 ref.25307 5)

Proteome mining for novel IgE-binding proteins from the German cockroach (Blattella germanica) and allergen profiling of patients  
Chuang JG, Su SN, Chiang BL, Lee HJ, Chow LP
Proteomics 2010(0):-

Abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Clinical significance of decline in serum IgE levels in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.
The total serum IgE level is a marker of immunological activity in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), and a 35% decline beyond six weeks is traditionally taken as criteria for remission. The data from this study suggests that a 35% decline in serum IgE levels at six weeks is not seen in all patients with ABPA, and the decline is slower in patients with baseline IgE levels <2500IU/mL. The quantum decline in serum IgE levels does not predict clinical outcomes.

Clinical significance of decline in serum IgE levels in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.  
Agarwal R, Gupta D, Aggarwal AN, Saxena AK, Saikia B, Chakrabarti A, Jindal SK.
Respir Med 2010 Feb;104(2):204-210

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti
This study investigated the prevalence of allergic reactions to Aedes aegypti bites in patients seeking treatment at a University Hospital in Monterrey, Mexico. A total of 482 patients between 2 and 60 years of age were included; 407 (84.4%) had a history of local reactions to mosquito bites. Twelve patients (2.4%) stated a history of large local reaction; three (0.6%) of them with a positive skin prick test, one (0.2%) of those had systemic reaction history to mosquito. Eighty five (17.6%) patients had a positive mosquito skin test and 307 (63.6%) had a positive skin test for at least one aeroallergen. Seventy-eight (91.7%) of the 85 patients with a positive mosquito skin test had a history of local skin reactions to mosquito bite. There was no statistically significance association between allergic diseases and mosquito allergy.

Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti at en el Regional Center of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, de Monterrey, Nuevo Leon. [Spanish]  
Gonzalez Diaz SN, Cruz AA, Sedo Mejia GA, Rojas Lozano AA, Valenzuela EA, Vidaurri Ojeda AC.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Mar;57(2):37-43

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to Ficus benjamina prevalence in adult patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis.
In this Mexican study, the prevalence of sensitization to Ficus benjamina on patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis, are reported. 89 patients with persistent moderate-severe allergic rhinitis were included. 59% had a Ficus benjamina plant at home or at work, 97% were located outdoors. Nine patients (10.1%) were sensitized to Ficus benjamina. A statistically significant association was found between sensitization to Ficus benjamina and to Felix domesticus, Canis familiaris, and Periplaneta. The prevalence of sensitization to Ficus benjamina was similar to that reported in the literature, and it is associated to three or more indoor allergens.

Sensitization to Ficus benjamina prevalence in adult patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis. [Spanish]  
Sedo Mejia GA, Weinmann AM, Gonzalez Diaz SN, Vidaurri Ojeda AC.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jan;57(1):11-17

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Consumption of camel's milk by patients intolerant to lactose.
Camel's milk can be considered an option for the individuals intolerant to lactose who present symptoms when ingesting cow's milk.

Consumption of camel's milk by patients intolerant to lactose. A preliminary study.  
Cardoso RR, Santos RM, Cardoso CR, Carvalho MO.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jan;57(1):26-32

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Sensitization to Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, farinae and siboney prevalence in patients with rhinitis, allergic asthma, or both, in a population of a metropolitan area of Mexico City.
This study sought to identify the prevalence of sensitization to Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides in patients with rhinitis and/or allergic bronchial asthma in a population of the metropolitan area of Mexico: 334 patients with a diagnosis of rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma, aged between 3 and 74 years, were selected, of which 189 had positive skin tests to at least one of the mites (Dermatophagoides and/or Blomia tropicalis). The total number of patients who presented positive skin test to Blomia tropicalis in association with other mites was 53 (28.0%) and the total number of patients who presented positive skin test to only Blomia tropicalis was 23 (12.1%).

Sensitization to Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, farinae and siboney prevalence in patients with rhinitis, allergic asthma, or both, in a population of a metropolitan area of Mexico City. [Spanish]  
Martinez Jimenez NE, Aguilar AD, Rojas RE.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jan;57(1):3-10

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Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Enterocolitis syndrome induced by dietary protein
Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) due to milk with signs of milk intolerance that began in the 1st days of life: consisting of minor and nonspecific symptoms. The 3 foods in question were cow's milk, soja, and wheat. FPIES was suspected at the age of 9 months after 3 hospitalizations for vomiting, sometimes associated with lethargy and hypotension which occurred around 2 h after cow's milk ingestion. Symptoms were not associated with positive specific IgE and cutaneous tests. Subsequently symptoms occurred with soy and wheat. As a result of late diagnosis, 3 anaphylactic shock episodes had occurred.

Syndrome d’entérocolite induit par les protéines alimentaires, à propos d’une observation (Enterocolitis syndrome induced by dietary protein, an observation)  
M. Chaabane, E. Bidat, B. Chevallier
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(5):465-469

Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to Art v 1 from mugwort.
Art v 1, the major pollen allergen of the composite plant mugwort has been identified recently as a thionin-like protein with a bulky arabinogalactan-protein moiety. A close relative of mugwort, ragweed is an important allergen source in North America, and, since 1990, ragweed has become a growing health concern in Europe as well. Weed pollen-sensitized patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to a ragweed pollen protein of 29-31 kDa which could be inhibited by the mugwort allergen Art v 1. The purified ragweed pollen protein had high homology to Art v 1. Immunological characterization revealed that the recombinant ragweed protein reacted with >30% of the weed pollen allergic patients. Therefore, this protein from ragweed pollen constitutes a novel important ragweed allergen and has been designated Amb a 4

A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to Art v 1 from mugwort.  
Leonard R, Wopfner N, Pabst M, Stadlmann J, Petersen BO, Duus JO, Himly M, Radauer C, Gadermaier G, Razzazi-Fazeli E, Ferreira F, Altmann F.
J Biol Chem 2010 Aug 27;285(35):27192-27200

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Partial characterization of red gram (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp) polypeptides recognized by patients exhibiting rhinitis and bronchial asthma.  
Misra A, Kumar R, Mishra V, Chaudhari BP, Tripathi A, Das M, Dwivedi PD.
Food Chem Toxicol 2010 Oct;48(10):2725-36.
Abstract

Prevalence and distribution of sensitization to foods in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey: a EuroPrevall analysis.  
Burney P, Summers C, Chinn S, Hooper R, van RR, Lidholm J.
Allergy 2010 Sep;65(9):1182-1188
Click to view abstract

Systemic allergic contact dermatitis from intravenous piritramide.  
Waltermann K, Geier J, Diessenbacher P, Schadendorf D, Hillen U.
Allergy 2010 Sep;65(9):1203-1204

Effects of green buildings on employee health and productivity.  
Singh A, Syal M, Grady SC, Korkmaz S.
Am J Public Health 2010 Sep;100(9):1665-1668

High exposure to passive tobacco smoking and the development of asthma in an adult patient who had never smoked.  
Jerzynska J, Stelmach I, Grzelewski T, Stelmach W, Krakowiak J.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010 Aug 1;182(3):433-434

Codeine and cutaneous drug reactions: Absence of cross-allergy with tramadol and fentanyl. [French]  
Schmutz JL, Barbaud A, Trechot P.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 May;137(5):429

Shiitake dermatitis now occurs in France. [French]  
Herault M, Waton J, Bursztejn AC, Schmutz JL, Barbaud A.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 Apr;137(4):290-293

Contact urticaria induced by hydrolyzed wheat proteins in cosmetics. [French]  
Olaiwan A, Pecquet C, Mathelier-Fusade P, Frances C.
Ann Dermatol Venereol 2010 Apr;137(4):281-284

Uncovered reactivity to lupine in lentil-allergic patients.  
Cabanillas B, Crespo JF, Cuadrado C, Burbano C, Rodriguez J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Jul;105(1):94-96

Anaphylaxis induced by fosfomycin.  
Sanchez-Morillas L, Perez-Ezquerra PR, Reano-Martos M, Mayorga C, Laguna-Martinez JJ.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;105(3):241

Dog characteristics and allergen levels in the home.  
Nicholas C, Wegienka G, Havstad S, Zoratti E, Ownby D, Johnson CC.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;105(3):228-233
Click to view abstract

Bridging allergologic and botanical knowledge in seasonal allergy: a role for phenology.  
Frenguelli G, Passalacqua G, Bonini S, Fiocchi A, Incorvaia C, Marcucci F, Tedeschini E, Canonica GW, Frati F.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2010 Sep;105(3):223-227
Click to view abstract

The hazards of moist toilet paper: allergy to the preservative methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone.  
Gardner KH, Davis MD, Richardson DM, Pittelkow MR.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Aug;146(8):886-890

Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis to baby wipes.  
Mendese G, Beckford A, Demierre MF.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Aug;146(8):934-935

Papulopustular eruption associated with panitumumab.  
Korman JB, Ward DB, Maize JC.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Aug;146(8):926-927

Octocrylene, an emerging photoallergen.  
venel-Audran M, Dutartre H, Goossens A, Jeanmougin M, Comte C, Bernier C, Benkalfate L, Michel M, Ferrier-Lebouedec MC, Vigan M, Bourrain JL, Outtas O, Peyron JL, Martin L.
Arch Dermatol 2010 Jul;146(7):753-757

Sitagliptin-associated drug allergy: review of spontaneous adverse event reports.  
Desai S, Brinker A, Swann J, Iyasu S.
Arch Intern Med 2010 Jul 12;170(13):1169-1171

Microarray and allergenic activity assessment of milk allergens.  
Hochwallner H, Schulmeister U, Swoboda I, Balic N, Geller B, Nystrand M, Harlin A, Thalhamer J, Scheiblhofer S, Niggemann B, Quirce S, Ebner C, Mari A, Pauli G, Herz U, Van Tol EA, Valenta R, .
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep 22;
Click to view abstract

Physico-chemical features of the environment affect the protein conformation and the immunoglobulin E reactivity of kiwellin (Act d 5).  
Bernardi ML, Picone D, Tuppo L, Giangrieco I, Petrella G, Palazzo P, Ferrara R, Tamburrini M, Mari A, Ciardiello MA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep 2;
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What do asthmatics have to fear from food and additive allergy?  
Gillman A, Douglass JA.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep;40(9):1295-1302
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Allergy to rodents: an update.  
Jeal H, Jones M.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep 14;
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Characterization of peach thaumatin-like proteins and their identification as major peach allergens.  
Palacin A, Tordesillas L, Gamboa P, Sanchez-Monge R, Cuesta-Herranz J, Sanz ML, Barber D, Salcedo G, az-Perales A.
Clin Exp Allergy 2010 Sep;40(9):1422-1430
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Nail-art and cobalt allergy.  
Guarneri F, Guarneri C, Cannavo SP.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):320-321

Allergic contact dermatitis due to the beta-blocker betaxolol in eyedrops, with cross-sensitivity to timolol.  
Nino M, Napolitano M, Scalvenzi M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):319-320

Angioedema-like allergic contact dermatitis to castor oil.  
Sanchez-Guerrero IM, Huertas AJ, Lopez MP, Carreno A, Ramirez M, Pajaron M.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):318-319

Non-occupational allergic contact dermatitis from 2-N-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one in a Japanese mattress gel-sheet used for cooling.  
Fukunaga A, Nishiyama S, Shimizu H, Nagai H, Horikawa T, Mori A, Inoue N, Sasaki K, Nishigori C.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):317-318

Allergic contact dermatitis to Dermabond after orthopaedic joint replacement.  
El-Dars LD, Chaudhury W, Hughes TM, Stone NM.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):315-317

Contact dermatitis to self-adhesive ECG electrodes.  
Ruhlemann D, Kugler K, Mydlach B, Frosch PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):314-315

Variability in patch test reactions--first report from the Norwegian Patch Test Registry.  
Helsing P, Gjersvik P, Holm JO, Steinkjer B, Holsen D, Johnsson M, Braun R, Vardal M, Austad J.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):309-313

Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from tetrazepam in nurses.  
Vander HK, Kerre S, Goossens A.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):303-308

Increased sensitivity of patch testing by standardized tape stripping beforehand: a multicentre diagnostic accuracy study.  
Dickel H, Kreft B, Kuss O, Worm M, Soost S, Brasch J, Pfutzner W, Grabbe J, ngelova-Fischer I, Elsner P, Fluhr J, Altmeyer P, Geier J.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):294-302

Validity of self-reported nickel allergy.  
Josefson A, Farm G, Meding B.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):289-293

Sensitivity and specificity of the nickel spot (dimethylglyoxime) test.  
Thyssen JP, Skare L, Lundgren L, Menne T, Johansen JD, Maibach HI, Liden C.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):279-288

Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Formaldehyde-releasers in clothes: durable press chemical finishes. Part 1.  
de Groot AC, Le Coz CJ, Lensen GJ, Flyvholm MA, Maibach HI, Coenraads PJ.
Contact Dermatitis 2010 May;62(5):259-271

Component resolved testing for allergic sensitization.  
Skamstrup HK, Poulsen LK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):340-348
Click to view abstract

Microarrayed allergen molecules for the diagnosis of allergic diseases.  
Mari A, Alessandri C, Bernardi ML, Ferrara R, Scala E, Zennaro D.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):357-364
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The role of inhalant food allergens in occupational asthma.  
Cartier A.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):349-356
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The role of lipid transfer proteins in allergic diseases.  
Egger M, Hauser M, Mari A, Ferreira F, Gadermaier G.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):326-335
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Are specific allergen sensitivities inherited?  
Misiak RT, Wegienka G, Zoratti E.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):336-339
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There's a mouse in the house.  
Bush RK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):306-307

Exposure to indoor fungi: a new paradigm.  
Bush RK.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2010 Sep;10(5):308-309

Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and congenital susceptibility to Candida.  
Glocker E, Grimbacher B.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Sep 20;
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Molecular and immunological characterization of subtilisin like serine protease, a major allergen of Curvularia lunata.  
Tripathi P, Nair S, Singh BP, Arora N.
Immunobiology 2010 Jul 26. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Skin prick test extracts for dog allergy diagnosis show considerable variations regarding the content of major and minor dog allergens.  
Curin M, Reininger R, Swoboda I, Focke M, Valenta R, Spitzauer S.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):258-263
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Serum IL-9 levels depend on allergen exposure: preliminary study.  
Ciprandi G, De AM, Castellazzi AM, Tosca MA, Marseglia G.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):246-248
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A novel immunoassay using recombinant allergens simplifies peanut allergy diagnosis.  
Codreanu F, Collignon O, Roitel O, Thouvenot B, Sauvage C, Vilain AC, Cousin MO, Decoster A, Renaudin JM, Astier C, Monnez JM, Vallois P, Morisset M, Moneret-Vautrin DA, Brulliard M, Ogier V.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):216-226
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Allergenicity of Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and IgE sensitization among asthmatic patients in a tropical environment.  
Acevedo N, Erler A, Briza P, Puccio F, Ferreira F, Caraballo L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):195-206
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Peanut allergy - a tough nut to crack.  
Zuidmeer L.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep 21;154(3):181-182
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Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by means of peptide microarray immunoassay.  
Vereda A, Andreae DA, Lin J, Shreffler WG, Ibanez MD, Cuesta-Herranz J, Bardina L, Sampson HA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Sep;126(3):596-601
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Phl p 5 resorption in human oral mucosa leads to dose-dependent and time-dependent allergen binding by oral mucosal Langerhans cells, attenuates their maturation, and enhances their migratory and TGF-beta1 and IL-10-producing properties.  
Allam JP, Wurtzen PA, Reinartz M, Winter J, Vrtala S, Chen KW, Valenta R, Wenghoefer M, Appel T, Gros E, Niederhagen B, Bieber T, Lund K, Novak N.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Sep;126(3):638-645
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Sensitization to Dermatophagoides, Blomia tropicalis, and other mites in atopic patients.  
Sade K, Roitman D, Kivity S.
J Asthma 2010 Sep 17;
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Putative association of SMAPIL polymorphisms with risk of aspirin intolerance in asthmatics.  
Yongha KJ, Kim JH, Park BL, Sub CH, Sook PJ, Soo JA, Uh ST, Choi JS, Kim YH, Kim MK, Choi IS, Heon CS, Whui CB, Park CS, Doo SH.
J Asthma 2010 Sep 13;
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Immuno-reactive molecules identified from the secreted proteome of Aspergillus fumigatus.  
Singh B, Oellerich M, Kumar R, Kumar M, Bhadoria DP, Reichard U, Gupta VK, Sharma GL, Asif AR.
Miscellaneous J Proteome Res 2010 Sep 9. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

A major IgE epitope of rainbow trout collagen alpha2 chain.  
Shiomi K, Yoshida S, Sawaguchi T, Ishizaki S.
Miscellaneous 592 2010;51(4):153-9.
Abstract

Characterization of potential allergens in fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) using patient sera and MS-based proteomic analysis.  
Faeste CK, Christians U, Egaas E, Jonscher KR.
Miscellaneous 592 2010 May 7;73(7):1321-33.
Abstract

Insights into proteolytic processing of the major peanut allergen Ara h 2 by endogenous peanut proteases.  
Radosavljevic J, Dobrijevic D, Jadranin M, Blanusa M, Vukmirica J, Cirkovic Velickovic T.
Miscellaneous 592 2010;90(10):1702-8.
Abstract

Characterization of lupin major allergens (Lupinus albus L.).  
Guillamón E, Rodríguez J, Burbano C, Muzquiz M, Pedrosa MM, Cabanillas B, Crespo JF, Sancho AI, Mills EN, Cuadrado C.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2010 May 11. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

Occupational asthma to caddis flies (Phryganeiae).  
Miedinger D, Cartier A, Lehrer SB, Labrecque M.
Occup Environ Med 2010 Jul;67(7):503

Allergen and endotoxin exposure in a companion animal hospital.  
Samadi S, Heederik DJ, Krop EJ, Jamshidifard AR, Willemse T, Wouters IM.
Occup Environ Med 2010 Jul;67(7):486-492

Establishing the diagnosis of peanut allergy in children never exposed to peanut or with an uncertain history: a cross-Canada study.  
Ben-Shoshan M, Kagan R, Primeau MN, Alizadehfar R, Turnbull E, Harada L, Dufresne C, Allen M, Joseph L, St PY, Clarke A.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep;21(6):920-926
Click to view abstract

Correlation of allergen-specific IgG subclass antibodies and T lymphocyte cytokine responses in children with multiple food allergies.  
Scott-Taylor TH, O'B HJ, Strobel S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010 Sep;21(6):935-944
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Proteome mining for novel IgE-binding proteins from the German cockroach (Blattella germanica) and allergen profiling of patients  
Chuang JG, Su SN, Chiang BL, Lee HJ, Chow LP
Proteomics 2010(0):-
Abstract

Clinical significance of decline in serum IgE levels in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.  
Agarwal R, Gupta D, Aggarwal AN, Saxena AK, Saikia B, Chakrabarti A, Jindal SK.
Respir Med 2010 Feb;104(2):204-210

Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti at en el Regional Center of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, de Monterrey, Nuevo Leon. [Spanish]  
Gonzalez Diaz SN, Cruz AA, Sedo Mejia GA, Rojas Lozano AA, Valenzuela EA, Vidaurri Ojeda AC.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Mar;57(2):37-43
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to Ficus benjamina prevalence in adult patients with moderate-severe allergic rhinitis. [Spanish]  
Sedo Mejia GA, Weinmann AM, Gonzalez Diaz SN, Vidaurri Ojeda AC.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jan;57(1):11-17
Click to view abstract

Consumption of camel's milk by patients intolerant to lactose. A preliminary study.  
Cardoso RR, Santos RM, Cardoso CR, Carvalho MO.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jan;57(1):26-32
Click to view abstract

Sensitization to Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, farinae and siboney prevalence in patients with rhinitis, allergic asthma, or both, in a population of a metropolitan area of Mexico City. [Spanish]  
Martinez Jimenez NE, Aguilar AD, Rojas RE.
Rev Alerg Mex 2010 Jan;57(1):3-10
Click to view abstract

Premier cas d’allergie à la spiruline chez un enfant de treize ans (First case of allergy to spiruline in a 13-year-old child.)  
Petrus M, Assih L, Horen B, Lapebie P, Trigatti A, Culerrier R, Barre A, Rouge P, Dutau G.
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(5):470-472
Abstract

Existe-t-il de nouvelles prises en charge pour les allergiques à l’arachide? (Are there any new support for those allergic to peanuts?)  
F. Rancé
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(5):417-418
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Synergie pollen–polluants et rôle des facteurs météorologiques sur le risque de pollinose:évolution des consultations (Synergy pollen-pollutants and the role of meteorological factors on the risk of hay fever)  
O.R. Abou Chakra, G. Lacroix, H. Senechal, M. Thibaudon
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(5):443-449
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Rôle des endotoxines de l’environnement intérieur dans les symptômes asthmatiques (Role of endotoxin in the indoor environment in asthma symptoms)  
D. Caillaud, B. Evrard, H. Laurichesse, B. Souweine
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(5):450-455
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Syndrome d’entérocolite induit par les protéines alimentaires, à propos d’une observation (Enterocolitis syndrome induced by dietary protein, an observation)  
M. Chaabane, E. Bidat, B. Chevallier
Rev Fr Allergol 2010;50(5):465-469
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Occupational rhinosinusitis due to etoposide, an antineoplastic agent.  
Meyer HW, Skov PS.
Scand J Work Environ Health 2010 May;36(3):266-267

A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to Art v 1 from mugwort.  
Leonard R, Wopfner N, Pabst M, Stadlmann J, Petersen BO, Duus JO, Himly M, Radauer C, Gadermaier G, Razzazi-Fazeli E, Ferreira F, Altmann F.
J Biol Chem 2010 Aug 27;285(35):27192-27200

Iodine toxicity from soy milk and seaweed ingestion is associated with serious thyroid dysfunction.  
Crawford BA, Cowell CT, Emder PJ, Learoyd DL, Chua EL, Sinn J, Jack MM.
MJA 2010;193(7):413-415
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract


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