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 Allergy Advisor Digest - September 2015
Editor: Dr. Harris A. Steinman

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This is a monthly digest of interesting information that is being added to Allergy Advisor. While we add a great deal of information every month, here we highlight some of the more interesting articles.
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Snippets NOT posted in the September 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read What could be the role of molecular-based allergy diagnostics in detecting the risk of developing allergic sensitization to furry animals?
Read Different allergenicity of pollen extracts of three Mediterranean cypress species accounted for cytological observations.
Read Work-related respiratory symptoms in Champagne vineyard workers.
Read Two new types of allergens from the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.
Read Component-resolved diagnostics in vernal conjunctivitis.
Read What we miss if standard panel is used for skin prick testing?
Read Amaranthus species around Bangkok, Thailand and the release of allergenic proteins from their pollens.
Read Applications of molecular diagnostic testing in food allergy.
Read Allergen component testing in the diagnosis of food allergy.
Read A useful method to detect opioid allergies.
Read Pollensomes as natural vehicles for pollen allergens.

Snippets posted in the September 2015 Advisor Digest Newsletter

Read Malassezia spp.-specific immunoglobulin E level is a marker for severity of atopic dermatitis in adults.
Read Delayed Anaphylaxis to the flu vaccine unrelated to known non-viral components.
Read Tolerability to dogfish in children with fish allergy.
Read A case of natto (fermented-soybean)-induced late-onset anaphylaxis following scuba diving.
Read Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.
Read Molecular allergy diagnostics: analytical features that support clinical decisions.
Read Anaphylaxis to oats after cutaneous sensitization by oatmeal in skin products used for the treatment of atopic dermatitis.
Read Structural features, IgE binding and preliminary clinical findings of the 7kDa Lipid Transfer Protein from tomato seeds.
Read Wheat allergy in celiac children.
Read Exercise-induced anaphylaxis eating tuna
Read Allergenicity of sweetening proteins

Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What could be the role of molecular-based allergy diagnostics in detecting the risk of developing allergic sensitization to furry animals?
Although this highly refined diagnostic approach has been used in several fields of allergy diagnosis, we noticed the scarcity of data on the role of CDR in detecting current sensitization to the allergens of common pets (cat / dog) and, especially, its potential usefulness in predicting the risk of sensitization to other furry animals. Reported data suggest that cross-reacting mechanisms might play an important role in a significant proportion of allergic sensitizations to furry animals (common pets and unusual / exotic mammals) especially in the absence of any possible direct / indirect contact. In this context an evaluation of specific IgE by using the micro-array technique ImmunoCAP ISAC for lipocalins (Can f 1, Can f 2, Equ c 1, Fel d 4, Mus m 1) and albumins (Bos d 6, Can f 3, Equ c 3, Fel d 2) might be very useful to evaluate the possibility of cross-reactions between the allergens of different animals. In fact, allergic sensitization without animal exposure is a relevant risk for patients, because they are not aware about the possibility that even severe respiratory symptoms may develop after an occasional animal contact. This aspect should be taken into account by susceptible individuals before acquiring new pets, after removal of common pets or beginning a contact for working / leisure activity with a common as well as uncommon animal.

What could be the role of molecular-based allergy diagnostics in detecting the risk of developing allergic sensitization to furry animals?  
Liccardi G, Bilo MB, Manzi F, Piccolo A, Di ME, Salzillo A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):163-167

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Different allergenicity of pollen extracts of three Mediterranean cypress species accounted for cytological observations.
Cypresses play an important role in the urban landscape of the Mediterranean region, releasing a huge amount of allergenic airborne pollen which causes a specific pollinosis in exposed people. The aim of this work is to evaluate, in vivo and in vitro, the potential allergenicity of Cupressus macrocarpa pollen, and to compare it with the allergenicity observed for C. arizonica and C. sempervirens. SDS PAGE, EAST inhibition and SPT indicated the higher allergenic potential of C. arizonica compared to C. sempervirens and C. macrocarpa. No significant differences in allergenic potential were found between the latter two species. Cytochemical observations reveal higher beta-glucans and protein content in the intine of C. arizonica during hydration. The higher protein content found in C. arizonica pollen grains extract may be due to higher enzyme activity leading to the movement of beta-glucans and pectins from the intine to the partially developed pollen cell wall during hydration. This could explain the higher potential allergenicity of C.arizonica in respect to C. macrocarpa and C. sempervirens

Different allergenicity of pollen extracts of three Mediterranean cypress species accounted for cytological observations.  
Barberini S, Della RG, Danti R, Zanoni D, Mori B, Ariano R, Mistrello G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):149-155

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Work-related respiratory symptoms in Champagne vineyard workers.
The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of work related respiratory symptoms (WRS) in Champagne VW in France and to analyze the relationships between symptoms, occupational exposure and sensitization profile. 307 subjects were included. The prevalence of WRS was 11%. Compared to subjects with symptoms unrelated to work, subjects with WRS were more frequently sensitized to gramineae (34% vs 18%, p = 0.05), described ocular itching (74% vs 37%, p < 0.001) and seasonal symptoms (88% vs 69%, p = 0.03) mainly during lifting and trellising (57% vs 17%, p < 0.001).

Work-related respiratory symptoms in Champagne vineyard workers.  
Perotin JM, Barbe C, Nguyen KL, Fontaine JF, Gabignon Y, Nardi J, Launois C, Lebargy F, Lavaud F, Deslee G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):140-144

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Two new types of allergens from the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.
Two novel allergen proteins Per a 11 (alpha-amylase) and Per a 12 (chitinase) with molecular weight around 55 and 45 kDa, respectively, were purified and characterized from the midgut of cockroaches. Sera from 39 and 30 of 47 (83.0% and 63.8%) patients reacted to Per a 11 and Per a 12 on immunoblots, respectively. The allergenicity of Per a 11 and Per a 12 was further confirmed by competitive ELISA, basophil activation test (BAT) and skin prick test (SPT).

Two new types of allergens from the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.  
Fang Y, Long C, Bai X, Liu W, Rong M, Lai R, An S.
Allergy 2015 Sep 12;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Component-resolved diagnostics in vernal conjunctivitis.
Conventional diagnostic tests in allergy are insufficient to clarify the origin of vernal conjunctivitis (VC). This study evaluated IgE-mediated hypersensitivity by component-resolved diagnosis (CRD) in tears and serum from patients with VC and to evaluate how to treat patients with identified triggering allergens by specific immunotherapy. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) patients with VC (25 patients), (2) patients allergic to grass pollen with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (AC) (50 patients), and (3) healthy blood donors (50 patients). If triggering allergens were detected, specific conventional immunotherapy was administered for 1 year. Twenty-five patients with VC were evaluated. The identified triggering allergens were n Lol p 1 (11 patients), n Cyn d 1 (8 patients), group 4 and 6 grasses (6 patients), and group 5 grasses (5 patients). Prick test and pollen IgE test results were positive in one patient. Clinical improvement was observed in 13 of the 25 patients with VC after 1 year of specific immunotherapy. The authors suggest that CRD seems to be a more sensitive diagnostic tool compared with prick test and IgE detection. Specific CRD-led immunotherapy may achieve clinical improvements in patients with VC.

Component-resolved diagnostics in vernal conjunctivitis.  
Armentia A, Iglesias B, Iglesias D, Montero JA, Sanchis E, Martin B, Fernandez D, Munoz F, Bermejo J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Sep 2;

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
What we miss if standard panel is used for skin prick testing?
This Turkish study aimed to find out sensitization rates (SR)s to additional panel of allergens and their relative contributions in allergic diseases. SPTs with a battery of aeroallergens [tree pollen (A.glutinosa, C.arizonica, J.communis, T.platyphyllos, R.pseudoacacia), weed pollen (R.acetosa, U.dioica, A.artemisifolia), smut mix, yeast mix, storage mites (SM) (B.tropicalis, L.destructor, T.putrescentiae, A.siro), mouse and budgerigar epithelia], were performed to 318 participants (6-18 years) who were previously identified to be sensitized to at least one of the aeroallergens found in standard battery. Forty percent of participants were sensitized to at least one additional aerollergen. Three most frequent sensitizations were to B.tropicalis (11.3%), R.pseudoacacia (9.7%) and L.destructor (8.2%). SR for tree pollen increased from 6.9% to 19.8%, for mites increased from 26.3% to 31.6% and for moulds increased from 5.3% to 9.4% with addition of respective group of other allergens to battery. Furthermore, higher rates for additional tree pollen sensitization was found among patients with 'only AR' (21%) compared to patients with 'only asthma' (4.6%, p =0.006), contrarily higher rates for SM sensitization was found among patients with 'only asthma' (20%) compared to patients with 'only AR' (3.2%, p =0.003). Though some of sensitizations may occur due to cross-reactivity, almost 40% of sensitized children were also co-sensitized to the additional allergens tested. Physicians should consider further steps when a negative or inconsistent result is achieved through a standard skin test panel.

What we miss if standard panel is used for skin prick testing?  
Cavkaytar O, Buyuktiryaki B, Sag E, Soyer O, Sekerel BE.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep;33(3):211-221

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Amaranthus species around Bangkok, Thailand and the release of allergenic proteins from their pollens.
Pollen of Amaranthus L., commonly known as careless weed or Phak-khom in Thai, has become one of the major causes of airway allergy in many countries including Thailand. This study aimed to survey species of Amaranthus found in Bangkok and to investigate the impact of water on pollen damage and protein release from Amaranthus pollens. Three species of Amaranthus-A. hybridus, A. spinosus, and A. viridis were identified. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed at least twelve protein bands with MW ranging from 10 to 80 kDa. The results of Western blot showed IgE-bound proteins with MW ranging from 30 to 50 kDa. Water could damage pollens and time after shedding and significantly affected the amount of allergenic proteins released from pollen.

Amaranthus species around Bangkok, Thailand and the release of allergenic proteins from their pollens.  
Siriwattanakul U, Piboonpocanun S, Traiperm P, Pichakam A, Songnuan W.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep;33(3):203-210

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Applications of molecular diagnostic testing in food allergy.
This review provides an update on the current knowledge on food allergens and their application in various diagnostic approaches such as skin prick test, basophil activation test, and serum IgE testing. Furthermore, these new approaches are discussed and compared to conventional extract-based assays and correlated to the gold standard of food allergy diagnosis, the double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. Finally, the application of food allergens for preventive measurements such as allergen detection assays and the determination of threshold levels for allergen levels are discussed

Applications of molecular diagnostic testing in food allergy.  
Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Pfeifer S, Bublin M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Sep;15(9):557

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Allergen component testing in the diagnosis of food allergy.
The diagnosis of food allergy has traditionally been based on clinical history and food specific IgE (sIgE) testing, including skin prick testing (SPT), serum tests, or both. These tests tend to be extremely sensitive, but positive test results to foods that are tolerated are common. Studies of allergen component-resolved diagnostics (CRD) show that adjuvant use of this modality may provide a more accurate assessment in the diagnosis of food allergy, though the reported benefits are questionable for a number of major allergens. Furthermore, diagnostic cutoff values have been difficult to determine for allergens where component testing has been demonstrated to be beneficial

Allergen component testing in the diagnosis of food allergy.  
Schussler E, Kattan J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Sep;15(9):554

Click to view abstract

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
A useful method to detect opioid allergies.
A letter to this journal states: "A recent Belgian study by Van Gasse et al concluded that IgE to poppy seed and morphine are not useful for the diagnosis of opiate allergy.1 We disagree with this affirmation that was based on a study of only 22 patients, of whom only 10 had positive IgE to poppy seed and were also sensitized to the major cross-reactive allergen, Bet v1. The patients in this study may have had a negative challenge because they were not really allergic to opiates" and continues "Our group has designed and patented a simple, inexpensive method of discovering antibodies to opioids. This is of major importance because opioids are commonly used as surgical anesthetics and as analgesics, and are sometimes not employed due to the severe allergic reactions they produce. Our method, based on a simple immunoassay, allows the detection of antibodies to opioids, cannabis, and cocaine."

A useful method to detect opioid allergies.  
Armentia A, Pineda F, Martin-Armentia B, Palacios R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):829-830

Index
Allergy and Intolerance Abstracts
Pollensomes as natural vehicles for pollen allergens.
Olive (Olea europaea) pollen constitutes one of the most important allergen sources in the Mediterranean countries and some areas of the United States, South Africa, and Australia. Recently, we provided evidence that olive pollen releases nanovesicles of respirable size, named generically pollensomes, during in vitro germination. Olive pollensomes contain allergens, such as Ole e 1, Ole e 11, and Ole e 12, suggesting a possible role in allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of pollensomes to the allergic reaction. We show that pollensomes exhibit allergenic activity in terms of patients' IgE-binding capacity, human basophil activation, and positive skin reaction in sensitized patients. Furthermore, allergen-containing pollensomes have been isolated from three clinically relevant nonphylogenetically related species: birch (Betula verrucosa), pine (Pinus sylvestris), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Most interesting, pollensomes were isolated from aerobiological samples collected with an eight-stage cascade impactor collector, indicating that pollensomes secretion is a naturally occurring phenomenon. Our findings indicate that pollensomes may represent widespread vehicles for pollen allergens, with potential implications in the allergic reaction

Pollensomes as natural vehicles for pollen allergens.  
Prado N, De LC, Sanz ML, Gamboa P, Villalba M, Rodriguez R, Batanero E.
J Immunol 2015 Jul 15;195(2):445-449

Index

Allergen-, Food allergy-, Intolerance-related articles

Nickel exposure when working out in the gym.  
Gumulka M, Matura M, Liden C, Kettelarij JA, Julander A.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Feb;95(2):247-249

Shiitake dermatitis - now also in Poland.  
Baran W, Batycka-Baran A, Maj J, Szepietowski JC.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Jan;95(1):102-103

Malassezia spp.-specific immunoglobulin E level is a marker for severity of atopic dermatitis in adults.  
Glatz M, Buchner M, von BW, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Worm M, Hedderich J, Folster-Holst R.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Feb;95(2):191-196

Methylisothiazolinone contact allergy is rising to alarming heights also in southern Sweden.  
Isaksson M, Hauksson I, Hindsen M, Ponten A, Svedman C, Bruze M.
Acta Derm Venereol 2015 Jan;95(1):31-34

What could be the role of molecular-based allergy diagnostics in detecting the risk of developing allergic sensitization to furry animals?  
Liccardi G, Bilo MB, Manzi F, Piccolo A, Di ME, Salzillo A.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):163-167
Click to view abstract

Alpha-gal anaphylaxis: the first case report in Italy.  
Calamari AM, Poppa M, Villalta D, Pravettoni V.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):161-162
Click to view abstract

Delayed Anaphylaxis to the flu vaccine unrelated to known non-viral components.  
David J, Horbal J, Tcheurekdjian H, Sher TH, Hostoffer R.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):159-160
Click to view abstract

Different allergenicity of pollen extracts of three Mediterranean cypress species accounted for cytological observations.  
Barberini S, Della RG, Danti R, Zanoni D, Mori B, Ariano R, Mistrello G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):149-155
Click to view abstract

Work-related respiratory symptoms in Champagne vineyard workers.  
Perotin JM, Barbe C, Nguyen KL, Fontaine JF, Gabignon Y, Nardi J, Launois C, Lebargy F, Lavaud F, Deslee G.
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep;47(5):140-144
Click to view abstract

Tolerability to dogfish in children with fish allergy.  
Calderon-Rodriguez S, Pineda F, Perez R, Munoz C.
Allergol Immunopathol (Madr ) 2015 Sep 1;
Click to view abstract

Abstracts from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Congress, 6-10 June 2015, Barcelona, Spain.  

Allergy 2015 Sep;70 Suppl 1011-649

Two new types of allergens from the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.  
Fang Y, Long C, Bai X, Liu W, Rong M, Lai R, An S.
Allergy 2015 Sep 12;
Click to view abstract

Differential skin test reactivity to pollens in pollen food allergy syndrome versus allergic rhinitis.  
Ta V, Scott DR, Chin WK, Wineinger NE, Kelso JM, White AA.
Allergy Asthma Proc 2015 Sep;36(5):379-385
Click to view abstract

Skin testing versus in vitro testing in the evaluation of aeroallergy: The great debate.  
Oppenheimer J.
Am J Rhinol Allergy 2015 Sep;29(5):362-364
Click to view abstract

Allergen of the Month-Western Red Cedar.  
Weber RW.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Sep;115(3):A11

Component-resolved diagnostics in vernal conjunctivitis.  
Armentia A, Iglesias B, Iglesias D, Montero JA, Sanchis E, Martin B, Fernandez D, Munoz F, Bermejo J.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Sep 2;
Click to view abstract

Seasonal exacerbation of esophageal eosinophilia in children with eosinophilic esophagitis and allergic rhinitis.  
Ram G, Lee J, Ott M, Brown-Whitehorn TF, Cianferoni A, Shuker M, Wang ML, Verma R, Liacouras CA, Spergel JM.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015 Sep;115(3):224-228
Click to view abstract

A case of nattou (fermented-soybean)-induced late-onset anaphylaxis following scuba diving. [Japanese]  
Nagakura T, Tanaka K, Horikawa S.
Arerugi 2015 Jun 1;64(6):816-821

Japanese guideline for food allergy 2012 specific type of food allergy.[Japanese]  
Urisu A.
Arerugi 2015 Jun 1;64(6):796-801

Airborne pollen survey in Bangkok, Thailand: A 35-year update.  
Songnuan W, Bunnag C, Soontrapa K, Pacharn P, Wangthan U, Siriwattanakul U, Malainual N.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep;33(3):253-262
Click to view abstract

What we miss if standard panel is used for skin prick testing?  
Cavkaytar O, Buyuktiryaki B, Sag E, Soyer O, Sekerel BE.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep;33(3):211-221
Click to view abstract

Amaranthus species around Bangkok, Thailand and the release of allergenic proteins from their pollens.  
Siriwattanakul U, Piboonpocanun S, Traiperm P, Pichakam A, Songnuan W.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep;33(3):203-210
Click to view abstract

Evolution of the incidence of pollen grains and sensitivity to pollen in the city of Elche (Spain).  
Javier F, Emilio F, Montserrat V, Victor S, Purificaci NG.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep;33(3):196-202
Click to view abstract

Prospective evaluation of IgE and eosinophilia in food allergy after liver transplantation.  
Yilmaz OO.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Sep 26;
Click to view abstract

Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Scherf KA, Brockow K, Biedermann T, Koehler P, Wieser H.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Sep 18;
Click to view abstract

Improved recombinant Api m1 and Ves v5 based IgE testing to dissect bee and yellow jacket allergy and their correlation with the severity of the sting reaction.  
Selb J, Kogovsek R, Silar M, Kosnik M, Korosec P.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Sep 14;
Click to view abstract

Pollinosis and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and elderly Japanese: a population-based cohort study.  
Konishi S, Ng CF, Stickley A, Watanabe C.
Clin Exp Allergy 2015 Sep 14;
Click to view abstract

Applications of molecular diagnostic testing in food allergy.  
Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Pfeifer S, Bublin M.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Sep;15(9):557
Click to view abstract

Molecular allergy diagnostics: analytical features that support clinical decisions.  
Hamilton RG, Kleine-Tebbe J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Sep;15(9):556
Click to view abstract

The prevalence of tree nut allergy: a systematic review.  
McWilliam V, Koplin J, Lodge C, Tang M, Dharmage S, Allen K.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Sep;15(9):555
Click to view abstract

Allergen component testing in the diagnosis of food allergy.  
Schussler E, Kattan J.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2015 Sep;15(9):554
Click to view abstract

Peanut allergy: changing epidemiology and management  
TA Ferreira-van der Watt
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(3):160
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Wheat-related disorders: making sense of Coeliac Disease and other reactions to wheat and gluten  
C van Rooyen, S van den Berg
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(3):176-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Immune-mediated adverse drug reactions in South Africa  
JG Peter, JP Mouton, R Lehloenya
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(3):186-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Epoxy resin and illness in the workplace  
L Fick
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(3):196-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

ABC OF ALLERGY - Cow’s Milk Protein Allergy  
S Emanuel, D Hawarden
Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2015;28(3):206-
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

From IgE to clinical trials of allergic rhinitis.  
Ciprandi G, Marseglia GL, Castagnoli R, Valsecchi C, Tagliacarne C, Caimmi S, Licari A.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2015 Sep 10;1-13
Click to view abstract

Work-related symptoms in indoor environments: a puzzling problem for the occupational physician.  
Magnavita N.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2015 Feb;88(2):185-196

Anaphylaxis to oats after cutaneous sensitization by oatmeal in skin products used for the treatment of atopic dermatitis.  
Radhakrishna N, Prickett S, Phan T, Rolland JM, Puy R, O'Hehir RE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Aug 14;

A useful method to detect opioid allergies.  
Armentia A, Pineda F, Martin-Armentia B, Palacios R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):829-830

Allergy to surgical implants.  
Pacheco KA.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):683-695
Click to view abstract

Pediatric allergic contact dermatitis: lessons for better care.  
Goldenberg A, Silverberg N, Silverberg JI, Treat J, Jacob SE.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):661-667
Click to view abstract

Contact dermatitis for the practicing allergist.  
Bernstein DI.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):652-658
Click to view abstract

Ovalbumin content in the yellow fever vaccine.  
Smith D, Wong P, Gomez R, White K.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):794-795

Food allergy to uncommonly challenged foods is rare based on oral food challenge.  
Ram G, Cianferoni A, Spergel JM.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep 2;

Implications of the 'Consensus Communication on Early Peanut Introduction in the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in High-Risk Infants' for Allergists, Primary Care Physicians, Patients, and Society.  
Sicherer SH, Bock SA, Zeiger RS.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015 Sep;3(5):649-651

Early peanut consumption is protective against peanut allergy development.  
Sicherer SH.
J Pediatr 2015 Jul;167(1):209

Highly increased levels of IgE antibodies to vaccine components in children with influenza vaccine-associated anaphylaxis.  
Nagao M, Fujisawa T, Ihara T, Kino Y.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep 11;
Click to view abstract

Allergenic significance of cephalosporin side chains.  
Baldo BA, Pham NH.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep 17;

Chronic cat allergen exposure induces a T2 cell-dependent IgG response related to low sensitization.  
Renand A, Archila LD, McGinty J, Wambre E, Robinson D, Hales BJ, Thomas WR, Kwok WW.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep 11;
Click to view abstract

Exposure-response analyses for platinum salt-exposed workers and sensitization: A retrospective cohort study among newly exposed workers using routinely collected surveillance data.  
Heederik D, Jacobs J, Samadi S, van RF, Portengen L, Houba R.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep 11;
Click to view abstract

Furry pets modulate gut microbiota composition in infants at risk for allergic disease.  
Nermes M, Endo A, Aarnio J, Salminen S, Isolauri E.
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Sep 3;

Pollensomes as natural vehicles for pollen allergens.  
Prado N, De LC, Sanz ML, Gamboa P, Villalba M, Rodriguez R, Batanero E.
J Immunol 2015 Jul 15;195(2):445-449

Titanium dioxide induces eyelid dermatitis in patients allergic to gold.  
Danesh M, Murase JE.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2015 Jul;73(1):e21

Cracking the egg: An insight into egg hypersensitivity.  
Dhanapala P, De SC, Doran T, Suphioglu C.
Mol Immunol 2015 Aug;66(2):375-383

Structural features, IgE binding and preliminary clinical findings of the 7kDa Lipid Transfer Protein from tomato seeds.  
Giangrieco I, Alessandri C, Rafaiani C, Santoro M, Zuzzi S, Tuppo L, Tamburrini M, D'Avino R, Ciardiello MA, Mari A.
Mol Immunol 2015 Aug;66(2):154-163

Allergen Responses Modified by a GATA3 DNAzyme.  
Caramori G, Chung KF, Barnes PJ.
N Engl J Med 2015 Sep 17;373(12):1176-1177

Provocation tests for the diagnosis of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.  
Asaumi T, Yanagida N, Sato S, Shukuya A, Nishino M, Ebisawa M.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep 11;
Click to view abstract

Recovery from food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by fish.  
Karefylaki S, Gustafsson D.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep 11;
Click to view abstract

Wheat allergy in celiac children.  
Martin-Munoz MF, Rivero D, Diaz PA, Polanco I, Quince S.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015 Sep 11;
Click to view abstract

Hypersensibilité retardée allergique à l’anakinra (Kineret®) / Delayed hypersensitivity allergic to anakinra (Kineret)  
E. Lungoci, F. Hacard, J.-F. Nicolas, F. Bérard
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(5):356-358
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Cas clinique : anaphylaxie d’effort induite par la consommation de thon / Clinical cases: exercise-induced anaphylaxis eating tuna  
Dandolo A, Sanmiguel M, Branellec A.
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(5):359-362
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Allergénicité des protéines édulcorantes / Allergenicity of sweetening proteins  
Barre A, Caze-Subra S, Gironde C, Bienvenu F, Bienvenu J, Rougé P.
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(5):363-371
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Impact du bilan d’allergie aux bêta-lactamines sur les médecins généralistes dans une cohorte de 154 patients / Balance sheet impact of allergy to beta-lactam of general practitioners in a cohort of 154 patients  
M. Ben Hayoun, T. Bourrier, C. Pognonec, C. Sanfiorenzo, C.H. Marquette, S. Leroy
Rev Fr Allergol 2015;55(5):333-340
Click to view abstract Click to view abstract

Comparability and quality of IgE-based in vitro allergy diagnosis: 25 years of external quality assessment. [German]  
Koch L, Aberer W.
Wien Klin Wochenschr 2014 Oct;126(19-20):634-641


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