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  Substance Info: (and synonyms)
Sugar Beet pollen

Background Info:

Pollen from the sugar beet plant, as opposed to the allergen from the sugar beet seed.
See also: Sugar Beet (seed).

Common names: Sugar Beet, White Beet, Mangel Wurzel, Mangold

The main varieties of Beta vulgaris are Crassa, which is the ordinary garden beet with thickened root; Cruenta, with root that is not highly developed but foliage that is large and showy; and Cicla with small branched roots not thick or fleshy and with very large, thick-ribbed leaves.

Beta vulgaris altissima (Syn: B. vulgaris rapa.) - Sugar beet
Beta vulgaris cicla - Spinach beet
Beta vulgaris craca (Syn: B. vulgaris rapacea) - Beetroot
Beta vulgaris flavescens - Swiss chard
Beta vulgaris maritime - Sea beet

Sugar beet is native to Europe to Middle east, originating in the areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea following selective breeding of Sea beet (Beta vulgaris maritime). Sugar beet is cultivated worldwide as a commercial sugar crop in temperate climates. About one third of all sugar production in the world is derived from this plant. Sugar beet contains between 18-20% sugar while the common beetroot is only about 6% sugar. Sugar beet sugar is softer than cane sugar and does not crystallize as well as the latter. Cane sugar has to be converted into fruit sugar, before the body can absorb it, unlike beet sugar.

Sugar beet is an annual or biennial plant growing to 1.5 m. The leaves are oval in shape, dark green or reddish in colour, and frequently forming a rosette from the underground stem. The roots are conspicuously swollen at junction with stem.

Sugar beet flowers in summer. A flowering stalk 1.2 - 1.8 m tall, is produced in the second year from the top of the tuber. Small numerous green or red flowers are produced in a tall open panicle. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by wind. The fruit is an aggregate of 2 or more fruits forming an irregular dry body. Unlike garden beets whose roots are usually a deep red colour and may be globular or cylindrical, in sugar beet, the taproot is white and deep in the soil.

Beets and their relatives are grown throughout the world for human and stock food. Uses: The leaves and root are edible. Sweetener. Herbal medication

Plants from this family may contain high levels of nitrates and oxalates. The red colour is largely from betacyanin, a compound closely related to anthocyanin which accounts for most of the red colours in plants.

Fresh leaf may also cause poisoning due to the 1% oxalic acid therein. Leaf may also contain dangerous levels of HCN and/or nitrates and nitrites. Betaine acts as a mild diuretic.

 

Adverse Reactions:

IMMUNE REACTIONS


[ 1 / 3 ]

Sensitization to the pollen of sugar beet is reported in this study. (Strigin 1974 ref.1926 3)

Reference:
Strigin VA, Iarullina SA. Sensitization to the pollen of sugar beet. [Russian] Klin Med (Mosk) 1974;52(7):133-135



[ 2 / 3 ]

In Arizona and Texas, when sugar beet cultivation first began at fields in the late thirties, workers and local people experienced allergic symptoms from the pollen which was spread by the wind. (Peck 1959 ref.9869 0)

Reference:
Peck GA, Moffat DA. Allergy to the pollen of the common sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). J Allergy 1959;30(2):140-50



[ 3 / 3 ]

See: Sugar Beet (for allergy to the pollen)
Sugar Beet seed (for allergy to the beet)

Reference:
Editor Comment Editorial comment, common knowledge, or still to add - -




Non-Immune reactions


[ 1 ]

This study proposes that extreme consumption of table beet root can cause several disturbances in iron accumulation not only in cases of healthy patients but, e.g. in patients suffering with metal accumulating diseases, e.g. porphyria cutanea tarda, haemochromatosis or Wilson disease-although moderate consumption may be beneficial in iron-deficiency anaemia and inflammatory bowel diseases. (Blázovics 2007 ref.21100 7)

Reference:
Blázovics A, Sárdi E, Szentmihályi K, Váli L, Takács-Hájos M, Stefanovits-Bányai E. Extreme consumption of Beta vulgaris var. rubra can cause metal ion accumulation in the liver. Acta Biol Hung 2007 Sep;58(3):281-6.



[ 2 ]

13 untoward mold anaphylactoid reactions were observed in patients infused with invert sugar solutions in Sweden. Traces of alpha-1,6-glucan were found as a contaminant, indicating that the sucrose had been exposed to microbial contamination during its manufacture from sugar-beet or sugar-cane. (Richter 1976 ref.6990 1)

Reference:
Richter AW, Granath K, Ostling G. Anaphylactoid reactions in connection with infusion of invert sugar solutions are due to macromolecular contaminants. Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 1976;50(5):606-12



[ 3 ]

The leaves of Beta vulgaris may have estrogenic activity. (Elghamry 1971 ref.5119 3)

Reference:
Elghamry MI, Grunert E, Aehnelt E. An active principle responsible for estrogenicity in the leaves of Beta vulgaris. Isolation, identification and estimation. Planta Med 1971;19(3):208-14



[ 4 ]

See: Sugar Beet (for allergy to the pollen)
Sugar Beet seed (for allergy to the beet)

Reference:
Editor Comment Editorial comment, common knowledge, or still to add - -




Occupational reactions


[ 1 ]

Out of 31 greenhouse workers at a sugar beet seed station, 24 experienced work-related symptoms and several showed positive skin prick tests and specific IgE to sugar beet pollen. Serum samples from 15 individuals were evaluated. Of these 15, 7 had specific IgE against sugar beet pollen extract. All 7 plus one more showed a positive reaction in skin prick test (SPT) and all these individuals had work-related symptoms of allergy. Of the 7 individuals that had specific IgE against sugar beet pollen extract, 6 also scored positively for Salsola, five for Atriplex, and two for Chenopodium, with values that were 2–5 fold lower than for sugar beet pollen. (Luoto 2008 ref.22231 5)

Reference:
Luoto S, Lambert W, Blomqvist A, Emanuelsson C. The identification of allergen proteins in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) pollen causing occupational allergy in greenhouses. Clin Mol Allergy 2008 Aug 11;6:7.



[ 2 ]

Reports in the literature suggest that sugar beet pollen is highly antigenic, but hypersensitivity to components of sugar beet is not a common disease. Hohenleutner et al. report on a 29-year-old man with a history of atopic dermatitis who developed both contact dermatitis and allergic rhinitis from sugar beet pollen through his job in a seed nursery. (Hohenleutner 1996 ref.1914 2)

Reference:
Hohenleutner S, Pfau A, Hohenleutner U, Landthaler M. Sugar beet pollen allergy as a rare occupational disease. [German] Hautarzt 1996;47(6):462-464



[ 3 ]

A patient with occupational asthma in the beet sugar processing industry is described. (Not pollen related). Symptomatology, skin testing, immunologic testing, and specific bronchoprovocation testing indicate exposure to moldy sugar beet pulp was the cause of the patient's occupational asthma. (Roseman 1992 ref.1917 1)

Reference:
Rosenman KD, Hart M, Ownby DR. Occupational asthma in a beet sugar processing plant. Chest 1992;101(6):1720-1722



[ 4 ]

Sugar beet pollinosis as an occupational disease. (Matsuyama 1972 ref.1925 8)

Reference:
Matsuyama R, Sato M, Miyata M, Wagatsuma Y, Ozaki H. Pollinosis. 4. Sugar beet pollinosis as an occupational disease. [Japanese] Arerugi 1972;21(3):235-243



[ 5 ]

Sugar beet pollen allergy as an occupational disease. (Ursing 1968 ref.6624 9)

Reference:
Ursing B. Sugar beet pollen allergy as an occupational disease. Acta Allergol 1968;23(5):396-9



[ 6 ]

Skin diseases among agricultural workers in flax and sugar beet of areas. (Tsirkunov 1965 ref.9868 3)

Reference:
Tsirkunov LP. Skin diseases among agricultural workers in flax and sugar beet of areas. [Russian] Vrach Delo 1965;5:110-1.



[ 7 ]

Time required for the production of hay fever by a newly encountered pollen, sugarbeet. (Phillips 1939 ref.26429 7)

Reference:
Phillips EW. Time required for the production of hay fever by a newly encountered pollen, sugarbeet. J Allergy 1939;11:28-31.



[ 8 ]

Beet pollen and beet seed dust causing hay fever and asthma. (Dutton 1938 ref.26400 7)

Reference:
Dutton LO. Beet pollen and beet seed dust causing hay fever and asthma. J Allergy 1938;9:607.



[ 9 ]

See: Sugar Beet (for allergy to the pollen)
Sugar Beet seed (for allergy to the beet)

Reference:
Editor Comment Editorial comment, common knowledge, or still to add - -




Information supplied from an abridged section of:
Allergy Advisor - Zing Solutions
http://allergyadvisor.com/index.html

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Allergy Advisor  - Food Additive and Preservative Allergy and Intolerance Database


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